UH Press Celebrates Asian Pacific American Heritage Month!

May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month celebrating the achievements and contributions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States.

We are continuing our sale by offering a new selection of titles focused on Hawai’i and the Pacific!

Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 2 (April 2019)

FIGURE 6 from Robert Perger’s article A New Species of Johngarthia from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae): Johngarthia oceanica sp. nov., Socorro I., body color in life (specimens not collected): (A) male (photograph by Jorge Ramón Reyes Olvera, Mexico); (B and C) males (photographs by Vince Scheidt, San Diego, U.S.A.); (D) female (photograph by Omar de Jesus Franco, Mexico); (E and F) gender unknown (photographs by Hartmut S. Walter, University of California, Los Angeles).

This second issue of volume 73 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article Seasonality and Prevalence of Pollen Collected from Hawaiian Nectarivorous Birds by Kathryn N. van Dyk, Kristina L. Paxton, Patrick J. Hart, and Even H. Paxton.

Preview volume 73 number 2 below and find a list of all 9 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Sympatric Invasive Rats Show Different Diets in a Tropical Rainforest of an Island Biodiversity Hotspot
Duron Quiterie, Bourguet Edouard, Thibault Martin, Scussel Sarah, Gouyet Raphaël, Méheut Mathilde, and Vidal Eric

Using DNA to Identify the Source of Invasive Mongooses, Herpestes auropunctatus (Carnivora: Herpestidae) Captured on Kaua‘i, Hawaiian Islands
Darren J. Wostenberg, Matthew W. Hopken, Aaron B. Shiels, and Antoinette J. Piaggio

Migration by the Japanese Wood Pigeon (Columba janthina) Across the Islands of East Asia: Direct Tracking by Satellite Telemetry
Soon Kyoo Choi, Yung Chul Park, Jong Chul Park, Gi Chang Bing, and Woo Yuel Kim

Environmental Correlates for Seed Desiccation Sensitivity of New Caledonian Plant Species
Octavie Toublanc-Lambault, Robin Pouteau, Marion Davezies, Manon Marron, Anthony Pain, Bruno Fogliani, and Philippe Marmey

Macrobenthic Biomass and Secondary Production in the Northern East China Sea and the Relative Importance of Environmental Variables
Qingxi Han, and Xiaobo Wang

Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Occurrence and Interactions with Marine Mammals Off Peru
Juan Pablo Testino, Andrea Petit, Belén Acorta, Aldo S. Pacheco, Sebastian Silva, Joanna Alfaro-Shigueto, David Sarmiento, Javier Quiñones, Alberto More Eche, Eduardo Motta, Sara Fernandez, Elizabeth Campbell, Geyby Carrillo, Maurice Epstein, Miguel Llapapasca, and Adriana González-Pestana

Apparent Low Densities of Small Cetaceans in Okinawa may be due to Uncontrolled Local Hunting
Thomas A. Jefferson, and Michael F. Richlen

A New Species of Johngarthia  from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae)
Robert Perger


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Pacific Science
Vol. 73 No. 2
April 2019

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal, Vol. 4#1, 2019

This issue includes the following articles

Gender Differences in Predictors of Physical Activity among Korean College Students based on the Health Promotion Model
Jeong-Ja Seo and Yeongmi Ha

Air quality and employee hygiene-related behavior in a post anesthesia care unit in Thailand
Somphorn Kampan

A review of Technology-based Interventions in Improving Type-2 Diabetes Management in Chinese Americans
Wen-wen Li and Jenny Zhong

Association between neck circumference and coronary heart disease: a meta-analysis
Guang-Ran Yang, Timothy D. Dye, Martin Zand, Thomas T. Fogg, Shen-Yuan Yuan, Jin-Kui Yang, and Dongmei Li

Comparison of knowledge about smoking and passive smoking and urinary cotinine levels in pregnant women and their partners in Mongolia: A cross-sectional study
Naoko Hikita, Megumi Haruna, Masayo Matsuzaki, Mei Sasagawa, Minoru Murata, Ariana Yura, and Otgontogoo Oidovsuren

Association between alcohol consumption and body mass index in university students
Uraiporn Booranasuksakul, Alongkote Singhato, Narisa Rueangsri, and Piyapong Prasertsri

 

 


About the Journal

Asian Pacific Island Nursing Journal: Official Journal of the Asian American / Pacific Islander Nurses Association features research papers, empirical and theoretical articles, editorials, abstracts of recent dissertations, and conference summaries that relate to nursing care written by scientists and researchers in nursing and the social sciences, such as:

  • Clinical and Developmental Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Social Work, Public Health, Education, Genetics, Pharmacology, Infectious Disease, Oncology, Cardiovascular Disease, Pulmonary Function and Disease, Dermatology, Wound Healing, Immunology, Anesthesiology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Hematology, Neonatology, Nephrology, Pathology, Physiology, Nutrition, Pain Management, Sleep Disturbances, and Mental Health.

 

Indexed in Scopus, the DOAJ and EBSCO

Three International Journals Celebrate 30th Anniversary

(HONOLULU, Hawai‘i)  The University of Hawai‘i Press celebrates the 30th Anniversary for three influential university-based journals—The Contemporary Pacific, Journal of World History, and Mānoa—in collaboration with the Center for Pacific Island Studies, Department of History, and the Department of English at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

In the past three decades, these journals have attracted a growing, global audience for more than 6,300 articles read in over 170 countries. The Journal of World History served as a pioneer in the field of world history and continues to publish quality peer-reviewed articles and special issues quarterly. Research published in The Contemporary Pacific has shaped an entire field of Pacific Studies and has often demonstrated foresight and long-lasting relevance. Indeed, the journal kicked off its first issue in 1989 with an article on the potential impacts of climate change in the Pacific. Also among the journal’s most cited pieces are features published in its political reviews section which document the local and regional politics of Pacific Islands states. Mānoa brings to light new translations of international literature, highlighting the work of both emerging and established translators and authors, including Pulitzer Prize winners and Nobel laureates. In 2018 alone, works from the three journals garnered more than one-quarter million downloads.  

The journals were founded in 1989 in response to the university president’s call to expand the journals published by UH Press. “Since being awarded the modest, three-year start-up funding, these journals now annually reach tens of thousands of researchers, scholars, students, and the general public,” said Joel Cosseboom, Interim Press Director & Publisher.

A special celebration was held at College Hill on March 13, commemorating the 30th anniversary of their founding. Learn more about The Contemporary Pacific, Journal of World History, and Mānoa below and at www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals.

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs, edited by Alexander Mawyer

ISSN: 1043-898X  / E-ISSN: 1527-9464  Published twice a year.

Founding Editorial Team: Robert Kiste, Terence Wesley-Smith, David Hanlon, Brij Lal and Linley Chapman. Awarded Best New Journal (1990) from the Association of American Publishers. The journal editorial office is supported by the Center for Pacific Island Studies.

The journal covers a wide range of disciplines with the aim of providing comprehensive coverage of contemporary developments in the entire Pacific Islands region, including Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. It features refereed, readable articles that examine social, economic, political, ecological, and cultural topics, along with political reviews, book and media reviews, resource reviews, and a dialogue section with interviews and short essays. Each issue highlights the work of a Pacific Islander artist.

The Journal of World History: Official Journal of the World History Association, with editor-in-chief Fabio López Lázaro

ISSN: 1045-6007 / E-ISSN: 1527-8050  Published quarterly.

Founding Editor, Jerry Bentley with Imre Bard as Book Review Editor. Awarded Best New Journal (1990) from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals. The journal editorial office is supported by the Department of History.

JWH publishes research into historical questions requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. It is devoted to the study of phenomena that transcend the boundaries of single states, regions, or cultures, such as large-scale population movements, long-distance trade, cross-cultural technology transfers, and the transnational spread of ideas. Individual subscription is by membership in the World History Association.

Mānoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, edited by Frank Stewart

ISSN: 1045-7909 / E-ISSN: 1527-943X Published twice a year.

Founding Editors, Frank Stewart and Robert Shapard.  Works in MĀNOA have been cited for excellence by the editors of such anthologies as Best American Short Stories, Best American Poetry, Best American Essays, Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards, and Pushcart Prize. The journal editorial office is supported by the Department of English.

Mānoa is a unique, award-winning literary journal that includes American and international fiction, poetry, artwork, and essays of current cultural or literary interest. An outstanding feature of each issue is original translations of contemporary work from Asian and Pacific nations, selected for each issue by a special guest editor. Beautifully produced, Mānoa presents traditional alongside contemporary writings from the entire Pacific Rim, one of the world’s most dynamic literary regions.

University of Hawai‘i Press

The University of Hawai‘i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. It strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai‘i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications, the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

UH Press is a member of the Association of University Presses and the Hawai‘i Book Publishers Association. The Press has also partnered with museums and associations to bring new or out-of-print titles into circulation, and offers publishing services for authors and partnering organizations.

News Release Date: March 19, 2019
Media contact: Pamela Wilson, Journals Manager
Pwilson6@hawaii.edu 808-956-6790

Rapa Nui Journal, Volume 31, 2018

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This issue of Rapa Nui Journal features an article on a use-wear and residue analysis of a collection of 12 matā in the Australian Museum, Sydney. The article questions the value of relying on tool shape as an adequate indication of past use. The study illustrates the value of museum ethnographic collections for understanding past tool use.

The second article of the issue looks at two examples of artifact collections that were brought back from the South Seas by Yankee whalers. Among them is a singular head of a wooden moai from Rapa Nui (Easter Island).

Also in this issue is a report about the surviving 1,200 words from the extinct Moriori language and a comparison with Maori and Rapanui languages. A Moriori speaker may have understood much said by an Easter Islander as their languages shared at least one word in five, or over 20%, and may have shared many more. Continue reading “Rapa Nui Journal, Volume 31, 2018”

Pacific Science-Call for Submissions

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Pacific Science: A Quarterly Devoted to the Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region is edited by Curtis Daehler, Dept. of Botany, University of Hawai‘i.

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics. In addition to publishing original research, the journal features review articles providing a synthesis of current knowledge. The official journal of the Pacific Science Association. Continue reading “Pacific Science-Call for Submissions”

Journal of Korean Religions, Vol. 9#2, 2018

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This issue of the Journal of Korean Religions is on Confucian Spirituality in East Asian Contexts with guest editor, Philip J. Ivanhoe. From the editor’s introduction:

Clifford Geertz writes, ”We are, in sum, incomplete or unfinished animals who complete ourselves through culture—and not through culture in general but through highly particular forms of it.”1 At least part of his point is that unlike other animals, many of whom—like bees, ducks, or dolphins—live in complex and orderly societies, human beings are creatures that come into the world with only a partially written script, unsure of exactly what characters they are to play, what roles they should fulfill, and how they and their actions contribute to some larger scheme or plan. Like culture, religion attempts to fill in the script by providing accounts of human nature, the proper roles humans should play, and how human actions contribute to some grand vision or cosmic plan. Nevertheless, as Geertz makes clear, we can only understand how religion does what it does by looking carefully at particular religions. This special issue of the Journal of Korean Religions seeks to do just that by being dedicated to ”Confucian Spirituality in East Asian Contexts.” The five essays it contains explore a set of interrelated issues about how Confucians, among them Koreans, fill in the script of human life aiming to orient and guide human beings to satisfying and meaningful lives. These essays describe key components of a distinctively Confucian form of spirituality by analyzing characteristically Confucian concerns with cultivating the self in ways that complete human nature, enable one to fulfill one’s proper roles within family and society, take one’s correct place in the world, and realize the Heavenly ordained purpose of one’s life.

Continue reading “Journal of Korean Religions, Vol. 9#2, 2018”

Buddhist-Christian Studies Vol. 38

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Figure 2. Bhavacakra, painting on cloth; Nepal, nineteenth to twentieth century. From Massimiliano Alessandro Polichetti’s article The Sorrowful Fates of Rebirth: Ippolito Desideri Encounters Tibetan Sacred Art.

“[T]he bhavacakra (a kind of mental map of the concepts placed at the basis of Buddhist psycho-cosmology, made graphic with small images set in place in a circular manner that represents the “wheel of rebirths”) is set against the “world of becoming,” samsāra devoured by forgetfulness, represented by Yama, the god of the dead in Buddhist cosmology, who holds all within his jowls as a sign of immanent sorrow.”

 

From the Editors’ Introduction:

October 14–15, 2017, the city of Pistoia in Tuscany hosted an international symposium to honor the legacy of Fr. Ippolito Desideri (1684–1733), the first Jesuit missionary to Tibet who engaged in sustained interreligious dialogue with local Buddhists and whose extraordinary command of the local language even enabled him to author Christian theological treatises in Classical Tibetan.

Continue reading “Buddhist-Christian Studies Vol. 38”

Language Documentation & Conservation Vol. 12 (March) 2018 -New Content

bowern.pdf - Adobe Acrobat Pro
New uploads have been added to the latest edition of the National Foreign Language Resource Center’s free and open-access journal Language Documentation & Conservation volume 12.

Articles

The endangered state of Negidal: A field report
Brigitte Pakendorf & Natalia Aralova, pp. 1-14

Orthography development for Darma (The case that wasn’t)
Christina Willis Oko, pp. 15–46

Review of Tone in Yongning Na: Lexical tones and morphotonology (Studies in Diversity Linguistics 13)
Maria Konoshenko, pp. 47–52

Contact languages around the world and their levels of endangerment
Nala H. Lee, pp. 53–79

Forced Alignment for Understudied Language Varieties: Testing Prosodylab-Aligner with Tongan Data
Lisa M. Johnson, Marianna Di Paolo & Adrian Bell, pp. 80–123

Kratylos: A tool for sharing interlinearized and lexical data in diverse formats
Daniel Kaufman & Raphael Finkel, pp. 124–146

Single-event Rapid Word Collection workshops: Efficient, effective, empowering
Brenda H. Boerger & Verna Stutzman, pp. 147–193

Review of Lakota Grammar Handbook : a pedagogically orientated self-study reference and practice book for beginner to upper-intermediate students
Bruce Ingham, pp. 194–203


Find the full text of the issue at the LD&C webpage


About the Journal

Language Documentation & Conservation is a free open-access journal on issues related to language documentation and revitalization.

Submissions

Instructions for submission can be found on the Language Documentation & Conservation‘s website.

Subscribe- Open Access

Although Language Documentation & Conservation is a free online journal, subscribers are notified by email when a new issue is released. Subscribe to LD&C here.

Religion and Philosophy Journals from the University of Hawai`i Press

00_BCS 37_c1 and c4_REVA scholarly journal devoted to Buddhism and Christianity and their historical and contemporary interrelationships, Buddhist-Christian Studies presents thoughtful articles, conference reports, and book reviews. It also includes sections on comparative methodology and historical comparisons, as well as ongoing discussions from two dialogue conferences: the Theological Encounter with Buddhism, and the Japan Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies.

Submission guidelines for BCS are available online. 

 

jdsThe Journal of Daoist Studies (JDS) is an annual publication dedicated to the scholarly exploration of Daoism in all its different dimensions. Each issue has three main parts: Academic Articles on history, philosophy, art,society, and more (limit 8,500 words); Forum on Contemporary Practice on issues of current activities both in China and other parts of the world (limit 5,000 words); and News of the Field, presenting publications, dissertations, conferences and websites.

For submission guidelines please contact daojournal@gmail.com.

 

jksThe Journal of Korean Religions is the only English-language academic journal dedicated to the study of Korean religions. It aims to stimulate interest in and research on Korean religions across a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Launched in 2010 by the Institute for the Study of Religion at Sogang University in Korea, it is peer-reviewed and published twice yearly, in April and October.

Submission guidelines for JKR are available online.

 

Promoting academic literacy on non-Western traditions of philosophy, Philosophy East PEWand West has for over half a century published the highest-quality scholarship that locates these cultures in their relationship to Anglo-American philosophy. Philosophy defined in its relationship to cultural traditions broadly integrates the professional discipline with literature, science, and social practices. Each issue includes debates on issues of contemporary concern and critical reviews of the most recent publications.

Submission guidelines for PEW are available online.

 

UHP-primarylogo-2c

For more information on the University of Hawai`i Press and our journal publications, visit  www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

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#LookItUP: Climate Change and Natural Disasters in UHP Journals

 

upweekiconThis is Part 6 in a series of University of Hawai`i Press blog posts celebrating University Press Week and highlighting scholarship published by UH Press journals in the past year. Read our introductory blog post here. Our hope is that this series will shed new light on how UH Press “sells the facts,” so to speak, and the value our 24 journals bring to our very existence. Links to each journal and article are provided below.*


Climate Change and Natural Disasters

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the PacificVolume 56, Number 2, 201700_AP_c1-4_blog
Article:
“The Search for Tsunami Evidence in the Geological and Archaeological Records, With a Focus on Japan” by Gina L. Barnes

Context: Archeologist Gina L. Barnes takes a look at tsunami sites through the lens of disaster preparedness: “tsunami damage seldom leads to collapse of a society or civilization, though the socio-economic status of the affected society is crucial to the nature of human response […] Disaster archaeology, including tsunami archaeology, is thus a timely and welcome approach to understanding the situation of the world today.”

 

Pacific Science: A Quarterly Devoted to the Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific RegionVolume 71, Number 4, October 2017Pacific Science 71:4 cover image
Article: “Estimating Cost-Effectiveness of Hawaiian Dry Forest Restoration Using Spatial Changes in Water Yield and Landscape Flammability under Climate Change” by Christopher A. Wada, Leah L. Bremer, Kimberly Burnett, Clay Trauernicht, Thomas Giambelluca, Lisa Mandle, Elliott Parsons, Charlotte Weil, Natalie Kurashima, and Tamara Ticktin

Context: This study joins dozens of Pacific Science research articles that show the effects of climate change, and it appears with seven open-access articles that focus on the challenges facing native forest restoration in Hawai’i and the Pacific region. (And while we’re “selling the facts,” we should mention Pacific Science also published a peer-reviewed biological fact in the past year: the discovery of a new species of Stylasterid in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands.)

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast GeographersVolume 79, 2017APCG Yearbook 79 cover
Article:
“Institutional Obstacles to Beaver Recolonization and Potential Climate Change Adaptation in Oregon, USA” by Jeff Baldwin

Context: As streams dry up due to climate change, beaver are being displaced from their natural habitats. This study critically examines five institutional blockages to beaver recolonization in Oregon through multiple interviews, policies, and publications.

 

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island AffairsVolume 29, Number 2, 2017
Section: “Year in Review: International Issues and Events” by Nic Maclellan

00_29.2 cover 1Context: Nic Maclellan reflects on the U.S.’s political influence on the Pacific region, especially as it relates to environmental regulation: “Debates over climate action, West Papua, fisheries, and trade continued as a feature of regional affairs in 2016, often dividing Pacific governments and their international partners. The election of Donald Trump as U.S. president in November set the stage for these divisions to continue, given Trump’s statements during the election campaign on climate change and America’s new directions in foreign policy.” This introduction is followed by more reports from the field, including Fiji, Papua, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. Also appearing in this issue: “Climate Change and the Imagining of Migration: Emerging Discourses on Kiribati’s Land Purchase in Fiji” by Elfriede Hermann and Wolfgang Kempf.

*Institutional access to online aggregators such as Project MUSE may be required for full-text reading. For access questions, please see the Project MUSE FAQ available here or contact your local library.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

#LookItUP: Religion and Politics in UHP Journals

 

upweekiconThis is Part 5 in a series of University of Hawai`i Press blog posts celebrating University Press Week and highlighting scholarship published by UH Press journals in the past year. Read our introductory blog post here. Our hope is that this series will shed new light on how UH Press “sells the facts,” so to speak, and the value our 24 journals bring to our very existence. Links to each journal and article are provided below.*


Religion and Politics

00_BCS 37_c1 and c4_REVBuddhist-Christian Studies, Volume 37, 2017
Special Section:
What Is Wrong With Us? What Is Wrong with the World?

Context: A sign of the times: Volume 37 of Buddhist-Christian Studies includes a special section of four articles where theologians attempt to answer these questions: What is Wrong With Us? What is Wrong With the World?

 

 

PalapalaCOVE2.indd

Palapala: A Journal for Hawaiian Language and Literature, Volume 1, 2017
Article: “No ka Baibala Hemolele: The Making of the Hawaiian Bible” by Jeffrey Lyon

Context: In the first peer-reviewed Hawaiian language journal to be published exclusively online, Palapala editor and author Jeffrey “Kapali” Lyon shares the history behind the making of the Hawaiian Bible, the largest single volume ever printed in the Hawaiian language.

 

jks

Journal of Korean ReligionsVolume 8, Number 1, April 2017
Special Issue: The 1,400th Anniversary of Wŏnhyo’s Birth

Context: How long can a religious figure shape the cultural landscape of a nation? In the case of Wŏnhyo 元曉, we can confidently say 1,400 years. The editors of the Journal of Korean Religions curated a special issue showing how the Korean Buddhist scholar’s writings “continue to inspire the current generation of intellectuals in Korea, Asia, and the West.”

 

pew

Philosophy East and WestVolume 67, Number 4, October 2017
Special Issue: Eleventh East-West Philosophers’ Conference, “State-of-the-Art on Comparative Philosophy”

Context: Philosophy East and West Volume 67 tackles issues around the long-standing tendency of Western philosophers to reject the legitimacy of Chinese, Indian and Japanese philosophy.

 

*Institutional access to online aggregators such as Project MUSE may be required for full-text reading. For access questions, please see the Project MUSE FAQ available here or contact your local library.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.