Review of Japanese Culture and Society, Issues 30 and 31 Now Available

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Issue 30, 2018- Scholar, Poet, Educator: Festschrift Issue in Honor of Mizuta Noriko

“One of Noriko’s brilliant endeavors was to imagine, and then bring about, a truly unique new educational institution in Japan, namely Josai International University. On my first visit to Japan in 1987 for the Japanese publication of Women in Film Noir, Noriko mentioned that she hoped Josai University could build on available land near Tokyo Airport. But it was just a dream. Only a few years later, however, Josai International University was up and running, bringing life and energy to the Chiba area. The buildings were beautifully designed and organized, and a delight to be in. Despite already being Vice Chancellor of the long established Josai University Educational Corporation, Noriko became President of Josai International University from 1996 to 2009 (She then became Chancellor of Josai University Educational Corporation from 2004 to 2017). Her masterstroke was to make this new International University unique in combining degrees in Business Studies with an M.A. in Women’s Studies. This was a time when there were very few Women’s Studies degrees being offered in Japan, so Noriko was charting new ground, perhaps partly inspired by American feminist research. I was honored to be invited to teach the first courses at Josai on Women and Film. At first I thought this was to be just for the one year, 1994; however, to my surprise and delight, Noriko in fact had arranged for me to teach a course or two once a year for four consecutive years.”   Excerpt from, In Honor of Noriko Mizuta by E. Ann Kaplan

Issue 30 also includes:

In Her Footsteps: The Legacy of Professor Mizuta Noriko by Linda Flores

Mizuta Noriko by  Ueno Chizuko, James Garza

Mizuta Noriko: Biocritical Essay of a Literary Feminist and Global Scholar by Alisa Freedman

Mizuta Noriko: Selected Bibliography by Linda Galvane, Rebecca Corbett

Feminine Failure and the Modern Hero: Mad Women in Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar and Joan Didion’s Play It As It Lays by Mizuta Noriko

Natsume Sōseki on Poe  by Mizuta Noriko

Literature, Ideology and Women’s Happiness: The Autobiographical Novels of Miyamoto Yuriko by Mizuta Noriko

Women’s Self-Representation and Transformation of the Body: Kōno Taeko and Ogawa Yōko by Mizuta Noriko

Beyond Home And City: Poems By Ishigaki Rin And Shiraishi Kazuko by Mizuta Noriko and Eiji Sekine

The Desolate Self and Its Circular Search for The Absolute Other: Transgression and Dream in the Work of Takahashi Takako by Mizuta  Noriko and Alessandro Castellini

When Women Narrate the Self: Personal Narratives in Modern Women’s Literaturebby Mizuta Noriko and Nadeschda Bachem

The Dream of the Yamanba—An Overview by Mizuta Noriko and Luciana Sanga

The Girl Double: On the Shōjo as Archetype in Modern Women’s Self-Expression by Mizuta Noriko and James Garza

Urashimasō: Memory as Trauma and Recovery in Literature by Mizuta Noriko and Hannah Osborne

Aesthetics and the Archive: The Poetry of Mizuta Noriko by Jordan A. Y. Smith

Selected Poems by Mizuta Noriko by Jordan A. Y. Smith

Dear Kojien Dictionary: Tomorrow Girls Troop by Reiko Tomii

 

RJCS 31 cover

Issue 31, 2019- Photography of the Heisei Era (1989-2019): Memory and Transformation, Crises and Opportunities

“In this introductory essay, I frame and contextualize shifts in the practices of Japanese photography during the Heisei era, examining how new themes and changing subjects of self-presentation, the dramatic change in power relations, responsibility, and political valence, and a new assortment of artists, multiple new subjects, and iconographies appeared on the stage and rose to prominence. This text primarily focuses on a single aspect of the changes that took place in photography and video art during the Heisei period, not as an established corpus or a specific canon, but as a process that defines itself through the multiple changes of that era. My appraisal of this process centers on the relationship between the photographer and the photographed, highlighting problems of identity and representation, as they appear in the works that are discussed throughout this issue. In this context, the present essay emphasizes the crucial changes enacted by the growing participation of women photographers, who have contributed to the rise of imagery related to marginalized subjects and have taken on a prominent role in defining the terms of photographic practice, such as the acknowledgement of minority groups, an openness toward sexual and gender identities, and a new legitimization of traditionally domestic subjects, such as old age, family, motherhood, etc.”  Excerpt from the Introduction: Between the Viewfinder and the Lens—A Journey into the Performativity of Self-Presentation, Gender, Race, and Class in Heisei Photography (1989–2019)  by Ayelot Zohar

Also in issue 31:

Preface: A Difficult New Dawn by Frank Feltens

Introduction: Between the Viewfinder and the Lens—A Journey into the Performativity of Self-Presentation, Gender, Race, and Class in Heisei Photography (1989–2019) by Ayelet Zohar

Yoneda Tomoko by Lena Fritsch

Twice Infinity: Sugimoto Hiroshi’s Architecture Series by Jonathan M. Reynolds.

Ghost in the Shell: An After-Thought on Pierre Huygue’s Human Mask by Michio Hayashi

Watanabe Toshiya by Kakishima Takashi

The Predicament and the Reflexive Turn: Japanese Street Photography since 1990 by Yoshiaki Kai

Cardboard Houses and Miyamoto Ryūji’s Visualization of Alternative Urban Realities in Heisei Japan by Carrie Cushman

Kitano Ken by Ishida Katsuya

Sudo Ayano’s Portrait Photography: Artificially Modified Beauties and the Uncanny by Nava Astrachan

The Position of Ninoshima by Kuraishi Shino, Ellen Takata, Jason Beckman, and Mikiko Hirayama

Linking Disaster to Natural History, A Visit to Sasaoka Keiko’s Exhibition: Tanesashi, Ninoshima (Hachinohe City Museum of Art) by Kuraishi Shino and Daryl Maude

The Story of Two Women: Ishiuchi Miyako and Iwasaki Chihiro (Excerpts from a Conversation between Ishiuchi Miyako and Ueno Chizuko—On Mother’s and Hiroshima) by Tajima Miho, Ayelet Zohar, and Frank Feltens

Arai Takashi and Nagashima Yurie through the Historical Frame of “Japanese Photography” by Nakamura Fumiko, Mai Hayano, and Kevin Niehaus

Photography as Embalming: Yokota Daisuke’s Post-Production Process by Hoshino Futoshi

A Memorandum on the Photograph: Movement and Time in Blurs and Stills and Kanai Mieko and Hannah Osborne

The Story of The Inflated Man by Kanai Mieko and Hannah Osborne

Postwar Japanese Photography: A Selected Bibliography by Thomas F. O’Leary, Anat Icar-Shoham, Patricia Lenz, and Shir Yeffet

To subscribe to Review of Japanese Culture and Society, please visit the journal homepage.

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Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 29 (2017)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

READING SŌSEKI NOW

Editors’ Introduction: Sōseki Great and Small
Reiko Abe Auestad, Alan Tansman, J. Keith Vincent

What Sort of a Stone Was Sōseki? How to Become Who You Are Not
Tawada Yōko, J. Keith Vincent

Kokoro and the Economic Imagination
Brian Hurley

The Affect that Disorients Kokoro
Reiko Abe Auestad

Kokoro in the High School Textbook
Ken K. Ito

Doubled Visions of Desire: Fujimura Misao, Kusamakura, and Homosocial Nostalgia
Robert Tuck

Penning the Mad Man in the Attic: Queerness, Women Writers, and Race in Sōseki’s Sanshirō
Sayumi Takahashi Harb

Beach Boys in Manchuria: An Examination of Sōseki’s Here and There in Manchuria and Korea, 1909
Angela Yiu

The Relations Between Things and Three Types of People: A lecture sponsored by the Manshū Nichinichi Shimbun, September 12, 1909, in Dalian (translated by Angela Yiu)
Natsume Sōseki

“Why Was He…Well, Killed?” Natsume Sōseki, Empire, and the Open Secrets of Anticolonial Violence
Andre Haag

Impressions of Korea and Manchuria (1909) (translated by Andre Haag)
Natsume Sōseki

Judging a Book by Its Cover: Natsume Sōseki, Book Design, and the Value of Art
Pedro Thiago Ramos Bassoe

Death and Poetry: From Shiki to Sōseki (1992) (translated by Robert Tuck) 
Karatani Kōjin

From Postcolonial (2001) (translated by Andre Haag and Robert Tierney)
Komori Yōichi

Camellias and Vampires: Reading the Spermatic Economy in Natsume Sōseki’s And Then (2008) (translated by Kristin Sivak)
Miyazaki Kasumi

ART IN FOCUS: Matsuzawa Yutaka’s The Whole Works, 1961-1971

Introduction
Reiko Tomii

The Whole Works, 1961–71 (translated by Reiko Tomii)
Matsuzawa Tutaka

DESIGN IN FOCUS

Design in Japan: Contemporary Perspectives on Design Practice
Ignacio Adriasola

Interview with Sugiura Kōhei (2013) (translated by Mycah Braxton)

Report: From “Do It Yourself” to “Do It With Others” to “Do It For Others” —Can Fashion Be Renewed? Forum (2012) (translated by Yoonkyung Kim)

The Smart Design Award: The Always Convenient × Always Prepared Series (2012) (translated by Mycah Braxton)

The Essence of Social Design (2013) (translated by Elsa Chanez)
Kakei Yūsuke

FICTION

Butterfly (1889) (translated by Nicholas Albertson)
Yamada Bimyō

On the Contributors


About the Journal

The Review of Japanese Culture and Society is an annual English-language journal dedicated to the critical analysis of Japanese culture using thematic and interdisciplinary approaches to provide a broad perspective by combining the work of Japanese scholars and critics with that of non-Japanese writers. Dedicated to the translation of works written originally in Japanese, each issue also includes an original translation of a Japanese short story.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Manuscripts should be 7,000 to no more than 8,000 words including notes, and authors are responsible for obtaining rights and the cost of obtaining rights for any images included. Find submission guidelines here.

Review of Japanese Culture and Society
Volume 29 (2017)

Celebrating Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month with Free Journal Content

We are proud to publish an extensive list of Pacific, Asian, and Southeast Asian studies journals. This Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month, explore and enjoy the following free journal content online:

Open Access Journals:

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Language Documentation & Conservation

Palapala: a journal of Hawaiian language and literature

Free journal content online:

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific (46#1, 2007)

Asian Theatre Journal: Official Journal of the Association for Asian Performance (23#1, 2006)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture (1, 2007)

Buddhist-Christian Studies: Official Journal of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (27, 2007)

China Review International: Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies (15#1, 2008)

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs (15#1, 2003)

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review (3#1, 2014)

The Hawaiian Journal of History (49, 2015)

Journal of Daoist Studies (8, 2015)

Journal of Korean Religions (6#1, 2015)

Korean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans Abroad (29, 2005)

MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing: New Writing from America, the Pacific, and Asia (19#1, 2007)

Oceanic Linguistics: Current Research on Languages of the Oceanic Area (50#2, 2011)

Pacific Science: Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region (71#4, 2017)

Philosophy East & West: A Quarterly of Comparative Philosophy (53#3, 2007)

Rapa Nui Journal: The journal of the Easter Island Foundation (30#2, 2016)

Review of Japanese Culture and Society (24, 2012)

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (45, 2013)

Asian Perspectives 58-1
Asian Theatre Journal 36-1 cover

Visit our website to learn more about our publications or to subscribe.

 

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Asian Studies

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Top downloads of new 2018 content in our Asian Studies journals include articles and reviews from quarterly China Review International and annual Korean Studies, which also publishes early release articles throughout the year. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Asian Studies”

#LookItUP: U.S. Policy, Economics, and International Relations in UHP Journals

 

upweekiconThis is Part 2 in a series of University of Hawai`i Press blog posts celebrating University Press Week and highlighting scholarship published by UH Press journals in the past year. Read our introductory blog post here. Our hope is that this series will shed new light on how UH Press “sells the facts,” so to speak, and the value our 24 journals bring to our very existence. Links to each journal and article are provided below.*


U.S. Policy, Economics, and International Relations

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The Hawaiian Journal of HistoryVolume 50, 2016
Article: “Jeeps, Communists, and Quonset Huts: World War II Surplus Disposal in the Territory of Hawai‘i” by Gwen Sinclair

Context: The effects of militarization and colonialism in Hawai’i are brought into focus with a historical analysis of how the U.S. government took ownership of and dispersal of supplies after World War II. The market produced by these historic events continues to affect the current Hawai’i-U.S. mainland political climate, and are exasperated by comments from the 45th president about “boycotting” Hawai’i.

jwh

Journal of World HistoryVolume 28, Number 1, March 2017
Article: “Cotton and the Global Origins of Capitalism” by Sven Beckert

Context: While politicians on both sides of the U.S. election toted arguments of a lost domestic economy to industries overseas, the history of capitalism in the U.S. has always stretched beyond the nation’s borders. From his World History Association keynote address, Sven Beckert sets the tone for this issue’s special forum, which also makes a call for better understandings: “Commodity-focused histories are one powerful way to move toward a history beyond the nation-state, partly because they give empirical specificity to far-flung connections, partly because they allow us to bring the lessons of social history into global history, partly because they provide audiences for global history, and partly because, if done right, they can help us better understand some of the largest questions of world history.”

jj_2016_cover6HRReview of Japanese Culture and SocietyVolume 28, 2016
Special Section: Postwar Recovery, Affluence, and Its Critique

Context: What does reconstruction look like in a nation that lost a war and suffered two nuclear attacks? The Review of Japanese Culture and Society compiled a section of articles from Japanese photographers, architects, advertisers, and designers to share perspectives on the past and present postwar landscape.

 

untitledKorean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans AbroadVolume 41, 2017
Article: “Informal Empire: The Origins of the U.S.–ROK Alliance and the 1953 Mutual Defense Treaty Negotiations” by Victor D. Cha

Context: In a search for validity, scholar Victor D. Cha unpacks a rare archival account of the 1953 mutual defense treaty negotiations that led to the creation of the U.S.-Republic of Korea (ROK) alliance.

 

jdsJournal of Daoist Studies, Volume 10, 2017
Article: “The American Transformation of Daoist Cultivation” by Livia Kohn

Context: Livia Kohn studies the Chinese influence on American healthcare, including cognitive therapy and stress relief: “Since 1965, when the Immigration Act was changed to allow Asians to immigrate to the United States, Chinese healing and longevity methods have become increasingly popular in America.”

*Institutional access to online aggregators such as Project MUSE may be required for full-text reading. For access questions, please see the Project MUSE FAQ available here or contact your local library.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 28 (2016)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

From The City of the Future (1960) in this issue. Kikutake Kiyonori, Marine City, 1971. Drawing with felt-tip pen, 64 cm x 64 cm. Photo by Jean-Claude Planchet. Musee National d’Art Moderne, Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris France. © CNAC/MNAM/Dist.RMN-Grand Palais/Art Resource, NY. Courtesy of Kikutake Architects.

The Review of Japanese Culture and Society, volume 28 opens with an editors’ introduction:

…“Japanese design” possesses one of the most recognizable profiles, albeit one with multiple personalities. Notions of minimalism, Zen, wabi-sabi, and cute are often ascribed as inherent attributes of Japanese design. This profile operates  across media and disciplines, from graphic design to architecture and interiors, product and furniture design, and fashion and newer industries like interaction or experience design. On the one hand, we hear of “Zen minimalism” associated with architecture, interiors, and the simple lines and matte surfaces of sophisticated product design, and on the other hand, a sort of frenetic hyper-cute sensibility associated with youth culture and digital design.
Design and Society in Modern Japan: An Introduction, by Ignacio Adriasola, Sarah Teasley, and Jilly Traganou

DESIGN AND SOCIETY IN MODERN JAPAN

Japan’s Industrial Arts: Present and Future (1917) (translated by Penny Bailey)
by Yasuda Rokuzō

Industrial Arts and the Development of Japan’s Industry (1932) (translated by Penny Bailey)
by Kunii Kitarō Continue reading “Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 28 (2016)”

Say hello to UH Press at AAS Booth 600

If you’re attending the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference in Toronto March 16-19, 2017, be sure to visit the University of Hawai’i Press at booth 600!

UH Press will have Asian studies books from our latest catalogs on display, as well as copies of the following journals:

We’re also proud to debut three online-only journals at AAS 2017:

Stop by and say hello as you browse through our display copies and catalogs. You may also pick up an order form at our booth or place your orders online at www.uhpress.hawaii.edu.

We look forward to seeing you in cold, snowy Toronto!

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 27 (2015)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

SPECIAL JOURNAL ISSUE IN HONOR OF KYOKO SELDEN

The Review of Japanese Culture and Society, volume 27 is a special issue to honor the memory and contributions of Kyoko Selden.

Flute Boy, watercolor by Kyoko Selden.
From the family’s personal collection.

This special issue edited by Alisa Freedman includes many of Kyoko Selden’s finest translations, including some not previously published. They reveal the range and depth of Kyoko’s interests and knowledge. Her interpretations of modern literature, of writings about the atomic bomb, and of fiction and poetry by women writers, are well known—but her translations of the fourteenth-century Taiheiki: The Chronicle of Great Peace and the Tokugawa era Hinin Taiheiki: The Paupers’ Chronicle of Peace, published for the first time in this issue, reveal her sure grasp of the classical canon as well. The power of Kyoko’s translation work, her ability to bring a new text into being, and the subtle creativity of her expression, are hallmarks of her achievements.

1 In Remembrance of Kyoko Selden
Mizuta Noriko, 1

2 Remembering Kyoko Selden
Brett de Bary, 3

3 Introduction to the Special Issue in Honor of Kyoko Selden
Alisa Freedman, 6

Continue reading “Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 27 (2015)”

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 26 (2014)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

COMMENSURABLE DISTINCTIONS: INTERCULTURAL NEGOTIATIONS OF MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY JAPANESE VISUAL CULTURE

1 Guest Editors’ Introduction
Bert Winther-Tamaki and Kenichi Yoshida, 1

ARTICLES

Intersectionality

2 Six Episodes of Convergence Between Indian, Japanese, and Mexican Art from the Late Nineteenth Century to the Present
Bert Winther-Tamaki, 13

Continue reading “Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 26 (2014)”

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 25 (2013)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

Working Words: New Approaches to Japanese Studies

From the editors
Mizuta Noriko, Miya Elise Mizuta, Haga Kōichi, Natta Phisphumvidhi, v

ARTICLES

Working Words: New Approaches to Japanese Studies
Jordan Sand, Alan Tansman, Dennis Washburn, 1

Continue reading “Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 25 (2013)”

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 24 (2012)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

Beyond Tenshin:
Okakura Kakuzo’s Multiple Legacies

Dedication
to Kyoko Iriye Selden (1936-2013)

Images

Acknowledgements
Noriko Murai, Yukio Lippit, xi

ARTICLES

1 Okakura Kakuzō: A Reintroduction
Noriko Murai, Yukio Lippit, 1

Continue reading “Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 24 (2012)”