New Journal Issues: “Contagious Magic” in Japanese Theatre, Logistics of the Natural History Trade, Hawai‘i’s Toxic Plants + More

January is Kalaupapa Month

Published twice a year since 1989 by the University of Hawaiʻi Press, Mānoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing has two issues of special interest to readers this month, which has been designated Kalaupapa Month by the Hawaiʻi state government and celebrates two important figures. Father Damien, the Belgian priest who cared for victims of leprosy at Kalaupapa, Molokaʻi, was born on the 3rd, and civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was born on the 15th.


Mānoa vol. 23 no. 2 (2011) Almost Heaven

Almost Heaven: On the Human and Divine (winter 2011) presents Aldyth Morris’s play Damien in its entirety, plus a set of images reproduced from glass-plate negatives made at Kalaupapa in the early twentieth century. The images are from the collection of the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts United States Province. Morris was a Hawaiʻi playwright who received the Hawaiʻi Award for Literature in 1978 and worked for many years at UH Press.


Mānoa vol. 32 no. 1 (2020) Tyranny Lessons

Tyranny Lessons: International Prose, Poetry, and Performance (summer 2020) features photographs from the 1960s by Danny Lyon from his book Memories of the Southern Civil Rights Movement. Lyon was the first photographer of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee and was jailed alongside Martin Luther King Jr. Working next to activists such as Julian Bond and Howard Zinn, he captured sit-ins, church bombings, speeches by John Lewis and other leaders, and the arrest and jailing of protestors.

Members of the UH community can view these works for free at Project Muse.


Links:
• Star-Advertiser article on Kalaupapa Month https://www.staradvertiser.com/2022/01/07/hawaii-news/
in-january-kalaupapa-month-hawaiians-reclaim-loved-ones/

• Mānoa website https://manoa.hawaii.edu/manoajournal/
• Almost Heaven https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/25083
• Tyranny Lessons https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/42693

New Journal Issues: Schooling Journeys in the Southwestern Pacific, #KuToo Online Feminist Movement in Japan, Geographic Analysis of COVID-19 in L.A. + More

The Contemporary Pacific

Volume 22, Issue 2 (2021)

Special Issue: Schooling Journeys in the Southwestern Pacific

From the Guest Editors Rachel Emerine Hicks, Debra McDougall, and David Oakeshott in The Promise of Education: Schooling Journeys in the Southwester Pacific:

“Schooling journeys” is more than a metaphor in the southwestern Pacific. To step into a classroom, children and youth often travel hours each day or live for months at a time away from their families. The journey of schooling is rarely direct; it often winds between formal and informal learning and in and out of school, work, and home life. And the journey is expensive; many families struggle mightily to gather the money for fees, school supplies, uniforms, and transportation. Young people embark on these precarious journeys, and their families make sacrifices to support them, because schooling promises a better life—a move away from the backbreaking labor of subsistence agriculture toward a reliable salary that will better support their family and community. Because of the structural inequalities in school and a lack of jobs for those who complete schooling, however, few experience the socioeconomic advancement schooling promises. Still, students and their families continue to hope that schooling will lead to well-paid work. Even more important, though, going to school is seen as key to being a competent and effective person in society—increasingly for both women and men.

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers

Volume 83 (2021)

Editor Craig S. Revels reflects over the COVID-19 pandemic and how it has affected geographers and members as he states:

Last year’s volume was published in a time of great uncertainty as the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the world, and this year’s unfortunately arrives under similar conditions, slowly improving though they may be. The tragedies, disruptions, and general state of societal affairs during the pandemic will not soon be forgotten…

Geographers have been at the forefront of research into the spread of COVID-19 since the earliest days of the pandemic, and Steve Graves and Petra Nichols contribute an analytical perspective on infection rates in Los Angeles County. In particular, they statistically identify a causal relationship between infection and a range of key socioeconomic and demographic variables, a relationship influencing the location and rate of spread for the disease. They leave us to consider how those factors must be addressed in any preparations for future public health crises.

In a significantly different context, Ray Sumner and John Menary
demonstrate that taking students into the field, always a valuable exercise, is even more rewarding when it leads to unexpected discoveries and challenges our carefully laid plans. In this case, a straightforward field methods class oriented around the Los Angeles River instead became an open-ended, student-driven exploration into the social dimensions of heritage, ethnicity,
culture, and urban development.

New Journal Special Issues: We Are Maunakea, Contemporary Japanese Theatre + Digital Methods, Empire Histories

Asian Theatre Journal

Volume 38, Number 1, (2021)

From the Editor Siyuan Liu:

This issue starts with Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei’s appreciation of Leonard Pronko (1927–2019), noted kabuki scholar and teacher who passed away late 2019. Building on her profile of Pronko for Asian Theatre Journal’s “founders of the fields” series (28: 2, 2011), Sorgenfrei offers a touching personal profile of her former professor as an extraordinary human being.
As evidence to the flourishing field of Japanese theatre studies pioneered by Pronko and his peers, this issue continues with a special section on contemporary Japanese theatre with a combination of articles, reports, a translation, and a performance review essay.

cover image

biography

Volume 43, Number 3 (2020)


We Are Maunakea: Aloha ʻĀina Narratives of Protest, Protection, and Place
Bryan Kamaoli Kuwada and Noʻu Revilla

From the guest editors’ introduction:

In the summer of 2019, kiaʻi (protectors) gathered at Puʻuhonua o Puʻuhuluhulu to defend Maunakea, a sacred mountain, against desecration by the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). Thousands gathered at Ala Hulu Kupuna, or Mauna Kea Access Road. Daily protocols were led by cultural practitioners and long-time protectors of Maunakea, intergenerational Native Hawaiian leadership was developed and empowered on Hawaiian terms, a community kitchen was organized, Puʻuhuluhulu University was established as an actual Hawaiian place of learning, and a collective commitment to ʻāina and kapu aloha rooted all who arrived and all who continue to stay in this movement.
The 2019 stand was also an unprecedented opportunity to witness the battle of narratives, as mainstream media and highly paid public relations firms were outmaneuvered by Kanaka- and ally-authored life writing. This special issue features first-hand accounts, academic reflections, creative works, photography, and interviews with kiaʻi from the 2019 front lines and members of the media team.

Journal of World History

Volume 32, Number 2 (2021)

Special Issue: Digital Methods, Empire Histories

Introduction from Guest Editor Antoinette Burton reads:

The technological evangelism of much of anglophone digital humanities discourse should sit uneasily with empire historians, who know what languages of discovery and “new frontiers” have meant in the context of world history, especially where data collection is concerned. To be sure, digitization has made myriad colonial archives, official and unofficial, available via open access platforms. This means that vast stores of knowledge are now at our fingertips—a proximity and immediacy that has reshaped the lived experience of archival research for many scholars, in this case bringing the imperial world not just closer to home but into the hands of anyone who has access to a cellphone. And the revolution in digital tools in the last twenty-five years has given rise to equally vast possibilities for gathering and visualizing evidence as well as for scaling and interpreting data: for worlding, mostly by aggregation and consolidation, what we aim to know about the kinds of colonial pasts that are available and capturable via text and image. Yet, this information empire is not exactly new. Digitization most often reassembles archival collections proper, sometimes remixing them with print and visual culture and typically organizing them through mechanisms and selection processes that are more or less visible depending on the commitment to transparency of the conglomerator. In some cases, those conglomerators are private individuals or government entities; in others, corporate sponsors; in still others, community-based activists. Inevitably perhaps, today’s digital imperial “data” are actually, more accurately, digitally transformed imperial sources. And for colonial subjects, as for the enslaved, data has more often than not meant terror at the scene of the crime.

Pacific Science 75#3, 2021

The most recent issue of Pacific Science is now available on Project MUSE and BioOne.

cover imageTable of Contents

Pollination Biology of an Endemic Hawaiian Tree, Erythrina sandwicensis (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae), in a Novel Ecosystem
By Emily F. Grave, Timothy I. Kroessig, and Tamara Ticktin

Bi-Hemispheric Distribution and Ecology of the Commensal Amphipod Leucothoe nagatai Ishimaru, 1985 (Crustacea: Leucothoidae)
By James Darwin Thomas, Donald B. Cadien, and Kristine N. White

A Century of Wake Fish Surveys: Comprehensive Annotated Checklist of the Fishes of Wake Atoll
By D. Paul Brown

Evaluation of the Humphead Wrasse, Cheilinus undulatus, in Shallow Water Habitats in Saipan Lagoon, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
By Michael S. Trianni, John E. Gourley, and Scott R. Vogt

Nest Architecture of an Endangered Hawaiian Yellow-Faced Bee, Hylaeus anthracinus (Hymenoptera: Colletidae) and Potential Nest-Site Competition from Three Introduced Solitary Bees
By Jason R. Graham, Joshua W. Campbell, Sheldon Plentovich, and Cynthia B. A. King

Fly on the Wall: Comparing Arthropod Communities Between Islands With and Without House Mice (Mus musculus)
By Wieteke A. Holthuijzen, Susan L. Durham, Elizabeth N. Flint, Jonathan H. Plissner, Kaylee J. Rosenberger, Coral A. Wolf, and Holly P. Jones

Cetaceans of the Northern Bismarck Sea, Papua New Guinea
By Cara Miller and Vagi Rei

New Faunal Records from A World Heritage Site in Danger: Rennell Island, Solomon Islands
By Tyrone H. Lavery, Lucas H. DeCicco, Jonathan Q. Richmond, Ikuo G. Tigulu, Michael J. Andersen, David Boseto, and Robert G. Moyle

Event-Based Stable Isotope Analysis of Precipitation Along a High Resolution Transect on the South Face of O’ahu, Hawai’i
By Honour Booth, Nicole Lautze, Diamond Tachera, and Daniel Dores

Association Affairs: Pacific Science Association

 

For more information on Pacific Science please visit the journal homepage.

Hawaiʻi Conservation Conference 2021

 

SELECT TITLES BELOW ARE 20% OFF WITH CODE

 
 

 

















 


 
 


 


 





Pacific Science, Vol. 75#2, 2021

Special issue dedicated to Dr. Isabella Abbott 
Guest editor: Celia Smith


Isabella Kauakea Yau Yung Aiona Abbott: Contributions to a Celebration of the Centennial of her Birth
By Rosie Alegado, Cindy Hunter, Celia Smith

Biodiversity of Hawaiian Peyssonneliales (Rhodophyta). 1. Two New Species in the Genus Ramicrusta from Lehua Island
By Alison R. Sherwood, Monica O. Paiano, Rachael M. Wade, Feresa C. Cabrera, Heather L. Spalding, Randall K. Kosaki

Caulerpa bikinensis (Chlorophyta) Preference for the Mesophotic Depths of Pacific Atolls
By Roy T. Tsuda

Introduced Mangroves Along the Coast of Moloka‘i, Hawai‘i may Represent Novel Habitats for Megafaunal Communities
By Bryan A. Nakahara, Amanda W. J. Demopoulos, Yoshimi M. Rii, Rosanna A. Alegado, Kauaoa M. S. Fraiola, Craig R. Smith

Examining the UV-Absorbing Properties of Scaevola taccada (Goodeniaceae) and its Potential Use as a Sunscreen
By Keanu Rochette-Yu Tsuen, Claire Lager, Michael C. Ross, Mary Hagedorn

Ethelia hawaiiensis (Etheliaceae, Rhodophyta), a New Mesophotic Marine Alga from Manawai (Pearl and Hermes Atoll), Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, Hawai‘i
By Alison R. Sherwood, Monica O. Paiano, Feresa P. Cabrera, Heather L. Spalding, Brian B. Hauk, Randall K. Kosaki

Molecular Systematics of the Native Seagrass, Ruppia cf. maritima (Ruppiaceae, Alismatales), on Hawai‘i Island
By Brandie A. Colwell, Ronald P. Kittle III, Renee L. Corpuz, Karla J. McDermid

Cryptic Cryptogam Revealed: Hypnea corona (Gigartinales: Cystocloniaceae), A New Red Algal Species Described From the Hypnea cornuta Complex
By John M. Huisman, Roberta D’Archino, Wendy Nelson, Sung Min Boo, Antonella Petrocelli

Reduction in Cover of Two Introduced Invasive Macroalgae by Herbivores on Coral Reefs of Kāne‘ohe Bay, Hawai‘i
By John Stimson, Scott T. Larned

For more information about Pacific Science, the Official Journal of the Pacific Science Association, please visit the journal homepage.

Recently Published Journal Issues

Journal of Korean Religions

Journal of Korean Religions

Volume 12, Issue 1 (2021)

The new issue includes the following articles:

Going Global: The Transformation of the Korean Catholic Church
Denis WS Kim

Japanese Buddhist Modernism and the Thought of Sŏn Master Toeong Seongcheol (1912–1993)
Cho Myungje and Bernard Senécal S.J. (SeoMyeonggweon)

Calm Water is a Mirror: Neo-Confucian Meditation in the Chosŏn
Dynasty 
Guy S. Shababo

A Buddhist Critique of Neo-Confucianismin Seventeenth-Century Chosŏn Korea
Kim Jong Wook

Book Review

Gender Politics at Home and Abroad: Protestant Modernity in Colonial-Era Korea, by Hyaeweol Choi
Reviewed by Choi Hee An

 

cover image issue 58

U.S. -Japan Women’s Journal

Issue 58 (2020)

Includes the following articles:

Plotting Illness: Cancer in Ogino Anna’s “Nue” and
Yamauchi Reinan’s The Spirit of Cancer
Amanda C. Seaman

Nue.
by Ogino Anna. Translated by Amanda C. Seaman

Performativity of Gender in Speech: Life Experiences
of Japanese Trans Women
Hideko Abe

Natsume Fusanosuke, Panel Configurations in Sho¯jo
(Girls’) Manga.
by Natsume Fusanosuke. Translated and Introduced by
Jon Holt and Teppei Fukuda

Pacific Science

Pacific Science

Volume 75, Issue 1 (2021)

Includes the following articles:

The Historical Ecology of Game Species Introductions in Hawai’i
Deidre J. Duffy, Christopher A. Lepczyk

A Terrestrial Vertebrate Palaeontological Reconnaissance of Lord Howe Island, Australia
Julian P. Hume, Ian Hutton, Greg Middleton, Jacqueline M.T. Nguyen, John Wylie

Light-Level Geolocators Reveal That White-Throated Needletails (Hirundapus caudacutus) Follow a Figure-Eight Migration Route Between Japan and Australia
Noriyuki M. Yamaguchi, Sayaka Mori, Hiroshi Yonekawa, Daichi Waga, Hiroyoshi Higuchi

Fine-Scale Distribution, Abundance, and Foraging Behavior of Salvin’s, Buller’s, and Chatham Albatrosses in the Northern Humboldt Upwelling System
Javier Quiñones, Ana Alegre, Cynthia Romero, Massiel Manrique, Luis Vásquez

Influence of Light and Substrate Conditions on Regeneration of Native Tree Saplings in the Hawaiian Lowland Wet Forest
Susanne Kandert, Holger Kreft, Nicole DiManno, Amanda Uowolo, Susan Cordell, Rebecca Ostertag

Potential Distribution and Environmental Niche of the Black Corals Antipathes galapagensis and Myriopathes panamensis in the Eastern Tropical Pacific
Antonella Lavorato, Silvia Stranges, Hector Reyes Bonilla

Investigating the Diel Occurrence of Odontocetes Around the Maui Nui Region Using Passive Acoustic Techniques
Marian Howe, Marc O. Lammers

Limnological Characterization of Three Tropical Crater Lakes in the Archipelago of Samoa (Lanoto’o, Olomaga, Mataulano)
Robert Schabetsberger, Christian D. Jersabek, Zlatko Levkov, Bianca Ehrenfellner, Laulu Fialelei Enoka, Seumalo Afele Faiilagi

Association Affairs: Pacific Science Association

 

cover image vol. 54

Hawaiian Journal of History

Volume 54 (2020)

Includes the following articles:

The Lasting Significance of the Majors-Palakiko Case
Jonathan Y. Okamura

A Rock in the Park: The Key to a Remarkable Historical Tale
Hugh R. Montgomery

Ne Tentes aut Perfice: Early Hawaiian Diplomacy in the Southwestern Pacific and the Creation of Hawai‘i’s First Royal Order
Lorenz Gonschor

Reconnecting to Kawaiaha‘o Female Seminary: The Lives of the Students at the End of the Nineteenth Century
Deborah Day

Our Royal Guest: American Press Coverage of King Kalākaua’s Visit to the United States, 1874–1875
Douglas V. Askman

The Watchers: How Espionage Doomed the Counter-Revolution of 1895
Ralph Thomas Kam

Book Reviews

Aloha Rodeo: Three Hawaiian Cowboys, the World’s Greatest Rodeo, and a Hidden History of the American West by David Wolman and Julian Smith
Reviewed by Elyssa Ford

Unsustainable Empire: Alternative Histories of Hawai‘i Statehood by Dean Itsuji Saranillio
Reviewed by Sarah Miller-Davenport

American Sutra: A Story of Faith and Freedom in the Second World War by Duncan Ryūken Williams 
Reviewed by Kelli Y. Nakamura

Gateway State: Hawai‘i and the Cultural Transformation of American Empire by Sarah Miller-Davenport
Reviewed by JoAnna Poblete

Bibliography

Hawaiiana in 2019: A Bibliography of Titles of Historical Interest
Jodie Mattos

 

 

 

 

UH Press Titles Honored with 2019 Ka Palapala Po‘okela Awards

Seven books that received Ka Palapala awardsAt the 2019 Ka Palapala Po‘okela awards presentation on December 13, we were delighted that seven of our titles were selected as honorees. These included:
Pathway of the Birds: The Voyaging Achievements of Māori and Their Polynesian Ancestors, by New Zealand author Andrew Crowe, won in two categories: Illustrative or Photographic Books and Text or Reference Books.
Light in the Queen’s Garden: Ida May Pope, Pioneer for Hawaiʻi’s Daughters, 1862–1914, by San Diego educator Sandra Bonura, won the Award of Excellence for Nonfiction.
The Charm Buyers, a novel by Lillian Howan, won the Award of Excellence for Literature.
Nā Wāhine Koa: Hawaiian Women for Sovereignty and Demilitarization, with personal essays by Moanikeʻala Akaka, Maxine Kahaulelio, Terrilee Kekoʻolani-Raymond, and Loretta Ritte; edited by Noelani Kaʻōpua-Goodyear, tied as winner in the Hawaiian Language, Culture, and History category.
In Haste with Aloha: Letters and Diaries of Queen Emma, 1881–1885, edited by David W. Forbes, tied for honorable mention in the Nonfiction category.
Kalaupapa Place Names: Waikolu to Nihoa, John R. K. Clark, received the honorable mention in Text or Reference Books.
Inhouse Design of New Zealand won in the Design category for Tatau: A History of Sāmoan Tattooing, by Sean Mallon and Sébastien Galliot.

For a complete list of results and nominees, and a link to photos of the event, visit the Hawai‘i Book Publishers Association website.

Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 4 (October 2019)

FIGURE 4. Thysanoteuthis rhombus. Hatchlings in: (A) ventral and (B) dorsal view. Dorsal and lateral chromatophore
patterns in: (C and D) hatchling, (E and F) paralarva, (G and H) paralarva (dyed methylene blue) in ventral and dorsal view, (I) arm crown of paralarva in oral view showing the arrangement of suckers in tentacles and chromatophore pattern, (J) portion of the egg mass, (K) relative size of embryo inside egg and hatchling compared to zooplanktonic fauna identified, (L) Exocoetus spp., (M) Oxyporhamphus micropterus fish larvae, and (N) water strider Halobates micans. Scale bars = 1.0 mm. From the article “First Records of an Egg Mass and a Paralarva of Thysanoteuthis rhombus (Cephalopoda:Thysanoteuthidae) in the Northern Tropical Pacific, by Roxana De Silva-Dávila, Raymundo Avendaño-Ibarra, Ricardo Palomares-García, and Unai Markaida.

Preview volume 73 number 4 titles below and find content to all 6 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Biology and Impacts of Pacific Island Invasive Species. 15. Psittacula krameri, the Rose-Ringed Parakeet (Psittaciformes: Psittacidae)
Aaron B. Shiels, and Nicholas P. Kalodimos

Coral Settlement and Post-Settlement Mortality on Artificial Substrata in South Mexican Pacific Reefs
Andrés López-Pérez, and Yalha Solís-García

Some Metazoan Parasites from Marine Mammals Stranded in California
Marlene M. Colón-Llavina, Simonetta Mattiucci, Giuseppe Nascetti, James T. Harvey, Ernest H. Williams Jr., and Antonio A. Mignucci-Giannoni

First Records of an Egg Mass and a Paralarva of Thysanoteuthis rhombus (Cephalopoda: Thysanoteuthidae) in the Northeastern Tropical Pacific
Roxana De Silva-Dávila, Raymundo Avendaño-Ibarra, Ricardo Palomares-García, and Unai Markaida

A New Distichopora Species (Cnidaria: Stylasteridae) from the Mesophotic Zone of Palau
Stephen D. Cairns, and Daniela Pica

Population Status of Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas) Foraging in Arica Bay, Chile
Walter Sielfeld, Paula Salinas-Cisternas, Darío Contreras, Marco Tobar, Jesús Gallardo, and Cristian Azocar

This issue also includes author and subject indexes for all of volume 73, and the latest Association Affairs report.

Pacific Science
Vol. 73 No. 4
October 2019

Hawaiian Journal of History Vol. 53 (2019)

Figure 1 from the article Remembering the Committee of Safety: Identifying the Citizenship, Descent and Occupations of the Men Who Overthrew the Monarchy by Ralph Thomas Kam and Jeffrey K. Lyons: A collage of the Committee of Safety January 1893. Henry E. Cooper, Chairman, (center) Clockwise, starting with the picture directly above the top of the diamond around Cooper: Henry Waterhouse, Lorrin A. Thurston, Ed Suhr, F.W. McChesney, John Emmeluth, Wm. R. Castle, Wm. O. Smith, J.A. McCandless, C. Bolte, W.C. Wilder, Andrew Brown and Theodore F. Lansing. Courtesy Hawaiʻi Archives [PP-28-7-003]

Articles:

The Case of Leslie Satoru Nakashima and His Breaking News Dispatch
Crystal Uchino

Remembering the Committee of Safety: Identifying the Citizenship, Descent and Occupations of the Men Who Overthrew the Monarchy
Ralph Thomas Kam and Jeffrey K. Lyons

The Establishment of Kilauea Military Camp: The Early Years 1898–1921
Jadelyn J. Moniz Nakamura and Geoffrey Mowrer

An Extraordinary Troop: The Boy Scouts Program at Kalaupapa
Fred E. Woods and Anita Manning

“Doing Our Duty”: Dancing, Dating, and the Limits of Tolerance in Wartime Hawaiʻi
Lori Pierce

Notes and Queries: 

“Ea Mai Hawaiʻinuiākea”: Marking the Global Diplomatic Presence of the Nineteenth-century Hawaiian Kingdom
Ronald Williams, Jr.

An Inquiry Into Kawaiahaʻo Seminary’s “Melting Pot” Photograph Published in The National Geographic Magazine in 1924
Tomiko Conner

The Kamehameha III Statue in Thomas Square
John Clark

Father Damien’s First Photograph at Kalaupapa Reveal Its Secrets
Ruben Boon and Patrik Jaspers

Book Reviews:

Hawaiian By Birth: Missionary Children, Bicultural Identity, and U.S. Colonialism in the Pacific
Reviewed by Lori Pierce

Light in the Queen’s Garden: Ida May Pope, Pioneer for Hawaiʻi’s Daughters, 1862–1914
Reviewed by Derek Taira

Return to Kahiki: Native Hawaiians in Oceania
Reviewed by Lorenz Gonschor

Kalaupapa Place Names: Waikolu to Nihoa
Reviewed by Christine Thomas

Sharks upon the Land: Colonialism, Indigenous Health, and Culture in Hawai’i, 1778–1855
Reviewed by Juliet Nebolon

Hawaiiana in 2018: A Bibliography of Titles of Historical Interest
Jodie Mattos

 

About the Journal

Published annually since 1967, the Journal presents original articles on the history of Hawai‘i, Polynesia, and the Pacific area as well as book reviews and an annual bibliography of publications related to Island history. The Hawaiian Historical Society publishes books in both English and Hawaiian, and HJH is a leading peer-reviewed journal that focuses on the history of Native Hawaiians and all other cultures in Hawai‘i during both pre- and post-contact times.

Subscriptions

Individuals may receive the journal by joining the Hawaiian Historical Society.

Submissions

The HJH welcomes scholarly submissions from all writers. See the Guidelines for Contributors.

You can also read more about this issue at the Hawaiian Historical Society’s website.

The Hawaiian Journal of History
Vol. 53
2019