Journal of Korean Religions: Korean Religions and COVID Restrictions

Several of our editors and journals reflect on the changes in the last three years due to the COVID pandemic and how it has changed the face of life as we know it. Likewise editor Don Baker of Journal of Korean Religions established a special section in this issue to reflect on the changes to culture, finances, and rituals affected by lockdowns and the virus.

In his introduction Baker expresses the following:

In this issue, we have three articles delving into how Korea’s Christian communities-Catholic and Protestant-have dealt with a problem of the present: the COVID-19 pandemic. Christians place a lot of importance on regular weekly meetings for worship. The South Korean government, on the other hand, was concerned about those religious gatherings serving as venues for the spread of the deadly COVID-19 virus. Different Christian organizations in Korea responded in different ways to their government’s demand that they prioritize concern for public health and temporarily change the way their congregations gather for ritual expressions of their faith.

Articles featured:

“It Isn’t Just Us”: The Korean Catholic Church’s Responses to Corona-19 as Seen in Diocesan Bulletins
Franklin Rausch

The ceasing of public Catholic Masses just before Ash Wednesday 2020 in response to Corona-19 posed a significant problem as it meant Catholics could no longer easily receive Holy Communion, the center of Catholic faith life. Thus, one might have expected the Korean Catholic Church to oppose the limitation or cancellation of religious gatherings. But in fact, the opposite happened, with the Catholic Church being singled out for its support of such policies. This paper explores this response of Catholic leaders to Corona-19 and the theology that undergirded it through an examination of the bulletins of two archdioceses, Seoul and Daegu. It argues that the bulletins promoted a particular Catholic theology that understood adherence to public health measures as analogous to love of neighbor, and that such acts of love would bring a triumph over the virus.

Four Types of Protestant Responses to South Korean Government Measures to Control COVID-19 Outbreaks in 2020-2021
Timothy S. Lee

How did Korean Protestants respond to these anti-pandemic measures? This study seeks to address this question ­focusing on the period between February 1, 2020, when the Korea Center for Disease Control and Prevention first announced the discovery of the virus in a Protestant church, to November 1, 2021, when the “Living with COVID-19” policy was initiated. Along the way, the study examines tensions elicited by the measures and responses to them- not only between the government and the Protestant communities but also within the communities themselves. In the main, there were four types of Protestant responses to the government’s anti-pandemic measures, described in terms of their agents: willing compliers, begrudging compliers, amenable noncompliers, and defiant noncompliers.

Mediated Faith Coping with COVID-19: A Case Study of a Megachurch in South Korea
Seung Min Hong

While the Republic of Korea coped well with COVID-19 prior to the development of the vaccines, the major outbreaks of the virus in the country were largely caused and/or facilitated by several controversial Christian groups. There have also been many cases of smaller local churches spreading the virus due to their refusal to follow the government’s guidelines for religious gatherings. Meanwhile, major Korean media outlets have mostly focused on cases of uncooperative churches with the short disclaimer ‘the majority of Protestant churches are following the rules.’ What kind of experiences did those ‘cooperative’ churches have to go through then? This paper is a micro in-depth case study which explores a megachurch in South Korea that has supported the government’s safety measures.


Journal of Korean Religions, Vol. 13, No. 2 (2022)


Special Section: Korean Religions and COVID Restrictions

Introduction to the Special Section: Korean Religions and COVID Restrictions
Don Baker


“It Isn’t Just Us”: The Korean Catholic Church’s Responses to Corona-19 as Seen in Diocesan Bulletins
Franklin Rausch


Four Types of Protestant Responses to South Korean Government Measures to Control COVID-19 Outbreaks in 2020-2021
Timothy S. Lee


Mediated Faith Coping with COVID-19: A Case Study of a Megachurch in South Korea
Seung Min Hong


Research Articles

The Korean Buddhist Military Chaplaincy and Modern “State-Protection” Buddhism: A Study of the Mass Military Faith Promotion Movement
Jonathan C. Feuer


Religious Meaning-Making Narratives for Reconciliation in the aftermath of State Violence: South Korean Christian Perspectives
Hyukmin Kang


JKR invites contributions from senior and junior scholars researching on any aspects of Korean religions from a wide range of perspectives, including religion, philosophy, theology, literature, folklore, art, anthropology, history, sociology, political science, and cultural studies. Articles submitted for consideration should be under 10,000 words in length (including footnotes: bibliographies and appendices are additional) and should not have appeared elsewhere or be under review for publication elsewhere. JKR also welcomes book reviews (up to 1,000 words) and review articles (up to 3,000 words).

Find Submission Guidelines for the Journal of Korean Religions here.

Journals: Shanghai Fever, Divinatory Practices in Burma, Peculiar Molting Behavior of Hermit Crabs + more

China Review International

Volume 27, Number 2 (2020)

The new issue includes the following feature, “Shanghai between Modernity and Postmodernity.” Author Lei Ping explains in the introduction:

Shanghai, an unequivocally distinctive cosmopolitan city, has been a critical subject of scholarly studies and popular interest since the nineteenth century. “Shanghai fever” (Shanghaire), coupled with Shanghai nostalgia, became a sensational literary, cinematic, and cultural phenomenon in the 1990s and has continued throughout the turn of the twenty-first century as the post-Mao era unfolds. After a few temporarily dormant years following the culmination of the fervor, Shanghai has reemerged in recent global scholarship as a path to understand Chinese modernity and China’s rise to the world’s second largest economy. The question as to what kind of pivotal role Shanghai plays in conjuring the so-called China’s lost modernity causes a resurfacing of intellectual debates about Shanghai—“the other China.”

Find more reviews at Project MUSE.

Journal of Burma Studies

Special Issue: Astrological and Divinatory Practices in Burma

Volume 26, Number 2 (2022)

The new special issue is introduced by editors Aurore Candier and Jane M. Ferguson stating:

This special issue of The Journal of Burma Studies is part of a collective and multidisciplinary project which explores astrological and divinatory knowledge and practices in Burma. These practices include fortune telling, divinatory, and therapeutic techniques, and they serve a broader system for the interpretation of past, present, and future events. In Burma, as elsewhere in South and Southeast Asia, astrology and divination rationales are part of social thinking and are also embedded in religious fields (Vernant 1974:10; Guenzi 2021:9). The collective aim of these four articles is to investigate the articulation between astrology, divination, religion, power, and discourse in Burma.

Find this special section and more at Project MUSE.

Journal of Korean Religions

Special Section: Korean Religions and COVID Restrictions

Volume 13, Number 2 (2022)

The new issue includes a special section, “Korean Religions and COVID Restrictions.” Editor Don Baker introduces the section:

In this issue, we have three articles delving into how Korea’s Christian communities—Catholic and Protestant—have dealt with a problem of the present: the COVID-19 pandemic. Christians place a lot of importance on regular weekly meetings for worship. The South Korean government, on the other hand, was concerned about those religious gatherings serving as venues for the spread of the deadly COVID-19 virus. Different Christian organizations in Korea responded in different ways to their government’s demand that they prioritize concern for public health and temporarily change the way their congregations gather for ritual expressions of their faith.

Find this special section and more at Project MUSE.

Pacific Science Cover volume 76 number 2 2022 April

Pacific Science

Volume 76, Number 2 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

Spatial Ecology of Humpback Whales (Megaptera novaeangliae, Cetacea-Balaenopteridae) from the Mexican Central Pacific
Christian D. Ortega-Ortiz, Andrea B. Cuevas-Soltero,
Reyna Xóchitl García-Valencia, Astrid Frisch-Jordán, Katherina Audley, Aramis Olivos-Ortiz, and Marco A. Liñán-Cabello

Pacific Hibiscus (Malvaceae) in Sect. Lilibiscus. 1. Hibiscus kokio and Related Species from the Hawaiian Archipelago
Lex A.J. Thomson and Brock Mashburn

Peculiar Molting Behavior of Large Hermit Crabs
Rise Ohashi and Naoki Kamezaki

Efficiency and Efficacy of DOC-200 Versus Tomahawk Traps for Controlling Small Indian Mongoose, Herpestes auropunctatus (Carnivora: Herpestidae) in Wetland Wildlife Sanctuaries
Lisa S. Roerk, Lindsey Nietmann, and Aaron J. Works

Status of Forest Birds on Tinian Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, with an Emphasis on the Tinian Monarch (Monarcha takatsukasae) (Passeriformes; Monarchidae)
R. L. Spaulding, Richard J. Camp, Paul C. Banko, Nathan C. Johnson, and Angela D. Anders

Find more research articles at Project MUSE.

USJWJ62

U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal

Special Issue: Girls and Literature

Volume 62 (2022)

Guest Editors Hiromi Tsuchiya Dollase and Wakako Suzuki present the special issue stating:

We are pleased to present this special issue of the U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (no. 62) on “Girls and Literature.” This issue evolved from a panel titled “The Shōjo Genre and Gendered Discursive Practices: The Rise and Decline of Girls’ Novels in Japan” at the Association for Japanese Literary Studies (AJLS) annual conference held at Emory University in January 2020. Our goal was to discuss issues of genre categorization in literature, particularly as they pertain to shōjo shōsetsu, or girls’ fiction (short stories, novellas, and novels).

Find more articles, discussions, and reviews at Project MUSE.

New Journal Special Issues: The Religiosity of Tonghak, Vietnamese Linguistics + More

Oregon beautiful picture

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistic Society

Special Issue:

Vietnamese Linguistics: State of the Field

The new issue features the following introduction by Trang Phan, John Phan, and Mark J. Alves

The current issue is the result of a workshop held at the Harvard Yenching Institute in April of 2021, entitled Vietnamese Linguistics, Typology and Language Universals, and which featured nineteen linguists working on diverse aspects of the Vietnamese language, ranging from semantics to historical phonology. Our purpose in gathering was to take stock of the great leaps in Vietnamese linguistic research that have occurred over the past few decades, to bring together cutting-edge research from each subdiscipline, and to begin a new collaborative dialogue on Vietnamese linguistics, typology, and language universals. Most of all, it was our belief that the time had come to reconsider Vietnamese linguistics as a unified field of inquiry. As a result, a new academic organization was founded: the International Society of Vietnamese Linguistics.
In the past twenty years, research into the Vietnamese language has advanced exponentially, in tandem with developments in our understanding of syntax, semantics, phonetics, and phonology—both on the synchronic and diachronic levels. Specific work on the Vietnamese language now informs and even leads broader linguistic inquiry in a number of unprecedented ways. These new developments invite a concentration of state-the-field research into a single volume, one that will serve not only to summarize current issues in each subdiscipline of Vietnamese linguistics, but also to initiate a longer, more collaborative conversation about the Vietnamese language.
Our goals in this special issue are thus twofold: first, we seek to provide a snapshot of current research into Vietnamese syntax, semantics, phonology, and phonetics, from both the historical and synchronic points of view, that may serve as a resource for linguists interested in exploring our current understanding of the Vietnamese language. Second, we hope that this issue will also serve as an invitation to all linguists working on the Vietnamese language or related languages to contribute to a broader, more cosmopolitan discussion—one in which discoveries of one subdiscipline may serve to inform or enlighten another.


Find more articles at eVols.

New Journal Issues: Biography’s International Year in Review, Buddhist-Christian Studies, China Review International + More

Biography

Volume 44, Issue 1 (2021)

Special Issue: International Year in Review

Remembering Lauren Berlant

Contributors Riva Lehrer, Anna Poletti, and Rebecca Wanzo graciously provided this issue with estate artwork and tributes to Lauren Berlant.

From Anna Poletti’s More Flailing in Public:

For me, Berlant’s publications and their way of speaking with colleagues enacted and theorized core tensions that preoccupy lifewriting studies: what it means to be a person in public—sometimes alone, sometimes in a collective, sometimes in search of collectivity. Always thinking from, and beyond, psychoanalytic insights into the disorganizing experience of desire (largely through object-relations), Berlant explicated the kinds of stories about the good life that permeated American culture, and explored what happened to people’s belief in culture, politics, and themselves when they tried to live those narratives, or discovered those narratives were structurally unlivable (The Female Complaint; Cruel Optimism). Berlant’s early work on trauma (“Trauma and Ineloquence”) and their interviews (with Jay Prosser, and with Julie Rak and me) are the places where the relevance of their deep attention to the politics of “fantasies of the good life” are most clearly connected to lifewriting scholarship. Margaretta Jolly’s special issue of Biography on “Life Writing and Intimate Publics,” published ten years ago, shows us how productive Berlant’s theory of the importance of being and feeling intimate in public can be for studying life writing, particularly online.

Oceanic Linguistics

Volume 60, Number 20 (2021)

This new issue contains a squib titled, “Three Puzzles for Phonological Theory in Philippine Minority Languages” by Jason W. Lobel, Robert Blust, and Erik Thomas.

An excerpt from this squib reads as follows:

In viewing language as an object of scientific inquiry, description alone has never been enough to satisfy most researchers. Once observations about one language are compared with those about another, there is a desire to generalize, to make statements about what is common and what is not, and therefore about what is expected and what is surprising in language content, structure, or change. In terms of theory construction, expected observations follow from basic assumptions about how language works and how it is embedded in the larger context of human neurophysiology and behavior. Much progress has been made in recent decades concerning the phonetic forces that give rise to phonological processes, and there is widespread agreement about many of these. This note describes three well-documented phonological processes in languages spoken by aboriginal Filipino populations along the Pacific coast of Luzon that do not conform to current theoretical expectations about what is a likely or even a possible diachronic process. Each of these is part of a larger context of sound change which does conform to theoretical expectation, although the details are complex, and still not widely reported in the literature. For this reason, a brief background survey of vocalic changes triggered by voiced stops will be given first, followed by the puzzling changes that depart from this more general pattern.

Find more research articles, squibs, and reviews at Project MUSE.

Pacific Science

Volume 65, Number 4 (2021)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

Population Divergence and Evolution of the Hawaiian Endemic Sesbania tomentosa (Fabaceae)
David M. Cole and Clifford W. Morden

Eleotris (Teleostei: Eleotridae) from Indonesia with Description of Three New Species Within the ‘melanosoma’ Neuromast Pattern Group
Marion I. Mennesson, Philippe Keith, Sopian Sauri, Frédéric Busson, Erwan Delrieu-Trottin, Gino Limmon, Tedjo Sukmono, Jiran, Renny Risdawati, Hadi Dahruddin, and Nicolas Hubert.

Three New Records of Marine Macroalgae from Viet Nam Based on Morphological Observations and Molecular Analyses by
Xuan-Vy Nguyen, Nhu-Thuy Nguyen-Nhat, Xuan-Thuy T. Nguyen, My-Ngan T. Nguyen, Viet-Ha Dao, and Karla J. McDermid.

The Structure and Dynamics of Endangered Forest Bird Communities in the Mariana Islands
Robert J. Craig

And the following article is available on Open Access:
Modeling Scenarios for the Management of Axis Deer in Hawai‘i
Steven C. Hess and Seth W. Judge

Find more research articles at Project MUSE.

Recently Published Journal Issues

Journal of Korean Religions

Journal of Korean Religions

Volume 12, Issue 1 (2021)

The new issue includes the following articles:

Going Global: The Transformation of the Korean Catholic Church
Denis WS Kim

Japanese Buddhist Modernism and the Thought of Sŏn Master Toeong Seongcheol (1912–1993)
Cho Myungje and Bernard Senécal S.J. (SeoMyeonggweon)

Calm Water is a Mirror: Neo-Confucian Meditation in the Chosŏn
Dynasty 
Guy S. Shababo

A Buddhist Critique of Neo-Confucianismin Seventeenth-Century Chosŏn Korea
Kim Jong Wook

Book Review

Gender Politics at Home and Abroad: Protestant Modernity in Colonial-Era Korea, by Hyaeweol Choi
Reviewed by Choi Hee An

 

cover image issue 58

U.S. -Japan Women’s Journal

Issue 58 (2020)

Includes the following articles:

Plotting Illness: Cancer in Ogino Anna’s “Nue” and
Yamauchi Reinan’s The Spirit of Cancer
Amanda C. Seaman

Nue.
by Ogino Anna. Translated by Amanda C. Seaman

Performativity of Gender in Speech: Life Experiences
of Japanese Trans Women
Hideko Abe

Natsume Fusanosuke, Panel Configurations in Sho¯jo
(Girls’) Manga.
by Natsume Fusanosuke. Translated and Introduced by
Jon Holt and Teppei Fukuda

Pacific Science

Pacific Science

Volume 75, Issue 1 (2021)

Includes the following articles:

The Historical Ecology of Game Species Introductions in Hawai’i
Deidre J. Duffy, Christopher A. Lepczyk

A Terrestrial Vertebrate Palaeontological Reconnaissance of Lord Howe Island, Australia
Julian P. Hume, Ian Hutton, Greg Middleton, Jacqueline M.T. Nguyen, John Wylie

Light-Level Geolocators Reveal That White-Throated Needletails (Hirundapus caudacutus) Follow a Figure-Eight Migration Route Between Japan and Australia
Noriyuki M. Yamaguchi, Sayaka Mori, Hiroshi Yonekawa, Daichi Waga, Hiroyoshi Higuchi

Fine-Scale Distribution, Abundance, and Foraging Behavior of Salvin’s, Buller’s, and Chatham Albatrosses in the Northern Humboldt Upwelling System
Javier Quiñones, Ana Alegre, Cynthia Romero, Massiel Manrique, Luis Vásquez

Influence of Light and Substrate Conditions on Regeneration of Native Tree Saplings in the Hawaiian Lowland Wet Forest
Susanne Kandert, Holger Kreft, Nicole DiManno, Amanda Uowolo, Susan Cordell, Rebecca Ostertag

Potential Distribution and Environmental Niche of the Black Corals Antipathes galapagensis and Myriopathes panamensis in the Eastern Tropical Pacific
Antonella Lavorato, Silvia Stranges, Hector Reyes Bonilla

Investigating the Diel Occurrence of Odontocetes Around the Maui Nui Region Using Passive Acoustic Techniques
Marian Howe, Marc O. Lammers

Limnological Characterization of Three Tropical Crater Lakes in the Archipelago of Samoa (Lanoto’o, Olomaga, Mataulano)
Robert Schabetsberger, Christian D. Jersabek, Zlatko Levkov, Bianca Ehrenfellner, Laulu Fialelei Enoka, Seumalo Afele Faiilagi

Association Affairs: Pacific Science Association

 

cover image vol. 54

Hawaiian Journal of History

Volume 54 (2020)

Includes the following articles:

The Lasting Significance of the Majors-Palakiko Case
Jonathan Y. Okamura

A Rock in the Park: The Key to a Remarkable Historical Tale
Hugh R. Montgomery

Ne Tentes aut Perfice: Early Hawaiian Diplomacy in the Southwestern Pacific and the Creation of Hawai‘i’s First Royal Order
Lorenz Gonschor

Reconnecting to Kawaiaha‘o Female Seminary: The Lives of the Students at the End of the Nineteenth Century
Deborah Day

Our Royal Guest: American Press Coverage of King Kalākaua’s Visit to the United States, 1874–1875
Douglas V. Askman

The Watchers: How Espionage Doomed the Counter-Revolution of 1895
Ralph Thomas Kam

Book Reviews

Aloha Rodeo: Three Hawaiian Cowboys, the World’s Greatest Rodeo, and a Hidden History of the American West by David Wolman and Julian Smith
Reviewed by Elyssa Ford

Unsustainable Empire: Alternative Histories of Hawai‘i Statehood by Dean Itsuji Saranillio
Reviewed by Sarah Miller-Davenport

American Sutra: A Story of Faith and Freedom in the Second World War by Duncan Ryūken Williams 
Reviewed by Kelli Y. Nakamura

Gateway State: Hawai‘i and the Cultural Transformation of American Empire by Sarah Miller-Davenport
Reviewed by JoAnna Poblete

Bibliography

Hawaiiana in 2019: A Bibliography of Titles of Historical Interest
Jodie Mattos

 

 

 

 

New Journal Issues: Asian Theatre Journal, Cross-Currents, Journal of Korean Religions + More (June 2020)

Asian Theatre Journal 37-1

Asian Theatre Journal

The Field of Ramila, guest edited by Pamela Lothspeich

Volume 37, Issue 1 (2020)

This special issue is intended to briefly introduce the field of Ramlila, as a performance practice and as an idea. It is designed to give a taste of its geographic range and a sample of its multiple and diverse manifestations in India and the Indian diaspora. The Introduction briefly discusses the literary sources of Ramlila, its history, chief styles, and emerging trends. It also includes a synopsis of the story of Ram in Ramlila. Following this, a translation of three scenes from the Lav-Kush Ramlila in Old Delhi, with a critical introduction, sheds light on the mounting politicization of Ramlila by the Hindu Right. Two articles, one on Nautanki and one on Ramayan Gaan, illustrate that Ramlila is a form of theatre very much in dialogue with other forms of popular performance in the Hindi belt and along its linguistic borders, narratively, aesthetically, and ideologically. A review-essay of two documentaries and an interview with an expert on Kumaoni Ramlila further demonstrate the diversity of Ramayan-themed performance, despite the continued homogenization and commercialization of Ramlila. An article on a distinctive Ramlila in Trinidad and another in the United States (North Carolina) speak to the global reach of Ramlila, and its important role in “homemaking.” Finally, a report on a festival to commemorate a Ramayan-themed dance drama (wayang wong) at Prambanan recalls the Ramayan’s early journey from South to Southeast Asia.

Cross-Currents 9-1 CC Cover

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review

Global Island: Taiwan and the World, guest edited by James Lin, Graeme Read, and Peter Thilly

Volume 9, Issue 1 (2020)

In October 2018, the University of Washington Taiwan Studies Program hosted a workshop featuring a wide range of diverse humanities and social science research centered on the theme of “Global Island: Taiwan and the World.” The impetus for the workshop was to reimagine Taiwan outside the traditional confines of comparative and cross-Strait studies that have predominated in academic research on Taiwan. The articles that emerged from the workshop and have been assembled in this issue instead understand Taiwan as an actor embedded within global networks and spaces or, alternatively, as a unique site or producer of globally circulating knowledge. At a time when Taiwan studies is gaining increased visibility, exploring Taiwan’s linkages to the greater world showcases underexplored facets of Taiwan and the potential contributions of this field to interdisciplinary studies of society and culture.

Journal of Korean Religions JKR 11-1

Journal of Korean Religions

Yogācāra Studies of Silla, guest edited by A. Charles Muller

Volume 11, Issue 1 (2020)

One area in particular wherein interest in Korea has been relatively strong since earlier days is that of Silla-period Buddhist scholarship. Within Silla scholasticism, one of the most influential areas has been that of Yogācāra and related studies—which in Korea, tends to include much of what is usually categorized as the Buddhological strain of Tathāgatagarbha. Silla-period scholars were in close contact with their Chinese colleagues on the mainland, reading and writing the same Sinitic script. They had ready access to newly composed texts and translations soon after their production in Chang’an and elsewhere, and they were intimately aware of all of the most pertinent doctrinal discussions and debates occurring in the Tang capital and its surroundings, and were deeply engaged in all of these. One of Silla’s own sons, Wŏnch’ŭk 圓測 (613–696), was situated in the Tang capital and was working directly with Xuanzang and his team, although sometimes not seeing eye-to-eye with other of Xuanzang’s followers, such as Kuiji 窺基 (632–682). Other Silla scholars, such as Chajang 慈藏 (sixth-seventh centuries) and Ŭisang 義湘 (625–702) (just to name a few of the better-known figures) went to Tang for serious and sustained study, making their own mark, and bringing their new knowledge home to the peninsula.

Journal of World History

Volume 31, Issue 2 (2020)

Research articles for this issue include:

  • The Prestige Makers: Greek Slave Women in Ancient India by Kathryn A. Hain
  • The Medieval Origin of the Factory or the Institutional Foundations of Overseas Trade: Toward a Model for Global Comparison by Louis Sicking
  • Between the Red Sea Slave Trade and the Goa Inquisition: The Odyssey of Gabriel, a Sixteenth-Century Ethiopian Jew by Matteo Salvadore
  • Greatness is Like a Rubbish Hole: Social Frictions and Global Connections in the Early-Swahili World by David Bresnahan
  • How Civic Virtue Became Republican Honor: Revolution and Republicanism in Venezuela, 1800–1840 by Reuben Zahler
  • Decolonizing Global History? A Latin American Perspective (Open Access) by Gabriela De Lima Grecco, Sven Schuster

Journal of Korean Religions Vol. 10, No. 2 (2019)

A Comparative Study of Sudden and Gradual in Sŏn 禪 and the New Testament
by Bernard Senécal S.J.

Chinul’s Empty and Quiescent Spiritual Knowing (kongjŏk yŏngji 空寂靈知) and Ignatius of Loyola’s Indifference and Discernment of Spirits
by Yon-dahm Kwon

The Re-emergence of Chosŏn Buddhism in the 17th Century: A Question of Institutional Development and Legitimation
by Sung-Eun T. Kim

Kyŏnghŏ Sŏngu and the Existential Dimensions of Modern Korean Buddhism
by Jin Y. Park

The Real Face of Korean Buddhism under Japanese Colonial Rule
by Kue-jin Song

Four Pillars and Four Diviners: Fate, Fluidity, and Invention in Horoscopic Saju Divination in Contemporary South Korea
by David J. Kim

Religious and Philosophical Traditions of Korea by Kevin N. Cawley (review)
by David W. Kim

The Journal of Korean Religions is the only English-language academic journal dedicated to the study of Korean religions. The publication aims to stimulate interest in and research on Korean religions across a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Launched in 2010 by the Institute for the Study of Religion at Sogang University in Korea, the journal is peer-reviewed and published twice yearly, in April and October.

Journal of Korean Religions Vol. 10, No. 2 (2019)

Celebrating Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month with Free Journal Content

We are proud to publish an extensive list of Pacific, Asian, and Southeast Asian studies journals. This Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month, explore and enjoy the following free journal content online:

Open Access Journals:

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Language Documentation & Conservation

Palapala: a journal of Hawaiian language and literature

Free journal content online:

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific (46#1, 2007)

Asian Theatre Journal: Official Journal of the Association for Asian Performance (23#1, 2006)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture (1, 2007)

Buddhist-Christian Studies: Official Journal of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (27, 2007)

China Review International: Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies (15#1, 2008)

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs (15#1, 2003)

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review (3#1, 2014)

The Hawaiian Journal of History (49, 2015)

Journal of Daoist Studies (8, 2015)

Journal of Korean Religions (6#1, 2015)

Korean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans Abroad (29, 2005)

MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing: New Writing from America, the Pacific, and Asia (19#1, 2007)

Oceanic Linguistics: Current Research on Languages of the Oceanic Area (50#2, 2011)

Pacific Science: Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region (71#4, 2017)

Philosophy East & West: A Quarterly of Comparative Philosophy (53#3, 2007)

Rapa Nui Journal: The journal of the Easter Island Foundation (30#2, 2016)

Review of Japanese Culture and Society (24, 2012)

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (45, 2013)

Asian Perspectives 58-1
Asian Theatre Journal 36-1 cover

Visit our website to learn more about our publications or to subscribe.

 

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Religion and Philosophy

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New 2018 content published in our religion and philosophy journals garnered nearly 10,000 downloads worldwide on Project MUSE. Check out the top 10 downloads from quarterly Philosophy East and West, as well as popular articles from related titles. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Religion and Philosophy”

Journal of Korean Religions, Vol. 9#2, 2018

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This issue of the Journal of Korean Religions is on Confucian Spirituality in East Asian Contexts with guest editor, Philip J. Ivanhoe. From the editor’s introduction:

Clifford Geertz writes, ”We are, in sum, incomplete or unfinished animals who complete ourselves through culture—and not through culture in general but through highly particular forms of it.”1 At least part of his point is that unlike other animals, many of whom—like bees, ducks, or dolphins—live in complex and orderly societies, human beings are creatures that come into the world with only a partially written script, unsure of exactly what characters they are to play, what roles they should fulfill, and how they and their actions contribute to some larger scheme or plan. Like culture, religion attempts to fill in the script by providing accounts of human nature, the proper roles humans should play, and how human actions contribute to some grand vision or cosmic plan. Nevertheless, as Geertz makes clear, we can only understand how religion does what it does by looking carefully at particular religions. This special issue of the Journal of Korean Religions seeks to do just that by being dedicated to ”Confucian Spirituality in East Asian Contexts.” The five essays it contains explore a set of interrelated issues about how Confucians, among them Koreans, fill in the script of human life aiming to orient and guide human beings to satisfying and meaningful lives. These essays describe key components of a distinctively Confucian form of spirituality by analyzing characteristically Confucian concerns with cultivating the self in ways that complete human nature, enable one to fulfill one’s proper roles within family and society, take one’s correct place in the world, and realize the Heavenly ordained purpose of one’s life.

Continue reading “Journal of Korean Religions, Vol. 9#2, 2018”

Journal of Korean Religions vol. 9, no. 1 (April 2018)

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Journal of Korean Religions vol. 9, no. 1, a special issue on Religions in Cold War Korea and Peacemaking, guest edited by Heonik Kwon and Seong Nae Kim (view their Introduction here), features the following articles:

Continue reading “Journal of Korean Religions vol. 9, no. 1 (April 2018)”

Journal of Korean Religions, vol. 8, no. 2 (October 2017)

Journal of Korean Religions vol. 8, no. 2, a special issue on Religion and Media in Korea, features the following articles by scholars.

Special Issue: Religion and Media in Korea

Guest Editors: Kyuhoon Cho, Sam Han, and Jin Kyu Park

In contemporary social life, religion and media cannot be said to be separated. Contrary to the long-lasting understanding that the two are independent from each other, the spheres of religion and media are closely intertwined. Dynamic and increasing connections have been observed and reported by a range of scholars. Indeed, the scholarly interest in the relationship is a fairly recent one. Only thirty years ago, religion was just a blind spot within media studies (Hoover and Venturelli 1996). Similarly, media were an overlooked issue in religious studies.

Special issue articles include:

  • A History of Religious Broadcasting in Korea from a Religious Politics Standpoint: Focusing on the Period of a Protestant Broadcasting Monopoly
    by Sungmin Lee
  • The Role of Newspapers in the Early Korean Protestant Community: An Analysis of The Korean Christian Advocate and The Christian News
    by Minjung Noh
  • Religion in the Press: The Construction of Religion in the Korean News Media
    by Kyuhoon Cho
  • The Culture-Religion Nexus: (Neo-)Durkheimianism and Mediatized Confucianism in Korean “Piety Travel”
    by Sam Han
  • Authenticity, Brand Culture, and Templestay in the Digital Era: The Ambivalence and In-Betweenness of Korean Buddhism
    by Seung Soo Kim

Continue reading “Journal of Korean Religions, vol. 8, no. 2 (October 2017)”