Korean Studies Special Section: Music That Moves

This year’s issue of Korean Studies (Volume 46) features a special section, “Music That Moves: Sonic Narratives in Modern Korea,” guest edited by Dafna Zur and Susan Hwang. The six articles that comprise this section explore transnational religiosity and Cold War politics, resistance in protest songs, North Korea’s sonic culture, South Korea’s use of K-pop in marketing and more.

Here guest editors Dafna Zur and Susan Hwang discuss the “Music that Moves.”

Left: Susan Hwang (courtesy of author). Right: Dafna Zur (Do Pham / Stanford University)


University of Hawai‘i Press: Tell us how this special section came together.

Zur and Hwang: We have been working together for the last few years as members of the LLC Korean Forum at the Modern Language Association. When it was our turn to brainstorm panel ideas for the MLA’s annual convention, we landed on music. We realized that we had a lot in common—we were both trained as literary scholars, but we wanted to explore the relationship between music and text. Our panelists presented their work in January 2021, and this volume is a result of that panel.

UHP: This special section engages with Korean music from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Why was this important to you?

Editors: Although the contributors in our special section come from different disciplinary backgrounds—musicology, ethnomusicology, history, literature, and cultural studies—music is our common denominator. We gathered a group of scholars who were keen on engaging with different musical forms—music as scores, as voices coming from the throats of children and protesters, as part of mass consumption, as background tracks to epic narratives—and who were willing to cross disciplinary boundaries and think about music as a manifestation of cultural and historical phenomena. As many of us were scholars of text rather than music, we often found ourselves outside our comfort zone—at one point, Dafna consulted her father, a composer, on her musical analysis (he is acknowledged in the footnotes!). We hope to encourage others to take up the study of music in its multiple forms.

An early score of "March for the Beloved" (Source: The May 18th Memorial Foundation).
An early score of “March for the Beloved” (Source: The May 18th Memorial Foundation).

UHP: In addition to multiple disciplines, the articles cover a substantial period of time, from the colonial period to the 21st century. Overall, do you see any patterns in Korean music over time? Or perhaps change or conflicts?

Editors: Our project demonstrates that a broad historical perspective can highlight both the transnational and local qualities of Korean music. We cover, for instance, the impact of Western music on Korean composers who wrote children’s songs, the mobilization of affect through Christian hymns and sounds of war, and the revitalization of kut in modern practice of “folk” culture and the branding power of K-pop. Besides bringing attention to the qualities of music across time and in different geographic locations, our project also stays attentive to the richness of musical genres—songs, sound effects, accents and vocalization, background tracks—that lend themselves to textual and musical analysis. 

Burl Ives and the World Vision Korean Orphan Choir Sing of Faith and Joy album cover. Word Records W-3259-LP, 1963, LP. Featured in “From Waifs to Songbirds: The World Vision Korean Orphan Choir” by Katherine In-Young Lee, this issue.
Burl Ives and the World Vision Korean Orphan Choir Sing of Faith and Joy album cover. Word Records W-3259-LP, 1963, LP. Featured in “From Waifs to Songbirds: The World Vision Korean Orphan Choir” by Katherine In-Young Lee, this issue.

UHP: Why, in your opinion, is this special section important now?

Editors: For the last 15-20 years, Korean studies has enjoyed a surge of interest in the study of Korean culture and language, especially among high-school and college students. This success is largely thanks to the explosive popularity of K-pop around the globe. We continue to witness the power of music, such as civic engagement and political solidarity, that emerges from K-pop fandom. Two interrelated questions that the papers in this special section address are, how did the forces of social change and technological innovations impact the way people engage with music, and how did music as an affective force facilitate paradigmatic shifts in modern Korean history? It was important for us to show alternative forms of Korean music that have contributed to its enduring power.

UHP: How do you hope readers will utilize this special section in their own work?

The articles in the special section deal with a wide range of genres and sonorities from different historical periods. There are YouTube links to music in many of them. We hope scholars will find our articles accessible and teachable, and that the articles will contribute to our ongoing efforts to contextualize the current moment of Korean music’s success.

Graphic Medicine: Life Writing and Comics from Biography

In Graphic Medicine, the new monograph from the Biography quarterly, comics artists and scholars of life writing, literature, and comics explore the lived experience of illness and disability through original texts, images, and the dynamic interplay between the two.

The essays and autobiographical comics in this collection respond to the medical humanities’ call for different perceptions and representations of illness and disability than those found in conventional medical discourse. The collection expands and troubles our understanding of the relationships between patients and doctors, nurses, social workers, caregivers, and family members, considering such encounters in terms of cultural context, language, gender, class, and ethnicity. By treating illness and disability as an experience of fundamentally changed living, rather than a separate narrative episode organized by treatment, recovery, and a return to “normal life,” Graphic Medicine asks what it means to give and receive care.

During the past decade, graphic medicine comics have proliferated—an outpouring accelerated recently by the greatest health crisis in a century. Here, guest editors Erin La Cour and Anna Poletti discuss the collection.


University of Hawai‘i Press: Tell us how this special issue came together.

La Cour and Poletti: The idea for the special issue came from the Amsterdam Comics Conference in 2018, where there were a number of papers that explored graphic medicine. We became interested in bringing scholars and artists together to think about how the discourse of graphic medicine had developed and what future directions it might move in. We wanted to create an opportunity for interdisciplinary and intergenerational conversations about narratives of illness and disability in comics form, as well as consider what the limits of graphic medicine might be.

The final page of John Miers’s comic “Conflict Compromise?: An Imagined Conversation with John Hicklenton and Lindsay Cooper about Living with Multiple Sclerosis” in Graphic Medicine, pp. 25–38
The final page of John Miers’s comic “Conflict Compromise?: An Imagined Conversation with John Hicklenton and Lindsay Cooper about Living with Multiple Sclerosis” in Graphic Medicine, pp. 25–38

UHP: In the introduction, you pose the questions, “What can lifewriting scholars add to the burgeoning interest in life writing in comics form, and how might this new field of interest provoke lifewriting scholars to think differently about life writing?” How do you think this collection might provide an answer?

Editors: Our hope is that the special issue answers these questions by demonstrating that practitioners who reflect on their creative work are some of the most important theorists of graphic medicine’s potential uses and limitations. We also think that the investment in graphic medicine as a way of intervening in how medicine is practiced provides life writing scholars with fresh challenges in terms of thinking about how life writing is used, and the kinds of stakes people and institutions have in personal storytelling.

“Frame of Mind #1” by Nancy K. Miller in her essay “‘Is This Recover?’: Chronicity and Closure in Graphic Illness Memoir” in Graphic Medicine, pp. 53–70


“Frame of Mind #1” by Nancy K. Miller in her essay “‘Is This Recover?’: Chronicity and Closure in Graphic Illness Memoir” in Graphic Medicine, pp. 53–70

UHP: The cover features the work of Grant Gronewold, whose work does not “seek to translate the experience of chronic illness” but offers the “opportunity to learn the language” the artist developed to describe his world. Why did you choose to feature Gronewold on the cover, and how does this image serve as an entry to the collection?

Editors: We chose to commission an original image from Grant because of his highly developed symbolism: his images reward close attention and repeated viewing. We believe his work powerfully demonstrates that comics can (and do) communicate something of the experience of illness and disability that prose or poetry cannot. The way he places the figure in a landscape alongside objects of medical treatment (the giant scalpel, the bag of “patient clothes”) registers the social and political position of someone who is ill very evocatively and, we think, signals the thought-provoking nature of the comics and articles the special issue contains.

 “Disability Daily Drawn: A Comics Collaboration” by JoAnn Purcell in collaboration with Simone Purcell Randmaa in Graphic Medicine, pp. 97–115
“Disability Daily Drawn: A Comics Collaboration” by JoAnn Purcell in collaboration with Simone Purcell Randmaa in Graphic Medicine, pp. 97–115

UHP: What was the most challenging thing about creating this collection?

Editors: Without doubt, the pandemic. We had originally planned to bring all our contributors together for a physical meeting where the pieces would be workshopped, and we had to move that online. Our contributors were generous and flexible in finding other ways to read and respond to each other’s work.

Final page of Safdar Ahmed’s “Graphic Confessions and the Vulnerability Hangover from Hell” in Graphic Medicine, pp. 133–146
Final page of Safdar Ahmed’s “Graphic Confessions and the Vulnerability Hangover from Hell” in Graphic Medicine, pp. 133–146

 

UHP:  Since its publication, how has the response been?

Editors: We are getting lots of positive feedback about how beautiful the book is. A number of colleagues have commented on how much they like the range of contributions and the critical perspective the contributors bring to graphic medicine in terms of ethics and aesthetics.

UHP:  How do you hope to see this collection exist in your field and the wider community?

Editors: Our hope is that some of the graphic medicine programs in medical schools might adopt the collection so that health communicators and doctors can continue to reflect on their role as readers and distributors of life writing about illness and disability.

Cover of Graphic Medicine the Manoa Journal Volume 32 Issue (2020)
Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly, vol. 44, nos. 2 & 3, 2021

Get Graphic Medicine for 30% off

Buy the book today with code GMED30 for 30% off, valid until Dec. 31, 2022

Subscribe to Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly

Subscribe now and get Graphic Medicine as part of your Biography subscription.

Read Graphic Medicine on Project MUSE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Publishing in Academic Journals: Pro Tips from an Editor

An experienced editor offers authors practical advice about navigating the journal publishing process in an open access guide, “Publishing in Academic Journals: Pro Tips from U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal.”

Alisa Freedman gathers her experience as editor-in-chief of U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal from 2016-2022 to create this pragmatic how-to guide that details the process from submission to publication, what to expect and when, and who does what. Her suggestions draw from the humanities and qualitative social sciences, but the advice is also useful to scholars in other fields. 

This guide addresses the following common questions and more:

  • How long it takes to publish a peer reviewed article
  • How to choose the right journal for your article
  • How a journal article’s structure differs from a dissertation chapter
  • What happens when two reviewers offer differing recommendations
  • Obtaining permissions to use images in an article
  • What happens after an article is accepted for publication

Thanks to Alisa Freedman for illuminating this editing and production process for prospective authors! Find the publishing guide on Project MUSE.

USJWJ62

Call for Papers: U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal


The U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal welcomes contributions from all academic fields in the social sciences and humanities. The journal publishes new research, review articles, and translations. Manuscripts should be between 6,000 and 10,000 words, including the alphabetical list of Works Cited and endnotes. Submissions will be reviewed by the USJWJ editors and anonymously by outside reviewers. Please review the complete Submission Guidelines.

Free Special Issue: Celebrating 60+ Issues of U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal

A new digital-only special issue from U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal is now available free to readers on Project MUSE. 

“Celebrating 60+ Issues of U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal centers on three themes that often appear in the journal: mobility, storytelling, and activism. The journal is the world’s oldest periodical devoted to the study of gender and Japan and was founded in 1988 by Japanese feminists who were educated in the United States.

The issue brings together seven previously published articles of significance, which:

  • Profiles women from diverse backgrounds who worked abroad during different historical moments and changed how people in Japan, the United States, and France regarded each other 
  • Explores how cancer disrupts women’s life courses and relationships, including the first English translation of Ogino Anna’s quasi-autobiographical short story, “Nue / 鵺”
  • Analyzes the prevalent images of sweets and desserts in shōjo manga in how they symbolize power relationships and essentialize girls
  • Investigates the online feminist movement #KuToo, which disclosed exploitative workplace and political cultures and empowered women to try to change them

“All of these seven articles explain that, due to laws, social conventions, business practices, and other factors, women have faced different choices in work and family and different access to education, jobs, and politics than people of other genders. They show how women have coped with public and personal traumas, initiated movements for change and equality, and formed communities. They account for diversity among Japanese women and dispel stereotypes. They capture accounts omitted from historical records,” writes Alisa Freedman in the special issue’s introduction.

Alisa Freedman served as the the journal’s editor-in-chief from 2016-2022, is a professor of Japanese literature, cultural studies, and gender at the University of Oregon, and author of several books. She dedicates the commemorative issue to the journals’ previous editors: Drs. Yoko Kawashima, Noriko Mizuta, Sally A. Hastings, and Jan Bardsley.

Read the commemorative issue free on Project MUSE here.

Q & A with Editor in Chief of Pacific Science David Duffy

Photograph provided by David Duffy
Photograph provided by David Duffy

David Duffy has been editor of Pacific Science since January of 2021, however he has articles published within the journal for over a decade including “Biology and Impacts of Pacific Island Invasive Species. 7. The Domestic Cat (Felis catus)” (Volume 66, Number 2) and “Has the Small Indian Mongoose Become Established on Kaua‘i Island, Hawai‘i?” (Volume 69, Number 4)Outside of Pacific Science, Duffy has authored more than 100 scientific publications and is the founding editor of the journal Waterbirds.

On the School of Life Sciences page for the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Duffy characterizes himself as “a jack of all trades having worked on seabirds, Lyme Disease, fish schooling, old growth forest, El Niño, and mapping biodiversity. Here in Hawaiʻi, I ran the Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit for two decades, bringing in over a quarter of a billion dollars to UH and helping to grow basic and applied conservation biology. I am continuing my studies of the Peruvian upwelling and Alaskan seabirds, editing Pacific Science, and trying to sustain and improve the research environment at UH.”

Below Duffy shares with UH Press what its been like these last two years as the editorial head for Pacific Science:

University of Hawai‘i Press: You took on the editor role starting with our January 2021 issue, not even a year into the pandemic.  What were some of the challenges you faced then, and is that still an issue with the creation of these articles and research now?

David Duffy: The last two years have been very rough on researchers who could not get to their study sites. They are now catching up, which means there will be a lag before they go to publish their results so we aren’t seeing as many submissions as before COVID-19.  Researchers are extra busy so many journals including ours are finding it is harder to get peers to review manuscripts to vet them for publication. 

UHP: How do you see Pacific Science having the most relevance, in the classroom or in the field?

DD: Pacific Science is more aimed at the working scientist but it continues to be useful as a classroom resource to introduce students to scientific writing.

UHP: Is there an issue or article you are particularly proud of?

DD: The next one! We want to keep getting better.

UHP: What is next for Pacific Science? Any special issues in the works? 

DD: We depend on workers sending us good papers of general interests to Pacific scientists. We will make the submission process as efficient as possible. We are also increasing our efforts to offer editorial support for those for whom English is not their first language. Finally we hope to produce a memorial volume honoring a scientist who played a major role in Pacific Science.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS:

Established in 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Manuscript submissions on topics such as Pacific biodiversity, conservation, and sustainability are also encouraged. In addition to publishing original research, the journal features review articles providing a synthesis of current knowledge. Please review the complete Author Guidelines, available online. Manuscripts can be submitted online here:

New: Journal of Polynesian Archaeology and Research

As the state celebrates Hawai‘i Archaeology Week (Sept. 26-Oct. 2), two non-profit organizations join forces to launch the Journal of Polynesian Archaeology and Research, an open-access title that will soon accept submissions for its inaugural issue.

For more than three decades, both the Society for Hawaiian Archaeology (SHA) and the Easter Island Foundation (EIF) have been committed to promoting research and dialogue on the archaeology of Polynesia. While distribution of previous publications was limited to members, this new journal will be published open-access and freely available to all readers. Distributed by the University of Hawai‘i Press, the journal will publish peer-reviewed research articles, commentaries, and reviews that are of relevance to stakeholders and practitioners of archaeology and related research in Polynesia.

The Journal of Polynesian Archaeology and Research will be co-edited by Dr. Mara Mulrooney (board member of the EIF and current president of SHA) and Dr. Jillian Swift (board member and publications chair of SHA). The two editors developed the new journal as a forum to bring together important research and conversations around archaeology, history, and heritage management in Polynesia that are of significant relevance to both organizations. The new journal also brings into alignment several shared goals of the EIF and SHA, which include:

  • Encouraging research and dialogue about Polynesian archaeology, historic preservation, and public outreach among researchers, heritage professionals, and other stakeholders
  • Encouraging public education and appreciation of the aims and limitations of archaeological research, particularly through ethical archaeological practices and collaborative work with communities
  • Advocating for and assisting with the preservation, interpretation, and respectful treatment of archaeological sites and material culture

“The Journal of Polynesian Archaeology and Research will continue the tradition of publishing cutting-edge results of archaeological research in Hawai’i and throughout Polynesia, as well as providing a forum for discussion and debate regarding archaeological practice in the region,” notes Professor Patrick V. Kirch of UH Mānoa. Kirch has been involved with both of the organizations’ previous publications as a previous Editor and Editorial Board Member, and will serve on the Editorial Board for the new journal. “I expect that the Journal will be an essential resource for both scholars and the engaged public.”

This fall, the editors will review manuscripts through the journal submission system (forthcoming), and in 2023 the first issue will be published on eVols, the University of Hawai‘i’s open-access, digital institutional repository for both the university community and researchers around the world.

The Journal of Polynesian Archaeology and Research will replace two journals that will cease publication, Hawaiian Archaeology (published by SHA) and Rapa Nui Journal (published by UH Press in collaboration with the EIF). Over the past 30 years, Rapa Nui Journal published more than 33 volumes and Hawaiian Archaeology published 15 volumes and four special publications. The archive of both publications will also be freely available via eVols.

For more information, visit uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/jpar

About the Easter Island Foundation

The Easter Island Foundation was founded in 1989 with the aim of creating a library on Rapa Nui (Easter Island) to house the collections of anthropologist William Mulloy and to encourage study and research about the island. The Foundation’s mission is to work towards the conservation and protection of Rapa Nui and its history, culture, and environment.  Its scholarship program annually provides assistance to college students of Rapanui ancestry to help with their educational costs. Additionally, the Foundation works to promote, stimulate, and disseminate research on Rapa Nui and other Polynesian islands by members of scientific, historical, and cultural disciplines.

About the Society for Hawaiian Archaeology

Founded in 1980, the Society for Hawaiian Archaeology’s mission is to promote and stimulate interest and research in the archaeology of the Hawaiian Islands through an annual conference, workshops, and other networking opportunities for its membership. It also seeks to serve as a bond among those interested in Hawaiian archaeology, both professionals and non-professionals, and aid in directing their efforts into more scientific channels as well as encourage the publication of their results.

Working Out What to Wear in Papua New Guinea + Other Journal Articles for #FashionWeek 

In recognition of Fashion Week in New York, Milan, Paris, and London this month, we showcase the following journals, articles, and reviews. Fashion sets trends, makes a statement, and has a huge impact on industry and innovation in today’s world. We invite you to explore the following journal content:

bio 35-4

biography

Volume 35, Number 4 (2012)

The Public Time of Private Space in Dior by Dior
Ilya Parkins and Lara Haworth

Review of Japanese Culture and Society

Volume 29 (2017)

Report: From “Do It Yourself” to “Do It With Others” to “Do It For Others”—Can Fashion Be Renewed? Forum
Mizuno Daijirō, Kanemori Kaori, Takeuchi Akira, Nagai Kōsuke, Narumi Hiroshi, and Yoonkyung Kim

Honoring David L. Rolsten, Sonic Narratives in Modern Korea  + Girls in Japanese Literature

CHINOPERL

Volume 41, Number 1 (2022)

Special Issue: Honoring David L. Rolston

Associate Editor Catherine Swatek and Editorial Board Member Robert E. Hegel remember Rolston in the following introduction:

Given his publication record, one might assume that David L. Rolston is a scholar of narrative fiction. For his first major publication, David served as editor of How to Read the Chinese Novel, a milestone in providing English-language readers a glimpse of reading practices and practical criticism contemporaneous with Ming and Qing novels themselves. Not merely the compiler of the translations that comprise six of the book’s seven chapters, David’s work can be seen throughout the volume, from adding innumerable notes and explanations to the “How to Read” (dufa讀法) translations; to writing essays on the sources, history, and formal aspects of traditional fiction criticism; to compiling explanatory appendices and an extensive bibliography for each of the masterworks covered. This project was completed before David finished his Chicago doctorate.

Find more special features and articles at Project MUSE.

Korean Studies 46 (2022)

Korean Studies

Volume 46, Number 2 (2021)

Special Section: “Music That Moves: Sonic Narratives in Modern Korea”

This Special Section features discussion on 1960’s protect songs to K-pop idols. Editor Cheehyung Harrison Kim notes:

Culture is at once a medium through which we make sense of the
world (for good or ill), a field of empowerment for the underprivileged, and a source of hegemony for the state and corporations. This cultural complexity is discernible in South Korea’s current political landscape, and it is also the very theme explored in this volume’s Special Section “Music That Moves: Sonic Narratives in Modern Korea,” dexterously guest edited by Dafna Zur and Susan Hwang. In Katherine Lee’s elegant piece on the World Vision Korean Orphan Choir, musical performance is at the heart of transnational religiosity and Cold War politics. Transnationalism is also the framework of Dafna Zur and Yoon Joo Hwang’s original research on children’s music during the colonial period, when the merger between western style of songwriting and Korean emotionality unevenly transpired in the genre of tongyo. Music as a field of popular resistance is the core of Pil Ho Kim’s audacious piece on South Korea’s 1960s protest songs, which, for Kim, is a pre-minjung expression of the multitude. Susan Hwang’s emotionally prodigious article, too, is on the resistive and resilient aspect of music, which, in the aftermath of the 1980 Kwangju Uprising, served as a crucial repertoire for the counter-state. From the opposite side, music as practice of hegemonic efficacy is dealt with in Alexandra Leonzini and Peter Moody’s intricate article on North Korea’s sonic culture, as it is done in Roald Maliangkay’s perspicacious study on South Korea’s use of K-pop in marketing. Whether the hegemonic entity is the state or a corporation, music is, in these two articles, a potent medium of influence.

Find more special features and articles at Project MUSE.

USJWJ62

U.S. Japan Women’s Journal

Volume 62 (2022)

Special Issue: Girls and Literature

As expressed by authors Hiromi Tsuchiya Dollase and Wakako Suzuki in the introduction:

The literary genre shōjo shōsetsu emerged in conjunction with the rise of girls’ education in the Meiji period. Early stories were meant to educate readers to become “good wives and wise mothers.” Accordingly, shōjo shōsetsu endured restrictions on the narratives they could tell, limiting the breadth of their authors’ artistic and literary possibilities. Shōjo shōsetsu evolved and diversified in the postwar era and, especially starting in the 1980s, became a means for young female authors to empower themselves. Shōjo shōsetsu have declined in popularity recently as readers consume stories more broadly across media and genres. The goal of this special issue is to contemplate the function, meanings, and problems of shōjo shōsetsu. Instead of merely confining ourselves to a rigid, unified notion of shōjo shōsetsu, we consider shōjo characters from the wider literary world, investigating their roles, functions, and cultural implications.


The new issue includes the following articles:

Introduction: Girls and Literature
イントロダクション:少女と文学

Hiromi Tsuchiya Dollase and Wakako Suzuki

Trees That Grow Kimono (1895)
着物のなる木

Wakamatsu Shizuko 若松賤子
Translated by Wakako Suzuki

Kawabata Yasunari’s The Scarlet Gang of Asakusa as the
Territory of the Dispossessed Girl

追い立てられた少女の領域としての『浅草紅団』
Barbara Hartley

Love and Sexuality in Postwar Girls’ Culture: Examining
Tomishima Takeo’s Junior Fictiona
戦後少女文化における恋愛と性愛:富島健夫の

ジュニア小説をめぐって
Hiromi Tsuchiya Dollase

Countdown to the Demise of Girls’ Novels
少女小説のカウントダウンの開始

Kume Yoriko 久米依子
Translated and Introduced by Barbara Hartley

Find more articles at Project MUSE.

New MĀNOA Anthology Offers Unprecedented Collection of Cambodian Literature

Out of the Shadows of Angkor is a groundbreaking collection of prose, poetry, performance pieces, and visual art that emerges from a thirty-year effort of five guest editors to gather and champion Cambodian literary and cultural works. 

In the nearly 400-page MĀNOA volume, this anthology features rare works translated into English for the first time, and has also helped to rescue writing lost during the Khmer Rouge regime (1975–1979). Beautifully designed, Out of the Shadows of Angkor is an outstanding selection of Cambodian writing from the past and present.

Out of the Shadow of Angkor also features the stunning paintings of Theanly Chov from his Surviving series, which capture the future-forward dreams of many Cambodians today. 

Guest editors: Sharon May, Christophe Macquet, Trent Walker, Phina So, Rinith Taing

Series editor: Frank Stewart

Editor Q&A: Cambodian Writing Through the Ages 

Editors of Out of the Shadows of Angkor. Top row, L to R: Sharon May, Christophe Macquet, Trent Walker Bottom row: Rinith Taing, Phina So, Frank Stewart Photo courtesy of: Trent Walker
Editors of Out of the Shadows of Angkor. Top row, L to R: Sharon May, Christophe Macquet, Trent Walker. Bottom row: Rinith Taing, Phina So, Frank Stewart. Photo courtesy of Trent Walker.

Cambodian writers have been recording their literary gifts for over a millennium and a half. Yet very little Cambodian literature originally composed in Khmer, Sanskrit, or French is available in English. Our anthology seeks to change that,” say guest editors Trent Walker and Sharon May. In this Q&A, Walker and May tell us how this book came together. 

Out of the Shadows of Angkor in Your Classroom

Inscription of a "dharma song" Hymn to the Buddhaʻs Feet. The poem is traditionally chanted with complex melodies in Cambodian rituals. Photo courtesy of Trent Walker.
Inscription of a “dharma song” Hymn to the Buddhaʻs Feet. The poem is traditionally chanted with complex melodies in Cambodian rituals. Photo courtesy of Trent Walker.

Educators considering teaching from this landmark collection may have students from Cambodia or Southeast Asia and its diasporas, or students in a global literature course. The works in Out of the Shadows of Angkor may either stand alone or be read alongside other works of literature from the region of Southeast Asia.  

The University of Hawai‘i Press offers examination copies upon request, as well as complimentary desk copies for educators who order 10 or more copies for their classrooms. 

Learn more about our Desk and Exam Copy here.

Out of the Shadows of Angkor: Cambodian Poetry
MĀNOA Vol. 33 Issue 2 & Vol. 34 Issue 1 (2022)

Out of the Shadows of Angkor

Read free on Project MUSE:

On Cambodian American Writers

by Sokunthary Svay

A Small Request

by Khun Srun, Christophe Macquet, Sharon May

Subscribe to MĀNOA

All MĀNOA subscribers will receive the issue, Out of the Shadows of Angkor, upon print publication in September 2022 and an additional volume on Burmese literature in Winter 2022. A one-year, individual subscription costs $35.

Order Out of the Shadows of Angkor

Order your copy on Amazon for $25. Shipping begins in September 2022. 

Editor Q&A: Celebrating Cambodian Poetry, Prose, and Performance in New Landmark Anthology

Editors Sharon May and Trent Walker on Out of the Shadows of Angkor, the newest title from Mānoa journal, that publishes this month.

Out of the Shadows of Angkor, the newest title from MĀNOA, emerges from the thirty-year effort of a community seeking to bring together Khmer works of literature. In doing so, they not only translated rare works into English for the first time, but also helped to salvage, reconstruct, and resuscitate parts of books destroyed by the Cambodian Civil War. This issue represents a selection of what has been achieved. 

Readers will find in this volume: a comprehensive range of Khmer works over 1400 years; translations of classical texts in ancient script; selections of modern Cambodian poetry, prose, and folk theater; and contemporary writings by Cambodian refugees and children of the diaspora living in countries from Australia to the U.S., Canada, and Europe. This is a companion volume to In the Shadow of Angkor (2004).

Below, guest editors Trent Walker and Sharon May tell us about how this book came together. 

_________________________________________________________

Editors of Out of the Shadows of Angkor. Top row, L to R: Sharon May, Christophe Macquet, Trent Walker Bottom row: Rinith Taing, Phina So, Frank Stewart  Photo courtesy of: Trent Walker
Editors of Out of the Shadows of Angkor. Top row, L to R: Sharon May, Christophe Macquet, Trent Walker. Bottom row: Rinith Taing, Phina So, Frank Stewart. Photo courtesy of Trent Walker.

University of Hawai‘i Press: What was the inspiration for this issue?

Trent Walker and Sharon May, Editors: Cambodian writers have been recording their literary gifts for over a millennium and a half. Yet very little Cambodian literature originally composed in Khmer, Sanskrit, or French is available in English. Our anthology seeks to change that by joining a plethora of original literary translations of Cambodian texts with works composed in English by members of the global Cambodian diaspora. 

UHP: What is the book essentially about?

Editors: Out of the Shadows of Angkor unites the work of 33 different authors across fourteen centuries of Cambodian history. Their poems, short stories, novels, and essays are paired with a range of anonymous texts from the seventh century to the present, including inscriptions, oaths, chants, songs, epics, folk tales, and theater. Nineteen different translators make these works shine in English, offering accessible notes that frame these Cambodian compositions for a wide audience. A special emphasis on twentieth- and twenty-first-century writers, including those across four continents of the diaspora, showcases the present and emerging future of post-Khmer Rouge literature both inside and outside Cambodia.

UHP: Who was involved, and what was the process like of putting it together?

Editors: Sharon May, guest editor of In the Shadow of Angkor, a smaller but path-breaking 2004 anthology of contemporary Cambodian literature published by MĀNOA and University of Hawai‘i Press, brought together a team of four fellow guest editors over the course of over a decade. The guest editors—Phina So, Rinith Taing, Christophe Macquet, and Trent Walker, along with Sharon—have each long been leaders in advocating for Cambodian writers, literature, and publishing. We relied on each other’s strengths and on wide networks of literary friendships in Cambodia and beyond to bring the project to completion.

UHP: Tell us about the title. What’s the story of how you came to this title?

Editors: The title of the first volume, In the Shadows of Angkor, arose when Sharon was brainstorming with her friend Bhavia Wagner; Cambodian literature has long been in the shadows of the great temples and the tragedies of war, at least in the eyes of the West. As a considerably larger, non-overlapping companion volume to that 2004. MĀNOA anthology, Out of the Shadows of Angkor celebrates Cambodian poetry, prose, and performance emerging onto the world stage. Outside of the Khmer diaspora, Anglophone readers are still likely to only know Cambodia for the horrors of the Khmer Rouge or the splendors of Angkor Wat. Our book presents for the first time in English the vast spectrum of Cambodian writing through the ages—by turns joyous and tragic, pithy and elegant, tender and whip-smart. 

The Accused (1973), an account of imprisonment by Khun Srun, is nearly impossible to find in Cambodia today. An English translation of the excerpt can be found in Out of the Shadows of Angkor.  Photo courtesy of: Sharon May
The Accused (1973), an account of imprisonment by Khun Srun, is nearly impossible to find in Cambodia today. An English-translated excerpt can be found in Out of the Shadows of Angkor. Photo courtesy of Christophe Macquet.

UHP: What are some highlights of the issue? What should readers not miss?

Editors: The foreword by Vaddey Ratner and a special preface on Cambodian American writers by Sokunthary Svay set the tone for the book. Indradevi’s “In Praise of Sister Queens,” one of the oldest known works by a female author in Southeast Asia, and Brah Rajasambhar’s sixteenth-century poem, “My Soul of Gold,” long thought lost, anchor the classical section. Khun Srun’s “A Small Request” as well as excerpts from his novel The Accused cement his reputation as one of most insightful writers from the 1960s and ‘70s. Extracts from works by Nou Hach, Soth Polin, and Ty Chi Huot showcase the treasures of modern Khmer fiction. Poets ranging from Chey Chap and Pich Tum Kravel in Cambodia to Prince Amrindo Sisowath and Khau Ny Kim in France are also featured. Diasporic voices shine throughout: Maria Hach’s brilliant essay, “An Archive of Haunting,” especially in conversation with pieces by Boreth Ly and Elizabeth Chey, reveals powerful connections linking war, memory, and the arts. In the closing section on performance, the genius of Kong Nay, the country’s most famous living bard, comes to life through an extended interview as well as his bawdy lullaby, “An Elephant Rocks Its Trunk.” Throughout the issue, don’t miss the stunning paintings of Theanly Chov from his Surviving series, which capture the future-forward dreams of many Cambodians today. 

Kong Nay, Cambodia's most famous living bard, playing the chapei dang veng, a traditional Cambodian long-necked lute in his home in 2008.   Photo courtesy of: Sharon May
Kong Nay, Cambodia’s most famous living bard, playing the chapei dang veng, a traditional Cambodian long-necked lute in his home in 2008. Photo courtesy of Sharon May.

UHP: Is there anything else that you’d like to share?

In addition to classical Cambodian literature that has never before been translated into English, this book presents writing that was nearly lost during Cambodia’s civil war, the Khmer Rouge regime, and its aftermath. When Sharon first began work on the previous volume, In the Shadow of Angkor, an American journalist told her, “Cambodians can’t write.” We hope that this new volume, Out of the Shadows of Angkor, shows that they most certainly can, and have done so for centuries with humor, wisdom, beauty, and depth.

_________________________________________________________

Trent Walker is a postdoctoral fellow of the Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford University and a specialist in the manuscripts and chanting practices of mainland Southeast Asia. 

Sharon May worked for Columbia University’s Center for the Study of Human Rights—living and working in Cambodia while researching the Khmer Rouge regime—and was a Wallace Stegner Fellow in fiction at Stanford University.

Out of the Shadows of Angkor: Cambodian Poetry
MĀNOA Double Issue Vol. 33 Issue 2 and Vol. 34 Issue 1 (2022)

Out of the Shadows of Angkor

Read free on Project MUSE:

On Cambodian American Writers

by Sokunthary Svay

A Small Request

by Khun Srun, Christophe Macquet, Sharon May

Subscribe to MĀNOA

All MĀNOA subscribers will receive the issue, Out of the Shadows of Angkor, upon print publication in September 2022 and an additional volume on Burmese literature in Winter 2022. A one-year, individual subscription costs $35.

Order Out of the Shadows of Angkor

Order your copy on Amazon for $25. Shipping begins in September 2022. 

Special Features: Korean LGBTQ+ Literature, Remembering Linguists Robert Andrew Blust and Thomas Edward Dutton and more

Azalea

Volume 15 (2022)

From the editor Young-Jun Lee:

A century’s worth of change looks quite remarkable in Korean literature. Today’s young Koreans cannot read the same newspapers read by their grandparents’ generation. In less than a hundred years, the national written language has shifted from Chinese characters to Korean hangul, then briefly to Japanese as enforced under colonial rule, and then to the modern Korean language that we know today. During this process, remarkable sociocultural transformations dominated daily life. Over the first half of the 20th century, Koreans endured enormous political shifts most notably marked by colonization, the Korean War, and the ensuing divide of the country into separate political nations. Along the way, Korean literature registered these upheavals and fluctuations.

Notably, the literature of totalizing grand narrative, which concerned itself with the trajectory of nation-building, persisted in Korea until the 1980s. Ever since the end of the military dictatorship and the establishment of a civil government in the 1990s, however, that literature began to shift its focus to the lives of women. Now, those long ignored and marginalized—including queer women, as well as other queer people such as those who are non-binary— have also begun to emerge more strongly as published authors, even as they have been increasingly centered as subjects of literary narratives. The ongoing impact of this inclusive, expansionary shift
can be seen directly in AZALEA’s decision to focus on LGBTQ+ literature for its fifteenth issue.

Find more poetry, fiction, graphic shorts, and images at Project MUSE.

Oceanic Linguistics

Volume 61, Number 1 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

The Place of Space in Oceanic Linguistics
Leah Pappas and Alexander Mawyer

Semantics and Pragmatics of Voice in Central Malagasy Oral Narratives
Penelope Howe

On the Nature of Proto-Oceanic *o in Southern Vanuatu (and Beyond)
John Lynch

Rare, but Real: Native Nasal Clusters in Northern Philippine Languages
Robert Blust

The Greater West Bomberai Language Family
Timothy Usher and Antoinette Schapper

The Phonology and Typological Position of Waima’a Consonants
Kirsten Culhane

Find more research articles, squibs, and reviews at Project MUSE.

New Journal Issues: Aloha Shirt Aesthetics, Patterns of Mortuary Practice in Vanuatu, Taiwan Sugar in the 1600s + More

Asian Perspectives

Volume 61, Number 1 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

Lakheen-Jo-Daro, an Indus Civilization Settlement at Sukkur
in Upper Sindh (Pakistan): A Scrap Copper Hoard and
Human Figurine from a Dated Context

Paolo Biagi and Massimo Vidale

The Hamin Mangha Site: Mass Deaths and Abandonment
of a Late Neolithic Settlement in Northeastern China

Yawei Zhou, Xiaohui Niu, Ping Ji, Yonggang Zhu, Hong Zhu, and
Meng Zhang

Early Metal Age Settlement at the Site of Palemba, Kalumpang,
Karama Valley, West Sulawesi

Anggrreani

Patterns of Mortuary Practice over Millennia in Southern Vanuatu,
South Melanesia

Frédérique Valentin, Wanda Zinger, Alison Fenwick, Stuart Bedford,
James Flexner, Edson Willie, and Takaronga Kuautonga

Find more research articles and reviews at Project MUSE.

Biography

Volume 44, Issues 2 & 3 (2021)

Special Double Issue: Graphic Medicine

Graphic Medicine’s Possible Futures: Reconsidering Poetics and Reading
Erin La Cour and Anna Poletti

Conflict or Compromise?: An Imagined Conversation
with John Hicklenton and Lindsay Cooper about
Living with Multiple Sclerosis

John Miers

Out of Sync: Chronic Illness, Time, and Comics Memoir
Jared Gardner

Face as Landscape: Refiguring Illness, Disability,
and Disorders in David B.’s Epileptic

Erin La Cour

Graphic Confessions and the Vulnerability Hangover
from Hell

Safdar Ahmed

Drawn to History: Healing, Dementia, and the Armenian
Genocide in the Intertextual Collage of Aliceheimer’s

Crystal Yin Lie

Find more at Project MUSE.

Biography

Volume 44, Issue 4 (2021)

Open Forum Articles
Reviews

Editor Craig Howes embraces this volume as he explains:
“The latest issue of Biography qualifies as special because of its ordinariness. After a four-installment run featuring two special issues, an inaugural Forum, and the Annual Bibliography and International Year in Review, we now return to our regularly scheduled programming. Articles and book reviews—that’s all!
But the table of contents for this issue speaks to what has distinguished Biography for decades as a quarterly. First, the articles. Their geographic, historic, linguistic, and generic range is in keeping with our international and interdisciplinary profile. American celebrity biographies and philosophy, twentieth-century Indian regional autobiography, modernist Austrian psychoanalytic biography, post-WWII German-Romanian autofiction, contemporary Palestinian auto/biographical texts—our pages map out and tell the stories of the field.”

Find more articles and reviews at Project MUSE.

The Contemporary Pacific

Volume 34, Issue 1 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles, dialogues, political, media, and book reviews.

One Salt Water: The Storied Work of Trans-Indigenous Decolonial Imagining with West Papua
Bonnie Etherington

Making Sartorial Sense of Empire: Contested Meanings
of Aloha Shirt Aesthetics

Christen T Sasaki

The Compensation Page: News Narratives of Public Kinship in Papua New Guinea Print Journalism
Ryan Schram

“We Are So Happy EPF Came”: Transformations of Gender in Port Moresby Schools
Ceridwen Spark and Martha Macintyre

Pacific People Navigating the Sacred Vā to Frame Relational Care: A Conversation between Friends across Space and Time
Silia Pa‘usisi Finau, Mele Katea Paea, and Martyn Reynolds

Find more articles, dialogues, political, media, and book reviews at Project MUSE.