Interview: JSEALS Editor-in-Chief Mark J. Alves

The newest Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society (JSEALS) Special Publication recently launched is titled “A Cuoi Language Description and Extensive Glossary.” UH Press spoke to Editor-in-Chief, Mark J. Alves about this new special issue.

Alves took over as JSEALS head editor in 2015 from Paul Sidwell, who ran it from its first publication in 2009. Alves was the co-editor for the 2022 JSEALS Special Publication “Vietnamese Linguistics: State of the Field,” in which he also contributed an article “Lexical Evidence of the Vietic Household Before and After Language contact with Sinitic” and a co-authored paper with James Kirby “Exploring Statistical Regularities in the Syllable Canon of Sino-Vietnamese Loanmorph Phonology”. He also recently published “The Ðông Sơn Speech Community: Evidence for Vietic” in the interdisciplinary journal Crossroads and “The Vietic languages: a phylogenetic analysis” (co-authored with Paul Sidwell), both in 2021.

University of Hawai‘i Press: Can you tell our readers some of the research, impacts, or projects you have been involved with outside of JSEALS that have enhanced your work with the journal?

Mark J. Alves: In working with the International Conference of Austroasiatic Linguistics (ICAAL) group, I contributed two chapters (one of my own and one co-authored chapter) to “Austroasiatic Syntax in Areal and Diachronic Perspective” (ed. by Mathias Jenny, Paul Sidwell, and Mark Alves) in 2020 and a chapter on the Pacoh language in “The Handbook of Austroasiatic Languages” (ed. by Mathias Jenny and Paul Sidwell) in 2014. For the World Loanword Database (WOLD) through the Max Planck Institute (MPI), I contributed Vietnamese data for the database and the chapter on loanwords in Vietnamese in the resulting book “Loanwords in the World’s Languages: A Comparative Handbook” (2009, ed. by Martin Haspelmath & Uri Tadmor).

UHP: What are some of the challenges you have faced during the pandemic, and have those continued to be an issue with the creation of articles and research now?

MJA: Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, I have not travelled to Asia since 2019, but I have maintained academic activity through the internet. I have participated in more conferences and have given more invited presentations in the last few years (e.g., 8 presentations in 2022) than I would have if only in-person presentations were the standard. However, I think the limitations on linguistic fieldwork is showing itself in reduced numbers of papers submitted to JSEALS on recently collected data in the field. Plenty of my colleagues are bemoaning the lost time from what they could have done had the pandemic not created so many challenges in travelling to the field. Time will tell how this situation will resolve itself.

UHP: JSEALS recently introduced a new Special Issue, “A Cuoi Language Description and Extensive Glossary.”  How did this come about?  Why did you devote an entire issue to this topic?

MJA: I have been in contact with Vietnamese fieldwork linguists for many years, and when I found that Professor Nguyen Huu Hoanh was interested in publishing his extensive data and description of the Cuoi language, I was extremely pleased. The Cuoi language deserved a JSEALS Special Publication because there had never been a complete published description of the language nor such a large amount of lexical data: over 3,000 words in two dialects, along with Vietnamese translations.

UHP: Why was it important to publish “A Cuoi Language Description and Extensive Glossary” now?

MA: In the Ethnologue, Cuoi has an endangerment status of “shifting”, meaning that there is decreasing amount of usage of Cuoi among younger speakers. Language maintenance among such minority language groups is difficult. Whether or not the Cuoi language can survive in future generations, at the very least, it has been documented and the data shared in publication.

UHP: How do you hope that readers will utilize this special issue in their own work?

MJA: The ways that this data could be used are (a) comparing the language data with neighboring languages in the region for a broader understanding of language typology in the region, (b) exploring historical linguistic questions of the history of the Vietnamese language, and/or (c) building on the linguistic description and lexicon to continue to work with the Cuoi people, whether for linguistic or anthropological queries. I hope that this publication encourages other linguists to devote time to fieldwork of this depth among minority languages in Vietnam and Southeast Asia.

UHP: Is there anything else you would like to add? 

MJA: Linguistic researchers in the Greater Southeast Asian region are strongly encouraged to submit their work to JSEALS, whether full double-blind-reviewed research articles, “Data / Notes / Review” papers, or full JSEALS Special Publications. JSEALS has played an important role in publishing of Southeast Asian linguistics since changes of Open-Access Asia-Pacific Linguistics publisher and of loss of the Mon-Khmer Studies journal. Since 2009, JSEALS has published about 190 journal articles, and in the 10 JSEALS Special Publications, several dozen more articles have been published by an international range of scholars. Clearly, JSEALS contributes to Southeast Asian linguistic research, and we need submitted works to continue to such positive progress.


general cover of JSEALS

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS:

The Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society accepts submissions written in English that deal with general linguistic issues which further the lively debate that characterizes the annual SEALS conferences. Devoted to a region of extraordinary linguistic diversity, the journal features papers on the languages of Southeast Asia, including Austroasiatic, Austronesian, Hmong-Mien, Tibeto-Burman, and Tai-Kadai.

Topics may include descriptive, theoretical, or historical linguistics, dialectology, sociolinguistics, and anthropological linguistics, among other areas of linguistics of languages of Southeast Asia. JSEALS also admits data papers, reports, and notes, subject to an internal review process.
Although we normally expect that JSEALS articles will have been presented and discussed at the SEALS conference, submission is open to all, regardless of participation in SEALS meetings. Each original article undergoes double-blind review by at least two scholars, usually a member of the Advisory Board and one or more independent referees.

JSEALS publishes fully open access content, which means that all articles are available on the internet to all users immediately upon publication. Non-commercial use and distribution in any medium is permitted, provided the author and the journal are properly credited. Authors retain copyright of their material. The journal does not charge Article Processing Fees.

Journal of Korean Religions: Korean Religions and COVID Restrictions

Several of our editors and journals reflect on the changes in the last three years due to the COVID pandemic and how it has changed the face of life as we know it. Likewise editor Don Baker of Journal of Korean Religions established a special section in this issue to reflect on the changes to culture, finances, and rituals affected by lockdowns and the virus.

In his introduction Baker expresses the following:

In this issue, we have three articles delving into how Korea’s Christian communities-Catholic and Protestant-have dealt with a problem of the present: the COVID-19 pandemic. Christians place a lot of importance on regular weekly meetings for worship. The South Korean government, on the other hand, was concerned about those religious gatherings serving as venues for the spread of the deadly COVID-19 virus. Different Christian organizations in Korea responded in different ways to their government’s demand that they prioritize concern for public health and temporarily change the way their congregations gather for ritual expressions of their faith.

Articles featured:

“It Isn’t Just Us”: The Korean Catholic Church’s Responses to Corona-19 as Seen in Diocesan Bulletins
Franklin Rausch

The ceasing of public Catholic Masses just before Ash Wednesday 2020 in response to Corona-19 posed a significant problem as it meant Catholics could no longer easily receive Holy Communion, the center of Catholic faith life. Thus, one might have expected the Korean Catholic Church to oppose the limitation or cancellation of religious gatherings. But in fact, the opposite happened, with the Catholic Church being singled out for its support of such policies. This paper explores this response of Catholic leaders to Corona-19 and the theology that undergirded it through an examination of the bulletins of two archdioceses, Seoul and Daegu. It argues that the bulletins promoted a particular Catholic theology that understood adherence to public health measures as analogous to love of neighbor, and that such acts of love would bring a triumph over the virus.

Four Types of Protestant Responses to South Korean Government Measures to Control COVID-19 Outbreaks in 2020-2021
Timothy S. Lee

How did Korean Protestants respond to these anti-pandemic measures? This study seeks to address this question ­focusing on the period between February 1, 2020, when the Korea Center for Disease Control and Prevention first announced the discovery of the virus in a Protestant church, to November 1, 2021, when the “Living with COVID-19” policy was initiated. Along the way, the study examines tensions elicited by the measures and responses to them- not only between the government and the Protestant communities but also within the communities themselves. In the main, there were four types of Protestant responses to the government’s anti-pandemic measures, described in terms of their agents: willing compliers, begrudging compliers, amenable noncompliers, and defiant noncompliers.

Mediated Faith Coping with COVID-19: A Case Study of a Megachurch in South Korea
Seung Min Hong

While the Republic of Korea coped well with COVID-19 prior to the development of the vaccines, the major outbreaks of the virus in the country were largely caused and/or facilitated by several controversial Christian groups. There have also been many cases of smaller local churches spreading the virus due to their refusal to follow the government’s guidelines for religious gatherings. Meanwhile, major Korean media outlets have mostly focused on cases of uncooperative churches with the short disclaimer ‘the majority of Protestant churches are following the rules.’ What kind of experiences did those ‘cooperative’ churches have to go through then? This paper is a micro in-depth case study which explores a megachurch in South Korea that has supported the government’s safety measures.


Journal of Korean Religions, Vol. 13, No. 2 (2022)


Special Section: Korean Religions and COVID Restrictions

Introduction to the Special Section: Korean Religions and COVID Restrictions
Don Baker


“It Isn’t Just Us”: The Korean Catholic Church’s Responses to Corona-19 as Seen in Diocesan Bulletins
Franklin Rausch


Four Types of Protestant Responses to South Korean Government Measures to Control COVID-19 Outbreaks in 2020-2021
Timothy S. Lee


Mediated Faith Coping with COVID-19: A Case Study of a Megachurch in South Korea
Seung Min Hong


Research Articles

The Korean Buddhist Military Chaplaincy and Modern “State-Protection” Buddhism: A Study of the Mass Military Faith Promotion Movement
Jonathan C. Feuer


Religious Meaning-Making Narratives for Reconciliation in the aftermath of State Violence: South Korean Christian Perspectives
Hyukmin Kang


JKR invites contributions from senior and junior scholars researching on any aspects of Korean religions from a wide range of perspectives, including religion, philosophy, theology, literature, folklore, art, anthropology, history, sociology, political science, and cultural studies. Articles submitted for consideration should be under 10,000 words in length (including footnotes: bibliographies and appendices are additional) and should not have appeared elsewhere or be under review for publication elsewhere. JKR also welcomes book reviews (up to 1,000 words) and review articles (up to 3,000 words).

Find Submission Guidelines for the Journal of Korean Religions here.

Journal of World History: Remembering Jerry H. Bentley (1949-2012)

Photo of Jerry Bentley provided by the Department of History at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

Shana J. Brown and Kieko Matteson of the Department of History at University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa honor Jerry Bentley in the following 10-year remembrance published in Journal of World History Volume 33, Number 4:

Founding editor of the Journal of World History Jerry Bentley, who passed away a decade ago at far too young an age, left an indelible legacy in the field of World History. Co-author of a highly popular world history textbook, Traditions and Encounters (written with Herbert F. Ziegler and published by McGraw-Hill, now in its seventh edition), Jerry wrote convincingly of how history from a global perspective could advance human understanding by highlighting the dynamism of cross-cultural interactions and demonstrating the mutual influence of world societies in shaping processes of historical change.

Trained at the University of Minnesota as a specialist in the history of Early Modern Europe, Jerry authored two fine monographs on Renaissance scholarship and statecraft before finding his calling in the then-emerging field of World History. Jerry shifted gears when asked to teach the University of Hawai‘i’s introductory survey course in World Civilization, as it was then titled. He accepted the assignment with aplomb, bringing a Renaissance humanist’s understanding of text, context, and sociopolitical relations to bear as he worked to wrangle what had been a largely chronologically framed narrative into a compelling thematic interpretation of the intersections and interdependence of human societies over time. Seeking to improve the available curriculum and teaching texts, Jerry reached out to friends and colleagues who found themselves similarly eager to expand beyond nation-state frameworks. Together, they founded the World History Association in 1982 to facilitate dialogue about World History pedagogy, foster scholarship, and stimulate the development of methodological frameworks for the emerging sub-discipline. As part of the association, Jerry inaugurated the Journal of World History in 1990 with a view towards publishing “articles on comparative and cross-cultural themes,” that would focus on multiple cultural regions; analyses of encounters between peoples of different regions; studies in the historiography and methodology of world history; and reflections on conceptualization and periodization.

Read this memorial in full with free access at Project MUSE.

jwh 33-3

Journal of World History Vol. 33, No. 4

More from or about Jerry Bentley:

Volume 16, Number 1 (2005)
Myths, Wagers, and Some Moral Implications of World History
Jerry H. Bentley

Volume 9, Number 2 (1998)
Hemispheric Integration, 500-1500 C.E.
Jerry H. Bentley

Volume 23, Number 3 (2012)
In Memoriam: Jerry H. Bentley: (December 9, 1949–July 15, 2012)
Karen Jolly

Journal of World History
Volume 25, Number 4, (2014)
Special Issue in Honor of Jerry H. Bentley


Find more information about the Journal of World History, subscriptions, or submitting manuscripts here.

Working Out What to Wear in Papua New Guinea + Other Journal Articles for #FashionWeek 

In recognition of Fashion Week in New York, Milan, Paris, and London this month, we showcase the following journals, articles, and reviews. Fashion sets trends, makes a statement, and has a huge impact on industry and innovation in today’s world. We invite you to explore the following journal content:

bio 35-4

biography

Volume 35, Number 4 (2012)

The Public Time of Private Space in Dior by Dior
Ilya Parkins and Lara Haworth

Review of Japanese Culture and Society

Volume 29 (2017)

Report: From “Do It Yourself” to “Do It With Others” to “Do It For Others”—Can Fashion Be Renewed? Forum
Mizuno Daijirō, Kanemori Kaori, Takeuchi Akira, Nagai Kōsuke, Narumi Hiroshi, and Yoonkyung Kim

Special Features: Korean LGBTQ+ Literature, Remembering Linguists Robert Andrew Blust and Thomas Edward Dutton and more

Azalea

Volume 15 (2022)

From the editor Young-Jun Lee:

A century’s worth of change looks quite remarkable in Korean literature. Today’s young Koreans cannot read the same newspapers read by their grandparents’ generation. In less than a hundred years, the national written language has shifted from Chinese characters to Korean hangul, then briefly to Japanese as enforced under colonial rule, and then to the modern Korean language that we know today. During this process, remarkable sociocultural transformations dominated daily life. Over the first half of the 20th century, Koreans endured enormous political shifts most notably marked by colonization, the Korean War, and the ensuing divide of the country into separate political nations. Along the way, Korean literature registered these upheavals and fluctuations.

Notably, the literature of totalizing grand narrative, which concerned itself with the trajectory of nation-building, persisted in Korea until the 1980s. Ever since the end of the military dictatorship and the establishment of a civil government in the 1990s, however, that literature began to shift its focus to the lives of women. Now, those long ignored and marginalized—including queer women, as well as other queer people such as those who are non-binary— have also begun to emerge more strongly as published authors, even as they have been increasingly centered as subjects of literary narratives. The ongoing impact of this inclusive, expansionary shift
can be seen directly in AZALEA’s decision to focus on LGBTQ+ literature for its fifteenth issue.

Find more poetry, fiction, graphic shorts, and images at Project MUSE.

Oceanic Linguistics

Volume 61, Number 1 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

The Place of Space in Oceanic Linguistics
Leah Pappas and Alexander Mawyer

Semantics and Pragmatics of Voice in Central Malagasy Oral Narratives
Penelope Howe

On the Nature of Proto-Oceanic *o in Southern Vanuatu (and Beyond)
John Lynch

Rare, but Real: Native Nasal Clusters in Northern Philippine Languages
Robert Blust

The Greater West Bomberai Language Family
Timothy Usher and Antoinette Schapper

The Phonology and Typological Position of Waima’a Consonants
Kirsten Culhane

Find more research articles, squibs, and reviews at Project MUSE.

New Journal Issues: Aloha Shirt Aesthetics, Patterns of Mortuary Practice in Vanuatu, Taiwan Sugar in the 1600s + More

Asian Perspectives

Volume 61, Number 1 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

Lakheen-Jo-Daro, an Indus Civilization Settlement at Sukkur
in Upper Sindh (Pakistan): A Scrap Copper Hoard and
Human Figurine from a Dated Context

Paolo Biagi and Massimo Vidale

The Hamin Mangha Site: Mass Deaths and Abandonment
of a Late Neolithic Settlement in Northeastern China

Yawei Zhou, Xiaohui Niu, Ping Ji, Yonggang Zhu, Hong Zhu, and
Meng Zhang

Early Metal Age Settlement at the Site of Palemba, Kalumpang,
Karama Valley, West Sulawesi

Anggrreani

Patterns of Mortuary Practice over Millennia in Southern Vanuatu,
South Melanesia

Frédérique Valentin, Wanda Zinger, Alison Fenwick, Stuart Bedford,
James Flexner, Edson Willie, and Takaronga Kuautonga

Find more research articles and reviews at Project MUSE.

Biography

Volume 44, Issues 2 & 3 (2021)

Special Double Issue: Graphic Medicine

Graphic Medicine’s Possible Futures: Reconsidering Poetics and Reading
Erin La Cour and Anna Poletti

Conflict or Compromise?: An Imagined Conversation
with John Hicklenton and Lindsay Cooper about
Living with Multiple Sclerosis

John Miers

Out of Sync: Chronic Illness, Time, and Comics Memoir
Jared Gardner

Face as Landscape: Refiguring Illness, Disability,
and Disorders in David B.’s Epileptic

Erin La Cour

Graphic Confessions and the Vulnerability Hangover
from Hell

Safdar Ahmed

Drawn to History: Healing, Dementia, and the Armenian
Genocide in the Intertextual Collage of Aliceheimer’s

Crystal Yin Lie

Find more at Project MUSE.

Biography

Volume 44, Issue 4 (2021)

Open Forum Articles
Reviews

Editor Craig Howes embraces this volume as he explains:
“The latest issue of Biography qualifies as special because of its ordinariness. After a four-installment run featuring two special issues, an inaugural Forum, and the Annual Bibliography and International Year in Review, we now return to our regularly scheduled programming. Articles and book reviews—that’s all!
But the table of contents for this issue speaks to what has distinguished Biography for decades as a quarterly. First, the articles. Their geographic, historic, linguistic, and generic range is in keeping with our international and interdisciplinary profile. American celebrity biographies and philosophy, twentieth-century Indian regional autobiography, modernist Austrian psychoanalytic biography, post-WWII German-Romanian autofiction, contemporary Palestinian auto/biographical texts—our pages map out and tell the stories of the field.”

Find more articles and reviews at Project MUSE.

The Contemporary Pacific

Volume 34, Issue 1 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles, dialogues, political, media, and book reviews.

One Salt Water: The Storied Work of Trans-Indigenous Decolonial Imagining with West Papua
Bonnie Etherington

Making Sartorial Sense of Empire: Contested Meanings
of Aloha Shirt Aesthetics

Christen T Sasaki

The Compensation Page: News Narratives of Public Kinship in Papua New Guinea Print Journalism
Ryan Schram

“We Are So Happy EPF Came”: Transformations of Gender in Port Moresby Schools
Ceridwen Spark and Martha Macintyre

Pacific People Navigating the Sacred Vā to Frame Relational Care: A Conversation between Friends across Space and Time
Silia Pa‘usisi Finau, Mele Katea Paea, and Martyn Reynolds

Find more articles, dialogues, political, media, and book reviews at Project MUSE.

Call For Submissions: HICCS 2023 Conference

Hawaiʻi International Conference on Chinese Studies

The Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

JANUARY 4-6, 2023

The third annual Hawai‘i International Conference on Chinese Studies (HICCS), organized by the Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, will be held in-person from January 4 (Wednesday) through January 6 (Friday), 2023. This conference will bring together educators and professionals from a wide range of fields in Chinese Studies to present papers on various aspects of Chinese culture and society in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau, and among overseas Chinese societies. The goal of the conference is to create an interdisciplinary atmosphere for our understanding of the past, present, and future of Chinese society. Papers can address issues within China and in Chinese communities throughout the world.

Honolulu is a vibrant city in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Its central location provides a meeting point where researchers within various disciplines of Chinese Studies can meet, discuss, and network with scholars around the globe. Paper submission in either English and Chinese is acceptable.

TOPICS: Papers might address one or more of the following fields of Chinese Studies:

Anthropology
Art and Art History
Business
Comparative Literature
Cultural Studies
Economics
Family and Consumer
Sciences
Film/Media Studies
Finance
Health Sciences
History
Journalism and Communication
Language Pedagogy
Law
Library Sciences
Linguistics
Literature
Marketing
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Public Administration
Religion
Sociology
Theater, Music, and Performance Studies
Translation Studies
Travel Industry Management

The 2023 HICCS will be held in-person on the University of Hawaiʻi campus.

Participants must submit a paper title and an abstract (no more than 500 words)
by September 15, 2022.

Chinese and English papers are allowed. Please submit your abstract to:

https://manoa.hawaii.edu/hiccs/abstract-submissions/

Questions?: Email hiccs@hawaii.edu

China Review International is sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies, host of the annual HICCS conference.

Call For Papers: U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal

Established in 1988, the U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed, biannual publication, available in print and online, that promotes scholarly exchange on social, cultural, political, and economic issues pertaining to gender and Japan. The U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal encourages comparative study among Japan, the United States, and other countries. We welcome contributions from all academic fields in the social sciences and humanities. The journal publishes new research, review articles, and translations.

All articles are printed in English, and all submissions must be in English following the submission guidelines available from the journal home page. Manuscripts should be between 6,000 and 10,000 words, including the alphabetical list of Works Cited and endnotes. Submissions will be reviewed by the USJWJ editors and anonymously by outside reviewers. The review process takes around three months. Please review the complete Submission Guidelines, available online.

Submit manuscripts digitally to Jennifer Cullen, usjwj@hawaii.edu.

Subscribe to the U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal through UH Press or browse full-text issues online via Project MUSE and JSTOR.

Editor-in-Chief: Noriko Mizuta, The International Institute for Media and Women’s Studies

Managing Editor: Jennifer Cullen, Northeastern University

30% OFF Select World History Titles

USE CODE WHA2022

Free U.S. domestic shipping on orders of $100 or more
Offer ends September 30, 2022

Find a digital-only special issue, “Missions & Conversions in World History,” of the Journal of World History FREE HERE.


Continue reading “30% OFF Select World History Titles”

Journal of World History Special Issue: Missions & Conversions in World History – Free!

The World History Association will be hosting its annual meeting in-person and virtually in Bilbao, Spain from June 23 to 25, on the theme “Distance, Mobility, and Migration.” The Journal of World History offers this accompanying special collection “Missions and Conversions in World History,” free on the Project MUSE platform through September 30. Select World History Titles in our Books Department will also be 30% July 1 through September 30 with coupon code WHA2022.

Missionary efforts are usually enacted on a global scale and have been an important force within world history. This special collection of articles seeks to enhance our understanding of missionaries and conversion and their place in the discourse on religion in world history. Some of the articles in this special collection focus on the religious beliefs of the missionaries and converts, and how those beliefs adapted to the cultures of parties. Other contributors analyze the political ramifications of missionary undertakings, while still others explore the varied cultural exchanges and entanglements which result from these encounters, many of which extended beyond the religious.

This special issue provides accessible resources for scholars and teachers worldwide and features Guest Editor Stephen S. Francis, who discusses the issue below.  

Stephen S. Francis, guest editor for this Special Edition of “Missions & Conversions in World History” for Journal of World History
(Photo courtesy of Stephen S. Francis)

 

University of Hawai‘i Press: Tell us how this special issue came together.

Stephen S. Francis: My personal area of research is the history of religion and society, and also family relations and material culture, so I was drawn to these articles that not only dealt with the personal ideological conversion of peoples, but also how missionaries and religion affected other aspects of society and culture beyond the intended reasons for proselyting. 

UHP: Why is this issue important now?

SSF: Since the latter half of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first, religion throughout the world has undergone radical change, but perhaps no more so than in the past.  So, I think it is beneficial for us to look at the impact and effects of past encounters to place the current developments in context. 

UHP: How do you hope people will use this issue?

SSF: One of the goals of Journal of World History is to show broader interconnections of ideas that go beyond nations and regions, and in editing this volume, I gained greater insight into my own localized study by seeing the similarities and how my own work fits into this larger discourse.  I hope that other scholars will do the same, and that it will enhance their own research and world view. 

UHP:   How are things changing as the world has reopened slowly? Are there many ways the pandemic has affected your own research and teaching?

SSF: Specifically regarding the topic of this issue, I know that several churches have altered the way they have proselyted during the pandemic, and I am eager to see how some of those changes will be kept and what ones will be discarded as the world reopens, which in several years will be fascinating to research.  I, like many, had to cancel research trips due to the pandemic, but it also gave me time to reflect and focus on ideas that I may have ignored if life had continued as “normal.”  


The World History Association will host its annual meeting both in-person and virtually, from June 23 to 25, on the theme “Distance, Mobility, and Migration.” The Journal of World History offers this digital special issue “Missions and Conversions in World History” free on the Project MUSE platform through the end of September 2022. Select World History Titles in our Books Department will also be 30% July 1 through September 30 with coupon code WHA2022.

New Journal Special Issues: The Religiosity of Tonghak, Vietnamese Linguistics + More

Oregon beautiful picture

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistic Society

Special Issue:

Vietnamese Linguistics: State of the Field

The new issue features the following introduction by Trang Phan, John Phan, and Mark J. Alves

The current issue is the result of a workshop held at the Harvard Yenching Institute in April of 2021, entitled Vietnamese Linguistics, Typology and Language Universals, and which featured nineteen linguists working on diverse aspects of the Vietnamese language, ranging from semantics to historical phonology. Our purpose in gathering was to take stock of the great leaps in Vietnamese linguistic research that have occurred over the past few decades, to bring together cutting-edge research from each subdiscipline, and to begin a new collaborative dialogue on Vietnamese linguistics, typology, and language universals. Most of all, it was our belief that the time had come to reconsider Vietnamese linguistics as a unified field of inquiry. As a result, a new academic organization was founded: the International Society of Vietnamese Linguistics.
In the past twenty years, research into the Vietnamese language has advanced exponentially, in tandem with developments in our understanding of syntax, semantics, phonetics, and phonology—both on the synchronic and diachronic levels. Specific work on the Vietnamese language now informs and even leads broader linguistic inquiry in a number of unprecedented ways. These new developments invite a concentration of state-the-field research into a single volume, one that will serve not only to summarize current issues in each subdiscipline of Vietnamese linguistics, but also to initiate a longer, more collaborative conversation about the Vietnamese language.
Our goals in this special issue are thus twofold: first, we seek to provide a snapshot of current research into Vietnamese syntax, semantics, phonology, and phonetics, from both the historical and synchronic points of view, that may serve as a resource for linguists interested in exploring our current understanding of the Vietnamese language. Second, we hope that this issue will also serve as an invitation to all linguists working on the Vietnamese language or related languages to contribute to a broader, more cosmopolitan discussion—one in which discoveries of one subdiscipline may serve to inform or enlighten another.


Find more articles at eVols.

New Journal Issues: “Contagious Magic” in Japanese Theatre, Logistics of the Natural History Trade, Hawai‘i’s Toxic Plants + More