NEW JOURNAL Issues: Schooling Journeys in the Southwestern Pacific, #KuToo Online Feminist Movement in Japan, Geographic Analysis of COVID-19 in L.A. + More

The Contemporary Pacific

Volume 22, Issue 2 (2021)

Special Issue: Schooling Journeys in the Southwestern Pacific

From the Guest Editors Rachel Emerine Hicks, Debra McDougall, and David Oakeshott in The Promise of Education: Schooling Journeys in the Southwester Pacific:

“Schooling journeys” is more than a metaphor in the southwestern Pacific. To step into a classroom, children and youth often travel hours each day or live for months at a time away from their families. The journey of schooling is rarely direct; it often winds between formal and informal learning and in and out of school, work, and home life. And the journey is expensive; many families struggle mightily to gather the money for fees, school supplies, uniforms, and transportation. Young people embark on these precarious journeys, and their families make sacrifices to support them, because schooling promises a better life—a move away from the backbreaking labor of subsistence agriculture toward a reliable salary that will better support their family and community. Because of the structural inequalities in school and a lack of jobs for those who complete schooling, however, few experience the socioeconomic advancement schooling promises. Still, students and their families continue to hope that schooling will lead to well-paid work. Even more important, though, going to school is seen as key to being a competent and effective person in society—increasingly for both women and men.

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers

Volume 83 (2021)

Editor Craig S. Revels reflects over the COVID-19 pandemic and how it has affected geographers and members as he states:

Last year’s volume was published in a time of great uncertainty as the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the world, and this year’s unfortunately arrives under similar conditions, slowly improving though they may be. The tragedies, disruptions, and general state of societal affairs during the pandemic will not soon be forgotten…

Geographers have been at the forefront of research into the spread of COVID-19 since the earliest days of the pandemic, and Steve Graves and Petra Nichols contribute an analytical perspective on infection rates in Los Angeles County. In particular, they statistically identify a causal relationship between infection and a range of key socioeconomic and demographic variables, a relationship influencing the location and rate of spread for the disease. They leave us to consider how those factors must be addressed in any preparations for future public health crises.

In a significantly different context, Ray Sumner and John Menary
demonstrate that taking students into the field, always a valuable exercise, is even more rewarding when it leads to unexpected discoveries and challenges our carefully laid plans. In this case, a straightforward field methods class oriented around the Los Angeles River instead became an open-ended, student-driven exploration into the social dimensions of heritage, ethnicity,
culture, and urban development.

New Journal Issues: Biography’s International Year in Review, Buddhist-Christian Studies, China Review International + More

Biography

Volume 44, Issue 1 (2021)

Special Issue: International Year in Review

Remembering Lauren Berlant

Contributors Riva Lehrer, Anna Poletti, and Rebecca Wanzo graciously provided this issue with estate artwork and tributes to Lauren Berlant.

From Anna Poletti’s More Flailing in Public:

For me, Berlant’s publications and their way of speaking with colleagues enacted and theorized core tensions that preoccupy lifewriting studies: what it means to be a person in public—sometimes alone, sometimes in a collective, sometimes in search of collectivity. Always thinking from, and beyond, psychoanalytic insights into the disorganizing experience of desire (largely through object-relations), Berlant explicated the kinds of stories about the good life that permeated American culture, and explored what happened to people’s belief in culture, politics, and themselves when they tried to live those narratives, or discovered those narratives were structurally unlivable (The Female Complaint; Cruel Optimism). Berlant’s early work on trauma (“Trauma and Ineloquence”) and their interviews (with Jay Prosser, and with Julie Rak and me) are the places where the relevance of their deep attention to the politics of “fantasies of the good life” are most clearly connected to lifewriting scholarship. Margaretta Jolly’s special issue of Biography on “Life Writing and Intimate Publics,” published ten years ago, shows us how productive Berlant’s theory of the importance of being and feeling intimate in public can be for studying life writing, particularly online.

Oceanic Linguistics

Volume 60, Number 20 (2021)

This new issue contains a squib titled, “Three Puzzles for Phonological Theory in Philippine Minority Languages” by Jason W. Lobel, Robert Blust, and Erik Thomas.

An excerpt from this squib reads as follows:

In viewing language as an object of scientific inquiry, description alone has never been enough to satisfy most researchers. Once observations about one language are compared with those about another, there is a desire to generalize, to make statements about what is common and what is not, and therefore about what is expected and what is surprising in language content, structure, or change. In terms of theory construction, expected observations follow from basic assumptions about how language works and how it is embedded in the larger context of human neurophysiology and behavior. Much progress has been made in recent decades concerning the phonetic forces that give rise to phonological processes, and there is widespread agreement about many of these. This note describes three well-documented phonological processes in languages spoken by aboriginal Filipino populations along the Pacific coast of Luzon that do not conform to current theoretical expectations about what is a likely or even a possible diachronic process. Each of these is part of a larger context of sound change which does conform to theoretical expectation, although the details are complex, and still not widely reported in the literature. For this reason, a brief background survey of vocalic changes triggered by voiced stops will be given first, followed by the puzzling changes that depart from this more general pattern.

Find more research articles, squibs, and reviews at Project MUSE.

Pacific Science

Volume 65, Number 4 (2021)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

Population Divergence and Evolution of the Hawaiian Endemic Sesbania tomentosa (Fabaceae)
David M. Cole and Clifford W. Morden

Eleotris (Teleostei: Eleotridae) from Indonesia with Description of Three New Species Within the ‘melanosoma’ Neuromast Pattern Group
Marion I. Mennesson, Philippe Keith, Sopian Sauri, Frédéric Busson, Erwan Delrieu-Trottin, Gino Limmon, Tedjo Sukmono, Jiran, Renny Risdawati, Hadi Dahruddin, and Nicolas Hubert.

Three New Records of Marine Macroalgae from Viet Nam Based on Morphological Observations and Molecular Analyses by
Xuan-Vy Nguyen, Nhu-Thuy Nguyen-Nhat, Xuan-Thuy T. Nguyen, My-Ngan T. Nguyen, Viet-Ha Dao, and Karla J. McDermid.

The Structure and Dynamics of Endangered Forest Bird Communities in the Mariana Islands
Robert J. Craig

And the following article is available on Open Access:
Modeling Scenarios for the Management of Axis Deer in Hawai‘i
Steven C. Hess and Seth W. Judge

Find more research articles at Project MUSE.

New Journal Special Features: Gender Trouble in Korean Literature, Unsettling Korean Migration + Biography forum on Behrouz Boochani

Azalea 14 (2021)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture

Volume 14 (2021)

Special Feature: Korean Genre Fiction; O Chang-hwan; and Gender Trouble In Korean Literature

From the Editor Young Jung-Lee:

One of the most important recent shifts in Korean literature is found in gender conflict. This “Special Feature: Gender Trouble in Korean Literature and Society,” guest-edited by Hye-Ryoung Lee, shows a fundamentally new perspective through six scholars reading Korean Literature and Society. Over the past decade, the #MeToo Movement has shaken the world, and Korean society has been no exception, as can be seen in Choi Young-mi’s poem “En,”  introduced here with six critical essays. Even before its publication, “En” was the focus of media attention, and it remained a hot topic in Korean society for years due to Choi’s high-profile court battles.

biography

Volume 43, Number 4 (2020)

Special Feature: A Forum on Behrouz Boochani’s No Friend but the Mountains


From Coeditor Anna Poletti:

With this forum, we, the editors of Biography, inaugurate a new feature of the journal that aims to respond to and amplify specific examples of the power of life writing as a cultural, political, and social practice, and which document key moments in the evolution of that practice. In this forum, No Friend but the Mountains is discussed as both a profoundly localized text responding to, making knowledge about, and exposing a highly specific and complex set of conditions, and as a uniquely transnational text that speaks to and about a global phenomenon. Its highly innovative use of life writing as a narrative technique and epistemological practice warranted, in our minds, a concentrated response from the journal. Commissioning and editing this response has renewed my appreciation for the primary concerns of lifewriting scholarship: tracking the mercurial power of personal storytelling to crystalize the contemporary moment in such a way that new knowledge emerges from the entanglements it depicts, and the entanglements it drags its readers into.

Korean Studies

Volume 45 (2021)

Special Section: Unsettling Korean Migration: Multiple Trajectories and Experiences

From the Editor Cheehyun Harrison Kim:

This analytic potency of migration is superbly demonstrated in this volume’s Special Section Unsettling Korean Migration: Multiple Trajectories and Experiences, guest edited by Sunhee Koo (The University of Auckland) and Jihye Kim (The University of Central Lancashire). Sunhee Koo and Jihye Kim have brought together papers on labor (Yonson Ahn and Jihye Kim), ritual life (Marcus Bell), cultural identity (Sunhee Koo), and artistic production (Hee-seung Irene Lee and Soojin Kim). The six engrossing articles deal with how the Korean diaspora—in Argentina, Germany, Japan, China, and the United States—have shaped and represented their particular situations through negotiation, resilience, and creativity. The authors are highly critical of any national framework, and they see diasporic life as contexts of not only sorrow and sacrifice but also innovation and regeneration. Sunhee Koo and Jihye Kim offer a detailed explanation in their Introduction.

Celebrating Buwan ng Wikang Pambansa (Philippines National Language Month)


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Cover of Journal Oceanic Linguistics

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 58 no. 2 (2019)

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 58 no. 1 (2019)

Schapper Map 1
Map 1, Distribution of Smell/Kiss Colexification in Southeast Asia and Beyond in Antoinette Schapper’s article, “The Ethno-Linguistic Relationship between Smelling and Kissing: A Southeast Asian Case Study” in this issue of Oceanic Linguistics.

The summer issue of Oceanic Linguistics is the first from the new editorial team, lead by Daniel Kaufman, Yuko Otsuka, and Antoinette Schapper. Read more about the transition in this issue’s editorial note. The journal is now accepting submissions online at oceaniclinguistics.msubmit.net.

Articles

A Syntactic Motivation for Valency Reduction: Antipassive Constructions in Ulwa
Russell Barlow

Reintroducing Welaun
Owen Edwards

Language Contact and Gender in Tetun Dili: What Happens When Austronesian Meets Romance?
John Hajek and Catharina Williams-van Klinken

The Ethno-Linguistic Relationship between Smelling and Kissing: A Southeast Asian Case Study
Antoinette Schapper

A Second Look at Proto-Land Dayak Vowels
Alexander D. Smith

Book Reviews

Histoire et voyages des plantes cultivées à Madagascar by Philippe Beaujard (review)
Sander Adelaar

Critical Christianity: Translation and denominational conflict in Papua New Guinea by Courtney Handman (review)
Joel Bradshaw

Celebrating Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month with Free Journal Content

We are proud to publish an extensive list of Pacific, Asian, and Southeast Asian studies journals. This Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month, explore and enjoy the following free journal content online:

Open Access Journals:

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Language Documentation & Conservation

Palapala: a journal of Hawaiian language and literature

Free journal content online:

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific (46#1, 2007)

Asian Theatre Journal: Official Journal of the Association for Asian Performance (23#1, 2006)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture (1, 2007)

Buddhist-Christian Studies: Official Journal of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (27, 2007)

China Review International: Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies (15#1, 2008)

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs (15#1, 2003)

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review (3#1, 2014)

The Hawaiian Journal of History (49, 2015)

Journal of Daoist Studies (8, 2015)

Journal of Korean Religions (6#1, 2015)

Korean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans Abroad (29, 2005)

MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing: New Writing from America, the Pacific, and Asia (19#1, 2007)

Oceanic Linguistics: Current Research on Languages of the Oceanic Area (50#2, 2011)

Pacific Science: Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region (71#4, 2017)

Philosophy East & West: A Quarterly of Comparative Philosophy (53#3, 2007)

Rapa Nui Journal: The journal of the Easter Island Foundation (30#2, 2016)

Review of Japanese Culture and Society (24, 2012)

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (45, 2013)

Asian Perspectives 58-1
Asian Theatre Journal 36-1 cover

Visit our website to learn more about our publications or to subscribe.

 

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Language and Linguistics

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Today, the 6th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC), Connecting Communities, Languages & Technology kicked off at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. The conference features keynote talks, talk story sessions, workshops, papers, and posters. Two of our linguistic journal editors, Language Documentation & Conservation editor Nick Thieberger and Oceanic Linguistics co-editor Daniel Kaufman, are featured in the program.

In 2018, new content from Language Documentation & Conservation, Oceanic Linguistics, and the Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society garnered nearly 11,000 downloads worldwide on both Project MUSE and the University of Hawai‘i’s open access digital repository, ScholarSpace. Find the most downloaded 2018 articles from these three journals below. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Language and Linguistics”

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)

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The December issue of Oceanic Linguistics marks the end of an era. Retiring editor John Lynch, managing editor Byron Bender, and review editor Robert Blust will join the editorial advisory board as a new, international team takes over the helm.

In the final pages of this issue, Lynch writes, “On behalf of the outgoing team, I would like to thank authors for the constant flow of submissions, and for their generous acceptance of decisions that are not always in their favor; and I would like to wish the incoming team all the best for the future of Oceanic Linguistics.” Learn more about the new Oceanic Linguistics team here.

In this issue, Robert Blust remembers Richard Bernard McGinn Jr. (1939-2018), a “scholar who had a lifetime commitment to the Austronesian languages of insular Southeast Asia, a talented fieldworker, a lively and enthusiastic teacher, a skilled administrator and facilitator, a friend and colleague with an irrepressible sense of humor, and a committed social activist in his retirement years.” Continue reading “Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)”

Oceanic Linguistics welcomes new editorial board

Through the years: Oceanic Linguistics covers.

After decades of leadership, the current editorial team of Oceanic Linguistics will pass the baton on to a new group of editors.

The upcoming issue—Volume 57, Issue 2—will be the final issue for editor John Lynch, managing editor Byron Bender, and review editor Bob Blust. The incoming team is comprised of three co-editors: Daniel Kaufman, Yuko Otsuka, and Antoinette Schapper. Owen Edwards will join the team as assistant editor and Alexander D. Smith will take over as review editor.

In its 57 years, Oceanic Linguistics has been lead by only three editors. Founding editor George W. Grace served for 30 years before his University of Hawai‘i (UH) at Mānoa Linguistics Department colleague Byron Bender took over as editor in 1992. Bender was editor until John Lynch, based at the University of the South Pacific, became editor in 2007. Bob Blust, also at UH, began as review editor in 1999.

Daniel Kaufman joins the team from Queens College and the Endangered Language Alliance, Yuko Otsuka from Sophia University, Antoinette Schapper from CNRS, Owen Edwards from Leiden University, and Alexander D. Smith from the University of North Texas. Lynch, Bender, and Blust will continue on as editorial advisory board members.

It’s been wonderful to work with both the outgoing and incoming editorial teams at Oceanic Linguistics. We wish our outgoing editors well in retirement and welcome the new team to this longstanding and important title.

Learn more about the history of Oceanic Linguistics, along with an interview with outgoing editor John Lynch, and stay tuned for a new submission system in the coming year.

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 57, no. 1 (2018)

Present-day Languages of Pentecost Island, from “A Follow-up Analysis of Listener (Mis)comprehension across Language Varieties in Pentecost, Vanuatu” by Cindy Schneider and Charlotte Gooskens in this issue of Oceanic Linguistics. Image Source: Andrew Gray, 2016.

The summer issue of Oceanic Linguistics includes the following works:

ARTICLES

  • The Genetic Status of Lamalamic: Phonological and Morphological Evidence by Jean-Christophe Verstraete
  • Plural-Marking Strategies in Äiwoo by Åshild Næss
  • Directional Systems in Philippine Languages by Maria Kristina S. Gallego
  • Sex Differentiable Terms in Languages of Flores Island: A Comparative Review by Gregory Forth
  • Counting by Tens: Specific Counting in Southeast Solomonic Languages by Deborah Hill and Paul Unger
  • A Follow-up Analysis of Listener (Mis)comprehension across Language Varieties in Pentecost, Vanuatu by Cindy Schneider and Charlotte Gooskens
  • The Plural Word hire in Alorese: Contact-Induced Change from Neighboring Alor-Pantar Languages by Francesca R. Moro
  • Lexical Tone in Metnyo Ambel by Laura Arnold
  • The “Mystery Aspirates” in Philippine Languages by Robert Blust

In Memoriam

  • In Memoriam: Jean-Claude Rivierre, 1938–2018 by Claire Moyse-Faurie

Plus book reviews.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


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About the Journal

Oceanic Linguistics is the only journal devoted exclusively to the study of the indigenous languages of the Oceanic area and parts of Southeast Asia.

Subscriptions

Annual subscription rates are US$120 for institutions and US $40 for individuals. Click here to subscribe.

Submissions

All submissions and editorial inquiries should be addressed to John Lynch, Editor, at oceanic@hawaii.edu.

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 56, no. 2 (2017)

Earlier this year, we unveiled a new cover for Oceanic Linguistics in the first issue of volume 56. The second issue of each year has the same design with an alternate color scheme.

The new covers of Oceanic Linguistics.

In addition to the new look, the December issue includes the following works:

ARTICLES

  • Definiteness and Referentiality in Rapa Nui: The Interplay of Determiners and Demonstratives by Paulus Kieviet
  • Dynamism and Change in the Possessive Classifier System of Iaai by Anne-Laure Dotte
  • Toward Paradigm Uniformity: A Longitudinal Study in Alamblak by Les Bruce
  • Evidence of Contact between Binanderean and Oceanic Languages by Joel Bradshaw
  • Epenthetic and Contrastive Glottal Stops in Amarasi by Owen Edwards
  • The Western Malayo-Polynesian Problem by Alexander D. Smith

Squib

  • Regular Metathesis in Batanic (Northern Philippines)? by Robert Blust

Plus book reviews.

Continue reading “Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 56, no. 2 (2017)”