L. Miwa’s diary, August 6, 1945

pages show diary written in Japanese characters
Two-page spread showing the entry for August 6, 1945, from Lawrence Fumio Miwa’s diary kept as a fourteen-year-old schoolboy in Hiroshima. [Japanese]

[English translation]
August 6, 1945 Up at 5:40 a.m. In bed at 9:00 p.m.
Assignment: Work at Maehata
Others: Prayed for my parents’ safety on learning of air raids on Hiroshima City. Gambare (Hang on), Hiroshima!

Air-raid alarms went off three times–at 9:00 p.m., after midnight and this morning. We witnessed B-29s (U.S. bombers) flying over our area as we were heading to Maehata. We instinctively shouted that we could shoot them down if we had a fighter. The anger within us filled the silence. “Let’s move on,” my comrade encouraged me. We walked and stopped frequently. According to the teacher, the enemy raided Hiroshima City with napalm bombs. However, Hiroshima will stand firm. Gambare! That is all I can say. All of us are worried they could see the results of our deep commitment to our work. “I’ll work as hard as I can,” I told myself. I swear I will work harder than ever to contribute toward increased production and to work as hard as my parents do. Anyway, I am concerned about my parents and I wrote them this morning. I hope the letter is delivered quickly. I further vowed to do my best so my parents would be reassured. Who is afraid of air raids? Just dig in and work!

[Note: The diary image appears as the background on the cover of Tadaima! I Am Home: A Transnational Family History by Tom Coffman (University of Hawai‘i Press, 2018).

China Review International Vol. 25 No. 1 (2018)

 

Volume 25 Number 1 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 23 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

Featured Review:

When Fish Were Fish
Christopher Rea

Reviews:

Poetic Transformations: Eighteenth-Century Cultural Projects on the Mekong Plains by Claudine Ang (review)
Reviewed by Eric Henry

Worüber man nicht spricht: Tabus, Schweigen und Redeverbote in China ed. by Rüdiger Breuer and Heiner Roetz (review)
Reviewed by Anna Stecher

GMO China: How Global Debates Transformed China’s Agricultural Biotechnology Policies by Cong Cao (review)
Reviewed by Nancy N. Chen

Morality and Monastic Revival in Post-Mao Tibet by Jane E. Caple (review)
Reviewed by Nicole Willock

Qing Travelers to the Far West: Diplomacy and the Information Order in Late Imperial China by Jenny Huangfu Day (review)
Reviewed by Bradley Camp Davis

China’s Footprints in Southeast Asia ed. by Maria Serena I. Diokno, Hsin-Huang Michael Hsiao, and Alan H. Yang (review)
Karen M. Teoh

That Distant Country Next Door: Popular Japanese Perceptions of Mao’s China by Erik Esselstrom (review)
Reviewed by Lu Yan

Song King: Connecting People, Places, and Past in Contemporary China by Levi S. Gibbs (review)
Reviewed by Charlotte D’Evelyn

Farewell to the God of Plague: Chairman Mao’s Campaign to Deworm China by Miriam Gross (review)
Reviewed by Robert Peckham

The Silk Road Trap: How China’s Trade Ambitions Challenge Europe by Jonathan Holslag (review)
Reviewed by Min Ye

Efficacious Underworld: The Evolution of Ten Kings Paintings in Medieval China and Korea by Cheeyun Lilian Kwon (review)
Reviewed by Beatrix Mecsi

Becoming Bilingual in School and Home in Tibetan Areas of China: Stories of Struggle YiXi LaMuCuo (review)
Reviewed by Norbert Francis

Chinese Poetic Modernisms ed. by Paul Manfredi and Christopher Lupke (review)
Reviewed by Joseph R. Allen

Just a Song: Chinese Lyrics from the Eleventh and Early Twelfth Centuries by Stephen Owen (review)
Reviewed by Lanlan Kuang

China’s Chaplin: Comic Stories and Farces by Xu Zhuodai (review)
Reviewed by Zheyu Wei

Afterlives of Chinese Communism: Political Concepts from Mao to Xi ed. by Christian Sorace, Ivan Franceschini, and Nicholas Loubere (review)
Reviewed by Aaron Su

Fruit from the Sands: The Silk Road Origins of the Foods We Eat by Robert N. Spengler III (review)
Reviewed by Shiamin Kwa

The Dreaming Mind and the End of the Ming World by Lynn A. Struve (review)
Reviewed by Harry Miller

Asia Inside Out: Itinerant People ed. by Eric Tagliacozzo, Helen F. Siu, and Peter C. Perdue (review)
Reviewed by Ronald Skeldon

Public Goods Provision in the Early Modern Economy: Comparative Perspectives from Japan, China, and Europe ed. by Masayuki Tanimoto and R. Bin Wong (review)
Reviewed by Guillaume Carré

Raising China’s Revolutionaries: Modernizing Childhood for Cosmopolitan Nationalists and Liberated Comrades, 1920s–1950s by Margaret Mih Tillman (review)
Reviewed by Stig Thøgersen

Christian Women in Chinese Society: The Anglican Story ed. by Wai Ching Angela Wong and Patricia P. K. Chiu (review)
Reviewed by Fredrik Fällman

Maoist Laughter ed. by Ping Zhu, Zhuoyi Wang, and Jason McGrath (review)
Reviewed by Richard King

Works Received

 

China Review International
Vol. 25 No. 1
2018

Announcing Open Access for a new Pacific title!

book cover image

University of Hawai‘i Press proudly announces the publication of its first born-digital, open-access monograph: JoAnna Poblete’s Balancing the Tides: Marine Practices in American Sāmoa, now available in both complimentary electronic and for-purchase print formats.

Download an open access copy today!

ScholarSpace
JSTOR 
Project Muse
Internet Archive
Google Books
OAPEN

Also available for purchase in print here.

About the Book
“Poblete’s Balancing the Tides is remarkable for its focus on the impact of U.S. federal policies in American Sāmoa. Whether she is discussing federal minimum wage debates or examining federal fishing regulations, Poblete shows how Americans and Sāmoans alike shape and are shaped by the forceful and sometimes flexible nature of U.S. federal marine-related management in American Sāmoa.” —Keith L. Camacho, UCLA

Balancing the Tides highlights the far-reaching influence of marine practices and policies in the unincorporated territory of American Sāmoa on the local indigenous group, the American fishing industry, U.S. environmental programs, and on global discussions about ecology and indigenous communities. Each chapter of the book highlights a type of ocean-use policy or marine-related practice in American Sāmoa to demonstrate how American colonial efforts to protect natural resources intersect with indigenous adherence to customary principles of respect, reciprocity, and native rights. Poblete’s study ultimately connects the U.S.-American Sāmoa colonial relationship to global overfishing, world consumption patterns, the for-profit fishing industry, international environmental movements and studies, as well as native experiences and indigenous rights.

More information on this project
Balancing the Tides is sophisticated scholarship that investigates timely issues at the forefront of conversations in and outside of the academy,” said UH Press executive editor Masako Ikeda. “This makes it an especially well-suited book for OA; by making electronic copies available for download at no cost, we hope Dr. Poblete’s research about American Sāmoa will be more readily available to the people there, as well as to other important audiences, including policy makers and students.”

The first UH Press title to be released in OA prior to the print edition, Poblete’s book is produced through the Sustainable History Monograph Pilot, an initiative funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that seeks to develop a viable model for publishing high-quality scholarship in OA format by employing new production technologies. “The OA edition of Balancing the Tides is really a landmark event,” said interim director Joel Cosseboom. “It not only sets a precedent for OA publishing at UH Press, but also contributes to our goal of serving indigenous communities throughout the Pacific.”

Other UH Press titles forthcoming from the Sustainable History Monograph Pilot will address the histories of Vietnam, Korea, and Vanuatu. “My hope is that UH Press will soon be able to adopt the new technologies employed by this program to issue more OA publications, especially in Hawaiian and Pacific studies,” said Cosseboom.

The next SHMP title will be Alec Holcombe’s Mass Mobilization in the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, 1945–1960.

China Review International Vol. 24 No. 4 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 4 of China Review International begins with three feature reviews and 19 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

Featured Reviews:

Changing Clothes in Chang’an (reviewing BuYun Chen, Empire of Style: Silk and Fashion in Tang China)  Reviewed by Shao-yun Yang

The Local and Global Politics of Contemporary Art (reviewing Frank Vigneron, Hong Kong Soft Power: Art Practices in the Special Administrative Region, 2005–2014)
Reviewed by John Zarobell

The Monkey King, 4-EVER (reviewing Hongmei Sun, Transforming Monkey: Adaptation and Representation of a Chinese Epic)
Reviewed by Dore J. Levy

Reviews:

Barry Allen, Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition
Reviewed by Aaron B. Creller

Nadine Amsler, Jesuits & Matriarchs: Domestic Worship in Early Modern China
Reviewed by Anthony E. Clark

Kent E. Calder, Super Continent: The Logic of Eurasian Integration
Reviewed by Mark Henderson

Xiaomei Chen, Staging Chinese Revolution: Theater, Film, and the Afterlives of Propaganda
Reviewed by Emily Wilcox

Michael Dillon, Lesser Dragons: Minority Peoples of China
Reviewed by Kaitlin Banfill

Prasenjit Duara and Elizabeth J. Perry, editors, Beyond Regimes: China and India Compared
Reviewed by Sreemati Chakrabarti

Jia-Chen Fu, The Other Milk: Reinventing Soy in Republican China
Reviewed by Veronica, Sau-Wa Mak

Robyn R. Iredale and Fei Guo, editors, Handbook of Chinese Migration: Identity and Wellbeing
Reviewed by C. Cindy Fan

Paul Kendall, The Sounds of Social Space: Branding, Built Environment, and Leisure in Urban China 
Reviewed by Han Li

Elisabeth Koll, Railroads and the Transformation of China
Reviewed by Rudi Volti

Norman A. Kutcher, Eunuch and Emperor in the Great Age of Qing Rule
Reviewed by Carl Déry

Wendy Larson, Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture
Reviewed by Kun Qian

Hsiao-t’i Li, Opera, Society, and Politics in Modern China
Reviewed by Jonathan P. J. Stock

Michał Lubina, Russia and China: A Political Marriage of Convenience–Stable and Successful
Reviewed by Paul Bolt

Klaus Mühlhahn, Making China Modern: From the Great Qing to Xi Jinping
Reviewed by Thoralf Klein

Sarah Schneewind, Shrines to Living Men in the Ming Political Cosmos
Reviewed by Ying Zhang

Hsueh-man Shen, Authentic Replicas: Buddhist Art in Medieval China
Reviewed by Xiao Yang

Edward Vickers and Zeng Xiaodong, Education and Society in Post-Mao China
Reviewed by Yun You

Yan Xu, The Soldier Image and State-Building in Modern China, 1924–1945
Reviewed by Nicolas Schillinger

Works Received

China Review International
Vol. 24. No. 4
2017

Biography Vol. 42 No. 3 (2019)

Figure 3 from “Call My Name: Using Biographical Storytelling to Reconceptualize the History of African Americans at Clemson University” by Rhondda Robinson Thomas: Inventory of Slaves, Fort Hill Farm Deed, 15 May 1854, Thomas Green Clemson Papers, Special Collections and Archives, Clemson University Libraries, box 1, folder 25.

ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE:

Introduction to Biographic Mediation: On the Uses of Personal Disclosure in Bureaucracy and Politics
Ebony Coletu, guest editor

Biographic Mediation and the Formerly Incarcerated: How Dissembling and Disclosure Counter the Extended Consequences of Criminal Convictions
Michelle Jones

A Complaint Biography
Sara Ahmed

Lives on the Line: An Interview with Aly Wane
Aly Wane interviewed by Ebony Coletu

The Securitate File as a Record of Psuchegraphy
Cristina Plamadeala

“Has someone taken your passport?”: Everyday Surveillance of the Migrant Laborer as Trafficked Subject
Annie Isabel Fukushima

Guidelines for Squatting: Concerned Citizens of North Camden, 1978–1990
Mercy Romero

Frames of Witness: The Kavanaugh Hearings, Survivor Testimony, and #MeToo
Leigh Gilmore

Call My Name: Using Biographical Storytelling to Reconceptualize the History of African Americans at Clemson University
Rhondda Robinson Thomas

Mirror Memoirs: Amita Swadhin on Survivor Storytelling and the Mediation of Rape Culture
Amita Swadhin interviewed by Ebony Coletu

The Consumption of Adoption and Adoptees in American Middlebrow Culture
Kimberly McKee

(Un)Reasonable, (Un)Necessary, and (In)Appropriate: Biographic Mediation of Neurodivergence in Academic Accommodations
Aimée Morrison

About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

 

 

Biography:
An Interdisciplinary Quarterly
Vol. 42 No. 3
2019

Hawaiian Journal of History Vol. 53 (2019)

Figure 1 from the article Remembering the Committee of Safety: Identifying the Citizenship, Descent and Occupations of the Men Who Overthrew the Monarchy by Ralph Thomas Kam and Jeffrey K. Lyons: A collage of the Committee of Safety January 1893. Henry E. Cooper, Chairman, (center) Clockwise, starting with the picture directly above the top of the diamond around Cooper: Henry Waterhouse, Lorrin A. Thurston, Ed Suhr, F.W. McChesney, John Emmeluth, Wm. R. Castle, Wm. O. Smith, J.A. McCandless, C. Bolte, W.C. Wilder, Andrew Brown and Theodore F. Lansing. Courtesy Hawaiʻi Archives [PP-28-7-003]

Articles:

The Case of Leslie Satoru Nakashima and His Breaking News Dispatch
Crystal Uchino

Remembering the Committee of Safety: Identifying the Citizenship, Descent and Occupations of the Men Who Overthrew the Monarchy
Ralph Thomas Kam and Jeffrey K. Lyons

The Establishment of Kilauea Military Camp: The Early Years 1898–1921
Jadelyn J. Moniz Nakamura and Geoffrey Mowrer

An Extraordinary Troop: The Boy Scouts Program at Kalaupapa
Fred E. Woods and Anita Manning

“Doing Our Duty”: Dancing, Dating, and the Limits of Tolerance in Wartime Hawaiʻi
Lori Pierce

Notes and Queries: 

“Ea Mai Hawaiʻinuiākea”: Marking the Global Diplomatic Presence of the Nineteenth-century Hawaiian Kingdom
Ronald Williams, Jr.

An Inquiry Into Kawaiahaʻo Seminary’s “Melting Pot” Photograph Published in The National Geographic Magazine in 1924
Tomiko Conner

The Kamehameha III Statue in Thomas Square
John Clark

Father Damien’s First Photograph at Kalaupapa Reveal Its Secrets
Ruben Boon and Patrik Jaspers

Book Reviews:

Hawaiian By Birth: Missionary Children, Bicultural Identity, and U.S. Colonialism in the Pacific
Reviewed by Lori Pierce

Light in the Queen’s Garden: Ida May Pope, Pioneer for Hawaiʻi’s Daughters, 1862–1914
Reviewed by Derek Taira

Return to Kahiki: Native Hawaiians in Oceania
Reviewed by Lorenz Gonschor

Kalaupapa Place Names: Waikolu to Nihoa
Reviewed by Christine Thomas

Sharks upon the Land: Colonialism, Indigenous Health, and Culture in Hawai’i, 1778–1855
Reviewed by Juliet Nebolon

Hawaiiana in 2018: A Bibliography of Titles of Historical Interest
Jodie Mattos

 

About the Journal

Published annually since 1967, the Journal presents original articles on the history of Hawai‘i, Polynesia, and the Pacific area as well as book reviews and an annual bibliography of publications related to Island history. The Hawaiian Historical Society publishes books in both English and Hawaiian, and HJH is a leading peer-reviewed journal that focuses on the history of Native Hawaiians and all other cultures in Hawai‘i during both pre- and post-contact times.

Subscriptions

Individuals may receive the journal by joining the Hawaiian Historical Society.

Submissions

The HJH welcomes scholarly submissions from all writers. See the Guidelines for Contributors.

You can also read more about this issue at the Hawaiian Historical Society’s website.

The Hawaiian Journal of History
Vol. 53
2019

China Review International Vol. 24 no. 3 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 3 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 20 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEW

The Persistence and Significance of Small Urban Spaces in China (reviewing Di Wang, The Teahouse under Socialism: The Decline and Renewal of Public Life in Chengdu, 1950–2000)
Reviewed by Tim Simpson

REVIEWS

Jennifer Altehenger, Legal Lessons: Popularizing Laws in the People’s Republic of China, 1949–1989
Reviewed by Ji Li

Emily Baum, The Invention of Madness: State, Society, and the Insane in Modern China
Reviewed by Hsuan-Ying Huang

Yanjie Bian, Guanxi: How China Works
Reviewed by Jack Barbalet

Steve Chan, Trust and Distrust in Sino-American Relations: Challenge and Opportunity 
Reviewed by Richard Hu

Patricia P. Chu, Where I have Never Been: Migration, Melancholia, and Memory in Asian American Narratives of Return 
Reviewed by Shawn Higgins

Melissa Dale, Inside the World of the Eunuch: A Social History of the Emperor’s Servants in Qing China
Reviewed by Ellen Soullière

Joshua Eisenman, Red China’s Green Revolution: Technological Innovation, Institutional Change, and Economic Development under the Commune
Reviewed by Zhun Xu

Luke Habberstad, Forming the Early Chinese Court: Rituals, Spaces, Roles 
Reviewed by Christopher F. Kim

Kurtis Hagen and Steve Coutinho, translated with commentary, Philosophers of the Warring States: A Sourcebook in Chinese Philosophy 
Reviewed by Robin R. Wang

Derek Hird and Geng Song, editors, The Cosmopolitan Dream: Transnational Chinese Masculinities in a Global Age
Reviewed by Yinni Peng

Ming-sho Ho, Challenging Beijing’s Mandate of Heaven: Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement and Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement 
Reviewed by Kevin Wei Luo

Hsiao-ting Lin, Accidental State: Chiang Kai-shek, the United States, and the Making of Taiwan 
Reviewed by Syaru Shirley Lin

Thomas Maissen and Barbara Mittler, Why China Did Not Have a Renaissance – And Why That Matters: An Interdisciplinary Dialogue 
Reviewed by Luke Clossey

Yuan-ning Wen and others, edited by Christopher Rea, Imperfect Understanding: Intimate Portraits of Modern Chinese Celebrities 
Reviewed by David N. C. Hull

William T. Rowe, Speaking of Profit: Bao Shichen and Reform in Nineteenth-Century China 
Reviewed by Margherita Zanasi

Michael Szonyi, The Art of Being Governed: Everyday Politics in Late Imperial China 
Reviewed by Masato Hasegawa

Jinping Wang, In the Wake of the Mongols: The Making of a New Social Order in North China, 1200–1600  Reviewed by Carl Déry

Bing Wang, Classical Chinese Poetry in Singapore: Witnesses to Social and Cultural Transformations in the Chinese Community 
Reviewed by Jing-yi Qu

Pu Wang, The Translatability of Revolution: Guo Moruo and Twentieth-Century Chinese Culture 
Reviewed by Haosheng Yang

Yun Via, Down with Traitors: Justice and Nationalism in Wartime China 
Reviewed by Patrick Fuliang Shan

Works Received


Call for a Co-Editor for Rapa Nui Journal

Applications are invited for the position of co-editor of Rapa Nui Journal: The Journal of the Easter Island Foundation (RNJ). The journal is published by the University of Hawai‘i Press in partnership with the Easter Island Foundation. Dr. Mara Mulrooney has served as the journal editor for the past several years and is looking forward to sharing the editorial duties with one or two co-editors.

The journal, launched in 1986 as Rapa Nui Notes, serves as a forum for interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities and social sciences on Easter Island and the Eastern Polynesian region. Each issue may include Research Articles, Research Reports, Commentaries or Dialogues, Book or Media Reviews and EIF News.

RNJ is published twice a year and welcomes contributions from a wide range of social, cultural, indigenous and historical disciplines on topics related to the lives and cultures of the peoples of Rapa Nui and Eastern Polynesia. Abstracts for articles may be published in English, Spanish, and Rapanui. We welcome submissions from scholars across Oceania, North and South America, and beyond.

The editors are expected to assist in raising the profile of the journal, provide support increasing submissions, and secure timely and appropriate peer-review of articles. Editors will make the final decision on manuscripts, informing both the author(s) and reviewers of the final disposition. The editors must show openness to communicating with scholars about diverse ideas, openness to a diverse range of methodologies, and eagerness to continue building the journal’s reputation.

In accordance with the University of Hawai‘i Press’ mission to publish high quality scholarship, the following criteria are considered in selecting editors:

  • established record of scholarship
  • evidence of understanding the mission of the journal and its operation
  • a vision for the journal’s future
  • record of responsible service to scholarly publishing
  • evidence of organizational skill and intellectual leadership

The actual costs associated with production and the online submission system for the journal are covered by the publisher.

Selection Process: (1) Applications will be received by the UH Press Journals Manager by Sept. 4, 2019.  (2) The applicants will be reviewed and ranked by the current journal editor and UH Press Journals Manager. (3) The top two candidates will be contacted by phone for an interview and to discuss the journal editorial workflow by Sept. 25, 2019. (4) The candidate selection will be made by Oct. 10, 2019. (5) The new editor(s) will begin working with the current editor and UH Press no later than January 2020. (6) All other applicants will be notified of the final selection.

Applications: The applications should include the following:

Vision Statement: Set forth your goals and plans for the content of the journal.

Co-Editors Background Information: Describe the qualifications and experience of each person on the editorial team that supports their inclusion. There is no need to include names of individuals that you would like to include on the larger editorial board. If you wish to include names of nominees for Book Review editors, you may; these individuals will be appointed by the editors after they are selected, so you are not required to include them in your application.

Institutional Support: It is important for candidates to examine the feasibility of serving as co-editor in light of the resources provided by the publisher and their own home university. If candidates expect to receive support from their host institution, we request a preliminary letter of support from a dean or other appropriate institutional official.

CVs for all potential co-editors (and if applicable, any associate editors).

For questions and further information about the application process, please contact: Pamela Wilson, Journals Manager, pwilson6@hawaii.edu. We encourage anyone who is considering an application and wants to discuss ideas or ask questions, to get in touch. The application packet should be no more than five (5) pages (excluding CVs), and must be received by Sept. 4, 2019.

Applications may be emailed as PDFs to Pamela Wilson, Journals Manager at pwilson6@hawaii.edu.

University of Hawaii Press, 2840 Kolowalu Street Honolulu, HI 96822

Tel: (808) 956-6790

https://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals/


UH Press to publish The Journal of Burma Studies in partnership with the Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies

The University of Hawai‘i Press will publish and distribute The Journal of Burma Studies, one of the only scholarly peer-reviewed journals that focus exclusively on Burma/Myanmar. This new partnership with the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University begins with volume 23, 2019. The complete content of the journal is available online in Project MUSE.

UH Press Interim Director and Publisher, Joel Cosseboom, said: “We are pleased to partner with the NIU Center for Burma Studies on this important and unique journal.”

Edited by Catherine Raymond from Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies and Jane M. Ferguson from Australian National University, The Journal of Burma Studies seeks to publish the best scholarly research focused on Burma/Myanmar and its minority and diasporic cultures from a variety of disciplines, ranging from art history and religious studies, to economics and law.

Dr. Ferguson looks forward to collaborating with UH Press to launch innovative and engaging issues of The Journal of Burma Studies. “University of Hawai‘i Press has consistently produced some of the most exciting publications on Southeast Asia as well as Burma/Myanmar Studies, so I am delighted that JBS will now work with them,” she said.

The journal is jointly sponsored by the Burma Studies Group and the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University. Published since 1997, the journal draws together research and critical reflection on Burma/Myanmar from scholars across Asia, North America and Europe.

Content is available on the Project MUSE platform.

Subscribe at: https://uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/jbs/

Submit your manuscript at: https://jbs.scholasticahq.com/for-authors

The Journal of Burma Studies joins UH Press’s extensive list of Asian and Southeast Asian studies journals including: Asian Perspectives, Korean Studies, Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society, Review of Japanese Culture and Society, and others.

About UH Press

 The University of Hawai‘i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. It strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Hawaiian, Pacific, Asian American and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai‘i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

About Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies

 Founded in 1987, the Center collects and preserves information and artifacts of all kinds concerning the study of the peoples and cultures of Burma/Myanmar, and makes these materials broadly available for research and study.

The Center enjoys a unique relationship with the Burma Studies Foundation, which assures that all Burma/Myanmar-related items donated to the foundation will be offered to the center for inclusion and conservation within the university’s collections. Oversight by the foundation combines strong support of the center with lasting responsibility to the field of Burma/Myanmar studies.

The Center for Burma Studies is a non-political, non-degree granting, administrative and academic unit within Northern Illinois University. The Center has the following goals:

  • The maintenance and expansion of a comprehensive research library to sustain the field of Burma studies
  • The collection, care, and exhibition of the arts of Burma
  • The support and promotion of undergraduate and graduate teaching concerning Burma
  • The organization and hosting of self-supporting national and international conferences on Burma studies
  • The publication of relevant scholarship on Burma
  • The care and enhancement of archival resources such as photographs, music records, oral histories, personal papers, and field notes
  • The promotion of outreach activities to schools and communities
  • Encouraging the performance of Burmese arts
  • The securing of educational opportunities through scholarships, internships, and fellowships

Biography Vol. 42 No. 1 (2019)

From the front cover: He mau palapala aina, a me na niele e pili ana. Hookahi ke pai ana. Lahaina, 1840. Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/98687131/.

INTERNATIONAL YEAR IN REVIEW

The International Year in Review is a collection of short, site-specific essays on the year’s most influential publications in life writing. This year’s collection includes entries from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Estonia, France, the Gulf Cooperation Council, India, Italy, Korea, Lebanon, Mexico, the Netherlands, Palestine, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, South Africa, Spain, the UK, and two essays from the US, one on biography and one on memoir.

Contents

Editors’ Notes

Essays as Life Writing: The Year in Australia
Kylie Cardell

The Tercentenary of Maria Theresa (1717–1780): The Year in Austria and Germany
Tobias Heinrich

The Brazilian “I/Eye” at the IABA Global Conference: The Year in Brazil
Sergio da Silva Barcellos

Musicians’ Lives and National Identity: The Year in Canada
Alana Bell

Independent Biographical Documentaries: The Year in China
Chen Shen

Testigo de barbarie y resistencia: El año en Colombia
Gabriel Jaime Murillo-Arango

Life Writing’s Coming of Age: The Year in Estonia
Leena Kurvet-Käosaar and Maarja Hollo

The Ghosts of World War II: The Year in France
Joanny Moulin

Selves and Identities in the Arabian Gulf: The Year in the Gulf Cooperation Council
Szidonia Haragos

What the Stars Tell: The Year in India
Pramod K. Nayar

Biographies from the Alps to Capri: The Year in Italy
Ilaria Serra

Emergent Subjectivities: The Year in Korea
Heui-Yung Park

Archiving the Political, Narrating the Personal: The Year in Lebanon
Sleiman El Hajj

Politics and Violence: The Year in Mexico
Gerardo Necoechea Gracia

Mediators as the Subject of Dutch Biography: The Year in the Netherlands
Hans Renders and David Veltman

Voices against Erasure, Loss, and Dehumanization: The Year in Palestine
Adam Yaghi

A Time of Great Biographies—Gombrowicz and Herbert: The Year in Poland
Paweł Rodak

“No Coward Soul is Mine”: The Year in Portugal
Cláudia Faria

Auto/Biography After Disaster: The Year in Puerto Rico
Ricia Anne Chansky

Cultural Figures and the Biographical Turn: The Year in Romania
Ioana Luca

“Born-Frees” on South Africa’s Memory Traps: The Year in South Africa
Nick Mdika Tembo

Auto/Biography and Conflict: The Year in Spain
Ana Belén Martínez García

“The necessary disloyalty”: The Year in the UK
Tom Overton

#MeToo and the Memoir Boom: The Year in the US
Leigh Gilmore

American Biography: The Year in the US
Carl Rollyson

Annual Bibliography of Works about Life Writing, 2017–2018


About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

Palapala: A Journal for Hawaiian Language and Literature- Volume 2 (2018)

Figure 2 from Kapali Lyon’s article “Some Thoughts on Demonstrative and Locative and the Loss of /ŋ/ in Hawaiian”: John Webber’s drawing of the heiau at Waimea, Kauaʻi, where William Anderson collected his list of Hawaiian words.

The University of Hawai‘i Press is proud to publish the second volume of a new, open-access resource for Hawaiian scholars, Palapala: A Journal for Hawaiian language and literatureIt is the first peer-reviewed Hawaiian language journal to be published exclusively online.

The entirety of Palapala Volume 2, which includes contemporary research in both Hawaiian and English, is available for free through UH library’s ScholarSpace:


Papa Kuhikuhi (Contents)

No Palapala / About Palapala

Nā ʻAtikala Noiʻi Hou / New Research

Nā Kuhia ma Hawaiian Antiquities: Nathaniel Emerson a me nā Kānaka ‘Ōiwi Hawai‘i i Kōkua ma ka ‘Ike Hawai‘i / The Notes to Hawaiian Antiquities: Nathaniel Emerson and His Native Hawaiian Consultants
Charles M. Langlas

Some Thoughts on Demonstrative and Locative and the Loss of /ŋ/ in Hawaiian
Jeffrey “Kapali” Lyon

Ke Kanawai (1902): J. Moku‘ōhai Poepoe’s Obscure Law Journal
A. Kuuipoleialoha Poai

Nā Palapala Paʻi Hou ʻIa / Reprints

“Nohea mai na Kanaka Hawaii” / “Where Do Hawaiians Originate” (1873, with English translation)
Lorenz Gonschor

“Ka u [sic] ka Iwa, he La Makani” / “The ‘Iwa Appears, It Is a Windy Day” (1887, with English translation)
Lorenz Gonschor

Ke Kanawai (1902), ho‘oponopono ‘ia e J. Moku‘ōhai Poepoe 
Buke 1, Helu 1 (Ianuari 1902) / Book 1, Number 1 (January 1902)

Buke 1, Helu 2 (Feberuari 1902) /  Book 1, Number 2 (February 1902) 
Buke 1, Helu 3 (Maraki 1902) / Book 1, Number 3 (March 1902)

Nā Mea Kākau / Contributors 

 

Palapala
Volume 2 (2018)

Samuel Hideo Yamashita on the “Japanese Turn” and Hawaii Regional Cuisine

Five people after library talk, including Samuel Yamashita and Roy Yamaguchi, with librarians
(L to R) Tokiko Bazzell, Monica Ghosh, Mire Koikari, Samuel Yamashita, Roy Yamaguchi

Pomona College history professor Samuel Yamashita‘s lecture on what he calls the “Japanese Turn” in fine dining drew a full house to University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Hamilton Library last week (April 17). Audience members included well-known chef Roy Yamaguchi, who was part of this “turn” during his years in Los Angeles when he pioneered Euro-Asian cuisine. As a tie-in, advance copies and flyers were displayed of Professor Yamashita’s cover of book, Hawaii Regional Cuisinenew UH Press book, HAWAI‘I REGIONAL CUISINE: The Food Movement That Changed the Way Hawai‘i Eats. His talk was related to the library’s exhibit by Japan collection librarian Tokiko Bazzell, “Washoku: Japanese Foods & Flavors,” Yamashita next to Washoku displaywhich is on display until May 27 in Hamilton Library’s First Floor Elevator Gallery.

Read the wonderfully comprehensive information and view more photos on the event here. Yamashita will be returning to Honolulu in mid-July to launch Hawai‘i Regional Cuisine; meanwhile, order the book here. If you would like to be notified of the July events, contact Carol Abe in the UH Press marketing department. Mahalo to the UH Libraries and other sponsors for hosting Professor Yamashita during his UH Mānoa visit: UHM Center for Japanese Studies, UHM Department of American Studies, UHM Department of Women’s Studies, Kapi‘olani Community College, and UHM Student Equity, Excellence and Diversity (SEED).