Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 3 (July 2019)

Preview volume 73 number 3 titles below and find content of all 8 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Stream Benthic Macroinvertebrate Assemblages Reveal the Importance of a Recently Established Freshwater Protected Area in a Tropical Watershed
Elfritzson M. Peralta, Alexis E. Belen, Gelsie Rose Buenaventura, Francis Godwin G. Cantre, Katharine Grace R. Espiritu, Jana Nicole A. De Vera, Cristine P. Perez, Aleziz Kryzzien V. Tan, Irisse Bianca B. De Jesus, Paul Palomares, Jonathan Carlo A. Briones, Tohru Ikeya, Francis S. Magbanua, Rey Donne S. Papa, and Noboru Okuda

Island Hopping in a Biodiversity Hotspot Archipelago: Reconstructed Invasion History and Updated Status and Distribution of Alien Frogs in the Philippines
Arman N. Pili, Emerson Y. Sy, Mae Lowe L. Diesmos, and Arvin C. Diesmos

Importance of Non-native Honeybees (Apis mellifera) as Flower Visitors to the Hawaiian Tree ‘Ōhi‘a Lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) Across an Elevation Gradient
Camila A. Cortina, Clare E. Aslan, and Stacey J. Litson

Screening and Biosecurity for White-nose Fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Ascomycota: Pseudeurotiaceae) in Hawai‘i
Violeta L. Zhelyazkova, Nia L. Toshkova, Serena E. Dool, Frank J. Bonaccorso, Corinna A. Pinzari, Kristina Montoya-Aiona, and Sebastien J. Puechmaille

Genetic and Morphological Diversity in Aphis gossypii  Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in the Pacific Basin
Ross H. Miller, Robert G. Foottit, Eric Maw, and Keith S. Pike

Age, Growth and Mortality of the Goldlined Seabream Rhabdosargus sarba in Waters off Southwestern Taiwan
Shoou-Jeng Joung, Yu-Yung Shyh, Kwang-Ming Liu, and Shyh-Bin Wang

Morphology and Behavior of Gametes and Zoospores from the Plant-Parasitic Green Algae, Cephaleuros  (Chlorophyta, Ulvophyceae)
Narasinee Thithuan, Penpadsorn Bunjonsiri, and Anurag Sunpapao

New Chromosome Number Reports for Angiosperms Native or Introduced to Hawai‘i, with Additional Reports for Fiji and Samoa
Michael Kiehn, and David H. Lorence


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Celebrating Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month with Free Journal Content

We are proud to publish an extensive list of Pacific, Asian, and Southeast Asian studies journals. This Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month, explore and enjoy the following free journal content online:

Open Access Journals:

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Language Documentation & Conservation

Palapala: a journal of Hawaiian language and literature

Free journal content online:

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific (46#1, 2007)

Asian Theatre Journal: Official Journal of the Association for Asian Performance (23#1, 2006)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture (1, 2007)

Buddhist-Christian Studies: Official Journal of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (27, 2007)

China Review International: Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies (15#1, 2008)

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs (15#1, 2003)

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review (3#1, 2014)

The Hawaiian Journal of History (49, 2015)

Journal of Daoist Studies (8, 2015)

Journal of Korean Religions (6#1, 2015)

Korean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans Abroad (29, 2005)

MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing: New Writing from America, the Pacific, and Asia (19#1, 2007)

Oceanic Linguistics: Current Research on Languages of the Oceanic Area (50#2, 2011)

Pacific Science: Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region (71#4, 2017)

Philosophy East & West: A Quarterly of Comparative Philosophy (53#3, 2007)

Rapa Nui Journal: The journal of the Easter Island Foundation (30#2, 2016)

Review of Japanese Culture and Society (24, 2012)

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (45, 2013)

Asian Perspectives 58-1
Asian Theatre Journal 36-1 cover

Visit our website to learn more about our publications or to subscribe.

 

Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 2 (April 2019)

FIGURE 6 from Robert Perger’s article A New Species of Johngarthia from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae): Johngarthia oceanica sp. nov., Socorro I., body color in life (specimens not collected): (A) male (photograph by Jorge Ramón Reyes Olvera, Mexico); (B and C) males (photographs by Vince Scheidt, San Diego, U.S.A.); (D) female (photograph by Omar de Jesus Franco, Mexico); (E and F) gender unknown (photographs by Hartmut S. Walter, University of California, Los Angeles).

This second issue of volume 73 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article Seasonality and Prevalence of Pollen Collected from Hawaiian Nectarivorous Birds by Kathryn N. van Dyk, Kristina L. Paxton, Patrick J. Hart, and Even H. Paxton.

Preview volume 73 number 2 below and find a list of all 9 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Sympatric Invasive Rats Show Different Diets in a Tropical Rainforest of an Island Biodiversity Hotspot
Duron Quiterie, Bourguet Edouard, Thibault Martin, Scussel Sarah, Gouyet Raphaël, Méheut Mathilde, and Vidal Eric

Using DNA to Identify the Source of Invasive Mongooses, Herpestes auropunctatus (Carnivora: Herpestidae) Captured on Kaua‘i, Hawaiian Islands
Darren J. Wostenberg, Matthew W. Hopken, Aaron B. Shiels, and Antoinette J. Piaggio

Migration by the Japanese Wood Pigeon (Columba janthina) Across the Islands of East Asia: Direct Tracking by Satellite Telemetry
Soon Kyoo Choi, Yung Chul Park, Jong Chul Park, Gi Chang Bing, and Woo Yuel Kim

Environmental Correlates for Seed Desiccation Sensitivity of New Caledonian Plant Species
Octavie Toublanc-Lambault, Robin Pouteau, Marion Davezies, Manon Marron, Anthony Pain, Bruno Fogliani, and Philippe Marmey

Macrobenthic Biomass and Secondary Production in the Northern East China Sea and the Relative Importance of Environmental Variables
Qingxi Han, and Xiaobo Wang

Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Occurrence and Interactions with Marine Mammals Off Peru
Juan Pablo Testino, Andrea Petit, Belén Acorta, Aldo S. Pacheco, Sebastian Silva, Joanna Alfaro-Shigueto, David Sarmiento, Javier Quiñones, Alberto More Eche, Eduardo Motta, Sara Fernandez, Elizabeth Campbell, Geyby Carrillo, Maurice Epstein, Miguel Llapapasca, and Adriana González-Pestana

Apparent Low Densities of Small Cetaceans in Okinawa may be due to Uncontrolled Local Hunting
Thomas A. Jefferson, and Michael F. Richlen

A New Species of Johngarthia  from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae)
Robert Perger


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Pacific Science
Vol. 73 No. 2
April 2019

Pacific Science-Call for Submissions

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Pacific Science: A Quarterly Devoted to the Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region is edited by Curtis Daehler, Dept. of Botany, University of Hawai‘i.

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics. In addition to publishing original research, the journal features review articles providing a synthesis of current knowledge. The official journal of the Pacific Science Association. Continue reading “Pacific Science-Call for Submissions”

Pacific Science Vol. 73 No. 1 (January 2019)

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Figure 4 from the article “Taiwan’s Dacini Fruit Flies: Rare Endemics and Abundant Pests, along Altitudinal Gradients” by Camiel Doorenwerd, Luc Leblanc, Yu-Feng Hsu, Chia-Lung Huang, Yu-Chi Lin, Michael San Jose, and Daniel Rubinoff. Bactrocera dorsaloides, voucher number ms4389, first recorded for Taiwan. (A) dorsal view, (B) head, frontal view, (C) abdomen detail photo, dorsal view, (D) lateral view, (E) detail photo of the wing.

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The first issue in volume 73 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article “Talāsiga Lands in Fiji: Their Potential Expansion through Modern Farming Activities” by R.J. Morrison, and eight more research articles.

Preview volume 73 number 1 below and find a list of all articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE. Continue reading “Pacific Science Vol. 73 No. 1 (January 2019)”

Pacific Science Vol. 72 No. 4 (October 2018)

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From the article “New Distribution Records of Cetaceans from the Federated States of Micronesia,” by Donald W. Buden and Allain Bourgoin. Cetaceans recorded on Pohnpei for the first time: Kogia sp., A, whole body, ventral view; B, undersurface of head showing teeth and jaws. Globicephala macrorhynchusC, whole body; D, oblique view of head showing teeth and jaws.

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The fourth issue in volume 72 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article “Nocturnal Visual Census of Pelagic Fauna Using Scuba near Kona, Hawaiʻi”, eight more research articles, plus an index to all of volume 72. Continue reading “Pacific Science Vol. 72 No. 4 (October 2018)”

Pacific Science, vol. 72, no. 3 (July 2018)

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The third issue in volume 72 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article “Variation in Dorsal Fin Morphology in Common Bottle Nose Dolphin Populations from the Southeast Pacific Ocean”, plus eight more research articles. Continue reading “Pacific Science, vol. 72, no. 3 (July 2018)”

Pacific Science, vol. 72, no. 2 (April 2018)

Picture of a feral pig on Hawai'i Island
Lactating feral pig, Sus scrofa, on Hawai‘i Island from “Biology and Impacts of Pacific Islands Invasive Species. 14. Sus scrofa, the Feral Pig (Artiodactyla: Suidae)” in this issue. (Photo: U.S. Geological Survey.)

The second issue in volume 72 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, includes the 14th article in the “Biology and Impacts of Pacific Islands Invasive Species” series, plus seven more research articles.

Preview volume 72, number 2 below and find a list of all articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

Contents

…plus Association Affairs from the PSA.


Find the full text of the issue at BioOne


Browse the TOC and read full text online at Project MUSE


Cover of Pacific Science volume 72, number 2 (April 2018)
Pacific Science volume 72, number 2 (April 2018)

About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Pacific Science, vol. 72, no. 1 (January 2018)

A blue shark
A blue shark (Prionace glauca) caught by a Japanese research vessel in the western North Pacific Ocean. Fujinami et al. (this issue) analyzed feeding habits of blue sharks in the Northwestern Pacific. Photo credit: Akira Kurashima, National Research Institute of Far Seas Fisheries.

Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, begins 2018 with new research on sharks, dolphins, cats, and more biological and physical studies. Preview volume 72, number 1 below and find a list of all articles available on Bio-One and Project MUSE.

Contents

  • Loss of Reservoir Capacity through Sedimentation in Hawai‘i: Management Implications for the Twenty-First Century by Kim Falinski and David Pen

  • Feeding Habits of the Blue Shark (Prionace glauca) in the Northwestern Pacific Based on Stomach Contents and Stable Isotope Ratios by Yuki Fujinami, Sayaka Nakatsuka, and Seiji Ohshimo

  • Presence, Behavior, and Resighting Pattern of Transient Bottlenose Dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in the Humboldt Current System off North-Central Chile by Macarena Santos-Carvallo, Maritza Sepúlveda, Rodrigo Moraga, Mauricio F. Landaeta, Doris Oliva, and María José Pérez-Alvarez

  • Modeling Impacts of Hunting on Control of an Insular Feral Cat Population by Brian T. Leo, James J. Anderson, James Ha, Reese B. Phillips, and Renee R. Ha

  • Resource Availability, Propagule Supply, and Effect of Nonnative Ungulate Herbivores on Senecio madagascariensis Invasion by Erin J. Questad, Amanda Uowolo, Sam Brooks, Robert Fitch, and Susan Cordell

…plus more articles and Association Affairs from the PSA.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


Pacific Science 72:1
Pacific Science vol. 72, no. 1 (January 2018)

About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

#LookItUP: Climate Change and Natural Disasters in UHP Journals

 

upweekiconThis is Part 6 in a series of University of Hawai`i Press blog posts celebrating University Press Week and highlighting scholarship published by UH Press journals in the past year. Read our introductory blog post here. Our hope is that this series will shed new light on how UH Press “sells the facts,” so to speak, and the value our 24 journals bring to our very existence. Links to each journal and article are provided below.*


Climate Change and Natural Disasters

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the PacificVolume 56, Number 2, 201700_AP_c1-4_blog
Article:
“The Search for Tsunami Evidence in the Geological and Archaeological Records, With a Focus on Japan” by Gina L. Barnes

Context: Archeologist Gina L. Barnes takes a look at tsunami sites through the lens of disaster preparedness: “tsunami damage seldom leads to collapse of a society or civilization, though the socio-economic status of the affected society is crucial to the nature of human response […] Disaster archaeology, including tsunami archaeology, is thus a timely and welcome approach to understanding the situation of the world today.”

 

Pacific Science: A Quarterly Devoted to the Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific RegionVolume 71, Number 4, October 2017Pacific Science 71:4 cover image
Article: “Estimating Cost-Effectiveness of Hawaiian Dry Forest Restoration Using Spatial Changes in Water Yield and Landscape Flammability under Climate Change” by Christopher A. Wada, Leah L. Bremer, Kimberly Burnett, Clay Trauernicht, Thomas Giambelluca, Lisa Mandle, Elliott Parsons, Charlotte Weil, Natalie Kurashima, and Tamara Ticktin

Context: This study joins dozens of Pacific Science research articles that show the effects of climate change, and it appears with seven open-access articles that focus on the challenges facing native forest restoration in Hawai’i and the Pacific region. (And while we’re “selling the facts,” we should mention Pacific Science also published a peer-reviewed biological fact in the past year: the discovery of a new species of Stylasterid in the Northwest Hawaiian Islands.)

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast GeographersVolume 79, 2017APCG Yearbook 79 cover
Article:
“Institutional Obstacles to Beaver Recolonization and Potential Climate Change Adaptation in Oregon, USA” by Jeff Baldwin

Context: As streams dry up due to climate change, beaver are being displaced from their natural habitats. This study critically examines five institutional blockages to beaver recolonization in Oregon through multiple interviews, policies, and publications.

 

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island AffairsVolume 29, Number 2, 2017
Section: “Year in Review: International Issues and Events” by Nic Maclellan

00_29.2 cover 1Context: Nic Maclellan reflects on the U.S.’s political influence on the Pacific region, especially as it relates to environmental regulation: “Debates over climate action, West Papua, fisheries, and trade continued as a feature of regional affairs in 2016, often dividing Pacific governments and their international partners. The election of Donald Trump as U.S. president in November set the stage for these divisions to continue, given Trump’s statements during the election campaign on climate change and America’s new directions in foreign policy.” This introduction is followed by more reports from the field, including Fiji, Papua, Solomon Islands, and Vanuatu. Also appearing in this issue: “Climate Change and the Imagining of Migration: Emerging Discourses on Kiribati’s Land Purchase in Fiji” by Elfriede Hermann and Wolfgang Kempf.

*Institutional access to online aggregators such as Project MUSE may be required for full-text reading. For access questions, please see the Project MUSE FAQ available here or contact your local library.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

Interview: Pacific Science 71:4 special section editors

Published this October, Pacific Science volume 71, no. 4 arrived with a special section on habitat restoration, which includes seven open-access articles. We asked Editor-in-Chief Curtis C. Daehler and guest editors Melissa Price and Robert J. Toonen to weigh in on this issue’s special topic and other research important to the quarterly science journal. 

Image of He'eia National Estuarine Research Reserve
This scenic photo shows the He’eia National Estuarine Research Reserve, where some Pacific Science 71:4 contributors did their research. The reserve is managed in partnership by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the State of Hawai’i. (Photo by Manuel Meija of The Nature Conservancy.)

Vol. 71, Issue 4 includes a special feature: “Scaling Up Restoration Efforts in the Pacific Islands.” Why devote a whole section to this topic?

We have lost a lot of native species to habitat destruction in the Pacific region. Today, considerable attention is being given to protecting native ecosystems, for example, in the Hawai‘i Governor’s Sustainable Hawai‘i Initiative to protect 30% of the state’s watersheds by 2030. However, much less attention is given to restoration efforts, or the conversion of nonnative to native-dominated habitats. Invaded ecosystems may be more at risk for wildfires, and may enhance invasions of nearby native ecosystems. A few large-scale restoration success stories exist, such as that of Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, and there are a number of small-scale efforts across the Pacific led by nonprofit groups. In this issue, we hope to promote conversations about how we can scale up restoration efforts to improve resiliency, promote ecosystem services, and reduce extinction rates across the Pacific region.

Koolaus 2
Melissa Price, guest editor of Pacific Science vol. 71, no. 4, is an assistant professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, CTAHR, at UH Mānoa. She provided this picture from her field work.

What challenges did you face in the creation of this special section?

The biggest challenges were representing the range of work being done around the Pacific and asking those working at small scales to think about how their work might be scaled-up. Also, a number of projects were just getting started, and it may be decades before there are results from these efforts. Finally, truly transformative work will likely be transdisciplinary. People involved in restoration must partner across sectors to solve challenging problems associated with restoration, such as seed production, removal of invasive plants and animals, and access for equipment and people to remote locations. We still have a long way to go in these areas, but we hope that this special collection will spark productive conversations.

Continue reading “Interview: Pacific Science 71:4 special section editors”

Pacific Science, vol. 71, no. 4 (October 2017)

A visual interpretation for a spatial model of the social-ecological zones (wao kanaka, wao lā`au, wao nāhele, wao kele, wao akua) implemented during the aliʻi-era for the ahupuaʻa of Hāʻena, Haleleʻa, Kauaʻi. This model is being used by contemporary resource managers to inform large-scale biocultural conservation and forest restoration efforts within this social-ecological system (see Winter & Lucas, this issue for additional details; image credit: Ben Nyberg).

The October 2017 issue of Pacific Science begins with a Special Feature, which includes seven open-access articles available on Project MUSE and Bio-One.

Special Feature: Scaling Up Restoration Efforts in the Pacific Islands (Open-Access)

Continue reading “Pacific Science, vol. 71, no. 4 (October 2017)”