Journal of World History, Vol 30, No. 4 (2019)

This issue of the Journal of World History includes the following scholarly articles:

Economic Conquest of the Pacific: Revisiting the Tacna-Arica Plebiscite of 1925–1926
By Robert Niebuhr

This article surveys the Tacna-Arica plebiscite period (1925–1926) by taking into consideration the regional history alongside increasingly important global trends. While the contest between Peru and Chile highlights the battle between primordial versus constructed nationalism, it also places contested notions of nationalism alongside a growing spirit of internationalism. Woodrow Wilson’s proclamations at the end of World War I, especially his focus on self-determination and justice, directly inspired leaders in Bolivia, Chile, and Peru to seek a finalization of the Tacna-Arica dispute. Despite the hope that Wilsonian principals would win the day, traditional concepts such as economics and power proved victorious, which underscored the fragility of humanitarian rights and justice between the world wars. This investigation into how global trends influenced Tacna-Arica are placed alongside contemporary comparisons of plebiscites held in Europe between the world wars.

Igniting Change in Colonial Indonesia: Soemarsono’s Contestation of Colonial Hegemony in a Global Context
By Arnout H. C. Van Der Meer

In 1913, Javanese public prosecutor Soemarsono clashed with his colonial superior by refusing him traditional deference, donning European clothes, and actively engaging in nationalist associations. These actions culminated in an overhaul of the appearance of Dutch hegemony and a widespread emancipatory social change in colonial Indonesia. This history is best appreciated from a world historical perspective that includes both long-term historical processes that shaped Soemarsono’s world, such as the Indianization of Indonesia, the spread of Islam, and Western colonialism, as well as contemporary global developments, such as the rise of Japan, the Chinese revolution, Islamic Modernism, and the appeal of democratic principles. Soemarsono’s awareness of these global perspectives enabled him to successfully ignite change in colonial Indonesia. His story provides an approach that allows historians to emphasize how individual agents make history in a world historical context.

Playing Politics with the Youth: Aga Khan III’s Use of Colonial Education and the Ismaili Girl Guide Movement in British Colonial Tanganyika, 1920–1940
By Alia Paroo

This article assesses how Ismaili Muslim leaders in British colonial Tanganyika utilized Guiding and Victorian schooling philosophies in an attempt to negotiate for advancement within the colonial structure. Aga Khan III understood the role that followers were expected to play in the “Great Game” of imperialism and attempted to use cooperation to broker for increased opportunities within the system of subjugation. This article sets out to analyze then how the Aga Khan and his representative leaders in British colonial Tanganyika used youth programs to operate within these liminal spaces, in turn revealing the ongoing negotiations that took place between colonizer and the colonized.

Bombs in Beijing and Delhi: The Global Spread of Bomb-Making Technology and the Revolutionary Terrorism in Modern China and India
By Yin Cao

In early 1910, Chinese revolutionaries attempted to assassinate the regent of the Qing Empire by planting a bomb near his residence in Beijing. Two years later, an explosive of a similar type was used by Indian revolutionaries in their attempted assassination of the viceroy of the British Raj in Delhi. Investigating these two seemingly unconnected events demonstrates that radical political activists in both China and India acquired their explosive-making skills from diasporic Russian revolutionaries in Japan and France respectively after the failure of the 1905 Russian Revolution. Although both assassination attempts failed and have largely been marginalized in the national narratives in both countries, the transnational connections between Chinese and Indian revolutionaries in their pursuit of learning the portable dynamite technology overseas sheds light on how modern Chinese and Indian history can be analyzed in a single framework. Staging Chinese and Indian revolutionary terrorism in the context of the cross-boundary circulation of dissident ideologies and technologies in the early twentieth century reexamines marginalized aspects of China’s 1911 Revolution and the Indian Nationalist Revolution that can be written as connected transnational history.

Putting Words in the Emperor’s Mouth: A Genealogy of Colonial Potential in the Study of Qing Chinese Diaspora
By Nicholas McGee

The Qing emperor Qianlong’s supposed response to the 1740 massacre of roughly 8,000 Chinese civilians in Dutch Batavia represents perhaps the most famous quotation by any Chinese emperor concerning the diaspora. Tracing a genealogy of the quote, this article contends that it was in fact invented and deployed by eighteenth and nineteenth century British authors in service of a discourse that framed Chinese migrants as ideal potential colonial recruits and the Qing state as secretly desiring their recruitment. Only in the twentieth century was it taken up by Chinese authors, who mourned the Qing’s failure to capitalize on this colonial potential in their efforts to construct a diaspora-centered national identity. Legacies of this translingual discourse endure, especially in the narrative that the Qing state forbade its subjects from going overseas, and disowned those who did so, until forced to allow Chinese indentured labor recruitment following the Second Opium War (1856–1860).

Plus book reviews.

Journal of World History 30-4
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)

Journal of Korean Religions Vol. 10, No. 2 (2019)

A Comparative Study of Sudden and Gradual in Sŏn 禪 and the New Testament
by Bernard Senécal S.J.

Chinul’s Empty and Quiescent Spiritual Knowing (kongjŏk yŏngji 空寂靈知) and Ignatius of Loyola’s Indifference and Discernment of Spirits
by Yon-dahm Kwon

The Re-emergence of Chosŏn Buddhism in the 17th Century: A Question of Institutional Development and Legitimation
by Sung-Eun T. Kim

Kyŏnghŏ Sŏngu and the Existential Dimensions of Modern Korean Buddhism
by Jin Y. Park

The Real Face of Korean Buddhism under Japanese Colonial Rule
by Kue-jin Song

Four Pillars and Four Diviners: Fate, Fluidity, and Invention in Horoscopic Saju Divination in Contemporary South Korea
by David J. Kim

Religious and Philosophical Traditions of Korea by Kevin N. Cawley (review)
by David W. Kim

The Journal of Korean Religions is the only English-language academic journal dedicated to the study of Korean religions. The publication aims to stimulate interest in and research on Korean religions across a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Launched in 2010 by the Institute for the Study of Religion at Sogang University in Korea, the journal is peer-reviewed and published twice yearly, in April and October.

Journal of Korean Religions Vol. 10, No. 2 (2019)

Access Now: Trending Journal Articles, Fall 2019

Contemporary Pacific 31-2

Philosophy East and West 69-3

Buddhist-Christian Studies 37

Individuals can now access many of our journal articles and issues previously only available to those with institutional access, thanks to a new program on the Project MUSE platform.

Since spring, readers have purchased nearly 100 full issues or articles from our archive, including The Journal of Daoist Studies, Biography, China Review International, Korean Studies, and Rapa Nui Journal.

Recently downloaded articles include:


Find journal issues and articles for sale on Project MUSE.

Romaniello returns to the Journal of World History

The University of Hawai‘i Press welcomes Matthew P. Romaniello back to the Journal of World History. Romaniello, a Russian and world historian at Weber State University, was first appointed as associate editor by founding editor Jerry Bentley in 2011. Following Bentley’s retirement, Romaniello produced volumes 23 through 25 and served as the Center for World History director.

Romaniello now takes over the helm from editor-in-chief Fabio López Lázaro. Professor López Lázaro, from the University of Hawai‘i, edited the journal from 2014 to 2019 along with co-editors Kerry Ward from Rice University and Cátia Antunes from Leiden University. Michele Louro from Salem State University served as managing editor and Wensheng Wang from the University of Hawai‘i as Book Reviews Coordinating Editor.

The Journal of World History, which recently celebrated its 30th anniversary, has long been the leading research journal in the field of world history, often featuring approaches to economic and world systems. Looking ahead, Romaniello sees the opportunity for the Journal of World History to further include the scholarship of other comparative and transnational subfields of history, including medical, environmental, and social and gender history.

Prior to Weber, Romaniello spent eleven years at the University of Hawai‘i, where he was promoted to full professor. He has published two monographs,  Enterprising Empires: Russia and Britain in Eighteenth-Century Eurasia (Cambridge University Press, 2019) and The Elusive Empire: Kazan and the Creation of Russia, 1552-1671 (University of Wisconsin Press, 2012), and is currently finishing a monograph on a study of health and illness in the Russian Empire, examining state regulation of colonial bodies. He is also the co-editor of four volumes of collected essays, with two more currently in production, and twenty articles on a variety of topics, but particularly in commodities history and material culture, the history of medicine and knowledge exchanges, and colonialism. In addition to his previous work with the Journal of World History, Romaniello has served as editor at Sibirica: Interdisciplinary Journal of Siberia Studies


The Journal of World History publishes research into historical questions requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. It is devoted to the study of phenomena that transcend the boundaries of single states, regions, or cultures, such as large-scale population movements, long-distance trade, cross-cultural technology transfers, and the transnational spread of ideas. Individual subscription is by membership in the World History Association.

Matthew P. Romaniello, editor of the Journal of World History
Matthew P. Romaniello, editor of the Journal of World History
Journal of World History 30-4

Early Release Articles: Korean Studies (October 2019)

University of Hawaiʻi Press is proud to present the early release of the following articles and book reviews from Korean Studies through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLES

K-pop Live: Fans, Idols, and Multimedia Performance by Suk-Young Kim (review)
by Kyung Hyun Kim

Communication, Digital Media, and Popular Culture in Korea: Contemporary Research and Future Prospects, edited by Dal Yong Jin and Nojin Kwak. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books, 2018. 532 pp. ISBN: 978-1-4985-6203-4. $140.00 hardback.
by Su Young Choi

International Perspectives on Translation, Education and Innovation in Japanese and Korean Societies, ed. by David G. Herbert
by David G. Herbert

How Did Buddhists Venerate the Avataṃsaka-sūtra in Late Premodern Korea? Insights from Two Manuscript Ritual Texts
by Richard D. McBride II

The Foresight of Dark Knowing: Chǒng Kam nok and Insurrectionary Prognostication in Pre-modern Korea
by John Jorgensen

Browse all Korean Studies early release articles online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have been through our rigorous peer-review process, accepted for publication, and copyedited. These articles will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. These articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

Stay tuned for more early release articles from UH Press journals.

Early Release Articles: Korean Studies (October 2019)

Asian Perspectives Vol. 58, No. 2 (2019)

From Yang Qian's "Conflict and Identity: The Ritual of Wall Construction in Early China," this issue of Asian Perspectives. Fig. 1: Character for yi on front of oracle bone No. 7854 (Heji 1978:1192, photo used by permission from Zhonghua Book Company).
From Yang Qian’s “Conflict and Identity: The Ritual of Wall Construction in Early China,” this issue of Asian Perspectives. Fig. 1: Character for yi on front of oracle bone No. 7854 (Heji 1978:1192, photo used by permission from Zhonghua Book Company).

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific is the leading peer-reviewed archaeological journal devoted to the prehistory of Asia and the Pacific region. The new issue features the following scholarly articles:

Articles

A Bioarchaeological Study of Trauma at Late Iron Age to Protohistoric Non Ban Jak, Northeast Thailand
by Lucille T. Pedersen, Kate M. Domett, Nigel J. Chang, Siân E. Halcrow, Hallie R. Buckley, Charles F. W. Higham, Dougald J. W. O’reilly, Louise Shewan

Austronesian Expansions and the Role of Mainland New Guinea: A New Perspective
by Glenn R. Summerhayes

Ritual, Landscapes of Exchange, and the Domestication of Canarium: A Seram Case Study
by Roy Ellen

Conflict and Identity: The Ritual of Wall Construction in Early China
by Yang Qian

Last-Millennium Settlement on Yadua Island, Fiji: Insights into Conflict and Climate Change
by Piérick C. M. Martin, Patrick D. Nunn, Niko Tokainavatu, Frank Thomas, Javier Leon, Neil Tindale

Household Ethnoarchaeology and Social Action in a Megalith-Building Society in West Sumba, Indonesia
by Ron L. Adams

On Craft Production and the Settlement Pattern of the Jinsha Site Cluster on the Chengdu Plain
by Kuei-chen Lin

Book Reviews

World Heritage Craze in China: Universal Discourse, National Culture, and Local Memory by Haiming Yan (review)
by Magnus Fiskesjö

Archaeology and Buddhism in South Asia by Himanshu Prabha Ray (review)
by Lars Fogelin

Yungang: Art, History, Archaeology, Liturgy by Joy Lidu Yi (review)
by Denise Patry Leidy

Khao Sam Kaeo: An Early Port-City between the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea ed. by Bérénice Bellina (review)
by Michèle H. S. Demandt

Women in Ancient China by Bret Hinsch (review)
by Sheri A. Lullo

Asian Perspectives 58-2
Asian Perspectives Vol. 58, No. 2 (2019)

Buddhist-Christian Studies Vol. 39

From “The Souls of Animals in Christianity and Mahāyāna Buddhism” by Junhyoung Michael Shin: Fig. 8 Giotto, St. Francis preaching to Birds, 1297-99, Upper Church, San Francesco, Assisi.

From the Editors’ Introduction:

This issue continues to open up new questions in Buddhist-Christian Studies from a variety of approaches. We have included papers from the panels from our 2017 Society of Buddhist-Christian Studies’ panels held concurrently with the American Academy of Religion annual meeting on “Uses and Misuses of Anger in Buddhism and Christianity”  and “What Buddhism and Christians Can Learn from Muslims,”  as well as papers that were presented at other conferences such as the World Parliament of Religions held in Toronto in November 2018, and a symposium organized by Denison University in February 2019 on “Confronting Mara and Mammon: Buddhist-Christian Dialogue for Resistance and Spirituality.”  The themes of human suffering, resiliency, and resistance to structural forms of oppression run through all of these sections, as our authors seek new models for sustaining us in these challenging global times.

Articles from this Volume:

Stopping At Hell’s Gate
by Carolyn M. Jones Medine

The Wrathful Guru: Exploring the Vajrayana Understanding of Anger
by Lama Rod Owens

Anger Makes Us Ugly: Reflections from Pāli Buddhism
by Carol S. Anderson

The Wind Blows Gently and Fiercely: A Pentecostal Perspective on Love and Anger
by Joel D. Daniels

Holy Anger, Holy Wrath: The Role of Anger and the Emotions in Early Christian Spirituality and the Mahāyāna Buddhist Tradition
by Tomas Cattoi

Tending the Fire of Anger: A Feminist Defense of a Much Maligned Emotion
by Alice A. Keefe

Radicalization and Bold Mercy: Christian Theological Learning in Dialogue with the 2014 Open Letter
by John N. Sheveland

A Buddhist-Christian-Muslim Reflection on the Concepts of Mercy, Surrender, and Union
by Bahar Davary

The Small Engage the Powerful: An American Buddhist–Liberation Theology–Quaker Trialogue
by Sallie B. King

Resilience and Interdependence: Christian and Buddhist Views of Social Responsibility Following Natural Disasters
by Beverley Foulks McGuire

…plus 10 more articles, a News and Views section, and 6 Book Reviews.

About the Journal

Buddhist-Christian Studies is a scholarly journal published annually by University of Hawai‘i Press. It presents research papers, book reviews, and news items on Buddhism and Christianity, their interrelation, and comparative study based on historical materials and contemporary experience.

Subscriptions

Annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions are available here. Individual subscription is also available through membership in the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (SBCS).

Submissions

The materials selected for publication will be balanced between historical research and contemporary practice, and, where possible, they should employ analytical and theoretical tools and be set within the framework of our shared human history. More information is available at the journal’s website.

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 3

The new issue of Philosophy East and West features a special section, “Politics, Nature, and Society — The Actuality of North African Philosopher Ibn Khaldūn,” guest edited by Tamara Albertini, as well as a book discussion on Vrinda Dalmiya’s Caring to Know: Comparative Care Ethics, Feminist Epistemology, and the Mahābhārata, along with other articles and reviews.



Ibn Khaldūn: A Philosopher for Times of Crisis
Tamara Albertini

Political Power, the Maghreb Space, and the “Arab Spring”: A Reading through Ibn Khaldūn’s Looking Glass
Ridha Chennoufi

Beyond the Fourth Generation: Constituting a Muslim State in the Thought of Ibn Khaldūn and Khayr al-Dīn al-Tūnisī
Jeremy Kleidosty

The (Re-)Introduction of Ibn Khaldūn to Spain: A Journey Passing through Ortega y Gasset’s Work
Cynthia Scheopner

Ibn Khaldūn’s Notion of ‘Umrān: An Alternative Unit of Analysis for Contemporary Politics?
M. Akif Kayapınar

The Refutation of Astrology in Ibn Khaldūn’s Muqaddima: A Study of His Multileveled Reasoning Capability
Mehdi Saiden

Ibn Khaldūn and the Immanence of Judgment
Lenn E. Goodman

Ibn al-Haytham, from Place to Space: A Comparative Approach
Yomna T. Elkholy

The Suberogation Problem for Lei Zhong’s Confucian Virtue Theory of Supererogation
Tsung-Hsing Ho

Scriptural Injunctivism: Reading Yeshayahu Leibowitz in the Light of Mīmāṃsā Philosophy
Dimitry Shevchenko

Buddhist Philosophy of Mind: Nāgārjuna’s Critique of Mind-Body Dualism from His Rebirth Arguments
Sonam Thakchoe

The Endless Pursuit of Self-Perfection: A Hidden Dialogue between Mou Zongsan and F. H. Bradley
Roy Tseng

Book Discussion

Comparative Epistemology
Linda Martín Alcoff

Caring about Care
Eva Feder Kittay

The Nature of the Disposition to Care: Discursive and Pre-discursive Dimensions
Keya Maitra

The Importance of Being Modest
Nilanjan Das

Caring to Know: Response to Commentators
Vrinda Dalmiya

Comment and Discussion

When Science is in Defense of Value-Linked Facts
Donald J. Munro

The Plasticity of the Human and Inscribing History within Biology: A Response to Donald J. Munro
Sonya N. Özbey

Online Book Reviews

Tarō Naka, Music: Selected Poems trans. by Andrew Houwen and Chikako Nihei (review)
Ryan Johnson

The Philosophy of the Bhagavad Gītā: A Contemporary Introduction by Keya Maitra (review)
Malcolm Keating

The Mandala Sutra and Its English Translation: The New Dunhuang Museum Version Revised by Yang Zengwen (review)
Ma Lijuan

Absent Mother God of the West: A Kali Lover’s Journey into Christianity and Judaism by Neela Bhattacharya Saxena (review)
Swami Narasimhananda

Confucianism for the Contemporary World: Global Order, Politial Plurality, and Social Action ed. by Tze-ki Ton and Kristin Stapleton (review)
Bin Song

Read more in Volume 69

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 2 is also available on Project MUSE.

Philosophy East and West 69-3
Philosophy East and West
vol. 69, no. 3

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 31 no. 2 (2019)

Featured art, this issue: Opening the hangi. Te Wake unveiling. Matihetihe Marae. During the tangihanga for Ralph Hotere, by Natalie Robertson, 2013. Presented as part of a collection titled The Headlands Await Your Coming, this image evokes the practices of ahi kaa roa (keeping the home fires burning) and manaakitanga (offering hospitality to visitors) through the provision of food—practices that proclaim and sustain mana whenua, or intergenerational authority, pride, and tribal connections to land.
Featured art, this issue: Opening the hangi. Te Wake unveiling. Matihetihe Marae. During the tangihanga for Ralph Hotere, by Natalie Robertson, 2013. Presented as part of a collection titled The Headlands Await Your Coming, this image evokes the practices of ahi kaa roa (keeping the home fires burning) and manaakitanga (offering hospitality to visitors) through the provision of food—practices that proclaim and sustain mana whenua, or intergenerational authority, pride, and tribal connections to land.

This issue of The Contemporary Pacific features the art of Natalie Robertson, remembers mentor Robert (Bob) C. Kriste, and the following articles and reviews.

Articles

“More than a Music, It’s a Movement”: West Papua Decolonization Songs, Social Media, and the Remixing of Resistance
By Camellia Webb-Gannon, Michael Webb

Unsettling SpongeBob and the Legacies of Violence on Bikini Bottom
By Holly M Barker

Elemental Eating: Samoan Public Health and Valuation in Health Promotion
By Jessica Hardin, Christina Ting Kwauk

Employment of the Weak: The Role of a Multinational Factory in the Life Trajectory of Early School Leavers in Sāmoa
By Masami Tsujita Levi

Rearticulating Diplomatic Relationships: Contextualizing Tuvalu-Taiwan Relations
By Jess Marinaccio

Dialogue

Robert (Bob) C Kriste: Mentor and Friend of the Pacific
By Brij V Lal

Political Reviews

Region in Review
By Nic Maclellan

Micronesia in Review
By Volker Boege, Mathias Chauchat, Joseph Daniel Foukona, Budi Hernawan, Michael Leach, and James Stiefvater

Book and Media Reviews

I Hinanao-ta Nu I Manaotao Tåno’ I CHamoru Siha (The Journey of the CHamoru People) (review)
By Teresita L Perez

Decolonisation and the Pacific: Indigenous Globalisation and the Ends of Empire by Tracey Banivanua Mar (review)
By Trish Tupou

Hope at Sea: Possible Ecologies in Oceanic Literature by Teresa Shewry (review)
By Erin Cheslow

The Cultural Animation Film Festival (review)
By Elizabeth Bennett

Ainikien Jidjid ilo Boñ, and: Batmon vs Majuro, and: Jilel: The Calling of the Shell, and: Lañinbwil’s Gift, and: Ña Noniep, and: Yokwe Bartowe (review)
By Tom Brislin

Crossing Spaces (review)
By Myjolynne Marie Kim

Tikopia Collected: Raymond Firth and the Creation of Solomon Island Cultural Heritage by Elizabeth Bonshek (review)
By David Lipset

Textilia Linnaeana: Global 18th Century Textile Traditions & Trade by Viveka Hansen (review)
By Alexander Mawyer

Ship of Fate: Memoir of a Vietnamese Repatriate by Trần Ðình Trụ (review)
By Mary Therese Perez Hattori

Uncovering Indigenous Models of Leadership: An Ethnographic Case Study of Samoa’s Talavou Clan by Leiataua Robert Jon Peterson (review)
By Luafata Simanu-Klutz

Contemporary Pacific 31-2
The Contemporary Pacific
Volume 31, Issue 2

The Journal of Burma Studies Vol 23, No. 1 (2019)

Featured in Caroline Ha Thuc's "Research as Strategy: Reactivating Mythologies and Building a Collective Memory in Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung's The Name (2008-)" this issue: Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung The Name (2008–). Detail: Portrait of Bo Cho. Multimedia installation. Image courtesy of the artists.
Featured in Caroline Ha Thuc’s “Research as Strategy: Reactivating Mythologies and Building a Collective Memory in Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung’s The Name (2008-)” this issue: Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung The Name (2008–). Detail: Portrait of Bo Cho. Multimedia installation. Image courtesy of the artists.

The new issue of The Journal of Burma Studies (JBS) promises a tour de force of ethnographic, historical, and artistic insight into religious practice and cultural
expression.

This issue marks the first in our new partnership with the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University. Find top articles from The Journal of Burma Studies‘ archive and enjoy the new issue today on Project MUSE.


Editor’s Note
By Jane M. Ferguson

Making Merit, Making Civil Society: Free Funeral Service Societies and Merit-Making in Contemporary Myanmar
By Mu-Lung Hsu

Thrice-Honored Sangharaja Saramedha (1801-1882): Arakan-Chittagong Buddhism across Colonial and Counter-Colonial Power
By D. Mitra Barua

Research as Strategy: Reactivating Mythologies and Building a Collective Memory in Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung’s The Name (2008-)
By Caroline Ha Thuc

Bottom-Up Explorations: Locating Rule of Law Intermediaries after Transition in Myanmar
By Kristina Simion

Smoke, No Fire 
By Richard M. Cooler

Imperial Intoxication: Alcohol and the Making of Colonial Indochina by Gerard Sasges (review)
By Luke Corbin

Constitutionalism and Legal Change in Myanmar ed. by Andrew Harding (review)
By Elliot Prasse-Freeman

Saffron Shadows and Salvaged Scripts: Literary Life in Myanmar under Censorship and in Transition by Ellen Wiles (review)
By Kenneth Wong

Journal of Burma Studies 23-1
The Journal of Burma Studies, Vol. 23, No. 1 (2019)

Asian Theatre Journal Vol. 36, No. 2, (2019)

From Troy, Troy. . . Taiwan, 2005 performed at Hobe Fort in Tamsui, featured in Sophia Yashih Liu's article, "Performing Intercultural Truama: State, Land, and Women in Troy, Troy. . . Taiwan" this issue.  Photo: Chen Shao-Wei
From Troy, Troy. . . Taiwan, 2005 performed at Hobe Fort in Tamsui, featured in Sophia Yashih Liu’s article, “Performing Intercultural Truama: State, Land, and Women in Troy, Troy. . . Taiwan” this issue. Photo: Chen Shao-Wei

The fall issue of Asian Theatre Journal opens with a special section on the 2016 quatercentenary celebration of Tang Xianzu and William Shakespeare, guest edited by Alexa Alice Joubin. The regular issue follows with scholarly articles and reviews, including three emerging scholar articles that offer perspectives from India, Taiwan, and Singapore.

From the Editor
By Siyuan Liu

Special Section: Tang Xianzu and William Shakespeare Quatercentenary Celebration

Performing Commemoration: The Cultural Politics of Locating Tang Xianzu and Shakespeare
By Alexa Alice Joubin

Intercultural and Cross-cultural Encounters during the Quatercentenary of Tang Xianzu and Shakespeare
By Mary Mazzilli

Looking for Common Ground: A Thematic Comparison between Tang Xianzu’s and Shakespeare’s Dramatic Imagination
By Letizia Fusini

Engaging Tang Xianzu and Shakespeare in the Quest for Self
By Liana Chen

Pansori Hamlet Project: Taroo’s New Pansori Shakespeare for the Local Audience
By Seokhun Choi

Regular Issue Articles

Politics and Tactics in Revolutionary Performance: A Sino-Burmese Arts Troupe in Transnational Circulation
By Tasaw Hsin-chun Lu

Bhuta Kola Ritual Performances: Locating Aesthetics in Collective Memory and Shared Experience
By Meera Baindur, Tapaswi H M

Tradition and Modernity: Two Modern Adaptations of the Chinese Opera Hezhu’s Match
By Shiao-ling Yu

Applying/Contesting the Brechtain “Model”: Calcutta Repertory Theatre’s Galileo Jibon (Life of Galileo)
By Dwaipayan Chowdhury

Performing Intercultural Trauma: State, Land, and Women in Troy, Troy… Taiwan
By Sophia Yashih Liu

Spaces of Citizenship in Contemporary Singaporean Theatre: Staging the 2011 General Election
By Nathan F. Bullock

Plus reviews.

Asian Theatre Journal 36-2
Asian Theatre Journal Vol. 36, No. 2, (2019)

Journal of Word History, Vol 30, No. 3 (2019)

Figure 2 from "Traveling Anthropophagy: The Depiction of Cannibalism in Modern Travel Writing, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries" by José María Hernández Gutiérrez, this issue: Ptolemaic Map of Africa (Geography, 1511). Anthropophagi are supposedly present in the southeast according to the map. Source: Rare Maps.
Figure 2 from “Traveling Anthropophagy: The Depiction of Cannibalism in Modern Travel Writing, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries” by José María Hernández Gutiérrez, this issue: Ptolemaic Map of Africa (Geography, 1511). Anthropophagi are supposedly present in the southeast according to the map. Source: Rare Maps.

 

This issue of the Journal of World History includes the following scholarly articles:

The Globalisation of Franciscan Poverty
By Julia McClure 

This article explores the Franciscans’ attempt to translate their local conception of poverty into a world order between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries. Studies of Franciscan poverty have generally been confined to Europe and to the Middle Ages, yet the pursuit of poverty also shaped the Franciscans’ global interactions across the medieval and early modern periods. This focus provides an alternative perspective not only on the history of the Franciscan Order but also on global history, which has often been conceptualised as the European expansion of commodities, money and markets. Economic expansion was in dialogue with an overlooked story of resistance to, and questioning of, the phenomena of money and markets, and the attempt to realise a vision of the world based upon a unifying, yet unequal, notion of poverty.

The First Global Turn: Chinese Contributions of Enlightenment World History
By Alexander Statman

This article argues that certain Enlightenment approaches to world history developed through engagement with Chinese texts. In the eighteenth century, two French savants, Michel-Ange le Roux Deshauterayes and Joseph de Guignes, read original Chinese language histories and deployed them to ask and answer world-historical questions. Deshauterayes drew from the sixteenth-century historian Nan Xuan to argue that the mariner’s compass was invented in ancient China and diffused to the west. De Guignes looked to Ma Duanlin’s fourteenth-century encyclopedia to explain how the Huns came from Central Asia to threaten the Roman Empire. Their conclusions and their methods contributed to Enlightenment historiography through the works of philosophes such as Voltaire and Edward Gibbon. Enlightenment authors not only learned about China; they also learned from China.

Traveling Anthropophagy: The Depiction of Cannibalism in Modern Travel Writing, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries
By José María Hernández Gutiérrez

Travel writing had a significant impact on the way cannibalism was to be interpreted and diffused from the sixteenth century onwards. By analyzing how much our current understanding of anthropophagy owes to the discourse of travel writing and the simultaneous interaction between concept and medium, a better understanding of its implications in philosophical, political and scientific discourse can be perceived. It also elaborates on how we built self-identification through the uses of fears and cultural stereotypes. A quick glance at the structure of travel writing helps conceptualize how the encounter with Native Americans by Christopher Columbus transformed the Western perceptions of cannibalism and determined relations with other peoples in the following centuries, from Polynesians to Africans. The repercussions of this dialectical process are still palpable today.

The War is Our War: Antifascism among Lebanese Leftist Intellectuals*
By Sana Tannoury-Karam

In the years preceding and during the Second World War, the Lebanese left founded and spearheaded a vibrant antifascist struggle in the Lebanese and wider Arab public sphere. Examining how Arab leftists organized against, debated, and rejected fascism and Nazism challenges the narrative of Arab cooperation with fascism. It also takes issue with viewing antifascism as simply reactive to fascism. Rather, this article shows that antifascists drew upon pre-war and interwar intellectual frameworks of nationalism and anticolonialism to create counterhegemonic discourses against fascism. It argues that those who opposed fascism were operating within a terrain of interconnected and overlapping structures of oppression that they saw facing their societies, specifically the nexus between colonialism and fascism, and their relation to Zionism. Lebanese antifascists built east-east networks of activism to create linkages between the Arab liberation struggle and other oppressed nations, thus converging their nationalist and internationalist projects.

Plus book reviews.

 

Journal of World History 30-3
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)