New Journal Issues: Biography’s International Year in Review, Buddhist-Christian Studies, China Review International + More

Biography

Volume 44, Issue 1 (2021)

Special Issue: International Year in Review

Remembering Lauren Berlant

Contributors Riva Lehrer, Anna Poletti, and Rebecca Wanzo graciously provided this issue with estate artwork and tributes to Lauren Berlant.

From Anna Poletti’s More Flailing in Public:

For me, Berlant’s publications and their way of speaking with colleagues enacted and theorized core tensions that preoccupy lifewriting studies: what it means to be a person in public—sometimes alone, sometimes in a collective, sometimes in search of collectivity. Always thinking from, and beyond, psychoanalytic insights into the disorganizing experience of desire (largely through object-relations), Berlant explicated the kinds of stories about the good life that permeated American culture, and explored what happened to people’s belief in culture, politics, and themselves when they tried to live those narratives, or discovered those narratives were structurally unlivable (The Female Complaint; Cruel Optimism). Berlant’s early work on trauma (“Trauma and Ineloquence”) and their interviews (with Jay Prosser, and with Julie Rak and me) are the places where the relevance of their deep attention to the politics of “fantasies of the good life” are most clearly connected to lifewriting scholarship. Margaretta Jolly’s special issue of Biography on “Life Writing and Intimate Publics,” published ten years ago, shows us how productive Berlant’s theory of the importance of being and feeling intimate in public can be for studying life writing, particularly online.

Oceanic Linguistics

Volume 60, Number 20 (2021)

This new issue contains a squib titled, “Three Puzzles for Phonological Theory in Philippine Minority Languages” by Jason W. Lobel, Robert Blust, and Erik Thomas.

An excerpt from this squib reads as follows:

In viewing language as an object of scientific inquiry, description alone has never been enough to satisfy most researchers. Once observations about one language are compared with those about another, there is a desire to generalize, to make statements about what is common and what is not, and therefore about what is expected and what is surprising in language content, structure, or change. In terms of theory construction, expected observations follow from basic assumptions about how language works and how it is embedded in the larger context of human neurophysiology and behavior. Much progress has been made in recent decades concerning the phonetic forces that give rise to phonological processes, and there is widespread agreement about many of these. This note describes three well-documented phonological processes in languages spoken by aboriginal Filipino populations along the Pacific coast of Luzon that do not conform to current theoretical expectations about what is a likely or even a possible diachronic process. Each of these is part of a larger context of sound change which does conform to theoretical expectation, although the details are complex, and still not widely reported in the literature. For this reason, a brief background survey of vocalic changes triggered by voiced stops will be given first, followed by the puzzling changes that depart from this more general pattern.

Find more research articles, squibs, and reviews at Project MUSE.

Pacific Science

Volume 65, Number 4 (2021)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

Population Divergence and Evolution of the Hawaiian Endemic Sesbania tomentosa (Fabaceae)
David M. Cole and Clifford W. Morden

Eleotris (Teleostei: Eleotridae) from Indonesia with Description of Three New Species Within the ‘melanosoma’ Neuromast Pattern Group
Marion I. Mennesson, Philippe Keith, Sopian Sauri, Frédéric Busson, Erwan Delrieu-Trottin, Gino Limmon, Tedjo Sukmono, Jiran, Renny Risdawati, Hadi Dahruddin, and Nicolas Hubert.

Three New Records of Marine Macroalgae from Viet Nam Based on Morphological Observations and Molecular Analyses by
Xuan-Vy Nguyen, Nhu-Thuy Nguyen-Nhat, Xuan-Thuy T. Nguyen, My-Ngan T. Nguyen, Viet-Ha Dao, and Karla J. McDermid.

The Structure and Dynamics of Endangered Forest Bird Communities in the Mariana Islands
Robert J. Craig

And the following article is available on Open Access:
Modeling Scenarios for the Management of Axis Deer in Hawai‘i
Steven C. Hess and Seth W. Judge

Find more research articles at Project MUSE.

Buddhist-Christian Studies Vol. 39

From “The Souls of Animals in Christianity and Mahāyāna Buddhism” by Junhyoung Michael Shin: Fig. 8 Giotto, St. Francis preaching to Birds, 1297-99, Upper Church, San Francesco, Assisi.

From the Editors’ Introduction:

This issue continues to open up new questions in Buddhist-Christian Studies from a variety of approaches. We have included papers from the panels from our 2017 Society of Buddhist-Christian Studies’ panels held concurrently with the American Academy of Religion annual meeting on “Uses and Misuses of Anger in Buddhism and Christianity”  and “What Buddhism and Christians Can Learn from Muslims,”  as well as papers that were presented at other conferences such as the World Parliament of Religions held in Toronto in November 2018, and a symposium organized by Denison University in February 2019 on “Confronting Mara and Mammon: Buddhist-Christian Dialogue for Resistance and Spirituality.”  The themes of human suffering, resiliency, and resistance to structural forms of oppression run through all of these sections, as our authors seek new models for sustaining us in these challenging global times.

Articles from this Volume:

Stopping At Hell’s Gate
by Carolyn M. Jones Medine

The Wrathful Guru: Exploring the Vajrayana Understanding of Anger
by Lama Rod Owens

Anger Makes Us Ugly: Reflections from Pāli Buddhism
by Carol S. Anderson

The Wind Blows Gently and Fiercely: A Pentecostal Perspective on Love and Anger
by Joel D. Daniels

Holy Anger, Holy Wrath: The Role of Anger and the Emotions in Early Christian Spirituality and the Mahāyāna Buddhist Tradition
by Tomas Cattoi

Tending the Fire of Anger: A Feminist Defense of a Much Maligned Emotion
by Alice A. Keefe

Radicalization and Bold Mercy: Christian Theological Learning in Dialogue with the 2014 Open Letter
by John N. Sheveland

A Buddhist-Christian-Muslim Reflection on the Concepts of Mercy, Surrender, and Union
by Bahar Davary

The Small Engage the Powerful: An American Buddhist–Liberation Theology–Quaker Trialogue
by Sallie B. King

Resilience and Interdependence: Christian and Buddhist Views of Social Responsibility Following Natural Disasters
by Beverley Foulks McGuire

…plus 10 more articles, a News and Views section, and 6 Book Reviews.

About the Journal

Buddhist-Christian Studies is a scholarly journal published annually by University of Hawai‘i Press. It presents research papers, book reviews, and news items on Buddhism and Christianity, their interrelation, and comparative study based on historical materials and contemporary experience.

Subscriptions

Annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions are available here. Individual subscription is also available through membership in the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (SBCS).

Submissions

The materials selected for publication will be balanced between historical research and contemporary practice, and, where possible, they should employ analytical and theoretical tools and be set within the framework of our shared human history. More information is available at the journal’s website.

Celebrating Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month with Free Journal Content

We are proud to publish an extensive list of Pacific, Asian, and Southeast Asian studies journals. This Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month, explore and enjoy the following free journal content online:

Open Access Journals:

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Language Documentation & Conservation

Palapala: a journal of Hawaiian language and literature

Free journal content online:

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific (46#1, 2007)

Asian Theatre Journal: Official Journal of the Association for Asian Performance (23#1, 2006)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture (1, 2007)

Buddhist-Christian Studies: Official Journal of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (27, 2007)

China Review International: Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies (15#1, 2008)

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs (15#1, 2003)

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review (3#1, 2014)

The Hawaiian Journal of History (49, 2015)

Journal of Daoist Studies (8, 2015)

Journal of Korean Religions (6#1, 2015)

Korean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans Abroad (29, 2005)

MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing: New Writing from America, the Pacific, and Asia (19#1, 2007)

Oceanic Linguistics: Current Research on Languages of the Oceanic Area (50#2, 2011)

Pacific Science: Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region (71#4, 2017)

Philosophy East & West: A Quarterly of Comparative Philosophy (53#3, 2007)

Rapa Nui Journal: The journal of the Easter Island Foundation (30#2, 2016)

Review of Japanese Culture and Society (24, 2012)

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (45, 2013)

Asian Perspectives 58-1
Asian Theatre Journal 36-1 cover

Visit our website to learn more about our publications or to subscribe.

 

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Religion and Philosophy

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New 2018 content published in our religion and philosophy journals garnered nearly 10,000 downloads worldwide on Project MUSE. Check out the top 10 downloads from quarterly Philosophy East and West, as well as popular articles from related titles. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Religion and Philosophy”

Buddhist-Christian Studies Vol. 38

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Figure 2. Bhavacakra, painting on cloth; Nepal, nineteenth to twentieth century. From Massimiliano Alessandro Polichetti’s article The Sorrowful Fates of Rebirth: Ippolito Desideri Encounters Tibetan Sacred Art.

“[T]he bhavacakra (a kind of mental map of the concepts placed at the basis of Buddhist psycho-cosmology, made graphic with small images set in place in a circular manner that represents the “wheel of rebirths”) is set against the “world of becoming,” samsāra devoured by forgetfulness, represented by Yama, the god of the dead in Buddhist cosmology, who holds all within his jowls as a sign of immanent sorrow.”

 

From the Editors’ Introduction:

October 14–15, 2017, the city of Pistoia in Tuscany hosted an international symposium to honor the legacy of Fr. Ippolito Desideri (1684–1733), the first Jesuit missionary to Tibet who engaged in sustained interreligious dialogue with local Buddhists and whose extraordinary command of the local language even enabled him to author Christian theological treatises in Classical Tibetan.

Continue reading “Buddhist-Christian Studies Vol. 38”

Religion and Philosophy Journals from the University of Hawai`i Press

00_BCS 37_c1 and c4_REVA scholarly journal devoted to Buddhism and Christianity and their historical and contemporary interrelationships, Buddhist-Christian Studies presents thoughtful articles, conference reports, and book reviews. It also includes sections on comparative methodology and historical comparisons, as well as ongoing discussions from two dialogue conferences: the Theological Encounter with Buddhism, and the Japan Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies.

Submission guidelines for BCS are available online. 

 

jdsThe Journal of Daoist Studies (JDS) is an annual publication dedicated to the scholarly exploration of Daoism in all its different dimensions. Each issue has three main parts: Academic Articles on history, philosophy, art,society, and more (limit 8,500 words); Forum on Contemporary Practice on issues of current activities both in China and other parts of the world (limit 5,000 words); and News of the Field, presenting publications, dissertations, conferences and websites.

For submission guidelines please contact daojournal@gmail.com.

 

jksThe Journal of Korean Religions is the only English-language academic journal dedicated to the study of Korean religions. It aims to stimulate interest in and research on Korean religions across a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Launched in 2010 by the Institute for the Study of Religion at Sogang University in Korea, it is peer-reviewed and published twice yearly, in April and October.

Submission guidelines for JKR are available online.

 

Promoting academic literacy on non-Western traditions of philosophy, Philosophy East PEWand West has for over half a century published the highest-quality scholarship that locates these cultures in their relationship to Anglo-American philosophy. Philosophy defined in its relationship to cultural traditions broadly integrates the professional discipline with literature, science, and social practices. Each issue includes debates on issues of contemporary concern and critical reviews of the most recent publications.

Submission guidelines for PEW are available online.

 

UHP-primarylogo-2c

For more information on the University of Hawai`i Press and our journal publications, visit  www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

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Interview: Buddhist-Christian Studies editors

Buddhist-Christian Studies is one of four society journals currently published by University of Hawai`i Press. The journal started here in Honolulu as the product of the 1980 East-West Religions Project conference titled “A Buddhist-Christian Conference on the Future of Humanity,” and it was first edited by UH professor emeritus David W. Chappell. We asked current co-editors Thomas Cattoi and Carol Anderson to share more about the society and the journal’s focus.

sbcs

First, what is the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies?

The Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies was founded in 1987 in order to continue interactions between Buddhist and Christian scholars and practitioners that began at several large international meetings in the early 1980s. In 1980 and again in 1984 two major international conferences were held at the University of Hawai’i, which led to the establishment of the “Cobb-Abe International Theological Encounter.” The latter was founded by process theologian John B. Cobb, Jr., and Kyoto-school philosopher Masao Abe; for the following twenty years (1984-2004), the Cobb-Abe group continued to meet every eighteen months to discuss issues connected with Buddhist-Christian dialogue.

In 1987, another large international conference on Buddhist-Christian interchange was held at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley.  At that meeting, a small group of scholars and practitioners decided to establish a society that could meet annually in conjunction with the American Academy of Religion (AAR). This led to the birth of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies. The Society is independent of the AAR and controls its own program, rather than being a section of the AAR. Most members are scholars and graduate students in the field of Buddhist-Christian studies, but membership is open to all.

Has Buddhist-Christian Studies changed over the years?

The first issue of the journal was published in 1981. Its content and orientation reflects the evolution of the field over the last few decades, which was influenced by the quick expansion of Buddhist and Asian studies in English-language universities, as well as the growing interest in interreligious dialogue in different Christian communities.

Thomas Cattoi
Thomas Cattoi, co-editor of Buddhist-Christian Studies

What makes a good interreligious dialogue?

This is an interesting question! Every person engaged in interreligious dialogue will give you a different answer. For me (Cattoi), interreligious dialogue requires the ability to be conversant in two different religious traditions, remaining grounded in one’s own while also engaging the other with integrity. This means that one should be open to points of contact between two traditions, while also acknowledging the presence of irreducible differences.

Continue reading “Interview: Buddhist-Christian Studies editors”

#LookItUP: Religion and Politics in UHP Journals

 

upweekiconThis is Part 5 in a series of University of Hawai`i Press blog posts celebrating University Press Week and highlighting scholarship published by UH Press journals in the past year. Read our introductory blog post here. Our hope is that this series will shed new light on how UH Press “sells the facts,” so to speak, and the value our 24 journals bring to our very existence. Links to each journal and article are provided below.*


Religion and Politics

00_BCS 37_c1 and c4_REVBuddhist-Christian Studies, Volume 37, 2017
Special Section:
What Is Wrong With Us? What Is Wrong with the World?

Context: A sign of the times: Volume 37 of Buddhist-Christian Studies includes a special section of four articles where theologians attempt to answer these questions: What is Wrong With Us? What is Wrong With the World?

 

 

PalapalaCOVE2.indd

Palapala: A Journal for Hawaiian Language and Literature, Volume 1, 2017
Article: “No ka Baibala Hemolele: The Making of the Hawaiian Bible” by Jeffrey Lyon

Context: In the first peer-reviewed Hawaiian language journal to be published exclusively online, Palapala editor and author Jeffrey “Kapali” Lyon shares the history behind the making of the Hawaiian Bible, the largest single volume ever printed in the Hawaiian language.

 

jks

Journal of Korean ReligionsVolume 8, Number 1, April 2017
Special Issue: The 1,400th Anniversary of Wŏnhyo’s Birth

Context: How long can a religious figure shape the cultural landscape of a nation? In the case of Wŏnhyo 元曉, we can confidently say 1,400 years. The editors of the Journal of Korean Religions curated a special issue showing how the Korean Buddhist scholar’s writings “continue to inspire the current generation of intellectuals in Korea, Asia, and the West.”

 

pew

Philosophy East and WestVolume 67, Number 4, October 2017
Special Issue: Eleventh East-West Philosophers’ Conference, “State-of-the-Art on Comparative Philosophy”

Context: Philosophy East and West Volume 67 tackles issues around the long-standing tendency of Western philosophers to reject the legitimacy of Chinese, Indian and Japanese philosophy.

 

*Institutional access to online aggregators such as Project MUSE may be required for full-text reading. For access questions, please see the Project MUSE FAQ available here or contact your local library.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

Buddhist-Christian Studies, Vol. 37 (2017)

Accompanying volume 37 of Buddhist-Christian Studies is a free online interview with the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies Frederick J. Streng Award winner:

1847 BCS 37_20_ Gardiner .News. 265..267

This issue also opens with a section of four articles, calling upon Buddhist and Christian scholars to answer, “What Is Wrong with Us? What Is Wrong with the World?” An excerpt from the introduction:

Christianity and Buddhism, in diverse ways, assert a fundamental flaw in the human condition expressed by terms like “sin” or “delusion”—a flaw that we are largely unconscious of, which prevents us from noticing the extent to which we ourselves as individuals and societies contribute to the harms we see around us. In what ways are Christian or Buddhist diagnoses of a basic human flaw critical for understanding the causality of current world problems, such as growing social and economic inequalities, religious animosities, racism, environmental degradation, and violence? Can any of these problems be addressed without adequate consideration of such traditional diagnoses? If not, what specific Christian or Buddhist understandings of the human condition need to be raised up today to shed light on such problems? How might Buddhist and Christian perspectives challenge or complement each other? And how might these traditional perspectives on the human condition undergo reinterpretation when relating them to current problems?

The following sections of articles also appear in volume 37 (2017):

  • Thomas Merton and Interreligious Dialogue (5 articles)
  • Conversations Across Interreligious Boundaries: Spirituality, Theology, and Interculturation (7 articles)
  • Engaged Buddhism and Christianity (2 articles)

Plus society News and Reviews and Book Reviews.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


00_BCS 37_c1 and c4_REVAbout the Journal

Buddhist-Christian Studies is a scholarly journal published annually by University of Hawai‘i Press. It presents research papers, book reviews, and news items on Buddhism and Christianity, their interrelation, and comparative study based on historical materials and contemporary experience.

Subscriptions

Annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions are available here. Individual subscription is also available through membership in the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (SBCS).

Submissions

The materials selected for publication will be balanced between historical research and contemporary practice, and, where possible, they should employ analytical and theoretical tools and be set within the framework of our shared human history. More information is available at the journal’s website.

Say hello to UH Press at AAS Booth 600

If you’re attending the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference in Toronto March 16-19, 2017, be sure to visit the University of Hawai’i Press at booth 600!

UH Press will have Asian studies books from our latest catalogs on display, as well as copies of the following journals:

We’re also proud to debut three online-only journals at AAS 2017:

Stop by and say hello as you browse through our display copies and catalogs. You may also pick up an order form at our booth or place your orders online at www.uhpress.hawaii.edu.

We look forward to seeing you in cold, snowy Toronto!

Buddhist-Christian Studies, Vol. 36 (2016)

The latest issue of this annual journal devoted to Buddhism and Christianity and their historical and contemporary interrelationships feature the following peer-reviewed works:

bcs-36_c1blog
Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE

Old Buddhist Texts: New Womanist Though

  • In the Company of Friends: Womanist Readings of Buddhist Poems
    by Melanie L. Harris
  • Freedom on My Mind: Buddhist-Womanist Dialogue
    by Keri Day
  • Practice in Buddhist-Womanist Thought
    by Carolyn M. Jones Medine
  • Womanist Approaches to the Therīgathā and the Therīgathā’s Influence on Womanism
    by Linda E. Thomas
  • Wombu: An Intellectual Exercise in Womanist and Buddhist Reading
    by Tracey Elaine Hucks

Continue reading “Buddhist-Christian Studies, Vol. 36 (2016)”

Buddhist-Christian Studies, vol. 35 (2015)

EDITORIAL
Buddhist-Christian Dialogue: Moving Forward
Thomas Cattoi and Carol Anderson, vii

Multiple Religious Belonging

Deep Listening and Virtuous Friendship: Spiritual Care in the Context of Religious Multiplicity
Duane R. Bidwell, 3

Like an Elephant Pricked by a Thorn: Buddhist Meditation Instructions as a Door to Deep Listening
Willa B. Miller, 15

Reflections on Jewish and Christian Encounters with Buddhism
Harold Kasimow, 21

Continue reading “Buddhist-Christian Studies, vol. 35 (2015)”