Honoring David L. Rolsten, Sonic Narratives in Modern Korea  + Girls in Japanese Literature

CHINOPERL

Volume 41, Number 1 (2022)

Special Issue: Honoring David L. Rolston

Associate Editor Catherine Swatek and Editorial Board Member Robert E. Hegel remember Rolston in the following introduction:

Given his publication record, one might assume that David L. Rolston is a scholar of narrative fiction. For his first major publication, David served as editor of How to Read the Chinese Novel, a milestone in providing English-language readers a glimpse of reading practices and practical criticism contemporaneous with Ming and Qing novels themselves. Not merely the compiler of the translations that comprise six of the book’s seven chapters, David’s work can be seen throughout the volume, from adding innumerable notes and explanations to the “How to Read” (dufa讀法) translations; to writing essays on the sources, history, and formal aspects of traditional fiction criticism; to compiling explanatory appendices and an extensive bibliography for each of the masterworks covered. This project was completed before David finished his Chicago doctorate.

Find more special features and articles at Project MUSE.

Korean Studies 46 (2022)

Korean Studies

Volume 46, Number 2 (2021)

Special Section: “Music That Moves: Sonic Narratives in Modern Korea”

This Special Section features discussion on 1960’s protect songs to K-pop idols. Editor Cheehyung Harrison Kim notes:

Culture is at once a medium through which we make sense of the
world (for good or ill), a field of empowerment for the underprivileged, and a source of hegemony for the state and corporations. This cultural complexity is discernible in South Korea’s current political landscape, and it is also the very theme explored in this volume’s Special Section “Music That Moves: Sonic Narratives in Modern Korea,” dexterously guest edited by Dafna Zur and Susan Hwang. In Katherine Lee’s elegant piece on the World Vision Korean Orphan Choir, musical performance is at the heart of transnational religiosity and Cold War politics. Transnationalism is also the framework of Dafna Zur and Yoon Joo Hwang’s original research on children’s music during the colonial period, when the merger between western style of songwriting and Korean emotionality unevenly transpired in the genre of tongyo. Music as a field of popular resistance is the core of Pil Ho Kim’s audacious piece on South Korea’s 1960s protest songs, which, for Kim, is a pre-minjung expression of the multitude. Susan Hwang’s emotionally prodigious article, too, is on the resistive and resilient aspect of music, which, in the aftermath of the 1980 Kwangju Uprising, served as a crucial repertoire for the counter-state. From the opposite side, music as practice of hegemonic efficacy is dealt with in Alexandra Leonzini and Peter Moody’s intricate article on North Korea’s sonic culture, as it is done in Roald Maliangkay’s perspicacious study on South Korea’s use of K-pop in marketing. Whether the hegemonic entity is the state or a corporation, music is, in these two articles, a potent medium of influence.

Find more special features and articles at Project MUSE.

USJWJ62

U.S. Japan Women’s Journal

Volume 62 (2022)

Special Issue: Girls and Literature

As expressed by authors Hiromi Tsuchiya Dollase and Wakako Suzuki in the introduction:

The literary genre shōjo shōsetsu emerged in conjunction with the rise of girls’ education in the Meiji period. Early stories were meant to educate readers to become “good wives and wise mothers.” Accordingly, shōjo shōsetsu endured restrictions on the narratives they could tell, limiting the breadth of their authors’ artistic and literary possibilities. Shōjo shōsetsu evolved and diversified in the postwar era and, especially starting in the 1980s, became a means for young female authors to empower themselves. Shōjo shōsetsu have declined in popularity recently as readers consume stories more broadly across media and genres. The goal of this special issue is to contemplate the function, meanings, and problems of shōjo shōsetsu. Instead of merely confining ourselves to a rigid, unified notion of shōjo shōsetsu, we consider shōjo characters from the wider literary world, investigating their roles, functions, and cultural implications.


The new issue includes the following articles:

Introduction: Girls and Literature
イントロダクション:少女と文学

Hiromi Tsuchiya Dollase and Wakako Suzuki

Trees That Grow Kimono (1895)
着物のなる木

Wakamatsu Shizuko 若松賤子
Translated by Wakako Suzuki

Kawabata Yasunari’s The Scarlet Gang of Asakusa as the
Territory of the Dispossessed Girl

追い立てられた少女の領域としての『浅草紅団』
Barbara Hartley

Love and Sexuality in Postwar Girls’ Culture: Examining
Tomishima Takeo’s Junior Fictiona
戦後少女文化における恋愛と性愛:富島健夫の

ジュニア小説をめぐって
Hiromi Tsuchiya Dollase

Countdown to the Demise of Girls’ Novels
少女小説のカウントダウンの開始

Kume Yoriko 久米依子
Translated and Introduced by Barbara Hartley

Find more articles at Project MUSE.

New Journal Special Issues: The Religiosity of Tonghak, Vietnamese Linguistics + More

Oregon beautiful picture

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistic Society

Special Issue:

Vietnamese Linguistics: State of the Field

The new issue features the following introduction by Trang Phan, John Phan, and Mark J. Alves

The current issue is the result of a workshop held at the Harvard Yenching Institute in April of 2021, entitled Vietnamese Linguistics, Typology and Language Universals, and which featured nineteen linguists working on diverse aspects of the Vietnamese language, ranging from semantics to historical phonology. Our purpose in gathering was to take stock of the great leaps in Vietnamese linguistic research that have occurred over the past few decades, to bring together cutting-edge research from each subdiscipline, and to begin a new collaborative dialogue on Vietnamese linguistics, typology, and language universals. Most of all, it was our belief that the time had come to reconsider Vietnamese linguistics as a unified field of inquiry. As a result, a new academic organization was founded: the International Society of Vietnamese Linguistics.
In the past twenty years, research into the Vietnamese language has advanced exponentially, in tandem with developments in our understanding of syntax, semantics, phonetics, and phonology—both on the synchronic and diachronic levels. Specific work on the Vietnamese language now informs and even leads broader linguistic inquiry in a number of unprecedented ways. These new developments invite a concentration of state-the-field research into a single volume, one that will serve not only to summarize current issues in each subdiscipline of Vietnamese linguistics, but also to initiate a longer, more collaborative conversation about the Vietnamese language.
Our goals in this special issue are thus twofold: first, we seek to provide a snapshot of current research into Vietnamese syntax, semantics, phonology, and phonetics, from both the historical and synchronic points of view, that may serve as a resource for linguists interested in exploring our current understanding of the Vietnamese language. Second, we hope that this issue will also serve as an invitation to all linguists working on the Vietnamese language or related languages to contribute to a broader, more cosmopolitan discussion—one in which discoveries of one subdiscipline may serve to inform or enlighten another.


Find more articles at eVols.

New Journal Issues: “Contagious Magic” in Japanese Theatre, Logistics of the Natural History Trade, Hawai‘i’s Toxic Plants + More

New Journal Special Features: Gender Trouble in Korean Literature, Unsettling Korean Migration + Biography forum on Behrouz Boochani

Azalea 14 (2021)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture

Volume 14 (2021)

Special Feature: Korean Genre Fiction; O Chang-hwan; and Gender Trouble In Korean Literature

From the Editor Young Jung-Lee:

One of the most important recent shifts in Korean literature is found in gender conflict. This “Special Feature: Gender Trouble in Korean Literature and Society,” guest-edited by Hye-Ryoung Lee, shows a fundamentally new perspective through six scholars reading Korean Literature and Society. Over the past decade, the #MeToo Movement has shaken the world, and Korean society has been no exception, as can be seen in Choi Young-mi’s poem “En,”  introduced here with six critical essays. Even before its publication, “En” was the focus of media attention, and it remained a hot topic in Korean society for years due to Choi’s high-profile court battles.

biography

Volume 43, Number 4 (2020)

Special Feature: A Forum on Behrouz Boochani’s No Friend but the Mountains


From Coeditor Anna Poletti:

With this forum, we, the editors of Biography, inaugurate a new feature of the journal that aims to respond to and amplify specific examples of the power of life writing as a cultural, political, and social practice, and which document key moments in the evolution of that practice. In this forum, No Friend but the Mountains is discussed as both a profoundly localized text responding to, making knowledge about, and exposing a highly specific and complex set of conditions, and as a uniquely transnational text that speaks to and about a global phenomenon. Its highly innovative use of life writing as a narrative technique and epistemological practice warranted, in our minds, a concentrated response from the journal. Commissioning and editing this response has renewed my appreciation for the primary concerns of lifewriting scholarship: tracking the mercurial power of personal storytelling to crystalize the contemporary moment in such a way that new knowledge emerges from the entanglements it depicts, and the entanglements it drags its readers into.

Korean Studies

Volume 45 (2021)

Special Section: Unsettling Korean Migration: Multiple Trajectories and Experiences

From the Editor Cheehyun Harrison Kim:

This analytic potency of migration is superbly demonstrated in this volume’s Special Section Unsettling Korean Migration: Multiple Trajectories and Experiences, guest edited by Sunhee Koo (The University of Auckland) and Jihye Kim (The University of Central Lancashire). Sunhee Koo and Jihye Kim have brought together papers on labor (Yonson Ahn and Jihye Kim), ritual life (Marcus Bell), cultural identity (Sunhee Koo), and artistic production (Hee-seung Irene Lee and Soojin Kim). The six engrossing articles deal with how the Korean diaspora—in Argentina, Germany, Japan, China, and the United States—have shaped and represented their particular situations through negotiation, resilience, and creativity. The authors are highly critical of any national framework, and they see diasporic life as contexts of not only sorrow and sacrifice but also innovation and regeneration. Sunhee Koo and Jihye Kim offer a detailed explanation in their Introduction.

Recently Published Journal Issues

Journal of Korean Religions

Journal of Korean Religions

Volume 12, Issue 1 (2021)

The new issue includes the following articles:

Going Global: The Transformation of the Korean Catholic Church
Denis WS Kim

Japanese Buddhist Modernism and the Thought of Sŏn Master Toeong Seongcheol (1912–1993)
Cho Myungje and Bernard Senécal S.J. (SeoMyeonggweon)

Calm Water is a Mirror: Neo-Confucian Meditation in the Chosŏn
Dynasty 
Guy S. Shababo

A Buddhist Critique of Neo-Confucianismin Seventeenth-Century Chosŏn Korea
Kim Jong Wook

Book Review

Gender Politics at Home and Abroad: Protestant Modernity in Colonial-Era Korea, by Hyaeweol Choi
Reviewed by Choi Hee An

 

cover image issue 58

U.S. -Japan Women’s Journal

Issue 58 (2020)

Includes the following articles:

Plotting Illness: Cancer in Ogino Anna’s “Nue” and
Yamauchi Reinan’s The Spirit of Cancer
Amanda C. Seaman

Nue.
by Ogino Anna. Translated by Amanda C. Seaman

Performativity of Gender in Speech: Life Experiences
of Japanese Trans Women
Hideko Abe

Natsume Fusanosuke, Panel Configurations in Sho¯jo
(Girls’) Manga.
by Natsume Fusanosuke. Translated and Introduced by
Jon Holt and Teppei Fukuda

Pacific Science

Pacific Science

Volume 75, Issue 1 (2021)

Includes the following articles:

The Historical Ecology of Game Species Introductions in Hawai’i
Deidre J. Duffy, Christopher A. Lepczyk

A Terrestrial Vertebrate Palaeontological Reconnaissance of Lord Howe Island, Australia
Julian P. Hume, Ian Hutton, Greg Middleton, Jacqueline M.T. Nguyen, John Wylie

Light-Level Geolocators Reveal That White-Throated Needletails (Hirundapus caudacutus) Follow a Figure-Eight Migration Route Between Japan and Australia
Noriyuki M. Yamaguchi, Sayaka Mori, Hiroshi Yonekawa, Daichi Waga, Hiroyoshi Higuchi

Fine-Scale Distribution, Abundance, and Foraging Behavior of Salvin’s, Buller’s, and Chatham Albatrosses in the Northern Humboldt Upwelling System
Javier Quiñones, Ana Alegre, Cynthia Romero, Massiel Manrique, Luis Vásquez

Influence of Light and Substrate Conditions on Regeneration of Native Tree Saplings in the Hawaiian Lowland Wet Forest
Susanne Kandert, Holger Kreft, Nicole DiManno, Amanda Uowolo, Susan Cordell, Rebecca Ostertag

Potential Distribution and Environmental Niche of the Black Corals Antipathes galapagensis and Myriopathes panamensis in the Eastern Tropical Pacific
Antonella Lavorato, Silvia Stranges, Hector Reyes Bonilla

Investigating the Diel Occurrence of Odontocetes Around the Maui Nui Region Using Passive Acoustic Techniques
Marian Howe, Marc O. Lammers

Limnological Characterization of Three Tropical Crater Lakes in the Archipelago of Samoa (Lanoto’o, Olomaga, Mataulano)
Robert Schabetsberger, Christian D. Jersabek, Zlatko Levkov, Bianca Ehrenfellner, Laulu Fialelei Enoka, Seumalo Afele Faiilagi

Association Affairs: Pacific Science Association

 

cover image vol. 54

Hawaiian Journal of History

Volume 54 (2020)

Includes the following articles:

The Lasting Significance of the Majors-Palakiko Case
Jonathan Y. Okamura

A Rock in the Park: The Key to a Remarkable Historical Tale
Hugh R. Montgomery

Ne Tentes aut Perfice: Early Hawaiian Diplomacy in the Southwestern Pacific and the Creation of Hawai‘i’s First Royal Order
Lorenz Gonschor

Reconnecting to Kawaiaha‘o Female Seminary: The Lives of the Students at the End of the Nineteenth Century
Deborah Day

Our Royal Guest: American Press Coverage of King Kalākaua’s Visit to the United States, 1874–1875
Douglas V. Askman

The Watchers: How Espionage Doomed the Counter-Revolution of 1895
Ralph Thomas Kam

Book Reviews

Aloha Rodeo: Three Hawaiian Cowboys, the World’s Greatest Rodeo, and a Hidden History of the American West by David Wolman and Julian Smith
Reviewed by Elyssa Ford

Unsustainable Empire: Alternative Histories of Hawai‘i Statehood by Dean Itsuji Saranillio
Reviewed by Sarah Miller-Davenport

American Sutra: A Story of Faith and Freedom in the Second World War by Duncan Ryūken Williams 
Reviewed by Kelli Y. Nakamura

Gateway State: Hawai‘i and the Cultural Transformation of American Empire by Sarah Miller-Davenport
Reviewed by JoAnna Poblete

Bibliography

Hawaiiana in 2019: A Bibliography of Titles of Historical Interest
Jodie Mattos

 

 

 

 

Virtual AAS2021 Annual Conference

Virtual AAS2021 We're Exhibiting badge

This week, March 21–26, the 2021 Association for Asian Studies (AAS) annual conference is taking place virtually. While most sessions require registration, there is also an open-access element to the conference, with plenary presentations accessible simply by signing up for a basic account. Be inspired by experiencing the opening ceremony and speech by AAS president Christine Yano (a University of Hawai‘i professor and UH Press author/series editor). The exhibit hall is also open to all—check out our virtual booth and explore its variety of offerings, including a conference discount and a jazzy video of our latest titles and books in series.

If you’re registered for the conference, there is much more to discover and absorb. For those who have a book proposal, please contact our acquisitions editors by email, after viewing this page that specifies their focus areas. As always, follow our Facebook and Twitter pages for our #AAS2021 posts. We look forward to the 2022 conference to be held (in-person, we hope) here in Honolulu!

China Review International Vol. 25 No. 1 (2018)

 

Volume 25 Number 1 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 23 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

Featured Review:

When Fish Were Fish
Christopher Rea

Reviews:

Poetic Transformations: Eighteenth-Century Cultural Projects on the Mekong Plains by Claudine Ang (review)
Reviewed by Eric Henry

Worüber man nicht spricht: Tabus, Schweigen und Redeverbote in China ed. by Rüdiger Breuer and Heiner Roetz (review)
Reviewed by Anna Stecher

GMO China: How Global Debates Transformed China’s Agricultural Biotechnology Policies by Cong Cao (review)
Reviewed by Nancy N. Chen

Morality and Monastic Revival in Post-Mao Tibet by Jane E. Caple (review)
Reviewed by Nicole Willock

Qing Travelers to the Far West: Diplomacy and the Information Order in Late Imperial China by Jenny Huangfu Day (review)
Reviewed by Bradley Camp Davis

China’s Footprints in Southeast Asia ed. by Maria Serena I. Diokno, Hsin-Huang Michael Hsiao, and Alan H. Yang (review)
Karen M. Teoh

That Distant Country Next Door: Popular Japanese Perceptions of Mao’s China by Erik Esselstrom (review)
Reviewed by Lu Yan

Song King: Connecting People, Places, and Past in Contemporary China by Levi S. Gibbs (review)
Reviewed by Charlotte D’Evelyn

Farewell to the God of Plague: Chairman Mao’s Campaign to Deworm China by Miriam Gross (review)
Reviewed by Robert Peckham

The Silk Road Trap: How China’s Trade Ambitions Challenge Europe by Jonathan Holslag (review)
Reviewed by Min Ye

Efficacious Underworld: The Evolution of Ten Kings Paintings in Medieval China and Korea by Cheeyun Lilian Kwon (review)
Reviewed by Beatrix Mecsi

Becoming Bilingual in School and Home in Tibetan Areas of China: Stories of Struggle YiXi LaMuCuo (review)
Reviewed by Norbert Francis

Chinese Poetic Modernisms ed. by Paul Manfredi and Christopher Lupke (review)
Reviewed by Joseph R. Allen

Just a Song: Chinese Lyrics from the Eleventh and Early Twelfth Centuries by Stephen Owen (review)
Reviewed by Lanlan Kuang

China’s Chaplin: Comic Stories and Farces by Xu Zhuodai (review)
Reviewed by Zheyu Wei

Afterlives of Chinese Communism: Political Concepts from Mao to Xi ed. by Christian Sorace, Ivan Franceschini, and Nicholas Loubere (review)
Reviewed by Aaron Su

Fruit from the Sands: The Silk Road Origins of the Foods We Eat by Robert N. Spengler III (review)
Reviewed by Shiamin Kwa

The Dreaming Mind and the End of the Ming World by Lynn A. Struve (review)
Reviewed by Harry Miller

Asia Inside Out: Itinerant People ed. by Eric Tagliacozzo, Helen F. Siu, and Peter C. Perdue (review)
Reviewed by Ronald Skeldon

Public Goods Provision in the Early Modern Economy: Comparative Perspectives from Japan, China, and Europe ed. by Masayuki Tanimoto and R. Bin Wong (review)
Reviewed by Guillaume Carré

Raising China’s Revolutionaries: Modernizing Childhood for Cosmopolitan Nationalists and Liberated Comrades, 1920s–1950s by Margaret Mih Tillman (review)
Reviewed by Stig Thøgersen

Christian Women in Chinese Society: The Anglican Story ed. by Wai Ching Angela Wong and Patricia P. K. Chiu (review)
Reviewed by Fredrik Fällman

Maoist Laughter ed. by Ping Zhu, Zhuoyi Wang, and Jason McGrath (review)
Reviewed by Richard King

Works Received

 

China Review International
Vol. 25 No. 1
2018

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, Volume 12 (2019)

From Young-Jun Lee’s Editor’s Note

Last year, peace in Korea seemed imminent, thanks to cooperation between Trump and Kim, but now, with the subsequent failure of talks, that expectation has diminished. Still, perhaps because of that failure, it is very noisy in front of Seoul Station or at Gwanghwamun Square these days, where people gather every weekend to make their opinions known. This clamor can be seen as expressing Korea’s disorder, or it can be seen as evidence of Korea’s eagerness for change. Social energy in Korea is still very high. The same goes for Korean literature.

Writer in Focus: Kim Kyung-uk

Bruce and Ju-Chan Fulton
Introduction

Kim Kyung-uk
The Mailman, Olivia Hussey, and Robert Redford
Heaven’s Door
Mirror and Window
Excerpt from Man in the Mirror

Fiction

Kong Sŏn-ok
Single Mother

Choi Jinyoung
Nearly

Jeong Yi Hyun
Forever Summer

Yun Ko-Eun
The Chef’s Nail

Choi Eunyoung
Sister, My Little Soonae

Also in this issue:
Special Feature: Hansi by Ch’usa Kim Chŏng-hŭi,
Special Feature: Zainichi Literature and Film
Images by Too Bohnchang, an image index, and a Notes on Contributors section.

 

 


About the Journal

Azalea promotes Korean literature among English-language readers. Azalea introduces to the world new writers as well as promising translators, providing the academic community of Korean studies with well-translated texts for college courses. Writers from around the world also share their experience of Korean literature or culture with wider audiences.

UH Press at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, March 27-30, Philadelphia

AAS-2014-meetingUniversity of Hawai‘i Press is exhibiting at the Association for Asian Studies Annual Conference, March 27-30, held this year at the Philadelphia Marriott Downtown hotel.

We have a larger than usual contingent attending: UHP director Michael Duckworth; editors Patricia Crosby, Pamela Kelley, and Stephanie Chun; marketing director Colins Kawai; and sales manager Royden Muranaka. Please visit us at booths 110-116 to see our latest titles and take advantage of the conference offer of a 20% discount and free shipping in the U.S. (Free shipping applies only to orders received or placed at the conference.) Our new Asian Studies print catalog will also be distributed.

Exhibiting across the aisle from us are publishing partners: Cornell University East Asia Program (booth 111), MerwinAsia and Seoul Selection (booth 113), NIAS Press-Nordic Institute of Asian Studies (booth 117), and NUS Press-Singapore (booth 115).

See you in Philly!

The Making of the First Korean President

Lew-Making1stKoreanPresThe only full-scale history of Syngman Rhee’s early career in English was published nearly six decades ago. Now, Young Ick Lew uncovers little-known aspects of Rhee’s leadership roles prior to 1948, when he became the Republic of Korea’s first president. In The Making of the First Korean President: Syngman Rhee’s Quest for Independence, 1875–1948, Lew delves into Rhee’s background, investigates his abortive diplomatic missions, and explains how and why he was impeached as the head of the Korean Provisional Government in 1925. He analyzes the numerous personal conflicts between Rhee and other prominent Korean leaders, including some close friends and supporters who eventually denounced him as an autocrat.

Based on exhaustive research that incorporates archival records as well as secondary sources in Korean, English, and Japanese, The Making of the First Korean President meticulously lays out the key developments of Rhee’s pre-presidential career. This richly illustrated volume is essential reading for anyone with an interest in modern Korean history and will serve as a lasting portrait of one of the pivotal figures in the evolution of Korea as it journeyed from colonial suppression to freedom and security.

November 2013 | ISBN: 978-0-8248-3168-4 | $68.00 | Cloth

A Reading by Gary Pak at Revolution Books

Pak-BrothersOn Sunday, October 27, at 3 pm, all-volunteer independent Revolution Books (Honolulu) will host a reading by Gary Pak for his new book, Brothers under a Same Sky. Here’s the store’s perspective on the book:

This is a fascinating novel about the psychological toll on Korean Americans during and after the Korean War and the ethical and moral decisions they were forced to make. Those of you who know Gary Pak, know that in this novel he’s speaking very personally. Perhaps the dedication “in the memory of Uncle Kenam” says it all. While the book directly relates to the Korean War, it is especially fitting that this reading will take place near the 12th anniversary of the U.S. war on Afghanistan – a war where hundreds of thousands of young men and women had to make similar decisions as those Nam Ki faced.

Korean American Writers Panel on CKS Literary Night

CKS Literary NightAs part of the celebration to mark the 110th anniversary of the first Korean immigration to Hawai‘i, four Hawai‘i-based Korean American writers will read and discuss their work on Thursday, September 26, 7:00 p.m., at the Center for Korean Studies, UH Mānoa. Presenters with UH Press books include novelist Gary Pak (Brothers under a Same Sky; A Ricepaper Airplane; Children of a Fireland) and documentarian Roberta Chang (The Koreans in Hawai‘i: A Pictorial History; When the Korean World in Hawaii Was Young). The other two participants are award-winning author Chris McKinney and poet/fiction writer Brenda Kwon.

The event is free and open to the public. For more information, see the CKS announcement, or call the Center at (808) 956-7041.

Related link: Listen to the Hawai‘i Public Radio interview with Gary Pak about his most recent book, Brothers under a Same Sky.