Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 2 (April 2019)

FIGURE 6 from Robert Perger’s article A New Species of Johngarthia from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae): Johngarthia oceanica sp. nov., Socorro I., body color in life (specimens not collected): (A) male (photograph by Jorge Ramón Reyes Olvera, Mexico); (B and C) males (photographs by Vince Scheidt, San Diego, U.S.A.); (D) female (photograph by Omar de Jesus Franco, Mexico); (E and F) gender unknown (photographs by Hartmut S. Walter, University of California, Los Angeles).

This second issue of volume 73 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article Seasonality and Prevalence of Pollen Collected from Hawaiian Nectarivorous Birds by Kathryn N. van Dyk, Kristina L. Paxton, Patrick J. Hart, and Even H. Paxton.

Preview volume 73 number 2 below and find a list of all 9 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Sympatric Invasive Rats Show Different Diets in a Tropical Rainforest of an Island Biodiversity Hotspot
Duron Quiterie, Bourguet Edouard, Thibault Martin, Scussel Sarah, Gouyet Raphaël, Méheut Mathilde, and Vidal Eric

Using DNA to Identify the Source of Invasive Mongooses, Herpestes auropunctatus (Carnivora: Herpestidae) Captured on Kaua‘i, Hawaiian Islands
Darren J. Wostenberg, Matthew W. Hopken, Aaron B. Shiels, and Antoinette J. Piaggio

Migration by the Japanese Wood Pigeon (Columba janthina) Across the Islands of East Asia: Direct Tracking by Satellite Telemetry
Soon Kyoo Choi, Yung Chul Park, Jong Chul Park, Gi Chang Bing, and Woo Yuel Kim

Environmental Correlates for Seed Desiccation Sensitivity of New Caledonian Plant Species
Octavie Toublanc-Lambault, Robin Pouteau, Marion Davezies, Manon Marron, Anthony Pain, Bruno Fogliani, and Philippe Marmey

Macrobenthic Biomass and Secondary Production in the Northern East China Sea and the Relative Importance of Environmental Variables
Qingxi Han, and Xiaobo Wang

Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Occurrence and Interactions with Marine Mammals Off Peru
Juan Pablo Testino, Andrea Petit, Belén Acorta, Aldo S. Pacheco, Sebastian Silva, Joanna Alfaro-Shigueto, David Sarmiento, Javier Quiñones, Alberto More Eche, Eduardo Motta, Sara Fernandez, Elizabeth Campbell, Geyby Carrillo, Maurice Epstein, Miguel Llapapasca, and Adriana González-Pestana

Apparent Low Densities of Small Cetaceans in Okinawa may be due to Uncontrolled Local Hunting
Thomas A. Jefferson, and Michael F. Richlen

A New Species of Johngarthia  from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae)
Robert Perger


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Pacific Science
Vol. 73 No. 2
April 2019

Pacific Science Vol. 73 No. 1 (January 2019)

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Figure 4 from the article “Taiwan’s Dacini Fruit Flies: Rare Endemics and Abundant Pests, along Altitudinal Gradients” by Camiel Doorenwerd, Luc Leblanc, Yu-Feng Hsu, Chia-Lung Huang, Yu-Chi Lin, Michael San Jose, and Daniel Rubinoff. Bactrocera dorsaloides, voucher number ms4389, first recorded for Taiwan. (A) dorsal view, (B) head, frontal view, (C) abdomen detail photo, dorsal view, (D) lateral view, (E) detail photo of the wing.

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The first issue in volume 73 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article “Talāsiga Lands in Fiji: Their Potential Expansion through Modern Farming Activities” by R.J. Morrison, and eight more research articles.

Preview volume 73 number 1 below and find a list of all articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE. Continue reading “Pacific Science Vol. 73 No. 1 (January 2019)”

February 2017 UH Press Author Events

Several author appearances are scheduled for the coming months; here are the remaining ones lined up for February. These events are free and the public is invited to attend. Books will be available for sale and signing, unless otherwise noted.

Saturday, February 18, 3:00 to 5:00 pm, Eastwind Books of Berkeley (2066 University Avenue)
howan-charmbuyers72dpiAt this venerable independent bookshop, Lillian Howan will discuss and read from her debut novel, The Charm Buyers. Set in 1990s Tahiti during the last years of French nuclear testing in the Pacific, the book has been praised by early reviewers as “gorgeous,” “sensuous,” and “hynoptic” (see the blurbs under the “reviews” tab on the UH Press web page). A review scheduled to appear in the March/April issue of Foreword Reviews says, in part: “Howan’s language is breathtaking, building a land and family with detail and power. . . . The Charm Buyers is a thought-provoking insight into a time of cultural change. It captures an essence of existing between reality and surreality, dreaming and wakefulness, the past and the future.”

For event information, go to the Eastwind Books website or Facebook page.
Howan also did a reading on February 15 at the University of San Francisco. See the flyer here.

Saturday, February 18, 11:00 am, Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i
furuya-internment_100dpiFifty years ago, Suikei Furuya chronicled his World War II imprisonment and published his memoirs in Japan. It took JCCH Resource Center volunteer Tatsumi Hayashi ten years to translate the book into English and now An Internment Odyssey: Haisho Tenten has been published by JCCH, with additional distribution by UH Press. The book launch will include a panel discussion with Tatsumi Hayashi, Sheila Chun, Brian Niiya and a member of the Furuya family. For further details, see the JCCH website.

Thursday, February 23, 12 noon to 1:15 pm, Kuykendall Hall 410, UH Mānoa

tsai-peoplesrace_100dpiAt this Brown Bag talk sponsored by the Center for Biographical Research, Michael Tsai, author of The People’s Race Inc.: Behind the Scenes at the Honolulu Marathon, discusses his melding of journalistic and life-writing approaches as well as the expected and unexpected challenges of dealing with living subjects. Tsai is a Kapi‘olani Community College instructor and Honolulu Star-Advertiser columnist and reporter.

For the Spring 2017 Brown Bag schedule of speakers, click here.

Saturday, February 25, 2:15 to 3:30 pm, The Ritz-Carlton, Kapalua

baird-dolphinswhales_100dpiAt Whales Tales 2017, presented by Whale Trust Maui, marine biologist Robin Baird speaks about his ocean fieldwork with Cascadia Research Collective and the results covered in his book, The Lives of Hawai‘i’s Dolphins and Whales: Natural History and Conservation. These include findings from years of research using satellite tagging, genetics, and photo identification to study resident whales and dolphins in Hawai‘i. Dr. Baird’s February 14 illustrated talk at the Waikiki Aquarium elicited numerous questions from the audience, leading to answers with more fascinating facts on these ocean mammals.


To keep up with UHP author talks and other event news, please follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Isles of Amnesia: Mark Rauzon on guano, rats, and military secrets of the Marine National Monuments

rauzon-islesofamnesiaAn article in JSTOR Daily by Juliet Lamb shares some of Mark Rauzon’s perspectives about the 1960s Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program expedition to remote US islands in the Pacific. Rauzon explores the history of this and other little-known incidents in his recent book, Isles of Amnesia: The History, Geography, and Restoration of America’s Forgotten Pacific Islands.

“Biologist Mark Rauzon, who spent many years studying documents related to the Pacific Project, has come to understand that the scientists themselves may have been guinea pigs for defense tests. Over fifty germ warfare tests were conducted in the Pacific during the 1960s, with substances ranging from harmless bacteria to rabbit fever. In the course of the tests, passengers on Pacific Project ships, which transported both military personnel and associated biologists, were exposed to harsh chemical cleansers, and the “harmless” bacteria have since been linked to a variety of debilitating conditions. Veterans who suffered adverse effects have been unsuccessful in requesting government compensation. Though no POBSP personnel have reported health effects, many may have been exposed. Rauzon’s efforts led to the release of many of the military’s documents related to the project, but complete records may never be provided.”

source: Hawai‘i State Archives
source: Hawai‘i State Archives

Read more on this in Rauzon’s 2006 essay, “Live Ammo: Testing of Biochemical Agents on U.S. Sailors,” that appeared in The Asia-Pacific Journal.

Other news on the book:
The Island Studies Journal review of Isles of Amnesia calls it “an interesting, thought-provoking and entertaining read” and “a good resource for scholars interested in these lightly-studied islands.” See the full review by downloading the PDF of the ISJ book review section (scroll down).

Rats on Wake Island, 2014
Rats on Wake Island, 2014

Isles of Amnesia makes Library Journal‘s 2016 top 20 bestselling books on biology.


Isles of Amnesia:
The History, Geography, and Restoration of America’s Forgotten Pacific Islands
by Mark J. Rauzon
A Latitude 20 Book | 2016 | 288 pages | 71 b&w illus.
Paperback | ISBN 978-0-8248-4679-4 | $24.99

Wild Man from Borneo: A Cultural History of the Orangutan

CribbWild Man from Borneo offers the first comprehensive history of the human-orangutan encounter. Arguably the most humanlike of all the great apes, particularly in intelligence and behavior, the orangutan has been cherished, used, and abused ever since it was first brought to the attention of Europeans in the seventeenth century. The red ape has engaged the interest of scientists, philosophers, artists, and the public at large in a bewildering array of guises that have by no means been exclusively zoological or ecological. One reason for such a long-term engagement with a being found only on the islands of Borneo and Sumatra is that, like its fellow great apes, the orangutan stands on that most uncomfortable dividing line between human and animal, existing, for us, on what has been called “the dangerous edge of the garden of nature.”

Beginning with the scientific discovery of the red ape more than three hundred years ago, this work goes on to examine the ways in which its human attributes have been both recognized and denied in science, philosophy, travel literature, popular science, literature, theatre, museums, and film. The authors offer a provocative analysis of the origin of the name “orangutan,” trace how the ape has been recruited to arguments on topics as diverse as slavery and rape, and outline the history of attempts to save the animal from extinction. Today, while human populations increase exponentially, that of the orangutan is in dangerous decline. The remaining “wild men of Borneo” are under increasing threat from mining interests, logging, human population expansion, and the widespread destruction of forests. The authors hope that this history will, by adding to our knowledge of this fascinating being, assist in some small way in their preservation.

Written by Robert Cribb, Helen Gilbert, and Helen Tiffin
2014 | 328 pages | 55 illustrations, 2 maps
ISBN: 978-0-8248-3714-3 | $54.00 | Cloth

 

“Voyagers of the Sky” Talk by Robert Shallenberger at Bishop Museum

Shallenberger-TOTP-Bishop MuseumConservation biologist and wildlife photographer Robert Shallenberger will share his exceptional images and knowledge on the seabirds of Hawai‘i on Thursday, December 12, 6:00 to 7:30 p.m. at Bishop Museum. The basis for his talk is Dr. Shallenberger’s UH Press book, Hawaiian Birds of the Sea: Nā Manu Kai, which showcases many of his photos accompanied by informative text on the natural history and behavior of Hawai‘i’s seabirds. His illustrated lecture is part in the museum’s Traditions of the Pacific educational program series. Click here for more information and to RSVP online.

The Watersmart Garden: 100 Great Plants for the Tropical Xeriscape

The Watersmart GardenTwo of Hawai‘i’s foremost horticulturalists, Fred Rauch and Paul Weissich, have chosen 100 plants perfect for inclusion in Hawai‘i’s xeriscape gardens. These carefully chosen plants, all readily available and fairly simple to maintain, are described and illustrated in this guide to planning a water-saving garden for the tropical climate.

The Watersmart Garden will help you to select and group plants to create a beautiful garden while saving our most precious resource―water. Xeriscape principles are carefully explained and made easy to incorporate in your garden. Plants are organized by size and by water usage, while thoughtful plant notes will guide the interested gardener in planning for everything from the beach garden to a lei maker’s paradise. The book is beautifully illustrated with photographs of each plant and with flowers or foliage in close-up.

November 2013, 256 pages, 224 illustrations
$24.99; ISBN: 978-0-8248-3896-6, paper
A Latitude 20 Book

Revised and Expanded Guide to Hanauma Bay Now Available

Exploring Hanauma Bay: RevisedThis revised and expanded edition of the popular Exploring Hanauma Bay, by Susan Scott, is the only guidebook you will need for East O‘ahu’s spectacular nature preserve, a favorite of residents and visitors alike. Whether you plan to snorkel, dive, tour the park on foot, or take in the bay from the beach, this book will help you make the most of your visit. Veteran Hawai‘i columnist and marine enthusiast Susan Scott has devised six tours to accommodate a wide range of interests and abilities, while covering the geology, biology, and history of the bay. The book is fully illustrated with more than 250 color photos and includes safety tips, transportation advice, and a helpful list of park do’s and don’ts.

July 2013 / ISBN 978-0-8248-3748-8 / $16.99 (PAPER)

Rethinking and Rebuilding Nature in Hawai‘i

Restoring ParadiseThree quarters of the U.S.’s bird and plant extinctions have occurred in Hawai‘i, and one third of the country’s threatened and endangered birds and plants reside within the state. Yet despite these alarming statistics, all is not lost: There are still 12,000 extant species unique to the archipelago and new species are discovered every year. In Restoring Paradise: Rethinking and Rebuilding Nature in Hawai‘i, Robert Cabin shows why current attempts to preserve Hawai‘i’s native fauna and flora require embracing the emerging paradigm of ecological restoration—the science and art of assisting the recovery of degraded species and ecosystems and creating more meaningful and sustainable relationships between people and nature.

“Bob Cabin has that rare gift of a scientist who writes like a novelist. The tale he tells is not so much about science as it is about courageous people—many of them dedicated volunteers—who are responding in very personal ways to environmental crises. These are people who are restoring impaired Hawaiian ecosystems in a heroic effort to recover Nature. Cabin, who has logged many hours as a restoration practitioner himself, explains that we can’t always return Hawai‘i’s fabled ecosystems back to the way they were in the past. Instead, he recovers as much as possible of the remaining native biodiversity and gives Nature the opportunity to reinvent itself in a contemporary expression. The story Cabin tells is one of fulfillment as Hawaiians engage directly in natural processes as if they were part of their own evolving ecosystems—and indeed they are.” ―Andre Clewell, Restoration Ecologist and President Emeritus, Society for Ecological Restoration

June 2013 / ISBN 978-0-8248-3693-1 / $24.99 (PAPER)

Plant & Gardening Book Sale: March 12-19, 40% Off Select Titles

Plant & Gardening Sale 2013 Sale
Mark your calendars and get ready to get planting! UH Press will be offering more than 30 plant and gardening titles at 40% off: online only, March 12-19 (starts and ends noon, HST), while supplies last (sale prices in red):

A Native Hawaiian Garden: How to Grow and Care for Island Plants – $26.99/$16.19
Breeding Anthuriums in Hawaii – $31.00/$18.60
Breeding Dendrobium Orchids in Hawaii – $31.00/$18.60
Ethnic Culinary Herbs: A Guide to Identification and Cultivation in Hawai‘i – $26.99/$16.19
Flowers of the Pacific Island Seashore: A Guide to the Littoral Plants of Hawai‘i, Tahiti, Samoa, Tonga, Cook Islands, Fiji, and Micronesia – $19.00/$11.40
A to Z of South East Asian Orchid Species – $39.00/$23.40
Hawaiian Heritage Plants: Revised Edition – $31.99/$19.19
Hawai‘i’s Ferns and Fern Allies – $25.00/$15.00
Landscape Planning in Singapore – $40.00/$24.00
Loulu: The Hawaiian Palm – $48.00/$28.80
Manual of the Flowering Plants of Hawaii, Revised Edition – $97.00/$58.20
Orders and Families of Malayan Seed Plants – $22.00/$13.20
Plants for Tropical Landscapes: A Gardener’s Guide – $41.99/$25.19
Plants in Hawaiian Culture – $31.99/$19.19
Plants and Flowers of Hawai‘i – $26.99/$16.19
Poisonous Plants of Paradise: First Aid and Medical Treatment of Injuries from Hawai‘i’s Plants – $21.99/$13.19
Polynesian Herbal Medicine – $27.00/$16.20
Rainforest Trees of Samoa: A Guide to the Common Lowland and Foothill Forest Trees of the Samoan Archipelago – $27.00/$16.20
Samoan Herbal Medicine: ‘O La‘au ma Vai Fofo o Samoa – $13.00/$7.80
Small Trees for the Tropical Landscape – $41.99/$25.19
Specialty Crops for Pacific Islands – $75.00/$45.00
The Classical Gardens of Suzhou – $20.95/$12.57
The Essential Guide to Creating a Chinese-Style Garden – $29.95/$17.97
The Ornamental Edible Garden – $24.99/$14.99
The Small Food Garden: Growing Organic Fruit and Vegetables at Home – $19.99/$11.99
The World of Bananas in Hawai‘i: Then and Now – $80.00/$48.00
Tongan Herbal Medicine – $13.00/$7.80
Trees of Hawai‘i – $14.99/$8.99
Trees of Our Garden City: A Guide to the Common Trees of Singapore – $42.00/$25.20
Tropical Exotics – $36.99/$22.19
Tropical Shrubs – $36.99/$22.19
Useful Plants of Guam: A Facsimile Edition Reprint of the Original Book Published in 1905 – $60.00/$36.00

A Comprehensive Treatment of the Hawaiian Palm

Loulu
The only native palms in Hawai‘i, loulu are among the Islands’ most distinctive plants. Several of the 24 recognized species are rare and endangered and all make handsome and appropriate ornamentals to adorn gardens and landscapes with their dramatic foliage, colorful flower clusters, and conspicuous fruits. In Loulu: The Hawaiian Palm, Donald R. Hodel shares his expertise on loulu, having traveled extensively throughout Hawai‘i to research and photograph nearly all the species in their native habitat. In the course of his work, he described and named three loulu that were new to science.

“I am very enthusiastic about this book. It is a loving tribute to some very threatened, very beautiful palms. They are an irreplaceable part of Hawai‘i’s natural history and patrimony. I hope this book brings the plight of these precious palms to the attention of the world.” —Scott Zona, Department of Biological Sciences, Florida International University

November 2012 / ISBN 978-0-8248-3567-5 / $48.00 (CLOTH)

Manual of the Flowering Plants of Hawaii Back in Print

Manual of the Flowering PlantsManual of the Flowering Plants of Hawai‘i, by Warren L. Wagner, Derral R.Herbst, and S. H. Sohmer, is available once again. The reprinting of the 2-volume revised edition, “the most significant botanical publication on Pacific plants in recent decades” (Flora Vitiensis Nova), was made possible by funding from the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of National History Publication Fund and Walcott Botanical Fund.

Praise for the first edition:
“The most complete and beautifully presented manual that this reviewer has ever seen. It will be an indispensable tool for serious students of the flora of Hawaii.” —Choice

“A very important tool for years to come for botanists studying the floristic and biogeographic questions involving these islands. The authors of this two volume set are to be commended on the production of a significant contribution to the understanding of an extremely interesting flora.” —Phytologia