Philosophy East and West, vol. 69, no. 2

Vincent Shen, 1949–2018.
Vincent Shen, 1949–2018.

Vincent Shen submitted his paper, “Desire, Representing Process, and Translatability” for blind review in 2017. Unfortunately, he passed away on Nov. 14, 2018, while the paper was in the last stages of copyediting. In this issue, Mingran Tan remembers this inspiring mentor and the editors at Philosophy East and West are honored to publish one of Prof. Shen’s last essays.

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 2 includes the following scholarly works:

Remembering Vincent Shen
Mingran Tan

Desire, Representing Process, and Translatability
Vincent Shen

Paul Tillich, Zhuangzi, and the Creational Role of Nonbeing
David Chai

Wang Bi’s Commentary on the Analects: A Confucian-Daoist Critique of Effable Morality
Paul J. D’Ambrosio

The Theory of the Self in the Zhuangzi: A Strawsonian Interpretation
Jenny Hung

Things Endure While We Fade Away: Tao Yuanming on Being Himself
Michael D. K. Ing

The No-Self View and the Meaning of Life
Baptiste Le Bihan

Abhidharma Metaphysics and the Two Truths
Kris McDaniel

A Pro-Realist Account of Gongsun Long’s “White Horse Dialogue”
Yuan Ren, Yuyu Liu

This Strange Idea of Art
Joseph Tanke

Agent and Deed in Confucian Thought
George Tsai

Knowledge, Action, and Virtue in Zhu Xi
Matthew D. Walker

“A Rich Conception of the Surface”: On Feng Zikai’s Paintings to Protect Life
Hektor K. T. Yan

Book Discussion

Bell’s Model of Meritocracy for China: Two Confucian Amendments
Yong Huang

Missing Links in The China Model
Chenyang Li

Meritocracy as a Political System: A Commentary on Bell’s The China Model
Binfan Wang

Toward Confucian-Inspired Democratic Meritocracy: A Response to Yong Huang, Chenyang Li, and Binfan Wang
Daniel A. Bell

Beyond Philosophical Euromonopolism: Other Ways of—Not Otherwise than—Philosophy
Bret W. Davis

Undoing Western Hegemony, Unpacking the Particulars:Taking Back Philosophy: A Review of Bryan Van Norden’s Taking Back Philosophy A Multicultural Manifesto
David H. Kim

A Comparative Feminist Reflection on Race and Gender
Li-Hsiang Lisa Rosenlee

Response to Comments by Bret Davis, David Kim, and Lisa Rosenlee on Taking Back Philosophy
Bryan W. Van Norden

Online Book Reviews

Tang Junyi: Confucian Philosophy and the Challenge of Modernity by Thomas Fröhlich (review) Chor-yung Cheung

Order in Early Chinese Excavated Texts: Natural, Supernatural, and Legal Approaches by Zhongjiang Wang (review)
Thomas Michael

Philosophy in Colonial India ed. by Sharad Deshpande (review)
Swami Narasimhananda

The Emotions in Early Chinese Philosophy by Curie Virág (review)
Ellen Y. Zhang

Philosophy of Language, Chinese Language, Chinese Philosophy: Constructive Engagement ed. by Bo Mou (review)
Rohan Sikri

Read more in Volume 69

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 1 is also available on Project MUSE.

 

Philosophy East and West 69-2
Philosophy East and West, vol. 68, no. 2

Biography Vol. 42 No. 2 (2019)

Figure 8 from Philip Miletic’s essay “Playing a Life in Nina Freeman’s Automedia Game, Cibele.” Valtameri. The meter with the handshake in the upper right corner progresses as Nina (left) and Ichi (right) fight together.

Editor’s Note

ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE:

Wounded Cities: Topographies of Self and Nation in Fay Afaf Kanafani’s Nadia, Captive of Hope
Hager Ben Driss

Playing a Life in Nina Freeman’s Automedia Game, Cibele
Philip Miletic

Reading, Writing, and Resistance in Audre Lorde’s Zami: A New Spelling of My Name
Sarita Cannon

“Bad” Biography Exposed!: A Critical Analysis of American Super-Pop
Oline Eaton

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Shadow in the Garden: A Biographer’s Tale, by James Atlas
Reviewed by Carl Rollyson

Experiments in Life-Writing: Intersections of Auto/Biography and Fiction, edited by Lucia Boldrini and Julia Novak
Reviewed by Alexandra Effe

American Autobiography after 9/11, by Megan Brown
Reviewed by Elisabeth Hedrick-Moser

Letter to My Father: A Memoir, by G. Thomas Couser
Reviewed by Emily Hipchen

The Selfie Generation: How Our Self Images Are Changing Our Notions of Privacy, Sex, Consent, and Culture, by Alicia Eler
Reviewed by Teresa Bruś

Invented Lives, Imagined Communities: The Biopic and American National Identity, edited by William H. Epstein and R. Barton Palmer
Reviewed by Eric M. Thau

An Artisan Intellectual: James Carter and the Rise of Modern Britain, 1792–1853, by Christopher Ferguson
Reviewed by Anna Clark

Autobiographical Writing in Latin America: Folds of the Self, by Sergio R. Franco
Reviewed by Francisco Brignole

Getting Personal: Teaching Personal Writing in the Digital Age, edited by Laura Gray-Rosendale
Reviewed by Madeleine Sorapure

The Art of Confession: The Performance of Self from Robert Lowell to Reality TV, by Christopher Grobe
Reviewed by Lynda Goldstein

A History of Irish Autobiography, edited by Liam Harte
Reviewed by Taura Napier

Victorians Undone: Tales of the Flesh in the Age of Decorum, by Kathryn Hughes
Reviewed by Alison Booth

Doña Teresa Confronts the Spanish Inquisition: A Seventeenth-Century New Mexican Drama, by Frances Levine
Reviewed by Jorge Ca.izares-Esguerra

Clio’s Lives: Biographies and Autobiographies of Historians, edited by Doug Munro and John G. Reid
Reviewed by Jaume Aurell

The Decolonial Mandela: Peace, Justice and the Politics of Life, edited by Sabelo Ndlovu-Gatsheni
Reviewed by Nick Mdika Tembo

Creating Identity in the Victorian Fictional Autobiography, by Heidi L. Pennington
Reviewed by Anne Reus

A History of Irish Working-Class Writing, edited by Michael Pierse
Reviewed by Muireann Leech

Canadian Graphic: Picturing Lives, edited by Candida Rifkind and Linda Warley
Reviewed by Roc.o G. Davis

Life? or Theatre? ( Leben? oder Theater?), by Charlotte Salomon
Reviewed by Julia Watson

The Phenomenology of Autobiography: Making it Real, by Arnaud Schmitt
Reviewed by Bettina Stumm

On the Arab-Jew, Palestine, and Other Displacements: Selected Writings, by Ella Shohat
Reviewed by Joyce Zonana

Bird-Bent Grass: A Memoir, in Pieces, by Kathleen Venema
Reviewed by G. Thomas Couser

Private Lives Made Public: The Invention of Biography in Early Modern England, by Andrea Walkden
Reviewed by Julie A. Eckerle


About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

China Review International Vol. 24 no. 3 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 3 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 20 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEW

The Persistence and Significance of Small Urban Spaces in China (reviewing Di Wang, The Teahouse under Socialism: The Decline and Renewal of Public Life in Chengdu, 1950–2000)
Reviewed by Tim Simpson

REVIEWS

Jennifer Altehenger, Legal Lessons: Popularizing Laws in the People’s Republic of China, 1949–1989
Reviewed by Ji Li

Emily Baum, The Invention of Madness: State, Society, and the Insane in Modern China
Reviewed by Hsuan-Ying Huang

Yanjie Bian, Guanxi: How China Works
Reviewed by Jack Barbalet

Steve Chan, Trust and Distrust in Sino-American Relations: Challenge and Opportunity 
Reviewed by Richard Hu

Patricia P. Chu, Where I have Never Been: Migration, Melancholia, and Memory in Asian American Narratives of Return 
Reviewed by Shawn Higgins

Melissa Dale, Inside the World of the Eunuch: A Social History of the Emperor’s Servants in Qing China
Reviewed by Ellen Soullière

Joshua Eisenman, Red China’s Green Revolution: Technological Innovation, Institutional Change, and Economic Development under the Commune
Reviewed by Zhun Xu

Luke Habberstad, Forming the Early Chinese Court: Rituals, Spaces, Roles 
Reviewed by Christopher F. Kim

Kurtis Hagen and Steve Coutinho, translated with commentary, Philosophers of the Warring States: A Sourcebook in Chinese Philosophy 
Reviewed by Robin R. Wang

Derek Hird and Geng Song, editors, The Cosmopolitan Dream: Transnational Chinese Masculinities in a Global Age
Reviewed by Yinni Peng

Ming-sho Ho, Challenging Beijing’s Mandate of Heaven: Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement and Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement 
Reviewed by Kevin Wei Luo

Hsiao-ting Lin, Accidental State: Chiang Kai-shek, the United States, and the Making of Taiwan 
Reviewed by Syaru Shirley Lin

Thomas Maissen and Barbara Mittler, Why China Did Not Have a Renaissance – And Why That Matters: An Interdisciplinary Dialogue 
Reviewed by Luke Clossey

Yuan-ning Wen and others, edited by Christopher Rea, Imperfect Understanding: Intimate Portraits of Modern Chinese Celebrities 
Reviewed by David N. C. Hull

William T. Rowe, Speaking of Profit: Bao Shichen and Reform in Nineteenth-Century China 
Reviewed by Margherita Zanasi

Michael Szonyi, The Art of Being Governed: Everyday Politics in Late Imperial China 
Reviewed by Masato Hasegawa

Jinping Wang, In the Wake of the Mongols: The Making of a New Social Order in North China, 1200–1600  Reviewed by Carl Déry

Bing Wang, Classical Chinese Poetry in Singapore: Witnesses to Social and Cultural Transformations in the Chinese Community 
Reviewed by Jing-yi Qu

Pu Wang, The Translatability of Revolution: Guo Moruo and Twentieth-Century Chinese Culture 
Reviewed by Haosheng Yang

Yun Via, Down with Traitors: Justice and Nationalism in Wartime China 
Reviewed by Patrick Fuliang Shan

Works Received


Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 58 no. 1 (2019)

Schapper Map 1
Map 1, Distribution of Smell/Kiss Colexification in Southeast Asia and Beyond in Antoinette Schapper’s article, “The Ethno-Linguistic Relationship between Smelling and Kissing: A Southeast Asian Case Study” in this issue of Oceanic Linguistics.

The summer issue of Oceanic Linguistics is the first from the new editorial team, lead by Daniel Kaufman, Yuko Otsuka, and Antoinette Schapper. Read more about the transition in this issue’s editorial note. The journal is now accepting submissions online at oceaniclinguistics.msubmit.net.

Articles

A Syntactic Motivation for Valency Reduction: Antipassive Constructions in Ulwa
Russell Barlow

Reintroducing Welaun
Owen Edwards

Language Contact and Gender in Tetun Dili: What Happens When Austronesian Meets Romance?
John Hajek and Catharina Williams-van Klinken

The Ethno-Linguistic Relationship between Smelling and Kissing: A Southeast Asian Case Study
Antoinette Schapper

A Second Look at Proto-Land Dayak Vowels
Alexander D. Smith

Book Reviews

Histoire et voyages des plantes cultivées à Madagascar by Philippe Beaujard (review)
Sander Adelaar

Critical Christianity: Translation and denominational conflict in Papua New Guinea by Courtney Handman (review)
Joel Bradshaw

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review


The journal offers its readers up-to-date research findings, emerging trends, and cutting-edge perspectives concerning East Asian history and culture from scholars in both English-speaking and Asian language-speaking academic communities. The journal seeks to balance issues traditionally addressed by Western humanities and social science journals with issues of immediate concern to scholars in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.  Cross-Currents includes material from the sixteenth century to the present day that have significant implications for current models of understanding East Asian history and culture.

Cross-Currents is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), Scopus, the Bibliography of Asian Studies, and Project MUSE.

Print Issues available for purchase:

8#1, 2019 includes special sections on Diasporic Art and Korean Identity, guest edited by Hijoo Son and Jooyeon Rhee.

This special section, titled “Diasporic Art and Korean Identity,” is the fruit of a two-day conference on “Korean Diaspora and the Arts” held at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in May 2017. The contributors explore new delineations of the political, social, cultural, and emotional landscapes inhabited by Koreans living in diaspora. Korean diasporic artists investigate the meaning of “Koreanness” through their paintings, political cartoons, theater, film, documentary, photographs, and multimedia art. The topic of diaspora—which Gabriel Sheffer defines as “ethnic minority groups residing and acting in host countries while maintaining material and sentimental ties to their homelands”—has received impressive scholarly attention in the humanities and social sciences, and Korean diaspora studies has been part of this trend (Sheffer 1986, 3).

Special Section, Air-Water-Land-Human: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health and Environment in East Asia, guest edited by Ruth Rogaski.

If East Asia has been defined by particular ideas about the intertwining of humans and the environment, it also gives us a reality in which humans and the environment are frequently at odds. Philosophies may have preached the harmony of the macrocosm and human microcosm, but this did not stop people from exploiting and harming the environment for centuries with catastrophic impact on human health (Elvin 2008; Perdue 1987; Totman 1989). The advent of capitalist development and its accompanying neoliberal philosophies have accelerated these processes to unimaginable effect. Indeed, it is impossible to think about East Asia today without touching on destructive links between humans and the environment, whether manifest in the nuclear catastrophe at Fukushima, cancer villages in Sichuan, or bird flu pandemics emerging from Vietnam (Walker 2010; Lora-Wainwright 2013a; Porter forthcoming 2019). Historian Brett Walker’s observation about Japan holds true for all of East Asia: scholars “can no longer be content to ruminate on Japan’s exquisite harmony with nature” but must instead “explain how it has contributed to regional ecological collapse and global climate change” (Walker 2013, xiii).

Also available online in Project MUSE!

Other recent back issues:

7#2 Recent Research on North and South Korea

Writing Revolution Across Northeast Asia, guest edited by Steven S. Lee

7#1 Binding Maritime China: Control, Evasion, and Interloping, guest editors Eugenio Menegon, Philip Thai, and Xing Hang

6#2 Maps and Their Contexts: Reflections on Cartography and Culture in Premodern East Asia, guest edited by Robert Goree

Naming Modernity: Rebranding and Neologisms during China’s Interwar Global Moment in Eastern Asia, guest edited by Anna Belogurova

Order print copies by contacting: University of Hawai’i Press, 2840 Kolowalu Street, Honolulu, HI 96822, Toll-free (U.S. & Canada):  Tel. 1-808-956-8833    Fax 1-808-988-6052 Tel. 1-888-UHPRESS  Fax 1-800-650-7811 Email: uhpjourn@hawaii.edu $25.00 per issue

Call for a Co-Editor for Rapa Nui Journal

Applications are invited for the position of co-editor of Rapa Nui Journal: The Journal of the Easter Island Foundation (RNJ). The journal is published by the University of Hawai‘i Press in partnership with the Easter Island Foundation. Dr. Mara Mulrooney has served as the journal editor for the past several years and is looking forward to sharing the editorial duties with one or two co-editors.

The journal, launched in 1986 as Rapa Nui Notes, serves as a forum for interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities and social sciences on Easter Island and the Eastern Polynesian region. Each issue may include Research Articles, Research Reports, Commentaries or Dialogues, Book or Media Reviews and EIF News.

RNJ is published twice a year and welcomes contributions from a wide range of social, cultural, indigenous and historical disciplines on topics related to the lives and cultures of the peoples of Rapa Nui and Eastern Polynesia. Abstracts for articles may be published in English, Spanish, and Rapanui. We welcome submissions from scholars across Oceania, North and South America, and beyond.

The editors are expected to assist in raising the profile of the journal, provide support increasing submissions, and secure timely and appropriate peer-review of articles. Editors will make the final decision on manuscripts, informing both the author(s) and reviewers of the final disposition. The editors must show openness to communicating with scholars about diverse ideas, openness to a diverse range of methodologies, and eagerness to continue building the journal’s reputation.

In accordance with the University of Hawai‘i Press’ mission to publish high quality scholarship, the following criteria are considered in selecting editors:

  • established record of scholarship
  • evidence of understanding the mission of the journal and its operation
  • a vision for the journal’s future
  • record of responsible service to scholarly publishing
  • evidence of organizational skill and intellectual leadership

The actual costs associated with production and the online submission system for the journal are covered by the publisher.

Selection Process: (1) Applications will be received by the UH Press Journals Manager by Sept. 4, 2019.  (2) The applicants will be reviewed and ranked by the current journal editor and UH Press Journals Manager. (3) The top two candidates will be contacted by phone for an interview and to discuss the journal editorial workflow by Sept. 25, 2019. (4) The candidate selection will be made by Oct. 10, 2019. (5) The new editor(s) will begin working with the current editor and UH Press no later than January 2020. (6) All other applicants will be notified of the final selection.

Applications: The applications should include the following:

Vision Statement: Set forth your goals and plans for the content of the journal.

Co-Editors Background Information: Describe the qualifications and experience of each person on the editorial team that supports their inclusion. There is no need to include names of individuals that you would like to include on the larger editorial board. If you wish to include names of nominees for Book Review editors, you may; these individuals will be appointed by the editors after they are selected, so you are not required to include them in your application.

Institutional Support: It is important for candidates to examine the feasibility of serving as co-editor in light of the resources provided by the publisher and their own home university. If candidates expect to receive support from their host institution, we request a preliminary letter of support from a dean or other appropriate institutional official.

CVs for all potential co-editors (and if applicable, any associate editors).

For questions and further information about the application process, please contact: Pamela Wilson, Journals Manager, pwilson6@hawaii.edu. We encourage anyone who is considering an application and wants to discuss ideas or ask questions, to get in touch. The application packet should be no more than five (5) pages (excluding CVs), and must be received by Sept. 4, 2019.

Applications may be emailed as PDFs to Pamela Wilson, Journals Manager at pwilson6@hawaii.edu.

University of Hawaii Press, 2840 Kolowalu Street Honolulu, HI 96822

Tel: (808) 956-6790

https://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals/


Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 3 (July 2019)

Preview volume 73 number 3 titles below and find content of all 8 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Stream Benthic Macroinvertebrate Assemblages Reveal the Importance of a Recently Established Freshwater Protected Area in a Tropical Watershed
Elfritzson M. Peralta, Alexis E. Belen, Gelsie Rose Buenaventura, Francis Godwin G. Cantre, Katharine Grace R. Espiritu, Jana Nicole A. De Vera, Cristine P. Perez, Aleziz Kryzzien V. Tan, Irisse Bianca B. De Jesus, Paul Palomares, Jonathan Carlo A. Briones, Tohru Ikeya, Francis S. Magbanua, Rey Donne S. Papa, and Noboru Okuda

Island Hopping in a Biodiversity Hotspot Archipelago: Reconstructed Invasion History and Updated Status and Distribution of Alien Frogs in the Philippines
Arman N. Pili, Emerson Y. Sy, Mae Lowe L. Diesmos, and Arvin C. Diesmos

Importance of Non-native Honeybees (Apis mellifera) as Flower Visitors to the Hawaiian Tree ‘Ōhi‘a Lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) Across an Elevation Gradient
Camila A. Cortina, Clare E. Aslan, and Stacey J. Litson

Screening and Biosecurity for White-nose Fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Ascomycota: Pseudeurotiaceae) in Hawai‘i
Violeta L. Zhelyazkova, Nia L. Toshkova, Serena E. Dool, Frank J. Bonaccorso, Corinna A. Pinzari, Kristina Montoya-Aiona, and Sebastien J. Puechmaille

Genetic and Morphological Diversity in Aphis gossypii  Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in the Pacific Basin
Ross H. Miller, Robert G. Foottit, Eric Maw, and Keith S. Pike

Age, Growth and Mortality of the Goldlined Seabream Rhabdosargus sarba in Waters off Southwestern Taiwan
Shoou-Jeng Joung, Yu-Yung Shyh, Kwang-Ming Liu, and Shyh-Bin Wang

Morphology and Behavior of Gametes and Zoospores from the Plant-Parasitic Green Algae, Cephaleuros  (Chlorophyta, Ulvophyceae)
Narasinee Thithuan, Penpadsorn Bunjonsiri, and Anurag Sunpapao

New Chromosome Number Reports for Angiosperms Native or Introduced to Hawai‘i, with Additional Reports for Fiji and Samoa
Michael Kiehn, and David H. Lorence


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Top Articles from The Journal of Burma Studies, New UHP Title

Gate to Myang Gyi Ngu monastic community, Karen State. BGF guards control visitors for guns, drugs, alcohol and meat. DKBA has been ousted from the place. U Thuzana’s photo is in the middle (Photo courtesy of Mikael Gravers).
From Mikael Gravers’ “Disorder as Order“: Gate to Myang Gyi Ngu monastic community, Karen State. BGF guards control visitors for guns, drugs, alcohol and meat. DKBA has been ousted from the place. U Thuzana’s photo is in the middle (Photo courtesy of Mikael Gravers).

As we look forward to publishing the next issue of The Journal of Burma Studies, we’re pleased to share the top ten most-read articles on Project MUSE in the past year.

The Journal of Burma Studies is one of the only scholarly peer-reviewed journals that focus exclusively on Burma/Myanmar. 


 

Disorder as Order: The Ethno-Nationalist Struggle of the Karen in Burma/Myanmar€—A Discussion of the Dynamics of an Ethicized Civil War and Its Historical Roots
By Mikael Gravers
Volume 19, Number 1, June 2015

A Textbook Case of Nation-Building: The Evolution of History Curricula in Myanmar
By Nicolas Salem-Gervais and Rosalie Metro
Volume 16, Number 1, June 2012

“Transition”€ as a Migratory Model in Myanmar
By Felix Girke and Judith Beyer
Volume 22, Number 2, December 2018

“Making a Name for Themselves:” Karen Identity and the Politicization of Ethnicity in Burma
By Jessica Harriden
Volume 7, 2002

Rethinking Land and Property in a “Transitioning”€ Myanmar: Representations of Isolation, Neglect, and Natural Decline
By Elizabeth L. Rhoads and Courtney T. Wittekind
Volume 22, Number 2, December 2018

Appraisal of Burma/Myanmar’s Roundabout Roadmaps
By Khen Suan Khai
Volume 22, Number 2, December 2018

“Burmanization”€ and the Impact of J.S. Furnivall’s Views on National Identity in Late-Colonial Burma
By Carol Ann Boshier
Volume 20, Number 2, December 2016

Bitter Pills: Colonialism, Medicine and Nationalism in Burma, 1870-1940
By Penny Edwards
Volume 14, 2010

Notes on Burmese Manuscripts: Text and Images
By Christian Lammerts
Volume 14, 2010

The Disciplining Discourse of Unity in Burmese Politics
By Matthew J. Walton
Volume 19, Number 1, June 2015

 

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 29 (2017)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

READING SŌSEKI NOW

Editors’ Introduction: Sōseki Great and Small
Reiko Abe Auestad, Alan Tansman, J. Keith Vincent

What Sort of a Stone Was Sōseki? How to Become Who You Are Not
Tawada Yōko, J. Keith Vincent

Kokoro and the Economic Imagination
Brian Hurley

The Affect that Disorients Kokoro
Reiko Abe Auestad

Kokoro in the High School Textbook
Ken K. Ito

Doubled Visions of Desire: Fujimura Misao, Kusamakura, and Homosocial Nostalgia
Robert Tuck

Penning the Mad Man in the Attic: Queerness, Women Writers, and Race in Sōseki’s Sanshirō
Sayumi Takahashi Harb

Beach Boys in Manchuria: An Examination of Sōseki’s Here and There in Manchuria and Korea, 1909
Angela Yiu

The Relations Between Things and Three Types of People: A lecture sponsored by the Manshū Nichinichi Shimbun, September 12, 1909, in Dalian (translated by Angela Yiu)
Natsume Sōseki

“Why Was He…Well, Killed?” Natsume Sōseki, Empire, and the Open Secrets of Anticolonial Violence
Andre Haag

Impressions of Korea and Manchuria (1909) (translated by Andre Haag)
Natsume Sōseki

Judging a Book by Its Cover: Natsume Sōseki, Book Design, and the Value of Art
Pedro Thiago Ramos Bassoe

Death and Poetry: From Shiki to Sōseki (1992) (translated by Robert Tuck) 
Karatani Kōjin

From Postcolonial (2001) (translated by Andre Haag and Robert Tierney)
Komori Yōichi

Camellias and Vampires: Reading the Spermatic Economy in Natsume Sōseki’s And Then (2008) (translated by Kristin Sivak)
Miyazaki Kasumi

ART IN FOCUS: Matsuzawa Yutaka’s The Whole Works, 1961-1971

Introduction
Reiko Tomii

The Whole Works, 1961–71 (translated by Reiko Tomii)
Matsuzawa Tutaka

DESIGN IN FOCUS

Design in Japan: Contemporary Perspectives on Design Practice
Ignacio Adriasola

Interview with Sugiura Kōhei (2013) (translated by Mycah Braxton)

Report: From “Do It Yourself” to “Do It With Others” to “Do It For Others” —Can Fashion Be Renewed? Forum (2012) (translated by Yoonkyung Kim)

The Smart Design Award: The Always Convenient × Always Prepared Series (2012) (translated by Mycah Braxton)

The Essence of Social Design (2013) (translated by Elsa Chanez)
Kakei Yūsuke

FICTION

Butterfly (1889) (translated by Nicholas Albertson)
Yamada Bimyō

On the Contributors


About the Journal

The Review of Japanese Culture and Society is an annual English-language journal dedicated to the critical analysis of Japanese culture using thematic and interdisciplinary approaches to provide a broad perspective by combining the work of Japanese scholars and critics with that of non-Japanese writers. Dedicated to the translation of works written originally in Japanese, each issue also includes an original translation of a Japanese short story.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Manuscripts should be 7,000 to no more than 8,000 words including notes, and authors are responsible for obtaining rights and the cost of obtaining rights for any images included. Find submission guidelines here.

Review of Japanese Culture and Society
Volume 29 (2017)

UH Press to publish The Journal of Burma Studies in partnership with the Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies

The University of Hawai‘i Press will publish and distribute The Journal of Burma Studies, one of the only scholarly peer-reviewed journals that focus exclusively on Burma/Myanmar. This new partnership with the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University begins with volume 23, 2019. The complete content of the journal is available online in Project MUSE.

UH Press Interim Director and Publisher, Joel Cosseboom, said: “We are pleased to partner with the NIU Center for Burma Studies on this important and unique journal.”

Edited by Catherine Raymond from Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies and Jane M. Ferguson from Australian National University, The Journal of Burma Studies seeks to publish the best scholarly research focused on Burma/Myanmar and its minority and diasporic cultures from a variety of disciplines, ranging from art history and religious studies, to economics and law.

Dr. Ferguson looks forward to collaborating with UH Press to launch innovative and engaging issues of The Journal of Burma Studies. “University of Hawai‘i Press has consistently produced some of the most exciting publications on Southeast Asia as well as Burma/Myanmar Studies, so I am delighted that JBS will now work with them,” she said.

The journal is jointly sponsored by the Burma Studies Group and the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University. Published since 1997, the journal draws together research and critical reflection on Burma/Myanmar from scholars across Asia, North America and Europe.

Content is available on the Project MUSE platform.

Subscribe at: https://uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/jbs/

Submit your manuscript at: https://jbs.scholasticahq.com/for-authors

The Journal of Burma Studies joins UH Press’s extensive list of Asian and Southeast Asian studies journals including: Asian Perspectives, Korean Studies, Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society, Review of Japanese Culture and Society, and others.

About UH Press

 The University of Hawai‘i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. It strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Hawaiian, Pacific, Asian American and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai‘i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

About Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies

 Founded in 1987, the Center collects and preserves information and artifacts of all kinds concerning the study of the peoples and cultures of Burma/Myanmar, and makes these materials broadly available for research and study.

The Center enjoys a unique relationship with the Burma Studies Foundation, which assures that all Burma/Myanmar-related items donated to the foundation will be offered to the center for inclusion and conservation within the university’s collections. Oversight by the foundation combines strong support of the center with lasting responsibility to the field of Burma/Myanmar studies.

The Center for Burma Studies is a non-political, non-degree granting, administrative and academic unit within Northern Illinois University. The Center has the following goals:

  • The maintenance and expansion of a comprehensive research library to sustain the field of Burma studies
  • The collection, care, and exhibition of the arts of Burma
  • The support and promotion of undergraduate and graduate teaching concerning Burma
  • The organization and hosting of self-supporting national and international conferences on Burma studies
  • The publication of relevant scholarship on Burma
  • The care and enhancement of archival resources such as photographs, music records, oral histories, personal papers, and field notes
  • The promotion of outreach activities to schools and communities
  • Encouraging the performance of Burmese arts
  • The securing of educational opportunities through scholarships, internships, and fellowships

Journal of World History Special Issue: Other Bandungs (Vol. 30, Nos. 1&2)

FIGURE 1. Sjahrir arrives for the Asian Socialist Conference. Left to right: Ali Algadri, SutanSjahrir, U Ba Swe, and U Kyaw Nyein   (Sjahrir Family Collection.
In “Asian Socialism and the Forgotten Architects of Post-Colonial Freedom, 1952–1956” by Su Lin Lewis, this issue. Sutan Sjahrir arrives for the Asian Socialist Conference. Left to right: Ali Algadri, Sutan Sjahrir, U Ba Swe, and U Kyaw Nyein (Sjahrir Family Collection).

Afro-Asian Internationalisms in the Early Cold War 

Excerpted from the Editors’ Introduction:

On the cover of the Jakarta Reporters Club handbook to the 1955 Asia-Africa Conference is an iconic photograph of a rickshaw driver looking up at a large billboard, featuring a map of the 29 participating nations stretching from China to Ghana. Bandung was once a colonial resort town, nestled in the mountainous tea plantations of West Java, and gained notoriety during the Indonesian Revolution, when Indonesians burned down part of their own town in response to the Dutch reoccupation of the city. Over six days in April, however, the modernist hillside bungalows housed not wealthy Dutchmen but the leaders of Asia’s largest powers. The city itself was overrun with diplomats, statesmen, journalists, and photographers enacting a spectacular moment of resurgence for nations emerging from colonial rule.

This special issue examines “other Bandungs”: conferences in the 1950s and 1960s that convened the decolonising world in different constellations. All the gatherings examined in this issue have in common that they were not styled as intergovernmental affairs. They did not convene heads of state, even though several of them were covertly or overtly state-sponsored. And none of them were completely disconnected from the state: delegations included civil servants, members of parliament, representatives of local and provincial governments, opposition leaders, government advisors, and state-appointed representatives. Together, they show the presence of a much broader Afro-Asian enthusiasm. While some of the early conferences foreshadow Bandung and solidify the connections that made the official conference possible, later conferences self-consciously claimed to be expressions of the Bandung Spirit, or at the very least located themselves vis-à-vis the Bandung conference.

Read the full introduction to the special issue by guest editors Su Lin Lewis and Carolien Stolte here. 

Articles

A Missing Peace: The Asia-Pacific Peace Conference in Beijing, 1952 and the Emotional Making of Third World Internationalism
Rachel Leow

Asian Socialism and the Forgotten Architects of Post-Colonial Freedom, 1952–1956
Su Lin Lewis

Where was the Afro in Afro-Asian Solidarity? Africa’s ‘Bandung Moment’ in 1950s Asia
Gerard McCann

“The People’s Bandung”: Local Anti-imperialists on an Afro-Asian Stage
Carolien Stolte

Building Egypt’s Afro-Asian Hub: Infrastructures of Solidarity and the 1957 Cairo Conference
Reem Abou-El-Fadl

Soviet “Afro-Asians” in UNESCO: Reorienting World History
Hanna Jansen

Dispatches from Havana: The Cold War, Afro-Asian Solidarities, and Culture Wars in Pakistan
Ali Raza

Plus book reviews.

Cross-Currents, Vol. 8, No. 1 (2019)

The new issue of Cross-Currents includes two special sections.

“Diasporic Art and Korean Identity,” is the fruit of a two-day conference held at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in May 2017 and explores new delineations of the political, social, cultural, and emotional landscapes inhabited by Koreans living in diaspora.

“Air-Water-Land-Human: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health and Environment in East Asia” presents new directions for thinking through connections between health, well-being, and environment in the region.

Diasporic Art and Korean Identity

Painting in Hijoo Son article, Cross-Currents 8-1
From “The Diasporic Intimacy and Transindividuality of Artists
Himan Sŏk (1914–2003) and Jun Ch’ae (1926– )” by Hijoo Son, this issue. Left: Jun Ch’ae, Public Opinion (Yoron), 2002. Oil on canvas, 90 cm x
65.5 cm. Right: Jun Ch’ae, Glass Marbles (Yuri kusŭl), 2002. Acrylic on canvas, 162 cm x 130 cm. Source: Gyeongnam Art Museum.

 

Introduction

Hijoo Son, Jooyeon Rhee

The Forgotten Childhoods of Korea: Ounie Lecomte’s A Brand New Life (2009) and So Yong Kim’s Treeless Mountain (2009)

Ji-Yoon An

Performing in the “Cultural Borderlands”: Gender, Trauma, and Performance Practices of a North Korean Women’s Musical Troupe in South Korea

Iain Sands

The Diasporic Intimacy and Transindividuality of Artists Himan Sŏk (1914–2003) and Jun Ch’ae (1926–)

Hijoo Son

Air-Water-Land-Human: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health and Environment in East Asia

Figure 1 &2 in Air/Qi Connections and China’s Smog Crisis: Notes from the History of Science by Ruth Rogaski, Cross-Currents 8-1
From “Air/Qi Connections and China’s Smog Crisis: Notes from the History of Science” by Ruth Rogaski, this issue. Left: Beijing University statue of a taijiquan practitioner wearing a face mask. Source: ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images. Right: Doing taijiquan in the smog. Source: AP Photo.

 

Introduction

Ruth Rogaski

Cholera and the Environment in Nineteenth-Century Japan

William Johnston

Danger in the Air: Tuberculosis Control and BCG Vaccination in the Republic of China, 1930–1949

Mary Augusta Brazelton

Air/Qi Connections and China’s Smog Crisis: Notes from the History of Science

Ruth Rogaski

“Swimming in Poison”: Reimagining Endocrine Disruption through China’s Environmental Hormones

Janelle Lamoreaux

Sacred Trash and Personhood: Living in Daily Waste-Management Infrastructures in the Eastern Himalayas

Bo Wang