Honoring David L. Rolsten, Sonic Narratives in Modern Korea  + Girls in Japanese Literature

CHINOPERL

Volume 41, Number 1 (2022)

Special Issue: Honoring David L. Rolston

Associate Editor Catherine Swatek and Editorial Board Member Robert E. Hegel remember Rolston in the following introduction:

Given his publication record, one might assume that David L. Rolston is a scholar of narrative fiction. For his first major publication, David served as editor of How to Read the Chinese Novel, a milestone in providing English-language readers a glimpse of reading practices and practical criticism contemporaneous with Ming and Qing novels themselves. Not merely the compiler of the translations that comprise six of the book’s seven chapters, David’s work can be seen throughout the volume, from adding innumerable notes and explanations to the “How to Read” (dufa讀法) translations; to writing essays on the sources, history, and formal aspects of traditional fiction criticism; to compiling explanatory appendices and an extensive bibliography for each of the masterworks covered. This project was completed before David finished his Chicago doctorate.

Find more special features and articles at Project MUSE.

Korean Studies 46 (2022)

Korean Studies

Volume 46, Number 2 (2021)

Special Section: “Music That Moves: Sonic Narratives in Modern Korea”

This Special Section features discussion on 1960’s protect songs to K-pop idols. Editor Cheehyung Harrison Kim notes:

Culture is at once a medium through which we make sense of the
world (for good or ill), a field of empowerment for the underprivileged, and a source of hegemony for the state and corporations. This cultural complexity is discernible in South Korea’s current political landscape, and it is also the very theme explored in this volume’s Special Section “Music That Moves: Sonic Narratives in Modern Korea,” dexterously guest edited by Dafna Zur and Susan Hwang. In Katherine Lee’s elegant piece on the World Vision Korean Orphan Choir, musical performance is at the heart of transnational religiosity and Cold War politics. Transnationalism is also the framework of Dafna Zur and Yoon Joo Hwang’s original research on children’s music during the colonial period, when the merger between western style of songwriting and Korean emotionality unevenly transpired in the genre of tongyo. Music as a field of popular resistance is the core of Pil Ho Kim’s audacious piece on South Korea’s 1960s protest songs, which, for Kim, is a pre-minjung expression of the multitude. Susan Hwang’s emotionally prodigious article, too, is on the resistive and resilient aspect of music, which, in the aftermath of the 1980 Kwangju Uprising, served as a crucial repertoire for the counter-state. From the opposite side, music as practice of hegemonic efficacy is dealt with in Alexandra Leonzini and Peter Moody’s intricate article on North Korea’s sonic culture, as it is done in Roald Maliangkay’s perspicacious study on South Korea’s use of K-pop in marketing. Whether the hegemonic entity is the state or a corporation, music is, in these two articles, a potent medium of influence.

Find more special features and articles at Project MUSE.

USJWJ62

U.S. Japan Women’s Journal

Volume 62 (2022)

Special Issue: Girls and Literature

As expressed by authors Hiromi Tsuchiya Dollase and Wakako Suzuki in the introduction:

The literary genre shōjo shōsetsu emerged in conjunction with the rise of girls’ education in the Meiji period. Early stories were meant to educate readers to become “good wives and wise mothers.” Accordingly, shōjo shōsetsu endured restrictions on the narratives they could tell, limiting the breadth of their authors’ artistic and literary possibilities. Shōjo shōsetsu evolved and diversified in the postwar era and, especially starting in the 1980s, became a means for young female authors to empower themselves. Shōjo shōsetsu have declined in popularity recently as readers consume stories more broadly across media and genres. The goal of this special issue is to contemplate the function, meanings, and problems of shōjo shōsetsu. Instead of merely confining ourselves to a rigid, unified notion of shōjo shōsetsu, we consider shōjo characters from the wider literary world, investigating their roles, functions, and cultural implications.


The new issue includes the following articles:

Introduction: Girls and Literature
イントロダクション:少女と文学

Hiromi Tsuchiya Dollase and Wakako Suzuki

Trees That Grow Kimono (1895)
着物のなる木

Wakamatsu Shizuko 若松賤子
Translated by Wakako Suzuki

Kawabata Yasunari’s The Scarlet Gang of Asakusa as the
Territory of the Dispossessed Girl

追い立てられた少女の領域としての『浅草紅団』
Barbara Hartley

Love and Sexuality in Postwar Girls’ Culture: Examining
Tomishima Takeo’s Junior Fictiona
戦後少女文化における恋愛と性愛:富島健夫の

ジュニア小説をめぐって
Hiromi Tsuchiya Dollase

Countdown to the Demise of Girls’ Novels
少女小説のカウントダウンの開始

Kume Yoriko 久米依子
Translated and Introduced by Barbara Hartley

Find more articles at Project MUSE.

Special Features: Korean LGBTQ+ Literature, Remembering Linguists Robert Andrew Blust and Thomas Edward Dutton and more

Azalea

Volume 15 (2022)

From the editor Young-Jun Lee:

A century’s worth of change looks quite remarkable in Korean literature. Today’s young Koreans cannot read the same newspapers read by their grandparents’ generation. In less than a hundred years, the national written language has shifted from Chinese characters to Korean hangul, then briefly to Japanese as enforced under colonial rule, and then to the modern Korean language that we know today. During this process, remarkable sociocultural transformations dominated daily life. Over the first half of the 20th century, Koreans endured enormous political shifts most notably marked by colonization, the Korean War, and the ensuing divide of the country into separate political nations. Along the way, Korean literature registered these upheavals and fluctuations.

Notably, the literature of totalizing grand narrative, which concerned itself with the trajectory of nation-building, persisted in Korea until the 1980s. Ever since the end of the military dictatorship and the establishment of a civil government in the 1990s, however, that literature began to shift its focus to the lives of women. Now, those long ignored and marginalized—including queer women, as well as other queer people such as those who are non-binary— have also begun to emerge more strongly as published authors, even as they have been increasingly centered as subjects of literary narratives. The ongoing impact of this inclusive, expansionary shift
can be seen directly in AZALEA’s decision to focus on LGBTQ+ literature for its fifteenth issue.

Find more poetry, fiction, graphic shorts, and images at Project MUSE.

Oceanic Linguistics

Volume 61, Number 1 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

The Place of Space in Oceanic Linguistics
Leah Pappas and Alexander Mawyer

Semantics and Pragmatics of Voice in Central Malagasy Oral Narratives
Penelope Howe

On the Nature of Proto-Oceanic *o in Southern Vanuatu (and Beyond)
John Lynch

Rare, but Real: Native Nasal Clusters in Northern Philippine Languages
Robert Blust

The Greater West Bomberai Language Family
Timothy Usher and Antoinette Schapper

The Phonology and Typological Position of Waima’a Consonants
Kirsten Culhane

Find more research articles, squibs, and reviews at Project MUSE.

New Journal Issues: “Contagious Magic” in Japanese Theatre, Logistics of the Natural History Trade, Hawai‘i’s Toxic Plants + More

New Journal Issues: Water as a Symbol of the Great Dao, #KeepOurLanguagesStrong + More

 

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society (JSEALS)

Papers from the 30th Conference of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society: Special Publication (2021)

The new issue is introduced by Editor in Chief Mark Alves, who states:

The volume contains 21 papers in total: five papers on historical linguistics, eleven papers on syntax and/or morphology, and five papers on phonetics/phonology. The languages covered in this volume are spoken in throughout the greater Southeast Asian region: Mainland Southeast Asia, Insular Southeast Asia, Southern China, and the Indian Subcontinent. The papers range from detailed descriptions of linguistic aspects of understudied languages to probing questions related to multiple groups of languages in the region.

Find more research articles and reviews at eVols.

Celebrating Buwan ng Wikang Pambansa (Philippines National Language Month)


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China Review International Vol. 25 No. 1 (2018)

 

Volume 25 Number 1 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 23 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

Featured Review:

When Fish Were Fish
Christopher Rea

Reviews:

Poetic Transformations: Eighteenth-Century Cultural Projects on the Mekong Plains by Claudine Ang (review)
Reviewed by Eric Henry

Worüber man nicht spricht: Tabus, Schweigen und Redeverbote in China ed. by Rüdiger Breuer and Heiner Roetz (review)
Reviewed by Anna Stecher

GMO China: How Global Debates Transformed China’s Agricultural Biotechnology Policies by Cong Cao (review)
Reviewed by Nancy N. Chen

Morality and Monastic Revival in Post-Mao Tibet by Jane E. Caple (review)
Reviewed by Nicole Willock

Qing Travelers to the Far West: Diplomacy and the Information Order in Late Imperial China by Jenny Huangfu Day (review)
Reviewed by Bradley Camp Davis

China’s Footprints in Southeast Asia ed. by Maria Serena I. Diokno, Hsin-Huang Michael Hsiao, and Alan H. Yang (review)
Karen M. Teoh

That Distant Country Next Door: Popular Japanese Perceptions of Mao’s China by Erik Esselstrom (review)
Reviewed by Lu Yan

Song King: Connecting People, Places, and Past in Contemporary China by Levi S. Gibbs (review)
Reviewed by Charlotte D’Evelyn

Farewell to the God of Plague: Chairman Mao’s Campaign to Deworm China by Miriam Gross (review)
Reviewed by Robert Peckham

The Silk Road Trap: How China’s Trade Ambitions Challenge Europe by Jonathan Holslag (review)
Reviewed by Min Ye

Efficacious Underworld: The Evolution of Ten Kings Paintings in Medieval China and Korea by Cheeyun Lilian Kwon (review)
Reviewed by Beatrix Mecsi

Becoming Bilingual in School and Home in Tibetan Areas of China: Stories of Struggle YiXi LaMuCuo (review)
Reviewed by Norbert Francis

Chinese Poetic Modernisms ed. by Paul Manfredi and Christopher Lupke (review)
Reviewed by Joseph R. Allen

Just a Song: Chinese Lyrics from the Eleventh and Early Twelfth Centuries by Stephen Owen (review)
Reviewed by Lanlan Kuang

China’s Chaplin: Comic Stories and Farces by Xu Zhuodai (review)
Reviewed by Zheyu Wei

Afterlives of Chinese Communism: Political Concepts from Mao to Xi ed. by Christian Sorace, Ivan Franceschini, and Nicholas Loubere (review)
Reviewed by Aaron Su

Fruit from the Sands: The Silk Road Origins of the Foods We Eat by Robert N. Spengler III (review)
Reviewed by Shiamin Kwa

The Dreaming Mind and the End of the Ming World by Lynn A. Struve (review)
Reviewed by Harry Miller

Asia Inside Out: Itinerant People ed. by Eric Tagliacozzo, Helen F. Siu, and Peter C. Perdue (review)
Reviewed by Ronald Skeldon

Public Goods Provision in the Early Modern Economy: Comparative Perspectives from Japan, China, and Europe ed. by Masayuki Tanimoto and R. Bin Wong (review)
Reviewed by Guillaume Carré

Raising China’s Revolutionaries: Modernizing Childhood for Cosmopolitan Nationalists and Liberated Comrades, 1920s–1950s by Margaret Mih Tillman (review)
Reviewed by Stig Thøgersen

Christian Women in Chinese Society: The Anglican Story ed. by Wai Ching Angela Wong and Patricia P. K. Chiu (review)
Reviewed by Fredrik Fällman

Maoist Laughter ed. by Ping Zhu, Zhuoyi Wang, and Jason McGrath (review)
Reviewed by Richard King

Works Received

 

China Review International
Vol. 25 No. 1
2018

In Memoriam: Trần Đình Trụ, 1935-2019

We mark last week’s passing of Trần Đình Trụ, the author of Ship of Fate: Memoir of a Vietnamese Repatriate (UH Press, 2017), with words from the book’s co-translators Jana K. Lipman and Bac Hoai Tran:  

Tran, smiling, seated at desk.“Trần Đình Trụ’s life story was one of grace, fortitude, and devotion to his family. A skilled seaman and a naval commander, he journeyed from North Vietnam to South Vietnam as a young man, and then from South Vietnam to the Philippines, Guam, Japan, and ultimately, the United States. In his memoir, he recounts his evacuation from South Vietnam in 1975, his experiences in a refugee camp in Guam, and his decision to return to Vietnam in October 1975 with more than 1500 Vietnamese repatriates as the captain of the Việt Nam Thương Tín. After he successfully navigated the ship back to Vietnam, the new government viewed him and the repatriates with fear and suspicion. Trần Đình Trụ suffered physical and psychological brutality in “re-education” camps for more than twelve years. On release, he finally rejoined with his family and resettled in the United States. Through his memoir, Trần Đình Trụ captured the singularity of his life story and the universality of despair and uncertainty at the end of war. He will be deeply missed by his family and community.”

Read more about the book and Tru’s life in an essay by Professor Lipman that first appeared in The Conversation and was republished on the UH Press blog.

Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 3 (July 2019)

Preview volume 73 number 3 titles below and find content of all 8 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Stream Benthic Macroinvertebrate Assemblages Reveal the Importance of a Recently Established Freshwater Protected Area in a Tropical Watershed
Elfritzson M. Peralta, Alexis E. Belen, Gelsie Rose Buenaventura, Francis Godwin G. Cantre, Katharine Grace R. Espiritu, Jana Nicole A. De Vera, Cristine P. Perez, Aleziz Kryzzien V. Tan, Irisse Bianca B. De Jesus, Paul Palomares, Jonathan Carlo A. Briones, Tohru Ikeya, Francis S. Magbanua, Rey Donne S. Papa, and Noboru Okuda

Island Hopping in a Biodiversity Hotspot Archipelago: Reconstructed Invasion History and Updated Status and Distribution of Alien Frogs in the Philippines
Arman N. Pili, Emerson Y. Sy, Mae Lowe L. Diesmos, and Arvin C. Diesmos

Importance of Non-native Honeybees (Apis mellifera) as Flower Visitors to the Hawaiian Tree ‘Ōhi‘a Lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) Across an Elevation Gradient
Camila A. Cortina, Clare E. Aslan, and Stacey J. Litson

Screening and Biosecurity for White-nose Fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Ascomycota: Pseudeurotiaceae) in Hawai‘i
Violeta L. Zhelyazkova, Nia L. Toshkova, Serena E. Dool, Frank J. Bonaccorso, Corinna A. Pinzari, Kristina Montoya-Aiona, and Sebastien J. Puechmaille

Genetic and Morphological Diversity in Aphis gossypii  Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in the Pacific Basin
Ross H. Miller, Robert G. Foottit, Eric Maw, and Keith S. Pike

Age, Growth and Mortality of the Goldlined Seabream Rhabdosargus sarba in Waters off Southwestern Taiwan
Shoou-Jeng Joung, Yu-Yung Shyh, Kwang-Ming Liu, and Shyh-Bin Wang

Morphology and Behavior of Gametes and Zoospores from the Plant-Parasitic Green Algae, Cephaleuros  (Chlorophyta, Ulvophyceae)
Narasinee Thithuan, Penpadsorn Bunjonsiri, and Anurag Sunpapao

New Chromosome Number Reports for Angiosperms Native or Introduced to Hawai‘i, with Additional Reports for Fiji and Samoa
Michael Kiehn, and David H. Lorence


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

UH Press to publish The Journal of Burma Studies in partnership with the Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies

The University of Hawai‘i Press will publish and distribute The Journal of Burma Studies, one of the only scholarly peer-reviewed journals that focus exclusively on Burma/Myanmar. This new partnership with the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University begins with volume 23, 2019. The complete content of the journal is available online in Project MUSE.

UH Press Interim Director and Publisher, Joel Cosseboom, said: “We are pleased to partner with the NIU Center for Burma Studies on this important and unique journal.”

Edited by Catherine Raymond from Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies and Jane M. Ferguson from Australian National University, The Journal of Burma Studies seeks to publish the best scholarly research focused on Burma/Myanmar and its minority and diasporic cultures from a variety of disciplines, ranging from art history and religious studies, to economics and law.

Dr. Ferguson looks forward to collaborating with UH Press to launch innovative and engaging issues of The Journal of Burma Studies. “University of Hawai‘i Press has consistently produced some of the most exciting publications on Southeast Asia as well as Burma/Myanmar Studies, so I am delighted that JBS will now work with them,” she said.

The journal is jointly sponsored by the Burma Studies Group and the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University. Published since 1997, the journal draws together research and critical reflection on Burma/Myanmar from scholars across Asia, North America and Europe.

Content is available on the Project MUSE platform.

Subscribe at: https://uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/jbs/

Submit your manuscript at: https://jbs.scholasticahq.com/for-authors

The Journal of Burma Studies joins UH Press’s extensive list of Asian and Southeast Asian studies journals including: Asian Perspectives, Korean Studies, Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society, Review of Japanese Culture and Society, and others.

About UH Press

 The University of Hawai‘i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. It strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Hawaiian, Pacific, Asian American and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai‘i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

About Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies

 Founded in 1987, the Center collects and preserves information and artifacts of all kinds concerning the study of the peoples and cultures of Burma/Myanmar, and makes these materials broadly available for research and study.

The Center enjoys a unique relationship with the Burma Studies Foundation, which assures that all Burma/Myanmar-related items donated to the foundation will be offered to the center for inclusion and conservation within the university’s collections. Oversight by the foundation combines strong support of the center with lasting responsibility to the field of Burma/Myanmar studies.

The Center for Burma Studies is a non-political, non-degree granting, administrative and academic unit within Northern Illinois University. The Center has the following goals:

  • The maintenance and expansion of a comprehensive research library to sustain the field of Burma studies
  • The collection, care, and exhibition of the arts of Burma
  • The support and promotion of undergraduate and graduate teaching concerning Burma
  • The organization and hosting of self-supporting national and international conferences on Burma studies
  • The publication of relevant scholarship on Burma
  • The care and enhancement of archival resources such as photographs, music records, oral histories, personal papers, and field notes
  • The promotion of outreach activities to schools and communities
  • Encouraging the performance of Burmese arts
  • The securing of educational opportunities through scholarships, internships, and fellowships

Celebrating Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month with Free Journal Content

We are proud to publish an extensive list of Pacific, Asian, and Southeast Asian studies journals. This Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month, explore and enjoy the following free journal content online:

Open Access Journals:

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Language Documentation & Conservation

Palapala: a journal of Hawaiian language and literature

Free journal content online:

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific (46#1, 2007)

Asian Theatre Journal: Official Journal of the Association for Asian Performance (23#1, 2006)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture (1, 2007)

Buddhist-Christian Studies: Official Journal of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (27, 2007)

China Review International: Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies (15#1, 2008)

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs (15#1, 2003)

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review (3#1, 2014)

The Hawaiian Journal of History (49, 2015)

Journal of Daoist Studies (8, 2015)

Journal of Korean Religions (6#1, 2015)

Korean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans Abroad (29, 2005)

MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing: New Writing from America, the Pacific, and Asia (19#1, 2007)

Oceanic Linguistics: Current Research on Languages of the Oceanic Area (50#2, 2011)

Pacific Science: Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region (71#4, 2017)

Philosophy East & West: A Quarterly of Comparative Philosophy (53#3, 2007)

Rapa Nui Journal: The journal of the Easter Island Foundation (30#2, 2016)

Review of Japanese Culture and Society (24, 2012)

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (45, 2013)

Asian Perspectives 58-1
Asian Theatre Journal 36-1 cover

Visit our website to learn more about our publications or to subscribe.

 

UH Press at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, March 27-30, Philadelphia

AAS-2014-meetingUniversity of Hawai‘i Press is exhibiting at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, March 27-30, held this year at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown hotel.

We have a larger than usual contingent attending: UHP director Michael Duckworth; editors Patricia Crosby, Pamela Kelley, and Stephanie Chun; marketing director Colins Kawai; and sales manager Royden Muranaka. Please visit us at booths 110-116 to see our latest titles and take advantage of the conference offer of a 20% discount and free shipping in the U.S. (Free shipping applies only to orders received or placed at the conference.) Our new Asian Studies print catalog will also be distributed.

Exhibiting across the aisle from us are publishing partners: Cornell University East Asia Program (booth 111), MerwinAsia and Seoul Selection (booth 113), NIAS Press-Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (booth 117), and NUS Press-Singapore (booth 115).

See you in Philly!

After the New Order: Space, Politics, and Jakarta

After the New Order: Space, Politics, and JakartaThis new work explores the formation of populist urban programs in post-Suharto Jakarta and the cultural and political contradictions that have arisen as a result of the continuing influence of the Suharto-era’s neoliberal ideology of development. Analyzing a spectrum of urban agendas from waterfront city to green environment and housing for the poor, Kusno deepens our understanding of the spatial mediation of power, the interaction between elite and populist urban imaginings, and how past ideologies are integral to the present even as they are newly reconfigured.

After the New Order will be essential reading for anyone—including Asianists, urban historians, social scientists, architects, and planners—concerned with the interplay of space, power, and identity.

November 2013 | 304 pages | 33 illustrations
ISBN: 978-0-8248-3745-7 | $60.00s | Cloth

Writing Past Colonialism