New Journal Issues: Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal, Journal of Burma Studies, Language Documentation & Conservation + More (July 2020)

Front cover of Biography 42-4 (2020)

Biography

Academic Freedom, Academic Lives, Guest Edited by Bill V. Mullen and Julie Rak

Volume 42, Issue 4 (2019)

From the guest editors’ introduction:

Academic freedom is currently highly public and highly contested terrain. What academic freedom actually means has become an urgent question, as alt-right activists have turned the tenets of academic freedom to their own ends, whether on college and university campuses, or through the actions of right-wing governments as they move to suppress dissent. We want to reclaim the concept of academic freedom for the left and for academic activism, not through a debate about the concept as an abstraction, but in connection to what we see as the radical potential of academic lives. Thinking of academic lives as interpretation and critique is a way to disrupt the current alt-right control of public discourse about freedom of speech. Read the special issue introduction free here.

Journal of Burma Studies 24-1

The Journal of Burma Studies

Special Issue: Environment and Resources: Burma/Myanmar and the (Un)Natural

Volume 24, Issue 1 (2020)

The editor’s note for this special issue begins:

From touristic impressions to geopolitical analyses, ubiquitous are the tremendous and varied natural resources of Myanmar. Teak forests, oil and gas reserves, precious gemstones, biodiversity, and the list goes on. The very meaning of the concept of resource, however, suggests that the country contains things of tremendous potential human, economic use, and therefore value. With the resources, mapping, and study of them, there is the seemingly boundless potential for greater wealth to be accumulated. On the other hand, discourse regarding natural beauty and wonder can be a purposeful distraction from ongoing issues of war and exploitation. Discussing the country’s abundance of resources, however, is never a neutral proposition: for outsiders looking in, there is frequently a value-laden assumption which guides the observation that the various regimes and economic interests are not responsibly conserving these resources for the greater good (however nebulous that may be). Life itself (before we even label it a natural resource) is already an active zone of economic production, engineering, banking, commodification, and exchange (Palsson 2016:4). The definition, mapping, laws, and social relationships which name and frame resources in Myanmar are of ongoing heuristic, cultural, economic, and inevitably political concern.

With this problematic in mind, in this Special Issue of The Journal of Burma Studies (JBS) we have gathered together an interdisciplinary set of research articles surrounding questions of what nature is and what its resources might be. With the four authors’ varied focus on historical and contemporary Myanmar, this set of papers offers challenging new vistas for the exploration and interrogation of how resources and the environment have been approached and brokered by local and transnational actors. Read the special issue introduction free here.

Top Articles from The Journal of Burma Studies, New UHP Title

Gate to Myang Gyi Ngu monastic community, Karen State. BGF guards control visitors for guns, drugs, alcohol and meat. DKBA has been ousted from the place. U Thuzana’s photo is in the middle (Photo courtesy of Mikael Gravers).
From Mikael Gravers’ “Disorder as Order“: Gate to Myang Gyi Ngu monastic community, Karen State. BGF guards control visitors for guns, drugs, alcohol and meat. DKBA has been ousted from the place. U Thuzana’s photo is in the middle (Photo courtesy of Mikael Gravers).

As we look forward to publishing the next issue of The Journal of Burma Studies, we’re pleased to share the top ten most-read articles on Project MUSE in the past year.

The Journal of Burma Studies is one of the only scholarly peer-reviewed journals that focus exclusively on Burma/Myanmar. 


 

Disorder as Order: The Ethno-Nationalist Struggle of the Karen in Burma/Myanmar€—A Discussion of the Dynamics of an Ethicized Civil War and Its Historical Roots
By Mikael Gravers
Volume 19, Number 1, June 2015

A Textbook Case of Nation-Building: The Evolution of History Curricula in Myanmar
By Nicolas Salem-Gervais and Rosalie Metro
Volume 16, Number 1, June 2012

“Transition”€ as a Migratory Model in Myanmar
By Felix Girke and Judith Beyer
Volume 22, Number 2, December 2018

“Making a Name for Themselves:” Karen Identity and the Politicization of Ethnicity in Burma
By Jessica Harriden
Volume 7, 2002

Rethinking Land and Property in a “Transitioning”€ Myanmar: Representations of Isolation, Neglect, and Natural Decline
By Elizabeth L. Rhoads and Courtney T. Wittekind
Volume 22, Number 2, December 2018

Appraisal of Burma/Myanmar’s Roundabout Roadmaps
By Khen Suan Khai
Volume 22, Number 2, December 2018

“Burmanization”€ and the Impact of J.S. Furnivall’s Views on National Identity in Late-Colonial Burma
By Carol Ann Boshier
Volume 20, Number 2, December 2016

Bitter Pills: Colonialism, Medicine and Nationalism in Burma, 1870-1940
By Penny Edwards
Volume 14, 2010

Notes on Burmese Manuscripts: Text and Images
By Christian Lammerts
Volume 14, 2010

The Disciplining Discourse of Unity in Burmese Politics
By Matthew J. Walton
Volume 19, Number 1, June 2015

 

UH Press to publish The Journal of Burma Studies in partnership with the Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies

The University of Hawai‘i Press will publish and distribute The Journal of Burma Studies, one of the only scholarly peer-reviewed journals that focus exclusively on Burma/Myanmar. This new partnership with the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University begins with volume 23, 2019. The complete content of the journal is available online in Project MUSE.

UH Press Interim Director and Publisher, Joel Cosseboom, said: “We are pleased to partner with the NIU Center for Burma Studies on this important and unique journal.”

Edited by Catherine Raymond from Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies and Jane M. Ferguson from Australian National University, The Journal of Burma Studies seeks to publish the best scholarly research focused on Burma/Myanmar and its minority and diasporic cultures from a variety of disciplines, ranging from art history and religious studies, to economics and law.

Dr. Ferguson looks forward to collaborating with UH Press to launch innovative and engaging issues of The Journal of Burma Studies. “University of Hawai‘i Press has consistently produced some of the most exciting publications on Southeast Asia as well as Burma/Myanmar Studies, so I am delighted that JBS will now work with them,” she said.

The journal is jointly sponsored by the Burma Studies Group and the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University. Published since 1997, the journal draws together research and critical reflection on Burma/Myanmar from scholars across Asia, North America and Europe.

Content is available on the Project MUSE platform.

Subscribe at: https://uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/jbs/

Submit your manuscript at: https://jbs.scholasticahq.com/for-authors

The Journal of Burma Studies joins UH Press’s extensive list of Asian and Southeast Asian studies journals including: Asian Perspectives, Korean Studies, Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society, Review of Japanese Culture and Society, and others.

About UH Press

 The University of Hawai‘i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. It strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Hawaiian, Pacific, Asian American and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai‘i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

About Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies

 Founded in 1987, the Center collects and preserves information and artifacts of all kinds concerning the study of the peoples and cultures of Burma/Myanmar, and makes these materials broadly available for research and study.

The Center enjoys a unique relationship with the Burma Studies Foundation, which assures that all Burma/Myanmar-related items donated to the foundation will be offered to the center for inclusion and conservation within the university’s collections. Oversight by the foundation combines strong support of the center with lasting responsibility to the field of Burma/Myanmar studies.

The Center for Burma Studies is a non-political, non-degree granting, administrative and academic unit within Northern Illinois University. The Center has the following goals:

  • The maintenance and expansion of a comprehensive research library to sustain the field of Burma studies
  • The collection, care, and exhibition of the arts of Burma
  • The support and promotion of undergraduate and graduate teaching concerning Burma
  • The organization and hosting of self-supporting national and international conferences on Burma studies
  • The publication of relevant scholarship on Burma
  • The care and enhancement of archival resources such as photographs, music records, oral histories, personal papers, and field notes
  • The promotion of outreach activities to schools and communities
  • Encouraging the performance of Burmese arts
  • The securing of educational opportunities through scholarships, internships, and fellowships