NEW JOURNAL Issues: Schooling Journeys in the Southwestern Pacific, #KuToo Online Feminist Movement in Japan, Geographic Analysis of COVID-19 in L.A. + More

The Contemporary Pacific

Volume 22, Issue 2 (2021)

Special Issue: Schooling Journeys in the Southwestern Pacific

From the Guest Editors Rachel Emerine Hicks, Debra McDougall, and David Oakeshott in The Promise of Education: Schooling Journeys in the Southwester Pacific:

“Schooling journeys” is more than a metaphor in the southwestern Pacific. To step into a classroom, children and youth often travel hours each day or live for months at a time away from their families. The journey of schooling is rarely direct; it often winds between formal and informal learning and in and out of school, work, and home life. And the journey is expensive; many families struggle mightily to gather the money for fees, school supplies, uniforms, and transportation. Young people embark on these precarious journeys, and their families make sacrifices to support them, because schooling promises a better life—a move away from the backbreaking labor of subsistence agriculture toward a reliable salary that will better support their family and community. Because of the structural inequalities in school and a lack of jobs for those who complete schooling, however, few experience the socioeconomic advancement schooling promises. Still, students and their families continue to hope that schooling will lead to well-paid work. Even more important, though, going to school is seen as key to being a competent and effective person in society—increasingly for both women and men.

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers

Volume 83 (2021)

Editor Craig S. Revels reflects over the COVID-19 pandemic and how it has affected geographers and members as he states:

Last year’s volume was published in a time of great uncertainty as the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the world, and this year’s unfortunately arrives under similar conditions, slowly improving though they may be. The tragedies, disruptions, and general state of societal affairs during the pandemic will not soon be forgotten…

Geographers have been at the forefront of research into the spread of COVID-19 since the earliest days of the pandemic, and Steve Graves and Petra Nichols contribute an analytical perspective on infection rates in Los Angeles County. In particular, they statistically identify a causal relationship between infection and a range of key socioeconomic and demographic variables, a relationship influencing the location and rate of spread for the disease. They leave us to consider how those factors must be addressed in any preparations for future public health crises.

In a significantly different context, Ray Sumner and John Menary
demonstrate that taking students into the field, always a valuable exercise, is even more rewarding when it leads to unexpected discoveries and challenges our carefully laid plans. In this case, a straightforward field methods class oriented around the Los Angeles River instead became an open-ended, student-driven exploration into the social dimensions of heritage, ethnicity,
culture, and urban development.

New Journal Special Features: Gender Trouble in Korean Literature, Unsettling Korean Migration + Biography forum on Behrouz Boochani

Azalea 14 (2021)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture

Volume 14 (2021)

Special Feature: Korean Genre Fiction; O Chang-hwan; and Gender Trouble In Korean Literature

From the Editor Young Jung-Lee:

One of the most important recent shifts in Korean literature is found in gender conflict. This “Special Feature: Gender Trouble in Korean Literature and Society,” guest-edited by Hye-Ryoung Lee, shows a fundamentally new perspective through six scholars reading Korean Literature and Society. Over the past decade, the #MeToo Movement has shaken the world, and Korean society has been no exception, as can be seen in Choi Young-mi’s poem “En,”  introduced here with six critical essays. Even before its publication, “En” was the focus of media attention, and it remained a hot topic in Korean society for years due to Choi’s high-profile court battles.

biography

Volume 43, Number 4 (2020)

Special Feature: A Forum on Behrouz Boochani’s No Friend but the Mountains


From Coeditor Anna Poletti:

With this forum, we, the editors of Biography, inaugurate a new feature of the journal that aims to respond to and amplify specific examples of the power of life writing as a cultural, political, and social practice, and which document key moments in the evolution of that practice. In this forum, No Friend but the Mountains is discussed as both a profoundly localized text responding to, making knowledge about, and exposing a highly specific and complex set of conditions, and as a uniquely transnational text that speaks to and about a global phenomenon. Its highly innovative use of life writing as a narrative technique and epistemological practice warranted, in our minds, a concentrated response from the journal. Commissioning and editing this response has renewed my appreciation for the primary concerns of lifewriting scholarship: tracking the mercurial power of personal storytelling to crystalize the contemporary moment in such a way that new knowledge emerges from the entanglements it depicts, and the entanglements it drags its readers into.

Korean Studies

Volume 45 (2021)

Special Section: Unsettling Korean Migration: Multiple Trajectories and Experiences

From the Editor Cheehyun Harrison Kim:

This analytic potency of migration is superbly demonstrated in this volume’s Special Section Unsettling Korean Migration: Multiple Trajectories and Experiences, guest edited by Sunhee Koo (The University of Auckland) and Jihye Kim (The University of Central Lancashire). Sunhee Koo and Jihye Kim have brought together papers on labor (Yonson Ahn and Jihye Kim), ritual life (Marcus Bell), cultural identity (Sunhee Koo), and artistic production (Hee-seung Irene Lee and Soojin Kim). The six engrossing articles deal with how the Korean diaspora—in Argentina, Germany, Japan, China, and the United States—have shaped and represented their particular situations through negotiation, resilience, and creativity. The authors are highly critical of any national framework, and they see diasporic life as contexts of not only sorrow and sacrifice but also innovation and regeneration. Sunhee Koo and Jihye Kim offer a detailed explanation in their Introduction.

2021 American Academy of Religion Meeting

The annual American Academy of Religion meeting (held jointly with the Society of Biblical Literature) continues through Tuesday, November 23. If you’re attending in person, be sure to pick up the Publishers Weekly “Religion & Spirituality” supplement and check out our ad on page 15, shown below. Even if you’re not in San Antonio, use the conference discount code AAR2021 to order recent religion titles, those in our religion-related book series, and titles such as Places by the late Buddhist nun, Setouchi Jakuchō. (Coupon code good through December 31, 2021.)

Click image to open the PW ad as a PDF; then click on each book cover to link to its web page.

Image of ad that shows 20 book covers; click to link to PDF

New Journal Special Issues: We Are Maunakea, Contemporary Japanese Theatre + Digital Methods, Empire Histories

Asian Theatre Journal

Volume 38, Number 1, (2021)

From the Editor Siyuan Liu:

This issue starts with Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei’s appreciation of Leonard Pronko (1927–2019), noted kabuki scholar and teacher who passed away late 2019. Building on her profile of Pronko for Asian Theatre Journal’s “founders of the fields” series (28: 2, 2011), Sorgenfrei offers a touching personal profile of her former professor as an extraordinary human being.
As evidence to the flourishing field of Japanese theatre studies pioneered by Pronko and his peers, this issue continues with a special section on contemporary Japanese theatre with a combination of articles, reports, a translation, and a performance review essay.

cover image

biography

Volume 43, Number 3 (2020)


We Are Maunakea: Aloha ʻĀina Narratives of Protest, Protection, and Place
Bryan Kamaoli Kuwada and Noʻu Revilla

From the guest editors’ introduction:

In the summer of 2019, kiaʻi (protectors) gathered at Puʻuhonua o Puʻuhuluhulu to defend Maunakea, a sacred mountain, against desecration by the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). Thousands gathered at Ala Hulu Kupuna, or Mauna Kea Access Road. Daily protocols were led by cultural practitioners and long-time protectors of Maunakea, intergenerational Native Hawaiian leadership was developed and empowered on Hawaiian terms, a community kitchen was organized, Puʻuhuluhulu University was established as an actual Hawaiian place of learning, and a collective commitment to ʻāina and kapu aloha rooted all who arrived and all who continue to stay in this movement.
The 2019 stand was also an unprecedented opportunity to witness the battle of narratives, as mainstream media and highly paid public relations firms were outmaneuvered by Kanaka- and ally-authored life writing. This special issue features first-hand accounts, academic reflections, creative works, photography, and interviews with kiaʻi from the 2019 front lines and members of the media team.

Journal of World History

Volume 32, Number 2 (2021)

Special Issue: Digital Methods, Empire Histories

Introduction from Guest Editor Antoinette Burton reads:

The technological evangelism of much of anglophone digital humanities discourse should sit uneasily with empire historians, who know what languages of discovery and “new frontiers” have meant in the context of world history, especially where data collection is concerned. To be sure, digitization has made myriad colonial archives, official and unofficial, available via open access platforms. This means that vast stores of knowledge are now at our fingertips—a proximity and immediacy that has reshaped the lived experience of archival research for many scholars, in this case bringing the imperial world not just closer to home but into the hands of anyone who has access to a cellphone. And the revolution in digital tools in the last twenty-five years has given rise to equally vast possibilities for gathering and visualizing evidence as well as for scaling and interpreting data: for worlding, mostly by aggregation and consolidation, what we aim to know about the kinds of colonial pasts that are available and capturable via text and image. Yet, this information empire is not exactly new. Digitization most often reassembles archival collections proper, sometimes remixing them with print and visual culture and typically organizing them through mechanisms and selection processes that are more or less visible depending on the commitment to transparency of the conglomerator. In some cases, those conglomerators are private individuals or government entities; in others, corporate sponsors; in still others, community-based activists. Inevitably perhaps, today’s digital imperial “data” are actually, more accurately, digitally transformed imperial sources. And for colonial subjects, as for the enslaved, data has more often than not meant terror at the scene of the crime.

Philosophy East and West, 71#3

This special issue of the journal is now available online with a freely available introduction.
 
Wisdom?cpver {EW

Guest Editors: Michael Hampe and Kai Marchal

Table Of Contents

Wisdom: Introduction to Special Issue
Michael Hampe, Kai Marchal
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0039

The Art of Dying is the Art of Living: Rationality in Theravada Buddhism
Susan E. Babbitt
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0040

The Wisdom of Insight
Ondřej Beran
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0041

Wisdom, Deep Deference, and the Problem of Autonomy: Engaging with Being Cheng
Philippe Brunozzi
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0042

Philosophers, Mystics, and Other Sages: Wisdom in Early Islamic Thought
Nadja Germann
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0043

Wisdom in Individual, Political, and Cultural Transformations: Brecht, Nietzsche, and the Limits of Academic Philosophy
Michael Hampe, Karsten Schoellner
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0044

Wisdom: A Murdochian Perspective
Kai Marchal
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0045

Who Is a Wise Person? Zhuangzi and Epistemological Discussions of Wisdom
Shane Ryan, Karyn Lai
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0046

Birds of Wisdom
Mario Wenning
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0047

Mulla Sadra’s Practical Philosophy: A Return to Platonic Phronesis
Sahar Kavandi, Maryam Ahmadi, Ahmad Hosseini
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0048

Putting Ruist and Hegelian Social Thought in Dialogue
Andrew James Komasinski
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0049

Ming 名 in the Laozi Daodejing 老子道德經: Interpretations and Translations of the Opening Verse
Yumi Suzuki
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0050

An Islamic Account of Reformed Epistemology
Jamie B. Turner
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0051

Discussion

Wilhelm Halbfass and the Purposes of Cross-Cultural Dialogue
Dimitry Shevchenko
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0052

After Comparative Philosophy: A Discussion of “Wilhelm Halbfass and the Purposes of Cross-Cultural Dialogue,” by Dimitry Shevchenko
Purushottama Bilimoria
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0053

Online Book Reviews

The Non-Existence of the Real World by Jan Westerhoff (review)
Ricki Bliss
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0054

Ratnakīrti’s Proof of Exclusion by Patrick McAllister (review)
Joel Feldman
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0055

Human Being, Bodily Being: Phenomenology from Classical India by Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (review)
Sonam Kachru
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0056

Classical Indian Philosophy: A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps by Peter Adamson and Jonardon Ganeri (review)
Joerg Tuske
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0057

Recently Published Journal Issues

Journal of Korean Religions

Journal of Korean Religions

Volume 12, Issue 1 (2021)

The new issue includes the following articles:

Going Global: The Transformation of the Korean Catholic Church
Denis WS Kim

Japanese Buddhist Modernism and the Thought of Sŏn Master Toeong Seongcheol (1912–1993)
Cho Myungje and Bernard Senécal S.J. (SeoMyeonggweon)

Calm Water is a Mirror: Neo-Confucian Meditation in the Chosŏn
Dynasty 
Guy S. Shababo

A Buddhist Critique of Neo-Confucianismin Seventeenth-Century Chosŏn Korea
Kim Jong Wook

Book Review

Gender Politics at Home and Abroad: Protestant Modernity in Colonial-Era Korea, by Hyaeweol Choi
Reviewed by Choi Hee An

 

cover image issue 58

U.S. -Japan Women’s Journal

Issue 58 (2020)

Includes the following articles:

Plotting Illness: Cancer in Ogino Anna’s “Nue” and
Yamauchi Reinan’s The Spirit of Cancer
Amanda C. Seaman

Nue.
by Ogino Anna. Translated by Amanda C. Seaman

Performativity of Gender in Speech: Life Experiences
of Japanese Trans Women
Hideko Abe

Natsume Fusanosuke, Panel Configurations in Sho¯jo
(Girls’) Manga.
by Natsume Fusanosuke. Translated and Introduced by
Jon Holt and Teppei Fukuda

Pacific Science

Pacific Science

Volume 75, Issue 1 (2021)

Includes the following articles:

The Historical Ecology of Game Species Introductions in Hawai’i
Deidre J. Duffy, Christopher A. Lepczyk

A Terrestrial Vertebrate Palaeontological Reconnaissance of Lord Howe Island, Australia
Julian P. Hume, Ian Hutton, Greg Middleton, Jacqueline M.T. Nguyen, John Wylie

Light-Level Geolocators Reveal That White-Throated Needletails (Hirundapus caudacutus) Follow a Figure-Eight Migration Route Between Japan and Australia
Noriyuki M. Yamaguchi, Sayaka Mori, Hiroshi Yonekawa, Daichi Waga, Hiroyoshi Higuchi

Fine-Scale Distribution, Abundance, and Foraging Behavior of Salvin’s, Buller’s, and Chatham Albatrosses in the Northern Humboldt Upwelling System
Javier Quiñones, Ana Alegre, Cynthia Romero, Massiel Manrique, Luis Vásquez

Influence of Light and Substrate Conditions on Regeneration of Native Tree Saplings in the Hawaiian Lowland Wet Forest
Susanne Kandert, Holger Kreft, Nicole DiManno, Amanda Uowolo, Susan Cordell, Rebecca Ostertag

Potential Distribution and Environmental Niche of the Black Corals Antipathes galapagensis and Myriopathes panamensis in the Eastern Tropical Pacific
Antonella Lavorato, Silvia Stranges, Hector Reyes Bonilla

Investigating the Diel Occurrence of Odontocetes Around the Maui Nui Region Using Passive Acoustic Techniques
Marian Howe, Marc O. Lammers

Limnological Characterization of Three Tropical Crater Lakes in the Archipelago of Samoa (Lanoto’o, Olomaga, Mataulano)
Robert Schabetsberger, Christian D. Jersabek, Zlatko Levkov, Bianca Ehrenfellner, Laulu Fialelei Enoka, Seumalo Afele Faiilagi

Association Affairs: Pacific Science Association

 

cover image vol. 54

Hawaiian Journal of History

Volume 54 (2020)

Includes the following articles:

The Lasting Significance of the Majors-Palakiko Case
Jonathan Y. Okamura

A Rock in the Park: The Key to a Remarkable Historical Tale
Hugh R. Montgomery

Ne Tentes aut Perfice: Early Hawaiian Diplomacy in the Southwestern Pacific and the Creation of Hawai‘i’s First Royal Order
Lorenz Gonschor

Reconnecting to Kawaiaha‘o Female Seminary: The Lives of the Students at the End of the Nineteenth Century
Deborah Day

Our Royal Guest: American Press Coverage of King Kalākaua’s Visit to the United States, 1874–1875
Douglas V. Askman

The Watchers: How Espionage Doomed the Counter-Revolution of 1895
Ralph Thomas Kam

Book Reviews

Aloha Rodeo: Three Hawaiian Cowboys, the World’s Greatest Rodeo, and a Hidden History of the American West by David Wolman and Julian Smith
Reviewed by Elyssa Ford

Unsustainable Empire: Alternative Histories of Hawai‘i Statehood by Dean Itsuji Saranillio
Reviewed by Sarah Miller-Davenport

American Sutra: A Story of Faith and Freedom in the Second World War by Duncan Ryūken Williams 
Reviewed by Kelli Y. Nakamura

Gateway State: Hawai‘i and the Cultural Transformation of American Empire by Sarah Miller-Davenport
Reviewed by JoAnna Poblete

Bibliography

Hawaiiana in 2019: A Bibliography of Titles of Historical Interest
Jodie Mattos

 

 

 

 

Virtual AAS2021 Annual Conference

Virtual AAS2021 We're Exhibiting badge

This week, March 21–26, the 2021 Association for Asian Studies (AAS) annual conference is taking place virtually. While most sessions require registration, there is also an open-access element to the conference, with plenary presentations accessible simply by signing up for a basic account. Be inspired by experiencing the opening ceremony and speech by AAS president Christine Yano (a University of Hawai‘i professor and UH Press author/series editor). The exhibit hall is also open to all—check out our virtual booth and explore its variety of offerings, including a conference discount and a jazzy video of our latest titles and books in series.

If you’re registered for the conference, there is much more to discover and absorb. For those who have a book proposal, please contact our acquisitions editors by email, after viewing this page that specifies their focus areas. As always, follow our Facebook and Twitter pages for our #AAS2021 posts. We look forward to the 2022 conference to be held (in-person, we hope) here in Honolulu!

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, Issues 30 and 31 Now Available

cover RJCS 30

Issue 30, 2018- Scholar, Poet, Educator: Festschrift Issue in Honor of Mizuta Noriko

“One of Noriko’s brilliant endeavors was to imagine, and then bring about, a truly unique new educational institution in Japan, namely Josai International University. On my first visit to Japan in 1987 for the Japanese publication of Women in Film Noir, Noriko mentioned that she hoped Josai University could build on available land near Tokyo Airport. But it was just a dream. Only a few years later, however, Josai International University was up and running, bringing life and energy to the Chiba area. The buildings were beautifully designed and organized, and a delight to be in. Despite already being Vice Chancellor of the long established Josai University Educational Corporation, Noriko became President of Josai International University from 1996 to 2009 (She then became Chancellor of Josai University Educational Corporation from 2004 to 2017). Her masterstroke was to make this new International University unique in combining degrees in Business Studies with an M.A. in Women’s Studies. This was a time when there were very few Women’s Studies degrees being offered in Japan, so Noriko was charting new ground, perhaps partly inspired by American feminist research. I was honored to be invited to teach the first courses at Josai on Women and Film. At first I thought this was to be just for the one year, 1994; however, to my surprise and delight, Noriko in fact had arranged for me to teach a course or two once a year for four consecutive years.”   Excerpt from, In Honor of Noriko Mizuta by E. Ann Kaplan

Issue 30 also includes:

In Her Footsteps: The Legacy of Professor Mizuta Noriko by Linda Flores

Mizuta Noriko by  Ueno Chizuko, James Garza

Mizuta Noriko: Biocritical Essay of a Literary Feminist and Global Scholar by Alisa Freedman

Mizuta Noriko: Selected Bibliography by Linda Galvane, Rebecca Corbett

Feminine Failure and the Modern Hero: Mad Women in Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar and Joan Didion’s Play It As It Lays by Mizuta Noriko

Natsume Sōseki on Poe  by Mizuta Noriko

Literature, Ideology and Women’s Happiness: The Autobiographical Novels of Miyamoto Yuriko by Mizuta Noriko

Women’s Self-Representation and Transformation of the Body: Kōno Taeko and Ogawa Yōko by Mizuta Noriko

Beyond Home And City: Poems By Ishigaki Rin And Shiraishi Kazuko by Mizuta Noriko and Eiji Sekine

The Desolate Self and Its Circular Search for The Absolute Other: Transgression and Dream in the Work of Takahashi Takako by Mizuta  Noriko and Alessandro Castellini

When Women Narrate the Self: Personal Narratives in Modern Women’s Literaturebby Mizuta Noriko and Nadeschda Bachem

The Dream of the Yamanba—An Overview by Mizuta Noriko and Luciana Sanga

The Girl Double: On the Shōjo as Archetype in Modern Women’s Self-Expression by Mizuta Noriko and James Garza

Urashimasō: Memory as Trauma and Recovery in Literature by Mizuta Noriko and Hannah Osborne

Aesthetics and the Archive: The Poetry of Mizuta Noriko by Jordan A. Y. Smith

Selected Poems by Mizuta Noriko by Jordan A. Y. Smith

Dear Kojien Dictionary: Tomorrow Girls Troop by Reiko Tomii

 

RJCS 31 cover

Issue 31, 2019- Photography of the Heisei Era (1989-2019): Memory and Transformation, Crises and Opportunities

“In this introductory essay, I frame and contextualize shifts in the practices of Japanese photography during the Heisei era, examining how new themes and changing subjects of self-presentation, the dramatic change in power relations, responsibility, and political valence, and a new assortment of artists, multiple new subjects, and iconographies appeared on the stage and rose to prominence. This text primarily focuses on a single aspect of the changes that took place in photography and video art during the Heisei period, not as an established corpus or a specific canon, but as a process that defines itself through the multiple changes of that era. My appraisal of this process centers on the relationship between the photographer and the photographed, highlighting problems of identity and representation, as they appear in the works that are discussed throughout this issue. In this context, the present essay emphasizes the crucial changes enacted by the growing participation of women photographers, who have contributed to the rise of imagery related to marginalized subjects and have taken on a prominent role in defining the terms of photographic practice, such as the acknowledgement of minority groups, an openness toward sexual and gender identities, and a new legitimization of traditionally domestic subjects, such as old age, family, motherhood, etc.”  Excerpt from the Introduction: Between the Viewfinder and the Lens—A Journey into the Performativity of Self-Presentation, Gender, Race, and Class in Heisei Photography (1989–2019)  by Ayelot Zohar

Also in issue 31:

Preface: A Difficult New Dawn by Frank Feltens

Introduction: Between the Viewfinder and the Lens—A Journey into the Performativity of Self-Presentation, Gender, Race, and Class in Heisei Photography (1989–2019) by Ayelet Zohar

Yoneda Tomoko by Lena Fritsch

Twice Infinity: Sugimoto Hiroshi’s Architecture Series by Jonathan M. Reynolds.

Ghost in the Shell: An After-Thought on Pierre Huygue’s Human Mask by Michio Hayashi

Watanabe Toshiya by Kakishima Takashi

The Predicament and the Reflexive Turn: Japanese Street Photography since 1990 by Yoshiaki Kai

Cardboard Houses and Miyamoto Ryūji’s Visualization of Alternative Urban Realities in Heisei Japan by Carrie Cushman

Kitano Ken by Ishida Katsuya

Sudo Ayano’s Portrait Photography: Artificially Modified Beauties and the Uncanny by Nava Astrachan

The Position of Ninoshima by Kuraishi Shino, Ellen Takata, Jason Beckman, and Mikiko Hirayama

Linking Disaster to Natural History, A Visit to Sasaoka Keiko’s Exhibition: Tanesashi, Ninoshima (Hachinohe City Museum of Art) by Kuraishi Shino and Daryl Maude

The Story of Two Women: Ishiuchi Miyako and Iwasaki Chihiro (Excerpts from a Conversation between Ishiuchi Miyako and Ueno Chizuko—On Mother’s and Hiroshima) by Tajima Miho, Ayelet Zohar, and Frank Feltens

Arai Takashi and Nagashima Yurie through the Historical Frame of “Japanese Photography” by Nakamura Fumiko, Mai Hayano, and Kevin Niehaus

Photography as Embalming: Yokota Daisuke’s Post-Production Process by Hoshino Futoshi

A Memorandum on the Photograph: Movement and Time in Blurs and Stills and Kanai Mieko and Hannah Osborne

The Story of The Inflated Man by Kanai Mieko and Hannah Osborne

Postwar Japanese Photography: A Selected Bibliography by Thomas F. O’Leary, Anat Icar-Shoham, Patricia Lenz, and Shir Yeffet

To subscribe to Review of Japanese Culture and Society, please visit the journal homepage.

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Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal – CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

SPECIAL ISSUE:
Student and Community Abstracts
Guest Editor: May Kealoha, PhD
Co-Editor: Jillian Inouye, PhD, FAAN

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal cover

This special issue will feature abstracts of papers from students and/or community members who are interested in disseminating new knowledge and practices for Asian and Pacific Islanders. 

Please submit your abstracts in the format of formal papers. The format should contain these or other approved headings of:  Introduction, Problem/Significance of Topic, Methods, Results, Discussion, and Recommendations  all relative to Asian/Pacific Islanders and nursing and health. Papers should be one to two pages in length and will be peer reviewed. For this special issue, we are particularly interested in the following but not limited to topics that are:

  • Culturally specific
  • Focuses on equity and diversity
  • Pilot studies
  • Evidence based practice projects
  • Description of community programs
  • Suggestions for policy changes to improve health/education for Asian and Pacific Islanders
  • Other related topics 

Original and empirical pilot studies using qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods are welcome. Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal is the only journal focused specifically on health and health care of and for this group. This journal publishes peer-reviewed articles that include, but are not limited to: 

  • Methods, interventions, instrumentation, and educational techniques that are unique to this group. 
  • Theoretical foundations that increase understanding of the unique response to changes in health and illness. 
  • Bio psychosocial, spiritual, and ecological impacts on practice, education, and research.
  • Policy issues as a result of rigorous research outcomes. 

Author Guidelines

All submitted papers must be written in English and contain only original work, which has not been published by or is currently under review at another journal (electronic or print). Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal rules governing the formatting of the final submission can be found at: 

Manuscript Preparation Guidelines https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/apin/styleguide.html

All manuscripts and any supplementary material should be submitted through https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/apin/

For more detailed guidelines, go to https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/apin/policies.html

The authors must select as “Special Issue” when they reach the “Article Type” step in the submission process. 

All papers will be peer-reviewed by two independent reviewers. Requests for additional information should be addressed to the guest editors. 

For more detailed, go to https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/university-press/

Article Processing Charge

There is no charge for submitting a paper to Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Upon acceptance of your manuscript, you will be charged a one-time Article Processing Charge of $100 for first author members; first author student members $80; and nonmember rates would be $150

Editorial Contact Information

Contact the guest editor with queries about appropriate topics or works in progress for the special issue: 

May Kealoha, PhD, MPHKapi’olani Community College Nursing Department.
Email:  kealohab@hawaii.edu 
Jillian Inouye, PhD, FAANEmeritus Professor, University of Hawaii John A Burns School of Medicine.
Email: jinouye@hawaii.edu


Contact the editor with questions about the manuscript submission process: 

Jillian Inouye Editor in Chief

Email: jinouye@hawaii.edu

China Review International Vol. 25 No. 1 (2018)

 

Volume 25 Number 1 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 23 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

Featured Review:

When Fish Were Fish
Christopher Rea

Reviews:

Poetic Transformations: Eighteenth-Century Cultural Projects on the Mekong Plains by Claudine Ang (review)
Reviewed by Eric Henry

Worüber man nicht spricht: Tabus, Schweigen und Redeverbote in China ed. by Rüdiger Breuer and Heiner Roetz (review)
Reviewed by Anna Stecher

GMO China: How Global Debates Transformed China’s Agricultural Biotechnology Policies by Cong Cao (review)
Reviewed by Nancy N. Chen

Morality and Monastic Revival in Post-Mao Tibet by Jane E. Caple (review)
Reviewed by Nicole Willock

Qing Travelers to the Far West: Diplomacy and the Information Order in Late Imperial China by Jenny Huangfu Day (review)
Reviewed by Bradley Camp Davis

China’s Footprints in Southeast Asia ed. by Maria Serena I. Diokno, Hsin-Huang Michael Hsiao, and Alan H. Yang (review)
Karen M. Teoh

That Distant Country Next Door: Popular Japanese Perceptions of Mao’s China by Erik Esselstrom (review)
Reviewed by Lu Yan

Song King: Connecting People, Places, and Past in Contemporary China by Levi S. Gibbs (review)
Reviewed by Charlotte D’Evelyn

Farewell to the God of Plague: Chairman Mao’s Campaign to Deworm China by Miriam Gross (review)
Reviewed by Robert Peckham

The Silk Road Trap: How China’s Trade Ambitions Challenge Europe by Jonathan Holslag (review)
Reviewed by Min Ye

Efficacious Underworld: The Evolution of Ten Kings Paintings in Medieval China and Korea by Cheeyun Lilian Kwon (review)
Reviewed by Beatrix Mecsi

Becoming Bilingual in School and Home in Tibetan Areas of China: Stories of Struggle YiXi LaMuCuo (review)
Reviewed by Norbert Francis

Chinese Poetic Modernisms ed. by Paul Manfredi and Christopher Lupke (review)
Reviewed by Joseph R. Allen

Just a Song: Chinese Lyrics from the Eleventh and Early Twelfth Centuries by Stephen Owen (review)
Reviewed by Lanlan Kuang

China’s Chaplin: Comic Stories and Farces by Xu Zhuodai (review)
Reviewed by Zheyu Wei

Afterlives of Chinese Communism: Political Concepts from Mao to Xi ed. by Christian Sorace, Ivan Franceschini, and Nicholas Loubere (review)
Reviewed by Aaron Su

Fruit from the Sands: The Silk Road Origins of the Foods We Eat by Robert N. Spengler III (review)
Reviewed by Shiamin Kwa

The Dreaming Mind and the End of the Ming World by Lynn A. Struve (review)
Reviewed by Harry Miller

Asia Inside Out: Itinerant People ed. by Eric Tagliacozzo, Helen F. Siu, and Peter C. Perdue (review)
Reviewed by Ronald Skeldon

Public Goods Provision in the Early Modern Economy: Comparative Perspectives from Japan, China, and Europe ed. by Masayuki Tanimoto and R. Bin Wong (review)
Reviewed by Guillaume Carré

Raising China’s Revolutionaries: Modernizing Childhood for Cosmopolitan Nationalists and Liberated Comrades, 1920s–1950s by Margaret Mih Tillman (review)
Reviewed by Stig Thøgersen

Christian Women in Chinese Society: The Anglican Story ed. by Wai Ching Angela Wong and Patricia P. K. Chiu (review)
Reviewed by Fredrik Fällman

Maoist Laughter ed. by Ping Zhu, Zhuoyi Wang, and Jason McGrath (review)
Reviewed by Richard King

Works Received

 

China Review International
Vol. 25 No. 1
2018

China Review International Vol. 24 No. 4 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 4 of China Review International begins with three feature reviews and 19 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

Featured Reviews:

Changing Clothes in Chang’an (reviewing BuYun Chen, Empire of Style: Silk and Fashion in Tang China)  Reviewed by Shao-yun Yang

The Local and Global Politics of Contemporary Art (reviewing Frank Vigneron, Hong Kong Soft Power: Art Practices in the Special Administrative Region, 2005–2014)
Reviewed by John Zarobell

The Monkey King, 4-EVER (reviewing Hongmei Sun, Transforming Monkey: Adaptation and Representation of a Chinese Epic)
Reviewed by Dore J. Levy

Reviews:

Barry Allen, Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition
Reviewed by Aaron B. Creller

Nadine Amsler, Jesuits & Matriarchs: Domestic Worship in Early Modern China
Reviewed by Anthony E. Clark

Kent E. Calder, Super Continent: The Logic of Eurasian Integration
Reviewed by Mark Henderson

Xiaomei Chen, Staging Chinese Revolution: Theater, Film, and the Afterlives of Propaganda
Reviewed by Emily Wilcox

Michael Dillon, Lesser Dragons: Minority Peoples of China
Reviewed by Kaitlin Banfill

Prasenjit Duara and Elizabeth J. Perry, editors, Beyond Regimes: China and India Compared
Reviewed by Sreemati Chakrabarti

Jia-Chen Fu, The Other Milk: Reinventing Soy in Republican China
Reviewed by Veronica, Sau-Wa Mak

Robyn R. Iredale and Fei Guo, editors, Handbook of Chinese Migration: Identity and Wellbeing
Reviewed by C. Cindy Fan

Paul Kendall, The Sounds of Social Space: Branding, Built Environment, and Leisure in Urban China 
Reviewed by Han Li

Elisabeth Koll, Railroads and the Transformation of China
Reviewed by Rudi Volti

Norman A. Kutcher, Eunuch and Emperor in the Great Age of Qing Rule
Reviewed by Carl Déry

Wendy Larson, Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture
Reviewed by Kun Qian

Hsiao-t’i Li, Opera, Society, and Politics in Modern China
Reviewed by Jonathan P. J. Stock

Michał Lubina, Russia and China: A Political Marriage of Convenience–Stable and Successful
Reviewed by Paul Bolt

Klaus Mühlhahn, Making China Modern: From the Great Qing to Xi Jinping
Reviewed by Thoralf Klein

Sarah Schneewind, Shrines to Living Men in the Ming Political Cosmos
Reviewed by Ying Zhang

Hsueh-man Shen, Authentic Replicas: Buddhist Art in Medieval China
Reviewed by Xiao Yang

Edward Vickers and Zeng Xiaodong, Education and Society in Post-Mao China
Reviewed by Yun You

Yan Xu, The Soldier Image and State-Building in Modern China, 1924–1945
Reviewed by Nicolas Schillinger

Works Received

China Review International
Vol. 24. No. 4
2017