Q & A with Editor in Chief of Pacific Science David Duffy

Photograph provided by David Duffy
Photograph provided by David Duffy

David Duffy has been editor of Pacific Science since January of 2021, however he has articles published within the journal for over a decade including “Biology and Impacts of Pacific Island Invasive Species. 7. The Domestic Cat (Felis catus)” (Volume 66, Number 2) and “Has the Small Indian Mongoose Become Established on Kaua‘i Island, Hawai‘i?” (Volume 69, Number 4)Outside of Pacific Science, Duffy has authored more than 100 scientific publications and is the founding editor of the journal Waterbirds.

On the School of Life Sciences page for the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Duffy characterizes himself as “a jack of all trades having worked on seabirds, Lyme Disease, fish schooling, old growth forest, El Niño, and mapping biodiversity. Here in Hawaiʻi, I ran the Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit for two decades, bringing in over a quarter of a billion dollars to UH and helping to grow basic and applied conservation biology. I am continuing my studies of the Peruvian upwelling and Alaskan seabirds, editing Pacific Science, and trying to sustain and improve the research environment at UH.”

Below Duffy shares with UH Press what its been like these last two years as the editorial head for Pacific Science:

University of Hawai‘i Press: You took on the editor role starting with our January 2021 issue, not even a year into the pandemic.  What were some of the challenges you faced then, and is that still an issue with the creation of these articles and research now?

David Duffy: The last two years have been very rough on researchers who could not get to their study sites. They are now catching up, which means there will be a lag before they go to publish their results so we aren’t seeing as many submissions as before COVID-19.  Researchers are extra busy so many journals including ours are finding it is harder to get peers to review manuscripts to vet them for publication. 

UHP: How do you see Pacific Science having the most relevance, in the classroom or in the field?

DD: Pacific Science is more aimed at the working scientist but it continues to be useful as a classroom resource to introduce students to scientific writing.

UHP: Is there an issue or article you are particularly proud of?

DD: The next one! We want to keep getting better.

UHP: What is next for Pacific Science? Any special issues in the works? 

DD: We depend on workers sending us good papers of general interests to Pacific scientists. We will make the submission process as efficient as possible. We are also increasing our efforts to offer editorial support for those for whom English is not their first language. Finally we hope to produce a memorial volume honoring a scientist who played a major role in Pacific Science.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS:

Established in 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Manuscript submissions on topics such as Pacific biodiversity, conservation, and sustainability are also encouraged. In addition to publishing original research, the journal features review articles providing a synthesis of current knowledge. Please review the complete Author Guidelines, available online. Manuscripts can be submitted online here:

New Journal Issues: “Contagious Magic” in Japanese Theatre, Logistics of the Natural History Trade, Hawai‘i’s Toxic Plants + More

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal – CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

SPECIAL ISSUE:
Student and Community Abstracts
Guest Editor: May Kealoha, PhD
Co-Editor: Jillian Inouye, PhD, FAAN

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal cover

This special issue will feature abstracts of papers from students and/or community members who are interested in disseminating new knowledge and practices for Asian and Pacific Islanders. 

Please submit your abstracts in the format of formal papers. The format should contain these or other approved headings of:  Introduction, Problem/Significance of Topic, Methods, Results, Discussion, and Recommendations  all relative to Asian/Pacific Islanders and nursing and health. Papers should be one to two pages in length and will be peer reviewed. For this special issue, we are particularly interested in the following but not limited to topics that are:

  • Culturally specific
  • Focuses on equity and diversity
  • Pilot studies
  • Evidence based practice projects
  • Description of community programs
  • Suggestions for policy changes to improve health/education for Asian and Pacific Islanders
  • Other related topics 

Original and empirical pilot studies using qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods are welcome. Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal is the only journal focused specifically on health and health care of and for this group. This journal publishes peer-reviewed articles that include, but are not limited to: 

  • Methods, interventions, instrumentation, and educational techniques that are unique to this group. 
  • Theoretical foundations that increase understanding of the unique response to changes in health and illness. 
  • Bio psychosocial, spiritual, and ecological impacts on practice, education, and research.
  • Policy issues as a result of rigorous research outcomes. 

Author Guidelines

All submitted papers must be written in English and contain only original work, which has not been published by or is currently under review at another journal (electronic or print). Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal rules governing the formatting of the final submission can be found at: 

Manuscript Preparation Guidelines https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/apin/styleguide.html

All manuscripts and any supplementary material should be submitted through https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/apin/

For more detailed guidelines, go to https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/apin/policies.html

The authors must select as “Special Issue” when they reach the “Article Type” step in the submission process. 

All papers will be peer-reviewed by two independent reviewers. Requests for additional information should be addressed to the guest editors. 

For more detailed, go to https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/university-press/

Article Processing Charge

There is no charge for submitting a paper to Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Upon acceptance of your manuscript, you will be charged a one-time Article Processing Charge of $100 for first author members; first author student members $80; and nonmember rates would be $150

Editorial Contact Information

Contact the guest editor with queries about appropriate topics or works in progress for the special issue: 

May Kealoha, PhD, MPHKapi’olani Community College Nursing Department.
Email:  kealohab@hawaii.edu 
Jillian Inouye, PhD, FAANEmeritus Professor, University of Hawaii John A Burns School of Medicine.
Email: jinouye@hawaii.edu


Contact the editor with questions about the manuscript submission process: 

Jillian Inouye Editor in Chief

Email: jinouye@hawaii.edu

Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 4 (October 2019)

FIGURE 4. Thysanoteuthis rhombus. Hatchlings in: (A) ventral and (B) dorsal view. Dorsal and lateral chromatophore
patterns in: (C and D) hatchling, (E and F) paralarva, (G and H) paralarva (dyed methylene blue) in ventral and dorsal view, (I) arm crown of paralarva in oral view showing the arrangement of suckers in tentacles and chromatophore pattern, (J) portion of the egg mass, (K) relative size of embryo inside egg and hatchling compared to zooplanktonic fauna identified, (L) Exocoetus spp., (M) Oxyporhamphus micropterus fish larvae, and (N) water strider Halobates micans. Scale bars = 1.0 mm. From the article “First Records of an Egg Mass and a Paralarva of Thysanoteuthis rhombus (Cephalopoda:Thysanoteuthidae) in the Northern Tropical Pacific, by Roxana De Silva-Dávila, Raymundo Avendaño-Ibarra, Ricardo Palomares-García, and Unai Markaida.

Preview volume 73 number 4 titles below and find content to all 6 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Biology and Impacts of Pacific Island Invasive Species. 15. Psittacula krameri, the Rose-Ringed Parakeet (Psittaciformes: Psittacidae)
Aaron B. Shiels, and Nicholas P. Kalodimos

Coral Settlement and Post-Settlement Mortality on Artificial Substrata in South Mexican Pacific Reefs
Andrés López-Pérez, and Yalha Solís-García

Some Metazoan Parasites from Marine Mammals Stranded in California
Marlene M. Colón-Llavina, Simonetta Mattiucci, Giuseppe Nascetti, James T. Harvey, Ernest H. Williams Jr., and Antonio A. Mignucci-Giannoni

First Records of an Egg Mass and a Paralarva of Thysanoteuthis rhombus (Cephalopoda: Thysanoteuthidae) in the Northeastern Tropical Pacific
Roxana De Silva-Dávila, Raymundo Avendaño-Ibarra, Ricardo Palomares-García, and Unai Markaida

A New Distichopora Species (Cnidaria: Stylasteridae) from the Mesophotic Zone of Palau
Stephen D. Cairns, and Daniela Pica

Population Status of Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas) Foraging in Arica Bay, Chile
Walter Sielfeld, Paula Salinas-Cisternas, Darío Contreras, Marco Tobar, Jesús Gallardo, and Cristian Azocar

This issue also includes author and subject indexes for all of volume 73, and the latest Association Affairs report.

Pacific Science
Vol. 73 No. 4
October 2019

Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 3 (July 2019)

Preview volume 73 number 3 titles below and find content of all 8 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Stream Benthic Macroinvertebrate Assemblages Reveal the Importance of a Recently Established Freshwater Protected Area in a Tropical Watershed
Elfritzson M. Peralta, Alexis E. Belen, Gelsie Rose Buenaventura, Francis Godwin G. Cantre, Katharine Grace R. Espiritu, Jana Nicole A. De Vera, Cristine P. Perez, Aleziz Kryzzien V. Tan, Irisse Bianca B. De Jesus, Paul Palomares, Jonathan Carlo A. Briones, Tohru Ikeya, Francis S. Magbanua, Rey Donne S. Papa, and Noboru Okuda

Island Hopping in a Biodiversity Hotspot Archipelago: Reconstructed Invasion History and Updated Status and Distribution of Alien Frogs in the Philippines
Arman N. Pili, Emerson Y. Sy, Mae Lowe L. Diesmos, and Arvin C. Diesmos

Importance of Non-native Honeybees (Apis mellifera) as Flower Visitors to the Hawaiian Tree ‘Ōhi‘a Lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) Across an Elevation Gradient
Camila A. Cortina, Clare E. Aslan, and Stacey J. Litson

Screening and Biosecurity for White-nose Fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Ascomycota: Pseudeurotiaceae) in Hawai‘i
Violeta L. Zhelyazkova, Nia L. Toshkova, Serena E. Dool, Frank J. Bonaccorso, Corinna A. Pinzari, Kristina Montoya-Aiona, and Sebastien J. Puechmaille

Genetic and Morphological Diversity in Aphis gossypii  Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in the Pacific Basin
Ross H. Miller, Robert G. Foottit, Eric Maw, and Keith S. Pike

Age, Growth and Mortality of the Goldlined Seabream Rhabdosargus sarba in Waters off Southwestern Taiwan
Shoou-Jeng Joung, Yu-Yung Shyh, Kwang-Ming Liu, and Shyh-Bin Wang

Morphology and Behavior of Gametes and Zoospores from the Plant-Parasitic Green Algae, Cephaleuros  (Chlorophyta, Ulvophyceae)
Narasinee Thithuan, Penpadsorn Bunjonsiri, and Anurag Sunpapao

New Chromosome Number Reports for Angiosperms Native or Introduced to Hawai‘i, with Additional Reports for Fiji and Samoa
Michael Kiehn, and David H. Lorence


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 2 (April 2019)

FIGURE 6 from Robert Perger’s article A New Species of Johngarthia from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae): Johngarthia oceanica sp. nov., Socorro I., body color in life (specimens not collected): (A) male (photograph by Jorge Ramón Reyes Olvera, Mexico); (B and C) males (photographs by Vince Scheidt, San Diego, U.S.A.); (D) female (photograph by Omar de Jesus Franco, Mexico); (E and F) gender unknown (photographs by Hartmut S. Walter, University of California, Los Angeles).

This second issue of volume 73 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article Seasonality and Prevalence of Pollen Collected from Hawaiian Nectarivorous Birds by Kathryn N. van Dyk, Kristina L. Paxton, Patrick J. Hart, and Even H. Paxton.

Preview volume 73 number 2 below and find a list of all 9 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Sympatric Invasive Rats Show Different Diets in a Tropical Rainforest of an Island Biodiversity Hotspot
Duron Quiterie, Bourguet Edouard, Thibault Martin, Scussel Sarah, Gouyet Raphaël, Méheut Mathilde, and Vidal Eric

Using DNA to Identify the Source of Invasive Mongooses, Herpestes auropunctatus (Carnivora: Herpestidae) Captured on Kaua‘i, Hawaiian Islands
Darren J. Wostenberg, Matthew W. Hopken, Aaron B. Shiels, and Antoinette J. Piaggio

Migration by the Japanese Wood Pigeon (Columba janthina) Across the Islands of East Asia: Direct Tracking by Satellite Telemetry
Soon Kyoo Choi, Yung Chul Park, Jong Chul Park, Gi Chang Bing, and Woo Yuel Kim

Environmental Correlates for Seed Desiccation Sensitivity of New Caledonian Plant Species
Octavie Toublanc-Lambault, Robin Pouteau, Marion Davezies, Manon Marron, Anthony Pain, Bruno Fogliani, and Philippe Marmey

Macrobenthic Biomass and Secondary Production in the Northern East China Sea and the Relative Importance of Environmental Variables
Qingxi Han, and Xiaobo Wang

Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Occurrence and Interactions with Marine Mammals Off Peru
Juan Pablo Testino, Andrea Petit, Belén Acorta, Aldo S. Pacheco, Sebastian Silva, Joanna Alfaro-Shigueto, David Sarmiento, Javier Quiñones, Alberto More Eche, Eduardo Motta, Sara Fernandez, Elizabeth Campbell, Geyby Carrillo, Maurice Epstein, Miguel Llapapasca, and Adriana González-Pestana

Apparent Low Densities of Small Cetaceans in Okinawa may be due to Uncontrolled Local Hunting
Thomas A. Jefferson, and Michael F. Richlen

A New Species of Johngarthia  from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae)
Robert Perger


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Pacific Science
Vol. 73 No. 2
April 2019

Pacific Science-Call for Submissions

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Pacific Science: A Quarterly Devoted to the Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region is edited by Curtis Daehler, Dept. of Botany, University of Hawai‘i.

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics. In addition to publishing original research, the journal features review articles providing a synthesis of current knowledge. The official journal of the Pacific Science Association. Continue reading “Pacific Science-Call for Submissions”

Isles of Amnesia: Mark Rauzon on guano, rats, and military secrets of the Marine National Monuments

rauzon-islesofamnesiaAn article in JSTOR Daily by Juliet Lamb shares some of Mark Rauzon’s perspectives about the 1960s Pacific Ocean Biological Survey Program expedition to remote US islands in the Pacific. Rauzon explores the history of this and other little-known incidents in his recent book, Isles of Amnesia: The History, Geography, and Restoration of America’s Forgotten Pacific Islands.

“Biologist Mark Rauzon, who spent many years studying documents related to the Pacific Project, has come to understand that the scientists themselves may have been guinea pigs for defense tests. Over fifty germ warfare tests were conducted in the Pacific during the 1960s, with substances ranging from harmless bacteria to rabbit fever. In the course of the tests, passengers on Pacific Project ships, which transported both military personnel and associated biologists, were exposed to harsh chemical cleansers, and the “harmless” bacteria have since been linked to a variety of debilitating conditions. Veterans who suffered adverse effects have been unsuccessful in requesting government compensation. Though no POBSP personnel have reported health effects, many may have been exposed. Rauzon’s efforts led to the release of many of the military’s documents related to the project, but complete records may never be provided.”

source: Hawai‘i State Archives
source: Hawai‘i State Archives

Read more on this in Rauzon’s 2006 essay, “Live Ammo: Testing of Biochemical Agents on U.S. Sailors,” that appeared in The Asia-Pacific Journal.

Other news on the book:
The Island Studies Journal review of Isles of Amnesia calls it “an interesting, thought-provoking and entertaining read” and “a good resource for scholars interested in these lightly-studied islands.” See the full review by downloading the PDF of the ISJ book review section (scroll down).

Rats on Wake Island, 2014
Rats on Wake Island, 2014

Isles of Amnesia makes Library Journal‘s 2016 top 20 bestselling books on biology.


Isles of Amnesia:
The History, Geography, and Restoration of America’s Forgotten Pacific Islands
by Mark J. Rauzon
A Latitude 20 Book | 2016 | 288 pages | 71 b&w illus.
Paperback | ISBN 978-0-8248-4679-4 | $24.99

Surf Science: An Introduction to Waves for Surfing, Third Edition

buttSurfRevEdHave you ever wondered where waves come from? What makes every one different, why some peel nicely and others just close out? Why, some days, waves come in sets of six and others in sets of three, and what factors affect the behavior of a surfing break? If you have, this book by Tony Butt is for you.

Now in its third edition, Surf Science is the first book to talk in depth about the science of waves from a surfer’s point of view. It fills the gap between surfing books and waves textbooks and will help you learn how to predict surf. You don’t need a scientific background to read it—just curiosity and a fascination for waves.

2014 | 136 pages
Paper ISBN 978-0-8248-3954-3, $35.00