Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal – CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

SPECIAL ISSUE:
Student and Community Abstracts
Guest Editor: May Kealoha, PhD
Co-Editor: Jillian Inouye, PhD, FAAN

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal cover

This special issue will feature abstracts of papers from students and/or community members who are interested in disseminating new knowledge and practices for Asian and Pacific Islanders. 

Please submit your abstracts in the format of formal papers. The format should contain these or other approved headings of:  Introduction, Problem/Significance of Topic, Methods, Results, Discussion, and Recommendations  all relative to Asian/Pacific Islanders and nursing and health. Papers should be one to two pages in length and will be peer reviewed. For this special issue, we are particularly interested in the following but not limited to topics that are:

  • Culturally specific
  • Focuses on equity and diversity
  • Pilot studies
  • Evidence based practice projects
  • Description of community programs
  • Suggestions for policy changes to improve health/education for Asian and Pacific Islanders
  • Other related topics 

Original and empirical pilot studies using qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods are welcome. Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal is the only journal focused specifically on health and health care of and for this group. This journal publishes peer-reviewed articles that include, but are not limited to: 

  • Methods, interventions, instrumentation, and educational techniques that are unique to this group. 
  • Theoretical foundations that increase understanding of the unique response to changes in health and illness. 
  • Bio psychosocial, spiritual, and ecological impacts on practice, education, and research.
  • Policy issues as a result of rigorous research outcomes. 

Author Guidelines

All submitted papers must be written in English and contain only original work, which has not been published by or is currently under review at another journal (electronic or print). Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal rules governing the formatting of the final submission can be found at: 

Manuscript Preparation Guidelines https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/apin/styleguide.html

All manuscripts and any supplementary material should be submitted through https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/apin/

For more detailed guidelines, go to https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/apin/policies.html

The authors must select as “Special Issue” when they reach the “Article Type” step in the submission process. 

All papers will be peer-reviewed by two independent reviewers. Requests for additional information should be addressed to the guest editors. 

For more detailed, go to https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/university-press/

Article Processing Charge

There is no charge for submitting a paper to Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Upon acceptance of your manuscript, you will be charged a one-time Article Processing Charge of $100 for first author members; first author student members $80; and nonmember rates would be $150

Editorial Contact Information

Contact the guest editor with queries about appropriate topics or works in progress for the special issue: 

May Kealoha, PhD, MPHKapi’olani Community College Nursing Department.
Email:  kealohab@hawaii.edu 
Jillian Inouye, PhD, FAANEmeritus Professor, University of Hawaii John A Burns School of Medicine.
Email: jinouye@hawaii.edu


Contact the editor with questions about the manuscript submission process: 

Jillian Inouye Editor in Chief

Email: jinouye@hawaii.edu

China Review International Vol. 25 No. 1 (2018)

 

Volume 25 Number 1 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 23 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

Featured Review:

When Fish Were Fish
Christopher Rea

Reviews:

Poetic Transformations: Eighteenth-Century Cultural Projects on the Mekong Plains by Claudine Ang (review)
Reviewed by Eric Henry

Worüber man nicht spricht: Tabus, Schweigen und Redeverbote in China ed. by Rüdiger Breuer and Heiner Roetz (review)
Reviewed by Anna Stecher

GMO China: How Global Debates Transformed China’s Agricultural Biotechnology Policies by Cong Cao (review)
Reviewed by Nancy N. Chen

Morality and Monastic Revival in Post-Mao Tibet by Jane E. Caple (review)
Reviewed by Nicole Willock

Qing Travelers to the Far West: Diplomacy and the Information Order in Late Imperial China by Jenny Huangfu Day (review)
Reviewed by Bradley Camp Davis

China’s Footprints in Southeast Asia ed. by Maria Serena I. Diokno, Hsin-Huang Michael Hsiao, and Alan H. Yang (review)
Karen M. Teoh

That Distant Country Next Door: Popular Japanese Perceptions of Mao’s China by Erik Esselstrom (review)
Reviewed by Lu Yan

Song King: Connecting People, Places, and Past in Contemporary China by Levi S. Gibbs (review)
Reviewed by Charlotte D’Evelyn

Farewell to the God of Plague: Chairman Mao’s Campaign to Deworm China by Miriam Gross (review)
Reviewed by Robert Peckham

The Silk Road Trap: How China’s Trade Ambitions Challenge Europe by Jonathan Holslag (review)
Reviewed by Min Ye

Efficacious Underworld: The Evolution of Ten Kings Paintings in Medieval China and Korea by Cheeyun Lilian Kwon (review)
Reviewed by Beatrix Mecsi

Becoming Bilingual in School and Home in Tibetan Areas of China: Stories of Struggle YiXi LaMuCuo (review)
Reviewed by Norbert Francis

Chinese Poetic Modernisms ed. by Paul Manfredi and Christopher Lupke (review)
Reviewed by Joseph R. Allen

Just a Song: Chinese Lyrics from the Eleventh and Early Twelfth Centuries by Stephen Owen (review)
Reviewed by Lanlan Kuang

China’s Chaplin: Comic Stories and Farces by Xu Zhuodai (review)
Reviewed by Zheyu Wei

Afterlives of Chinese Communism: Political Concepts from Mao to Xi ed. by Christian Sorace, Ivan Franceschini, and Nicholas Loubere (review)
Reviewed by Aaron Su

Fruit from the Sands: The Silk Road Origins of the Foods We Eat by Robert N. Spengler III (review)
Reviewed by Shiamin Kwa

The Dreaming Mind and the End of the Ming World by Lynn A. Struve (review)
Reviewed by Harry Miller

Asia Inside Out: Itinerant People ed. by Eric Tagliacozzo, Helen F. Siu, and Peter C. Perdue (review)
Reviewed by Ronald Skeldon

Public Goods Provision in the Early Modern Economy: Comparative Perspectives from Japan, China, and Europe ed. by Masayuki Tanimoto and R. Bin Wong (review)
Reviewed by Guillaume Carré

Raising China’s Revolutionaries: Modernizing Childhood for Cosmopolitan Nationalists and Liberated Comrades, 1920s–1950s by Margaret Mih Tillman (review)
Reviewed by Stig Thøgersen

Christian Women in Chinese Society: The Anglican Story ed. by Wai Ching Angela Wong and Patricia P. K. Chiu (review)
Reviewed by Fredrik Fällman

Maoist Laughter ed. by Ping Zhu, Zhuoyi Wang, and Jason McGrath (review)
Reviewed by Richard King

Works Received

 

China Review International
Vol. 25 No. 1
2018

China Review International Vol. 24 No. 4 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 4 of China Review International begins with three feature reviews and 19 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

Featured Reviews:

Changing Clothes in Chang’an (reviewing BuYun Chen, Empire of Style: Silk and Fashion in Tang China)  Reviewed by Shao-yun Yang

The Local and Global Politics of Contemporary Art (reviewing Frank Vigneron, Hong Kong Soft Power: Art Practices in the Special Administrative Region, 2005–2014)
Reviewed by John Zarobell

The Monkey King, 4-EVER (reviewing Hongmei Sun, Transforming Monkey: Adaptation and Representation of a Chinese Epic)
Reviewed by Dore J. Levy

Reviews:

Barry Allen, Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition
Reviewed by Aaron B. Creller

Nadine Amsler, Jesuits & Matriarchs: Domestic Worship in Early Modern China
Reviewed by Anthony E. Clark

Kent E. Calder, Super Continent: The Logic of Eurasian Integration
Reviewed by Mark Henderson

Xiaomei Chen, Staging Chinese Revolution: Theater, Film, and the Afterlives of Propaganda
Reviewed by Emily Wilcox

Michael Dillon, Lesser Dragons: Minority Peoples of China
Reviewed by Kaitlin Banfill

Prasenjit Duara and Elizabeth J. Perry, editors, Beyond Regimes: China and India Compared
Reviewed by Sreemati Chakrabarti

Jia-Chen Fu, The Other Milk: Reinventing Soy in Republican China
Reviewed by Veronica, Sau-Wa Mak

Robyn R. Iredale and Fei Guo, editors, Handbook of Chinese Migration: Identity and Wellbeing
Reviewed by C. Cindy Fan

Paul Kendall, The Sounds of Social Space: Branding, Built Environment, and Leisure in Urban China 
Reviewed by Han Li

Elisabeth Koll, Railroads and the Transformation of China
Reviewed by Rudi Volti

Norman A. Kutcher, Eunuch and Emperor in the Great Age of Qing Rule
Reviewed by Carl Déry

Wendy Larson, Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture
Reviewed by Kun Qian

Hsiao-t’i Li, Opera, Society, and Politics in Modern China
Reviewed by Jonathan P. J. Stock

Michał Lubina, Russia and China: A Political Marriage of Convenience–Stable and Successful
Reviewed by Paul Bolt

Klaus Mühlhahn, Making China Modern: From the Great Qing to Xi Jinping
Reviewed by Thoralf Klein

Sarah Schneewind, Shrines to Living Men in the Ming Political Cosmos
Reviewed by Ying Zhang

Hsueh-man Shen, Authentic Replicas: Buddhist Art in Medieval China
Reviewed by Xiao Yang

Edward Vickers and Zeng Xiaodong, Education and Society in Post-Mao China
Reviewed by Yun You

Yan Xu, The Soldier Image and State-Building in Modern China, 1924–1945
Reviewed by Nicolas Schillinger

Works Received

China Review International
Vol. 24. No. 4
2017

China Review International Vol. 24 no. 3 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 3 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 20 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEW

The Persistence and Significance of Small Urban Spaces in China (reviewing Di Wang, The Teahouse under Socialism: The Decline and Renewal of Public Life in Chengdu, 1950–2000)
Reviewed by Tim Simpson

REVIEWS

Jennifer Altehenger, Legal Lessons: Popularizing Laws in the People’s Republic of China, 1949–1989
Reviewed by Ji Li

Emily Baum, The Invention of Madness: State, Society, and the Insane in Modern China
Reviewed by Hsuan-Ying Huang

Yanjie Bian, Guanxi: How China Works
Reviewed by Jack Barbalet

Steve Chan, Trust and Distrust in Sino-American Relations: Challenge and Opportunity 
Reviewed by Richard Hu

Patricia P. Chu, Where I have Never Been: Migration, Melancholia, and Memory in Asian American Narratives of Return 
Reviewed by Shawn Higgins

Melissa Dale, Inside the World of the Eunuch: A Social History of the Emperor’s Servants in Qing China
Reviewed by Ellen Soullière

Joshua Eisenman, Red China’s Green Revolution: Technological Innovation, Institutional Change, and Economic Development under the Commune
Reviewed by Zhun Xu

Luke Habberstad, Forming the Early Chinese Court: Rituals, Spaces, Roles 
Reviewed by Christopher F. Kim

Kurtis Hagen and Steve Coutinho, translated with commentary, Philosophers of the Warring States: A Sourcebook in Chinese Philosophy 
Reviewed by Robin R. Wang

Derek Hird and Geng Song, editors, The Cosmopolitan Dream: Transnational Chinese Masculinities in a Global Age
Reviewed by Yinni Peng

Ming-sho Ho, Challenging Beijing’s Mandate of Heaven: Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement and Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement 
Reviewed by Kevin Wei Luo

Hsiao-ting Lin, Accidental State: Chiang Kai-shek, the United States, and the Making of Taiwan 
Reviewed by Syaru Shirley Lin

Thomas Maissen and Barbara Mittler, Why China Did Not Have a Renaissance – And Why That Matters: An Interdisciplinary Dialogue 
Reviewed by Luke Clossey

Yuan-ning Wen and others, edited by Christopher Rea, Imperfect Understanding: Intimate Portraits of Modern Chinese Celebrities 
Reviewed by David N. C. Hull

William T. Rowe, Speaking of Profit: Bao Shichen and Reform in Nineteenth-Century China 
Reviewed by Margherita Zanasi

Michael Szonyi, The Art of Being Governed: Everyday Politics in Late Imperial China 
Reviewed by Masato Hasegawa

Jinping Wang, In the Wake of the Mongols: The Making of a New Social Order in North China, 1200–1600  Reviewed by Carl Déry

Bing Wang, Classical Chinese Poetry in Singapore: Witnesses to Social and Cultural Transformations in the Chinese Community 
Reviewed by Jing-yi Qu

Pu Wang, The Translatability of Revolution: Guo Moruo and Twentieth-Century Chinese Culture 
Reviewed by Haosheng Yang

Yun Via, Down with Traitors: Justice and Nationalism in Wartime China 
Reviewed by Patrick Fuliang Shan

Works Received


Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review


The journal offers its readers up-to-date research findings, emerging trends, and cutting-edge perspectives concerning East Asian history and culture from scholars in both English-speaking and Asian language-speaking academic communities. The journal seeks to balance issues traditionally addressed by Western humanities and social science journals with issues of immediate concern to scholars in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.  Cross-Currents includes material from the sixteenth century to the present day that have significant implications for current models of understanding East Asian history and culture.

Cross-Currents is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), Scopus, the Bibliography of Asian Studies, and Project MUSE.

Print Issues available for purchase:

8#1, 2019 includes special sections on Diasporic Art and Korean Identity, guest edited by Hijoo Son and Jooyeon Rhee.

This special section, titled “Diasporic Art and Korean Identity,” is the fruit of a two-day conference on “Korean Diaspora and the Arts” held at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in May 2017. The contributors explore new delineations of the political, social, cultural, and emotional landscapes inhabited by Koreans living in diaspora. Korean diasporic artists investigate the meaning of “Koreanness” through their paintings, political cartoons, theater, film, documentary, photographs, and multimedia art. The topic of diaspora—which Gabriel Sheffer defines as “ethnic minority groups residing and acting in host countries while maintaining material and sentimental ties to their homelands”—has received impressive scholarly attention in the humanities and social sciences, and Korean diaspora studies has been part of this trend (Sheffer 1986, 3).

Special Section, Air-Water-Land-Human: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health and Environment in East Asia, guest edited by Ruth Rogaski.

If East Asia has been defined by particular ideas about the intertwining of humans and the environment, it also gives us a reality in which humans and the environment are frequently at odds. Philosophies may have preached the harmony of the macrocosm and human microcosm, but this did not stop people from exploiting and harming the environment for centuries with catastrophic impact on human health (Elvin 2008; Perdue 1987; Totman 1989). The advent of capitalist development and its accompanying neoliberal philosophies have accelerated these processes to unimaginable effect. Indeed, it is impossible to think about East Asia today without touching on destructive links between humans and the environment, whether manifest in the nuclear catastrophe at Fukushima, cancer villages in Sichuan, or bird flu pandemics emerging from Vietnam (Walker 2010; Lora-Wainwright 2013a; Porter forthcoming 2019). Historian Brett Walker’s observation about Japan holds true for all of East Asia: scholars “can no longer be content to ruminate on Japan’s exquisite harmony with nature” but must instead “explain how it has contributed to regional ecological collapse and global climate change” (Walker 2013, xiii).

Also available online in Project MUSE!

Other recent back issues:

7#2 Recent Research on North and South Korea

Writing Revolution Across Northeast Asia, guest edited by Steven S. Lee

7#1 Binding Maritime China: Control, Evasion, and Interloping, guest editors Eugenio Menegon, Philip Thai, and Xing Hang

6#2 Maps and Their Contexts: Reflections on Cartography and Culture in Premodern East Asia, guest edited by Robert Goree

Naming Modernity: Rebranding and Neologisms during China’s Interwar Global Moment in Eastern Asia, guest edited by Anna Belogurova

Order print copies by contacting: University of Hawai’i Press, 2840 Kolowalu Street, Honolulu, HI 96822, Toll-free (U.S. & Canada):  Tel. 1-808-956-8833    Fax 1-808-988-6052 Tel. 1-888-UHPRESS  Fax 1-800-650-7811 Email: uhpjourn@hawaii.edu $25.00 per issue

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 29 (2017)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

READING SŌSEKI NOW

Editors’ Introduction: Sōseki Great and Small
Reiko Abe Auestad, Alan Tansman, J. Keith Vincent

What Sort of a Stone Was Sōseki? How to Become Who You Are Not
Tawada Yōko, J. Keith Vincent

Kokoro and the Economic Imagination
Brian Hurley

The Affect that Disorients Kokoro
Reiko Abe Auestad

Kokoro in the High School Textbook
Ken K. Ito

Doubled Visions of Desire: Fujimura Misao, Kusamakura, and Homosocial Nostalgia
Robert Tuck

Penning the Mad Man in the Attic: Queerness, Women Writers, and Race in Sōseki’s Sanshirō
Sayumi Takahashi Harb

Beach Boys in Manchuria: An Examination of Sōseki’s Here and There in Manchuria and Korea, 1909
Angela Yiu

The Relations Between Things and Three Types of People: A lecture sponsored by the Manshū Nichinichi Shimbun, September 12, 1909, in Dalian (translated by Angela Yiu)
Natsume Sōseki

“Why Was He…Well, Killed?” Natsume Sōseki, Empire, and the Open Secrets of Anticolonial Violence
Andre Haag

Impressions of Korea and Manchuria (1909) (translated by Andre Haag)
Natsume Sōseki

Judging a Book by Its Cover: Natsume Sōseki, Book Design, and the Value of Art
Pedro Thiago Ramos Bassoe

Death and Poetry: From Shiki to Sōseki (1992) (translated by Robert Tuck) 
Karatani Kōjin

From Postcolonial (2001) (translated by Andre Haag and Robert Tierney)
Komori Yōichi

Camellias and Vampires: Reading the Spermatic Economy in Natsume Sōseki’s And Then (2008) (translated by Kristin Sivak)
Miyazaki Kasumi

ART IN FOCUS: Matsuzawa Yutaka’s The Whole Works, 1961-1971

Introduction
Reiko Tomii

The Whole Works, 1961–71 (translated by Reiko Tomii)
Matsuzawa Tutaka

DESIGN IN FOCUS

Design in Japan: Contemporary Perspectives on Design Practice
Ignacio Adriasola

Interview with Sugiura Kōhei (2013) (translated by Mycah Braxton)

Report: From “Do It Yourself” to “Do It With Others” to “Do It For Others” —Can Fashion Be Renewed? Forum (2012) (translated by Yoonkyung Kim)

The Smart Design Award: The Always Convenient × Always Prepared Series (2012) (translated by Mycah Braxton)

The Essence of Social Design (2013) (translated by Elsa Chanez)
Kakei Yūsuke

FICTION

Butterfly (1889) (translated by Nicholas Albertson)
Yamada Bimyō

On the Contributors


About the Journal

The Review of Japanese Culture and Society is an annual English-language journal dedicated to the critical analysis of Japanese culture using thematic and interdisciplinary approaches to provide a broad perspective by combining the work of Japanese scholars and critics with that of non-Japanese writers. Dedicated to the translation of works written originally in Japanese, each issue also includes an original translation of a Japanese short story.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Manuscripts should be 7,000 to no more than 8,000 words including notes, and authors are responsible for obtaining rights and the cost of obtaining rights for any images included. Find submission guidelines here.

Review of Japanese Culture and Society
Volume 29 (2017)

UH Press to publish The Journal of Burma Studies in partnership with the Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies

The University of Hawai‘i Press will publish and distribute The Journal of Burma Studies, one of the only scholarly peer-reviewed journals that focus exclusively on Burma/Myanmar. This new partnership with the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University begins with volume 23, 2019. The complete content of the journal is available online in Project MUSE.

UH Press Interim Director and Publisher, Joel Cosseboom, said: “We are pleased to partner with the NIU Center for Burma Studies on this important and unique journal.”

Edited by Catherine Raymond from Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies and Jane M. Ferguson from Australian National University, The Journal of Burma Studies seeks to publish the best scholarly research focused on Burma/Myanmar and its minority and diasporic cultures from a variety of disciplines, ranging from art history and religious studies, to economics and law.

Dr. Ferguson looks forward to collaborating with UH Press to launch innovative and engaging issues of The Journal of Burma Studies. “University of Hawai‘i Press has consistently produced some of the most exciting publications on Southeast Asia as well as Burma/Myanmar Studies, so I am delighted that JBS will now work with them,” she said.

The journal is jointly sponsored by the Burma Studies Group and the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University. Published since 1997, the journal draws together research and critical reflection on Burma/Myanmar from scholars across Asia, North America and Europe.

Content is available on the Project MUSE platform.

Subscribe at: https://uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/jbs/

Submit your manuscript at: https://jbs.scholasticahq.com/for-authors

The Journal of Burma Studies joins UH Press’s extensive list of Asian and Southeast Asian studies journals including: Asian Perspectives, Korean Studies, Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society, Review of Japanese Culture and Society, and others.

About UH Press

 The University of Hawai‘i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. It strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Hawaiian, Pacific, Asian American and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai‘i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

About Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies

 Founded in 1987, the Center collects and preserves information and artifacts of all kinds concerning the study of the peoples and cultures of Burma/Myanmar, and makes these materials broadly available for research and study.

The Center enjoys a unique relationship with the Burma Studies Foundation, which assures that all Burma/Myanmar-related items donated to the foundation will be offered to the center for inclusion and conservation within the university’s collections. Oversight by the foundation combines strong support of the center with lasting responsibility to the field of Burma/Myanmar studies.

The Center for Burma Studies is a non-political, non-degree granting, administrative and academic unit within Northern Illinois University. The Center has the following goals:

  • The maintenance and expansion of a comprehensive research library to sustain the field of Burma studies
  • The collection, care, and exhibition of the arts of Burma
  • The support and promotion of undergraduate and graduate teaching concerning Burma
  • The organization and hosting of self-supporting national and international conferences on Burma studies
  • The publication of relevant scholarship on Burma
  • The care and enhancement of archival resources such as photographs, music records, oral histories, personal papers, and field notes
  • The promotion of outreach activities to schools and communities
  • Encouraging the performance of Burmese arts
  • The securing of educational opportunities through scholarships, internships, and fellowships

China Review International Vol. 24 No. 2 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 2 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 19 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEW

A Matter of Life and Death: The Translator Fou Lei (reviewing Mingyuan Hu, Fou Lei: An Insistence on Truth)
Reviewed by John Minford

REVIEWS

Roger T. Ames and Jinhua Jia, editors, Li Zehou and Confucian Philosophy
Reviewed by Anna Ghiglione

David G. Atwill, Islamic Shangri-La: Inter-Asian Relations and Lhasa’s Muslim Communities, 1600 to 1960
Reviewed by Morris Rossabi

Rostislav Berezkin, Many Faces of Mulian: The Precious Scrolls of Late Imperial China
Reviewed by Daniel L. Overmyer

Franck Billé and Sören Urbansky, editors, Yellow Perils: China Narratives in the Contemporary World
Reviewed by David Martinez-Robles

Renee Y. Chow, Changing Chinese Cities: The Potentials of Field Urbanism
Reviewed by Perry P. J. Yang

Stephen Durrant, Wai-yee Li, Michael Nylan, and Hans van Ess, The Letter to Ren An & Sima Qian’s Legacy
Reviewed by Allan H. Barr

Rania Huntington, Ink and Tears: Memory, Mourning, and Writing in the Yu Family
Reviewed by Cathy Silber

Roger B. Jeans, editor, The Letters and Diaries of Colonel John Hart Caughey, 1944–1945: With Wedemeyer in World War II China
Reviewed by Peter Chenmain Wang

Pei-Chia Lan, Raising Global Families: Parenting, Immigration, and Class in Taiwan and the US
Reviewed by Yu-chin Tseng

Gina Marchetti, Citing China: Politics, Postmodernism, and World Cinema
Reviewed by Yingjin Zhang

Max Oidtmann, Forging the Golden Urn: The Qing Empire and the Politics of Reincarnation in Tibet
Reviewed by Yingcong Dai

Patrick Fuliang Shan, Yuan Shikai: A Reappraisal 

Reviewed by Qiang Fang

Zhihua Shen and Yafeng Xia, A Misunderstood Friendship: Mao Zedong, Kim Il-sung, and Sino-North Korean Relations, 1949–1976
Reviewed by Adam Cathcart

Wendy Swartz, Reading Philosophy, Writing Poetry: Intertextual Modes of Making Meaning in Early Medieval China
Reviewed by Ping Wang

Kenneth M. Swope, On the Trail of the Yellow Tiger: War, Trauma, and Social Dislocation in Southwest China during the Ming-Qing Transition
Reviewed by Jodi L. Weinstein

Cai Xiang, Revolution & Its Narratives: China’s Socialist Literary and Cultural Imaginaries, 1949–1966
Reviewed by Yiju Huang

Victor Cunrui Xiong, Capital Cities and Urban Form in Pre-modern China: Luoyang, 1038 BCE to 938 CE  

Reviewed by Dong Wang

Xiaowei Zheng, The Politics of Rights and the 1911 Revolution in China
Reviewed by Edward McCord

Li Zhi, edited and translated by Rivi Handler-Spitz, Pauline C. Lee, and Haun Saussy, A Book to Burn & a Book to Keep (Hidden): Selected Writings
Reviewed by Nanxiu Qian

Works Received 


About the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.

China Review International
Vol. 24. No. 2 (2017)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, Volume 12 (2019)

From Young-Jun Lee’s Editor’s Note

Last year, peace in Korea seemed imminent, thanks to cooperation between Trump and Kim, but now, with the subsequent failure of talks, that expectation has diminished. Still, perhaps because of that failure, it is very noisy in front of Seoul Station or at Gwanghwamun Square these days, where people gather every weekend to make their opinions known. This clamor can be seen as expressing Korea’s disorder, or it can be seen as evidence of Korea’s eagerness for change. Social energy in Korea is still very high. The same goes for Korean literature.

Writer in Focus: Kim Kyung-uk

Bruce and Ju-Chan Fulton
Introduction

Kim Kyung-uk
The Mailman, Olivia Hussey, and Robert Redford
Heaven’s Door
Mirror and Window
Excerpt from Man in the Mirror

Fiction

Kong Sŏn-ok
Single Mother

Choi Jinyoung
Nearly

Jeong Yi Hyun
Forever Summer

Yun Ko-Eun
The Chef’s Nail

Choi Eunyoung
Sister, My Little Soonae

Also in this issue:
Special Feature: Hansi by Ch’usa Kim Chŏng-hŭi,
Special Feature: Zainichi Literature and Film
Images by Too Bohnchang, an image index, and a Notes on Contributors section.

 

 


About the Journal

Azalea promotes Korean literature among English-language readers. Azalea introduces to the world new writers as well as promising translators, providing the academic community of Korean studies with well-translated texts for college courses. Writers from around the world also share their experience of Korean literature or culture with wider audiences.

Celebrating Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month with Free Journal Content

We are proud to publish an extensive list of Pacific, Asian, and Southeast Asian studies journals. This Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month, explore and enjoy the following free journal content online:

Open Access Journals:

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Language Documentation & Conservation

Palapala: a journal of Hawaiian language and literature

Free journal content online:

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific (46#1, 2007)

Asian Theatre Journal: Official Journal of the Association for Asian Performance (23#1, 2006)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture (1, 2007)

Buddhist-Christian Studies: Official Journal of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (27, 2007)

China Review International: Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies (15#1, 2008)

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs (15#1, 2003)

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review (3#1, 2014)

The Hawaiian Journal of History (49, 2015)

Journal of Daoist Studies (8, 2015)

Journal of Korean Religions (6#1, 2015)

Korean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans Abroad (29, 2005)

MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing: New Writing from America, the Pacific, and Asia (19#1, 2007)

Oceanic Linguistics: Current Research on Languages of the Oceanic Area (50#2, 2011)

Pacific Science: Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region (71#4, 2017)

Philosophy East & West: A Quarterly of Comparative Philosophy (53#3, 2007)

Rapa Nui Journal: The journal of the Easter Island Foundation (30#2, 2016)

Review of Japanese Culture and Society (24, 2012)

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (45, 2013)

Asian Perspectives 58-1
Asian Theatre Journal 36-1 cover

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UH Press at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, March 27-30, Philadelphia

AAS-2014-meetingUniversity of Hawai‘i Press is exhibiting at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, March 27-30, held this year at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown hotel.

We have a larger than usual contingent attending: UHP director Michael Duckworth; editors Patricia Crosby, Pamela Kelley, and Stephanie Chun; marketing director Colins Kawai; and sales manager Royden Muranaka. Please visit us at booths 110-116 to see our latest titles and take advantage of the conference offer of a 20% discount and free shipping in the U.S. (Free shipping applies only to orders received or placed at the conference.) Our new Asian Studies print catalog will also be distributed.

Exhibiting across the aisle from us are publishing partners: Cornell University East Asia Program (booth 111), MerwinAsia and Seoul Selection (booth 113), NIAS Press-Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (booth 117), and NUS Press-Singapore (booth 115).

See you in Philly!