NEW JOURNAL Issues: Schooling Journeys in the Southwestern Pacific, #KuToo Online Feminist Movement in Japan, Geographic Analysis of COVID-19 in L.A. + More

The Contemporary Pacific

Volume 22, Issue 2 (2021)

Special Issue: Schooling Journeys in the Southwestern Pacific

From the Guest Editors Rachel Emerine Hicks, Debra McDougall, and David Oakeshott in The Promise of Education: Schooling Journeys in the Southwester Pacific:

“Schooling journeys” is more than a metaphor in the southwestern Pacific. To step into a classroom, children and youth often travel hours each day or live for months at a time away from their families. The journey of schooling is rarely direct; it often winds between formal and informal learning and in and out of school, work, and home life. And the journey is expensive; many families struggle mightily to gather the money for fees, school supplies, uniforms, and transportation. Young people embark on these precarious journeys, and their families make sacrifices to support them, because schooling promises a better life—a move away from the backbreaking labor of subsistence agriculture toward a reliable salary that will better support their family and community. Because of the structural inequalities in school and a lack of jobs for those who complete schooling, however, few experience the socioeconomic advancement schooling promises. Still, students and their families continue to hope that schooling will lead to well-paid work. Even more important, though, going to school is seen as key to being a competent and effective person in society—increasingly for both women and men.

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers

Volume 83 (2021)

Editor Craig S. Revels reflects over the COVID-19 pandemic and how it has affected geographers and members as he states:

Last year’s volume was published in a time of great uncertainty as the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the world, and this year’s unfortunately arrives under similar conditions, slowly improving though they may be. The tragedies, disruptions, and general state of societal affairs during the pandemic will not soon be forgotten…

Geographers have been at the forefront of research into the spread of COVID-19 since the earliest days of the pandemic, and Steve Graves and Petra Nichols contribute an analytical perspective on infection rates in Los Angeles County. In particular, they statistically identify a causal relationship between infection and a range of key socioeconomic and demographic variables, a relationship influencing the location and rate of spread for the disease. They leave us to consider how those factors must be addressed in any preparations for future public health crises.

In a significantly different context, Ray Sumner and John Menary
demonstrate that taking students into the field, always a valuable exercise, is even more rewarding when it leads to unexpected discoveries and challenges our carefully laid plans. In this case, a straightforward field methods class oriented around the Los Angeles River instead became an open-ended, student-driven exploration into the social dimensions of heritage, ethnicity,
culture, and urban development.

New Journal Issues: Biography’s International Year in Review, Buddhist-Christian Studies, China Review International + More

Biography

Volume 44, Issue 1 (2021)

Special Issue: International Year in Review

Remembering Lauren Berlant

Contributors Riva Lehrer, Anna Poletti, and Rebecca Wanzo graciously provided this issue with estate artwork and tributes to Lauren Berlant.

From Anna Poletti’s More Flailing in Public:

For me, Berlant’s publications and their way of speaking with colleagues enacted and theorized core tensions that preoccupy lifewriting studies: what it means to be a person in public—sometimes alone, sometimes in a collective, sometimes in search of collectivity. Always thinking from, and beyond, psychoanalytic insights into the disorganizing experience of desire (largely through object-relations), Berlant explicated the kinds of stories about the good life that permeated American culture, and explored what happened to people’s belief in culture, politics, and themselves when they tried to live those narratives, or discovered those narratives were structurally unlivable (The Female Complaint; Cruel Optimism). Berlant’s early work on trauma (“Trauma and Ineloquence”) and their interviews (with Jay Prosser, and with Julie Rak and me) are the places where the relevance of their deep attention to the politics of “fantasies of the good life” are most clearly connected to lifewriting scholarship. Margaretta Jolly’s special issue of Biography on “Life Writing and Intimate Publics,” published ten years ago, shows us how productive Berlant’s theory of the importance of being and feeling intimate in public can be for studying life writing, particularly online.

Oceanic Linguistics

Volume 60, Number 20 (2021)

This new issue contains a squib titled, “Three Puzzles for Phonological Theory in Philippine Minority Languages” by Jason W. Lobel, Robert Blust, and Erik Thomas.

An excerpt from this squib reads as follows:

In viewing language as an object of scientific inquiry, description alone has never been enough to satisfy most researchers. Once observations about one language are compared with those about another, there is a desire to generalize, to make statements about what is common and what is not, and therefore about what is expected and what is surprising in language content, structure, or change. In terms of theory construction, expected observations follow from basic assumptions about how language works and how it is embedded in the larger context of human neurophysiology and behavior. Much progress has been made in recent decades concerning the phonetic forces that give rise to phonological processes, and there is widespread agreement about many of these. This note describes three well-documented phonological processes in languages spoken by aboriginal Filipino populations along the Pacific coast of Luzon that do not conform to current theoretical expectations about what is a likely or even a possible diachronic process. Each of these is part of a larger context of sound change which does conform to theoretical expectation, although the details are complex, and still not widely reported in the literature. For this reason, a brief background survey of vocalic changes triggered by voiced stops will be given first, followed by the puzzling changes that depart from this more general pattern.

Find more research articles, squibs, and reviews at Project MUSE.

Pacific Science

Volume 65, Number 4 (2021)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

Population Divergence and Evolution of the Hawaiian Endemic Sesbania tomentosa (Fabaceae)
David M. Cole and Clifford W. Morden

Eleotris (Teleostei: Eleotridae) from Indonesia with Description of Three New Species Within the ‘melanosoma’ Neuromast Pattern Group
Marion I. Mennesson, Philippe Keith, Sopian Sauri, Frédéric Busson, Erwan Delrieu-Trottin, Gino Limmon, Tedjo Sukmono, Jiran, Renny Risdawati, Hadi Dahruddin, and Nicolas Hubert.

Three New Records of Marine Macroalgae from Viet Nam Based on Morphological Observations and Molecular Analyses by
Xuan-Vy Nguyen, Nhu-Thuy Nguyen-Nhat, Xuan-Thuy T. Nguyen, My-Ngan T. Nguyen, Viet-Ha Dao, and Karla J. McDermid.

The Structure and Dynamics of Endangered Forest Bird Communities in the Mariana Islands
Robert J. Craig

And the following article is available on Open Access:
Modeling Scenarios for the Management of Axis Deer in Hawai‘i
Steven C. Hess and Seth W. Judge

Find more research articles at Project MUSE.

Rapa Nui Journal now available on eVols

Rapa Nui Journal‘s archive is now available on eVols, an open-access, digital institutional repository for the University of Hawai‘i community and researchers around the world.

The Rapa Nui Journal is the official, peer-reviewed journal of the Easter Island Foundation (EIF). The journal serves as a forum for interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities and social sciences on Easter Island and the Eastern Polynesian region.

The journal launched in 1984. Volumes 1 through 28 can be freely accessed via eVols and recent content can be viewed at Project MUSE. 

Learn more about Rapa Nui Journal here.

Journal cover
Rapa Nui Journal

The Zither: A Novella and New Short Stories from China (Mānoa, Vol. 33 Issue 1)

Featured in this Mānoa volume is The Woman Zou, the third in a series of novellas by the distinguished woman writer Zhang Yihe. Born in 1942 in Chongqing, Sichuan, Zhang Yihe was the daughter of Zhang Bojun, a high official in the Chinese Communist Party who was purged in 1957 and labeled a public enemy. By association, Zhang Yihe was convicted of counterrevolutionary activities and sentenced to twenty years in a remote prison camp. After serving ten years, she was released and allowed to return to Beijing in 1979. When she retired in 2001 from teaching at the Chinese National Opera Academy, she began writing her novellas based on the lives of her fellow women prisoners. Her nonfiction books were banned in China and she became an outspoken critic of China’s censorship laws. In 2004, she received the International PEN Award for Independent Chinese Writing. The award committee wrote that

Zhang Yihe’s writing is not only an indictment of the age of darkness, but it is also an affirmation of the indefatigable human dignity and a negation of all attempts to destroy this dignity… Zhang Yihe’s work illustrates the rarely seen courage among contemporary Chinese writers to defend freedom, dignity and historical memories.

The other outstanding writers in this volume are Yi Zhou, whose writing awards include the first prize for novellas and short stories in the Yellow River Literature competition, the Dunhuang Literary Award, and the Lu Xun literary prize, and Zhu Wenying, who is considered one of the leading representatives of post-70s women writers and has received the Annual People’s Literature Prize, among other awards.

The Zither was translated and guest edited by Karen Gernant and Chen Zeping. 

More News from Mānoa

Manoa MA 32-2 Acting My Age Cover Thomas Farber

“An Office in the Ocean”: An interview with author Thomas Farber at The Hawai‘i Review of Books

Podcast: Michael Ellsberg interviews author Thomas Farber

The Rumpus Mini-Interview Project: Leland Cheuk interviews author Thomas Farber

A letter from author Thomas Farber to Mānoa journal

Two Mānoa pieces are included in the new Pushcart anthology, including Xiao Xiao’s “Crime against Grief: Myth of an Age” (translated by Ming Di and Frank Stewart) and Tang Donhong’s essay, “Chairman Mao is Dead!” (translated by Anne Henochowicz). Both are included in the Mānoa volume, Tyranny Lessons.

The Zither: A Novella and New Short Stories from China
MĀNOA Vol. 33 Issue 1 (2021)

Read on Project MUSE:

The Zither

Subscribe to MĀNOA

Like The Zither? MĀNOA publishes two compelling issues annually of international literature. Subscribe here

New Journal Special Features: Gender Trouble in Korean Literature, Unsettling Korean Migration + Biography forum on Behrouz Boochani

Azalea 14 (2021)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture

Volume 14 (2021)

Special Feature: Korean Genre Fiction; O Chang-hwan; and Gender Trouble In Korean Literature

From the Editor Young Jung-Lee:

One of the most important recent shifts in Korean literature is found in gender conflict. This “Special Feature: Gender Trouble in Korean Literature and Society,” guest-edited by Hye-Ryoung Lee, shows a fundamentally new perspective through six scholars reading Korean Literature and Society. Over the past decade, the #MeToo Movement has shaken the world, and Korean society has been no exception, as can be seen in Choi Young-mi’s poem “En,”  introduced here with six critical essays. Even before its publication, “En” was the focus of media attention, and it remained a hot topic in Korean society for years due to Choi’s high-profile court battles.

biography

Volume 43, Number 4 (2020)

Special Feature: A Forum on Behrouz Boochani’s No Friend but the Mountains


From Coeditor Anna Poletti:

With this forum, we, the editors of Biography, inaugurate a new feature of the journal that aims to respond to and amplify specific examples of the power of life writing as a cultural, political, and social practice, and which document key moments in the evolution of that practice. In this forum, No Friend but the Mountains is discussed as both a profoundly localized text responding to, making knowledge about, and exposing a highly specific and complex set of conditions, and as a uniquely transnational text that speaks to and about a global phenomenon. Its highly innovative use of life writing as a narrative technique and epistemological practice warranted, in our minds, a concentrated response from the journal. Commissioning and editing this response has renewed my appreciation for the primary concerns of lifewriting scholarship: tracking the mercurial power of personal storytelling to crystalize the contemporary moment in such a way that new knowledge emerges from the entanglements it depicts, and the entanglements it drags its readers into.

Korean Studies

Volume 45 (2021)

Special Section: Unsettling Korean Migration: Multiple Trajectories and Experiences

From the Editor Cheehyun Harrison Kim:

This analytic potency of migration is superbly demonstrated in this volume’s Special Section Unsettling Korean Migration: Multiple Trajectories and Experiences, guest edited by Sunhee Koo (The University of Auckland) and Jihye Kim (The University of Central Lancashire). Sunhee Koo and Jihye Kim have brought together papers on labor (Yonson Ahn and Jihye Kim), ritual life (Marcus Bell), cultural identity (Sunhee Koo), and artistic production (Hee-seung Irene Lee and Soojin Kim). The six engrossing articles deal with how the Korean diaspora—in Argentina, Germany, Japan, China, and the United States—have shaped and represented their particular situations through negotiation, resilience, and creativity. The authors are highly critical of any national framework, and they see diasporic life as contexts of not only sorrow and sacrifice but also innovation and regeneration. Sunhee Koo and Jihye Kim offer a detailed explanation in their Introduction.

New Journal Special Issues: We Are Maunakea, Contemporary Japanese Theatre + Digital Methods, Empire Histories

Asian Theatre Journal

Volume 38, Number 1, (2021)

From the Editor Siyuan Liu:

This issue starts with Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei’s appreciation of Leonard Pronko (1927–2019), noted kabuki scholar and teacher who passed away late 2019. Building on her profile of Pronko for Asian Theatre Journal’s “founders of the fields” series (28: 2, 2011), Sorgenfrei offers a touching personal profile of her former professor as an extraordinary human being.
As evidence to the flourishing field of Japanese theatre studies pioneered by Pronko and his peers, this issue continues with a special section on contemporary Japanese theatre with a combination of articles, reports, a translation, and a performance review essay.

cover image

biography

Volume 43, Number 3 (2020)


We Are Maunakea: Aloha ʻĀina Narratives of Protest, Protection, and Place
Bryan Kamaoli Kuwada and Noʻu Revilla

From the guest editors’ introduction:

In the summer of 2019, kiaʻi (protectors) gathered at Puʻuhonua o Puʻuhuluhulu to defend Maunakea, a sacred mountain, against desecration by the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). Thousands gathered at Ala Hulu Kupuna, or Mauna Kea Access Road. Daily protocols were led by cultural practitioners and long-time protectors of Maunakea, intergenerational Native Hawaiian leadership was developed and empowered on Hawaiian terms, a community kitchen was organized, Puʻuhuluhulu University was established as an actual Hawaiian place of learning, and a collective commitment to ʻāina and kapu aloha rooted all who arrived and all who continue to stay in this movement.
The 2019 stand was also an unprecedented opportunity to witness the battle of narratives, as mainstream media and highly paid public relations firms were outmaneuvered by Kanaka- and ally-authored life writing. This special issue features first-hand accounts, academic reflections, creative works, photography, and interviews with kiaʻi from the 2019 front lines and members of the media team.

Journal of World History

Volume 32, Number 2 (2021)

Special Issue: Digital Methods, Empire Histories

Introduction from Guest Editor Antoinette Burton reads:

The technological evangelism of much of anglophone digital humanities discourse should sit uneasily with empire historians, who know what languages of discovery and “new frontiers” have meant in the context of world history, especially where data collection is concerned. To be sure, digitization has made myriad colonial archives, official and unofficial, available via open access platforms. This means that vast stores of knowledge are now at our fingertips—a proximity and immediacy that has reshaped the lived experience of archival research for many scholars, in this case bringing the imperial world not just closer to home but into the hands of anyone who has access to a cellphone. And the revolution in digital tools in the last twenty-five years has given rise to equally vast possibilities for gathering and visualizing evidence as well as for scaling and interpreting data: for worlding, mostly by aggregation and consolidation, what we aim to know about the kinds of colonial pasts that are available and capturable via text and image. Yet, this information empire is not exactly new. Digitization most often reassembles archival collections proper, sometimes remixing them with print and visual culture and typically organizing them through mechanisms and selection processes that are more or less visible depending on the commitment to transparency of the conglomerator. In some cases, those conglomerators are private individuals or government entities; in others, corporate sponsors; in still others, community-based activists. Inevitably perhaps, today’s digital imperial “data” are actually, more accurately, digitally transformed imperial sources. And for colonial subjects, as for the enslaved, data has more often than not meant terror at the scene of the crime.

Pacific Science 75#3, 2021

The most recent issue of Pacific Science is now available on Project MUSE and BioOne.

cover imageTable of Contents

Pollination Biology of an Endemic Hawaiian Tree, Erythrina sandwicensis (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae), in a Novel Ecosystem
By Emily F. Grave, Timothy I. Kroessig, and Tamara Ticktin

Bi-Hemispheric Distribution and Ecology of the Commensal Amphipod Leucothoe nagatai Ishimaru, 1985 (Crustacea: Leucothoidae)
By James Darwin Thomas, Donald B. Cadien, and Kristine N. White

A Century of Wake Fish Surveys: Comprehensive Annotated Checklist of the Fishes of Wake Atoll
By D. Paul Brown

Evaluation of the Humphead Wrasse, Cheilinus undulatus, in Shallow Water Habitats in Saipan Lagoon, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
By Michael S. Trianni, John E. Gourley, and Scott R. Vogt

Nest Architecture of an Endangered Hawaiian Yellow-Faced Bee, Hylaeus anthracinus (Hymenoptera: Colletidae) and Potential Nest-Site Competition from Three Introduced Solitary Bees
By Jason R. Graham, Joshua W. Campbell, Sheldon Plentovich, and Cynthia B. A. King

Fly on the Wall: Comparing Arthropod Communities Between Islands With and Without House Mice (Mus musculus)
By Wieteke A. Holthuijzen, Susan L. Durham, Elizabeth N. Flint, Jonathan H. Plissner, Kaylee J. Rosenberger, Coral A. Wolf, and Holly P. Jones

Cetaceans of the Northern Bismarck Sea, Papua New Guinea
By Cara Miller and Vagi Rei

New Faunal Records from A World Heritage Site in Danger: Rennell Island, Solomon Islands
By Tyrone H. Lavery, Lucas H. DeCicco, Jonathan Q. Richmond, Ikuo G. Tigulu, Michael J. Andersen, David Boseto, and Robert G. Moyle

Event-Based Stable Isotope Analysis of Precipitation Along a High Resolution Transect on the South Face of O’ahu, Hawai’i
By Honour Booth, Nicole Lautze, Diamond Tachera, and Daniel Dores

Association Affairs: Pacific Science Association

 

For more information on Pacific Science please visit the journal homepage.

Journal of World History, Vol 32#3

Special Issue: Development in World History – Development as World History
Guest Editor: Iris Borowy

Table of Contents

Introduction by Iris Borowy 
The introduction to this issue is free to read online!

Children in the Development Debate: The Role of UNICEF from 1947 to the First UN Development Decade 
by Angela Villani

Socialist Internationalism, World Capitalism, and the Global South: Soviet Foreign Economic Policy and India in Times of Cold War and Decolonization, 1950s–1960s
by Andreas Hilger

The Middle Zone: The 1964 UN Conference on Trade and Development and the Australian Responsecover image
by Nicholas Ferns

From Bullets to Bricks: Chinese Foreign Aid to Guyana During the Mao-Era, 1972-1976
by Jared Ward

Human Excreta: Hazardous Waste or Valuable Resource? Shifting Views of Modernity
by Iris Borowy

Book Reviews

Escape from Rome: The Failure of Empire and the Road to Prosperity by Walter Scheidel
Reviewed by Benjamin Reilly

Lost Maps of the Caliphs: Drawing the World in Eleventh-Century Cairo by Yossef Rapoport and Emilie Savage-Smith
Reviewed by Pinar Emiralioğlu

Indian Migration and Empire: A Colonial Genealogy of the Modern State by Radhika Mongia, and: Singapore, Chinese Migration and the Making of the British Empire, 1819–67 by Stan Neal
Reviewed by Jamie Banks

Contested Territory: Dien Bien Phu and the Making of Northwest Vietnam by Christian C. Lentz
Reviewed by Matthew Masur

 

The Journal of World History publishes research into historical questions requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. It is devoted to the study of phenomena that transcend the boundaries of single states, regions, or cultures, such as large-scale population movements, long-distance trade, cross-cultural technology transfers, and the transnational spread of ideas. Individual subscription is by membership in the World History Association.

For information on how to submit your manuscript or to subscribe, please visit the journal homepage.

Celebrating Buwan ng Wikang Pambansa (Philippines National Language Month)


20% OFF ON THESE SELECT TITLES

FIND OPEN ACCESS PHILIPPINES LANGUAGE TEXTS AND JOURNALS BELOW!

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Cover of Bikol Dictionary book, as open access

Cover of Kapampangan Dictionary book, as open access
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Cover of Spoken Pangasinan book, as open access

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Pacific Science, Vol. 75#2, 2021

Special issue dedicated to Dr. Isabella Abbott 
Guest editor: Celia Smith


Isabella Kauakea Yau Yung Aiona Abbott: Contributions to a Celebration of the Centennial of her Birth
By Rosie Alegado, Cindy Hunter, Celia Smith

Biodiversity of Hawaiian Peyssonneliales (Rhodophyta). 1. Two New Species in the Genus Ramicrusta from Lehua Island
By Alison R. Sherwood, Monica O. Paiano, Rachael M. Wade, Feresa C. Cabrera, Heather L. Spalding, Randall K. Kosaki

Caulerpa bikinensis (Chlorophyta) Preference for the Mesophotic Depths of Pacific Atolls
By Roy T. Tsuda

Introduced Mangroves Along the Coast of Moloka‘i, Hawai‘i may Represent Novel Habitats for Megafaunal Communities
By Bryan A. Nakahara, Amanda W. J. Demopoulos, Yoshimi M. Rii, Rosanna A. Alegado, Kauaoa M. S. Fraiola, Craig R. Smith

Examining the UV-Absorbing Properties of Scaevola taccada (Goodeniaceae) and its Potential Use as a Sunscreen
By Keanu Rochette-Yu Tsuen, Claire Lager, Michael C. Ross, Mary Hagedorn

Ethelia hawaiiensis (Etheliaceae, Rhodophyta), a New Mesophotic Marine Alga from Manawai (Pearl and Hermes Atoll), Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, Hawai‘i
By Alison R. Sherwood, Monica O. Paiano, Feresa P. Cabrera, Heather L. Spalding, Brian B. Hauk, Randall K. Kosaki

Molecular Systematics of the Native Seagrass, Ruppia cf. maritima (Ruppiaceae, Alismatales), on Hawai‘i Island
By Brandie A. Colwell, Ronald P. Kittle III, Renee L. Corpuz, Karla J. McDermid

Cryptic Cryptogam Revealed: Hypnea corona (Gigartinales: Cystocloniaceae), A New Red Algal Species Described From the Hypnea cornuta Complex
By John M. Huisman, Roberta D’Archino, Wendy Nelson, Sung Min Boo, Antonella Petrocelli

Reduction in Cover of Two Introduced Invasive Macroalgae by Herbivores on Coral Reefs of Kāne‘ohe Bay, Hawai‘i
By John Stimson, Scott T. Larned

For more information about Pacific Science, the Official Journal of the Pacific Science Association, please visit the journal homepage.

Philosophy East and West, 71#3

This special issue of the journal is now available online with a freely available introduction.
 
Wisdom?cpver {EW

Guest Editors: Michael Hampe and Kai Marchal

Table Of Contents

Wisdom: Introduction to Special Issue
Michael Hampe, Kai Marchal
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0039

The Art of Dying is the Art of Living: Rationality in Theravada Buddhism
Susan E. Babbitt
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0040

The Wisdom of Insight
Ondřej Beran
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0041

Wisdom, Deep Deference, and the Problem of Autonomy: Engaging with Being Cheng
Philippe Brunozzi
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0042

Philosophers, Mystics, and Other Sages: Wisdom in Early Islamic Thought
Nadja Germann
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0043

Wisdom in Individual, Political, and Cultural Transformations: Brecht, Nietzsche, and the Limits of Academic Philosophy
Michael Hampe, Karsten Schoellner
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0044

Wisdom: A Murdochian Perspective
Kai Marchal
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0045

Who Is a Wise Person? Zhuangzi and Epistemological Discussions of Wisdom
Shane Ryan, Karyn Lai
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0046

Birds of Wisdom
Mario Wenning
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0047

Mulla Sadra’s Practical Philosophy: A Return to Platonic Phronesis
Sahar Kavandi, Maryam Ahmadi, Ahmad Hosseini
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0048

Putting Ruist and Hegelian Social Thought in Dialogue
Andrew James Komasinski
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0049

Ming 名 in the Laozi Daodejing 老子道德經: Interpretations and Translations of the Opening Verse
Yumi Suzuki
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0050

An Islamic Account of Reformed Epistemology
Jamie B. Turner
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0051

Discussion

Wilhelm Halbfass and the Purposes of Cross-Cultural Dialogue
Dimitry Shevchenko
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0052

After Comparative Philosophy: A Discussion of “Wilhelm Halbfass and the Purposes of Cross-Cultural Dialogue,” by Dimitry Shevchenko
Purushottama Bilimoria
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0053

Online Book Reviews

The Non-Existence of the Real World by Jan Westerhoff (review)
Ricki Bliss
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0054

Ratnakīrti’s Proof of Exclusion by Patrick McAllister (review)
Joel Feldman
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0055

Human Being, Bodily Being: Phenomenology from Classical India by Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (review)
Sonam Kachru
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0056

Classical Indian Philosophy: A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps by Peter Adamson and Jonardon Ganeri (review)
Joerg Tuske
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0057

Journal of World History Special Issue: Health, Globally – Free!

Next week, the World History Association hosts its annual meeting virtually, from July 5 to 9, on the theme “Health, Globally.” The Journal of World History offers an accompanying special collection, free on the Project MUSE platform through summer. Attendees can also receive 30% off select world history titles.

The “Health, Globally” special issue draws together some of the journal’s most frequently cited and downloaded material alongside some less well-known contributions. Together, these articles present a multivalent approach to the study of global health. Some are driven by new scientific breakthroughs that allow previously held assumptions to be challenged and even rewritten. Some consider the history of health to be a debate about culture or the method of communicating knowledge. Some take a global approach to consider issues that touched every corner of the world, and others begin with specific local circumstances and consider how these episodes inform greater debates in world history. 

This special issue provides accessible resources for scholars and teachers worldwide, pulled together by editor Matthew P. Romaniello, who discusses the issue below.  

Matthew P. Romaniello, editor of the Journal of World History
Matthew P. Romaniello, editor of the Journal of World History

University of Hawai‘i Press: Tell us how this special issue came together.

Matthew P. Romaniello: The World History Association’s President, Laura Mitchell, let me know that the annual conference was going to be organized around the theme of “Health, Globally,” and it just seemed like a perfect fit for a special collection. Pandemics have been a recurring threat throughout history, making this theme not only reflective of the ongoing pandemic but also one with deep roots in the journal’s past.

UHP: Why is this issue important now?

MPR: I’m just going to quote from the WHA’s original call for papers for the conference this summer because it’s so apt: “The urgency of global public health crises, economic hardship, famine and food insecurity, political instability, ongoing violence, and environmental disasters demand immediate attention and invite measured analysis over long time horizons—a move along temporal scales at which world historian excel.”

UHP: How do you hope people will use this issue?

MPR: We are extremely fortunate that the University of Hawai‘i Press has once again worked with Project MUSE to make the special collection available open access until the end of September. My hope is that these articles will be brought into world history classes this fall to have students critically engage with the impact of health crises throughout history. We all know students are grappling with how their lives have changed in the past year, and these case studies can speak meaningfully to the way past societies have responded to, and recovered from, pandemics.

UHP: In addition to this year’s World History Association meeting, what resources would you point your colleagues to?

MPR: There’s a tremendous wealth of resources available to study responses to past pandemics, both other scholarly works and an enormous body of primary sources. Harvard University made available some of its resources through “Contagion: Historical Views of Diseases and Epidemics,” which is a curated collection for the classroom. Many scholars are probably familiar with the open access collection available through PubMed, but the National Library of Medicine (NLM) has rich digital resources available on its website. Between the NLM and the Wellcome Library in London, there’s just an enormous variety of primary sources available. I also recommend browsing the resources identified at the American Association for the History of Medicine, particularly the Syllabus for “A History of Anti-Black Racism in Medicine,” which lays out a plan for integrating two of the defining issues of the past year—structural racism and health—in one class.

UHP: Finally, a year in, how has the pandemic affected your own research and teaching?

MPR: It’s been a long year. I’ve learned a lot about how to approach virtual and online teaching, but I’m mostly relieved to be back in the classroom this fall. And I’ve enjoyed the time I’ve had to focus on both editing and writing, but I’m optimistic about a return to the archive next year. There’s no doubt we have incredible access to online materials compared to only a few years ago, but there’s nothing quite like being in the archive and making an unexpected discovery!

Join Matthew P. Romaniello for a roundtable discussion with special issue authors Gregory D. Smithers, Nükhet Varlik, and Stephanie Anne Boyle on July 8 at the World History Association meeting.