The Contemporary Pacific: New Brij V. Lal Award + ASAO Discount

This week, the Association for Social Anthropology in Oceania (ASAO) hosts its annual meeting in Kona, Hawai‘i. The Contemporary Pacific editor Vilsoni Hereniko is the conference’s keynote speaker. 

Attendees can enjoy the new issue + redesigned cover of The Contemporary Pacific as well as a discount on subscriptions.

ASAO Subscription Discount

Starting Feb. 1, use code ASAO2023 at uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/CP and receive 20% off on your TCP subscription. Code expires on Feb. 28.

New! Annual $1,000 Award for Best Article

The annual Brij V. Lal Award has been established by Professor Lal’s family, the Center for Pacific Islands Studies, and the University of Hawaiʻi for best article or paper published in The Contemporary Pacific: An Interdisciplinary Journal. The award is $1,000.00 USD.

Professor Brij Vilash Lal, an eminent Pacific historian and faction (a fusion of fact and fiction) writer, and the Founding Editor of The Contemporary Pacific, passed away on December 25, 2021. This award is in memory of his long-standing and immensely impactful professional career, as an academic, a participatory historian and writer, as well as a Pacific islander who always stood up for democracy, law and order, human rights, and freedom of speech in the Pacific.

Explore the journal archive, subscribe, and find author submission guidelines here.


Read the new issue, Vol. 34, Issue 2, on Project MUSE.

Sale! Celebrating 75 years of journal publishing

Journals Sale! 75% off uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals. Ends Feb. 5.

Since its establishment in 1947, University of Hawai‘i Press has been dedicated to publishing books and journals of exceptional merit. Our earliest titles—Philosophy East & West and Pacific Science—remain in print today.

For a limited time, we’re offering individual subscriptions 75% off of 1-year online and 2-year print (75% off first year). Hurry! Sale ends Feb. 5.


Interview: JSEALS Editor-in-Chief Mark J. Alves

The newest Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society (JSEALS) Special Publication recently launched is titled “A Cuoi Language Description and Extensive Glossary.” UH Press spoke to Editor-in-Chief, Mark J. Alves about this new special issue.

Alves took over as JSEALS head editor in 2015 from Paul Sidwell, who ran it from its first publication in 2009. Alves was the co-editor for the 2022 JSEALS Special Publication “Vietnamese Linguistics: State of the Field,” in which he also contributed an article “Lexical Evidence of the Vietic Household Before and After Language contact with Sinitic” and a co-authored paper with James Kirby “Exploring Statistical Regularities in the Syllable Canon of Sino-Vietnamese Loanmorph Phonology”. He also recently published “The Ðông Sơn Speech Community: Evidence for Vietic” in the interdisciplinary journal Crossroads and “The Vietic languages: a phylogenetic analysis” (co-authored with Paul Sidwell), both in 2021.

University of Hawai‘i Press: Can you tell our readers some of the research, impacts, or projects you have been involved with outside of JSEALS that have enhanced your work with the journal?

Mark J. Alves: In working with the International Conference of Austroasiatic Linguistics (ICAAL) group, I contributed two chapters (one of my own and one co-authored chapter) to “Austroasiatic Syntax in Areal and Diachronic Perspective” (ed. by Mathias Jenny, Paul Sidwell, and Mark Alves) in 2020 and a chapter on the Pacoh language in “The Handbook of Austroasiatic Languages” (ed. by Mathias Jenny and Paul Sidwell) in 2014. For the World Loanword Database (WOLD) through the Max Planck Institute (MPI), I contributed Vietnamese data for the database and the chapter on loanwords in Vietnamese in the resulting book “Loanwords in the World’s Languages: A Comparative Handbook” (2009, ed. by Martin Haspelmath & Uri Tadmor).

UHP: What are some of the challenges you have faced during the pandemic, and have those continued to be an issue with the creation of articles and research now?

MJA: Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, I have not travelled to Asia since 2019, but I have maintained academic activity through the internet. I have participated in more conferences and have given more invited presentations in the last few years (e.g., 8 presentations in 2022) than I would have if only in-person presentations were the standard. However, I think the limitations on linguistic fieldwork is showing itself in reduced numbers of papers submitted to JSEALS on recently collected data in the field. Plenty of my colleagues are bemoaning the lost time from what they could have done had the pandemic not created so many challenges in travelling to the field. Time will tell how this situation will resolve itself.

UHP: JSEALS recently introduced a new Special Issue, “A Cuoi Language Description and Extensive Glossary.”  How did this come about?  Why did you devote an entire issue to this topic?

MJA: I have been in contact with Vietnamese fieldwork linguists for many years, and when I found that Professor Nguyen Huu Hoanh was interested in publishing his extensive data and description of the Cuoi language, I was extremely pleased. The Cuoi language deserved a JSEALS Special Publication because there had never been a complete published description of the language nor such a large amount of lexical data: over 3,000 words in two dialects, along with Vietnamese translations.

UHP: Why was it important to publish “A Cuoi Language Description and Extensive Glossary” now?

MA: In the Ethnologue, Cuoi has an endangerment status of “shifting”, meaning that there is decreasing amount of usage of Cuoi among younger speakers. Language maintenance among such minority language groups is difficult. Whether or not the Cuoi language can survive in future generations, at the very least, it has been documented and the data shared in publication.

UHP: How do you hope that readers will utilize this special issue in their own work?

MJA: The ways that this data could be used are (a) comparing the language data with neighboring languages in the region for a broader understanding of language typology in the region, (b) exploring historical linguistic questions of the history of the Vietnamese language, and/or (c) building on the linguistic description and lexicon to continue to work with the Cuoi people, whether for linguistic or anthropological queries. I hope that this publication encourages other linguists to devote time to fieldwork of this depth among minority languages in Vietnam and Southeast Asia.

UHP: Is there anything else you would like to add? 

MJA: Linguistic researchers in the Greater Southeast Asian region are strongly encouraged to submit their work to JSEALS, whether full double-blind-reviewed research articles, “Data / Notes / Review” papers, or full JSEALS Special Publications. JSEALS has played an important role in publishing of Southeast Asian linguistics since changes of Open-Access Asia-Pacific Linguistics publisher and of loss of the Mon-Khmer Studies journal. Since 2009, JSEALS has published about 190 journal articles, and in the 10 JSEALS Special Publications, several dozen more articles have been published by an international range of scholars. Clearly, JSEALS contributes to Southeast Asian linguistic research, and we need submitted works to continue to such positive progress.


general cover of JSEALS

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS:

The Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society accepts submissions written in English that deal with general linguistic issues which further the lively debate that characterizes the annual SEALS conferences. Devoted to a region of extraordinary linguistic diversity, the journal features papers on the languages of Southeast Asia, including Austroasiatic, Austronesian, Hmong-Mien, Tibeto-Burman, and Tai-Kadai.

Topics may include descriptive, theoretical, or historical linguistics, dialectology, sociolinguistics, and anthropological linguistics, among other areas of linguistics of languages of Southeast Asia. JSEALS also admits data papers, reports, and notes, subject to an internal review process.
Although we normally expect that JSEALS articles will have been presented and discussed at the SEALS conference, submission is open to all, regardless of participation in SEALS meetings. Each original article undergoes double-blind review by at least two scholars, usually a member of the Advisory Board and one or more independent referees.

JSEALS publishes fully open access content, which means that all articles are available on the internet to all users immediately upon publication. Non-commercial use and distribution in any medium is permitted, provided the author and the journal are properly credited. Authors retain copyright of their material. The journal does not charge Article Processing Fees.

Journal of Korean Religions: Korean Religions and COVID Restrictions

Several of our editors and journals reflect on the changes in the last three years due to the COVID pandemic and how it has changed the face of life as we know it. Likewise editor Don Baker of Journal of Korean Religions established a special section in this issue to reflect on the changes to culture, finances, and rituals affected by lockdowns and the virus.

In his introduction Baker expresses the following:

In this issue, we have three articles delving into how Korea’s Christian communities-Catholic and Protestant-have dealt with a problem of the present: the COVID-19 pandemic. Christians place a lot of importance on regular weekly meetings for worship. The South Korean government, on the other hand, was concerned about those religious gatherings serving as venues for the spread of the deadly COVID-19 virus. Different Christian organizations in Korea responded in different ways to their government’s demand that they prioritize concern for public health and temporarily change the way their congregations gather for ritual expressions of their faith.

Articles featured:

“It Isn’t Just Us”: The Korean Catholic Church’s Responses to Corona-19 as Seen in Diocesan Bulletins
Franklin Rausch

The ceasing of public Catholic Masses just before Ash Wednesday 2020 in response to Corona-19 posed a significant problem as it meant Catholics could no longer easily receive Holy Communion, the center of Catholic faith life. Thus, one might have expected the Korean Catholic Church to oppose the limitation or cancellation of religious gatherings. But in fact, the opposite happened, with the Catholic Church being singled out for its support of such policies. This paper explores this response of Catholic leaders to Corona-19 and the theology that undergirded it through an examination of the bulletins of two archdioceses, Seoul and Daegu. It argues that the bulletins promoted a particular Catholic theology that understood adherence to public health measures as analogous to love of neighbor, and that such acts of love would bring a triumph over the virus.

Four Types of Protestant Responses to South Korean Government Measures to Control COVID-19 Outbreaks in 2020-2021
Timothy S. Lee

How did Korean Protestants respond to these anti-pandemic measures? This study seeks to address this question ­focusing on the period between February 1, 2020, when the Korea Center for Disease Control and Prevention first announced the discovery of the virus in a Protestant church, to November 1, 2021, when the “Living with COVID-19” policy was initiated. Along the way, the study examines tensions elicited by the measures and responses to them- not only between the government and the Protestant communities but also within the communities themselves. In the main, there were four types of Protestant responses to the government’s anti-pandemic measures, described in terms of their agents: willing compliers, begrudging compliers, amenable noncompliers, and defiant noncompliers.

Mediated Faith Coping with COVID-19: A Case Study of a Megachurch in South Korea
Seung Min Hong

While the Republic of Korea coped well with COVID-19 prior to the development of the vaccines, the major outbreaks of the virus in the country were largely caused and/or facilitated by several controversial Christian groups. There have also been many cases of smaller local churches spreading the virus due to their refusal to follow the government’s guidelines for religious gatherings. Meanwhile, major Korean media outlets have mostly focused on cases of uncooperative churches with the short disclaimer ‘the majority of Protestant churches are following the rules.’ What kind of experiences did those ‘cooperative’ churches have to go through then? This paper is a micro in-depth case study which explores a megachurch in South Korea that has supported the government’s safety measures.


Journal of Korean Religions, Vol. 13, No. 2 (2022)


Special Section: Korean Religions and COVID Restrictions

Introduction to the Special Section: Korean Religions and COVID Restrictions
Don Baker


“It Isn’t Just Us”: The Korean Catholic Church’s Responses to Corona-19 as Seen in Diocesan Bulletins
Franklin Rausch


Four Types of Protestant Responses to South Korean Government Measures to Control COVID-19 Outbreaks in 2020-2021
Timothy S. Lee


Mediated Faith Coping with COVID-19: A Case Study of a Megachurch in South Korea
Seung Min Hong


Research Articles

The Korean Buddhist Military Chaplaincy and Modern “State-Protection” Buddhism: A Study of the Mass Military Faith Promotion Movement
Jonathan C. Feuer


Religious Meaning-Making Narratives for Reconciliation in the aftermath of State Violence: South Korean Christian Perspectives
Hyukmin Kang


JKR invites contributions from senior and junior scholars researching on any aspects of Korean religions from a wide range of perspectives, including religion, philosophy, theology, literature, folklore, art, anthropology, history, sociology, political science, and cultural studies. Articles submitted for consideration should be under 10,000 words in length (including footnotes: bibliographies and appendices are additional) and should not have appeared elsewhere or be under review for publication elsewhere. JKR also welcomes book reviews (up to 1,000 words) and review articles (up to 3,000 words).

Find Submission Guidelines for the Journal of Korean Religions here.

Journal of World History: Remembering Jerry H. Bentley (1949-2012)

Photo of Jerry Bentley provided by the Department of History at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

Shana J. Brown and Kieko Matteson of the Department of History at University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa honor Jerry Bentley in the following 10-year remembrance published in Journal of World History Volume 33, Number 4:

Founding editor of the Journal of World History Jerry Bentley, who passed away a decade ago at far too young an age, left an indelible legacy in the field of World History. Co-author of a highly popular world history textbook, Traditions and Encounters (written with Herbert F. Ziegler and published by McGraw-Hill, now in its seventh edition), Jerry wrote convincingly of how history from a global perspective could advance human understanding by highlighting the dynamism of cross-cultural interactions and demonstrating the mutual influence of world societies in shaping processes of historical change.

Trained at the University of Minnesota as a specialist in the history of Early Modern Europe, Jerry authored two fine monographs on Renaissance scholarship and statecraft before finding his calling in the then-emerging field of World History. Jerry shifted gears when asked to teach the University of Hawai‘i’s introductory survey course in World Civilization, as it was then titled. He accepted the assignment with aplomb, bringing a Renaissance humanist’s understanding of text, context, and sociopolitical relations to bear as he worked to wrangle what had been a largely chronologically framed narrative into a compelling thematic interpretation of the intersections and interdependence of human societies over time. Seeking to improve the available curriculum and teaching texts, Jerry reached out to friends and colleagues who found themselves similarly eager to expand beyond nation-state frameworks. Together, they founded the World History Association in 1982 to facilitate dialogue about World History pedagogy, foster scholarship, and stimulate the development of methodological frameworks for the emerging sub-discipline. As part of the association, Jerry inaugurated the Journal of World History in 1990 with a view towards publishing “articles on comparative and cross-cultural themes,” that would focus on multiple cultural regions; analyses of encounters between peoples of different regions; studies in the historiography and methodology of world history; and reflections on conceptualization and periodization.

Read this memorial in full with free access at Project MUSE.

jwh 33-3

Journal of World History Vol. 33, No. 4

More from or about Jerry Bentley:

Volume 16, Number 1 (2005)
Myths, Wagers, and Some Moral Implications of World History
Jerry H. Bentley

Volume 9, Number 2 (1998)
Hemispheric Integration, 500-1500 C.E.
Jerry H. Bentley

Volume 23, Number 3 (2012)
In Memoriam: Jerry H. Bentley: (December 9, 1949–July 15, 2012)
Karen Jolly

Journal of World History
Volume 25, Number 4, (2014)
Special Issue in Honor of Jerry H. Bentley


Find more information about the Journal of World History, subscriptions, or submitting manuscripts here.

Journals: Shanghai Fever, Divinatory Practices in Burma, Peculiar Molting Behavior of Hermit Crabs + more

China Review International

Volume 27, Number 2 (2020)

The new issue includes the following feature, “Shanghai between Modernity and Postmodernity.” Author Lei Ping explains in the introduction:

Shanghai, an unequivocally distinctive cosmopolitan city, has been a critical subject of scholarly studies and popular interest since the nineteenth century. “Shanghai fever” (Shanghaire), coupled with Shanghai nostalgia, became a sensational literary, cinematic, and cultural phenomenon in the 1990s and has continued throughout the turn of the twenty-first century as the post-Mao era unfolds. After a few temporarily dormant years following the culmination of the fervor, Shanghai has reemerged in recent global scholarship as a path to understand Chinese modernity and China’s rise to the world’s second largest economy. The question as to what kind of pivotal role Shanghai plays in conjuring the so-called China’s lost modernity causes a resurfacing of intellectual debates about Shanghai—“the other China.”

Find more reviews at Project MUSE.

Journal of Burma Studies

Special Issue: Astrological and Divinatory Practices in Burma

Volume 26, Number 2 (2022)

The new special issue is introduced by editors Aurore Candier and Jane M. Ferguson stating:

This special issue of The Journal of Burma Studies is part of a collective and multidisciplinary project which explores astrological and divinatory knowledge and practices in Burma. These practices include fortune telling, divinatory, and therapeutic techniques, and they serve a broader system for the interpretation of past, present, and future events. In Burma, as elsewhere in South and Southeast Asia, astrology and divination rationales are part of social thinking and are also embedded in religious fields (Vernant 1974:10; Guenzi 2021:9). The collective aim of these four articles is to investigate the articulation between astrology, divination, religion, power, and discourse in Burma.

Find this special section and more at Project MUSE.

Journal of Korean Religions

Special Section: Korean Religions and COVID Restrictions

Volume 13, Number 2 (2022)

The new issue includes a special section, “Korean Religions and COVID Restrictions.” Editor Don Baker introduces the section:

In this issue, we have three articles delving into how Korea’s Christian communities—Catholic and Protestant—have dealt with a problem of the present: the COVID-19 pandemic. Christians place a lot of importance on regular weekly meetings for worship. The South Korean government, on the other hand, was concerned about those religious gatherings serving as venues for the spread of the deadly COVID-19 virus. Different Christian organizations in Korea responded in different ways to their government’s demand that they prioritize concern for public health and temporarily change the way their congregations gather for ritual expressions of their faith.

Find this special section and more at Project MUSE.

Pacific Science Cover volume 76 number 2 2022 April

Pacific Science

Volume 76, Number 2 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

Spatial Ecology of Humpback Whales (Megaptera novaeangliae, Cetacea-Balaenopteridae) from the Mexican Central Pacific
Christian D. Ortega-Ortiz, Andrea B. Cuevas-Soltero,
Reyna Xóchitl García-Valencia, Astrid Frisch-Jordán, Katherina Audley, Aramis Olivos-Ortiz, and Marco A. Liñán-Cabello

Pacific Hibiscus (Malvaceae) in Sect. Lilibiscus. 1. Hibiscus kokio and Related Species from the Hawaiian Archipelago
Lex A.J. Thomson and Brock Mashburn

Peculiar Molting Behavior of Large Hermit Crabs
Rise Ohashi and Naoki Kamezaki

Efficiency and Efficacy of DOC-200 Versus Tomahawk Traps for Controlling Small Indian Mongoose, Herpestes auropunctatus (Carnivora: Herpestidae) in Wetland Wildlife Sanctuaries
Lisa S. Roerk, Lindsey Nietmann, and Aaron J. Works

Status of Forest Birds on Tinian Island, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, with an Emphasis on the Tinian Monarch (Monarcha takatsukasae) (Passeriformes; Monarchidae)
R. L. Spaulding, Richard J. Camp, Paul C. Banko, Nathan C. Johnson, and Angela D. Anders

Find more research articles at Project MUSE.

USJWJ62

U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal

Special Issue: Girls and Literature

Volume 62 (2022)

Guest Editors Hiromi Tsuchiya Dollase and Wakako Suzuki present the special issue stating:

We are pleased to present this special issue of the U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (no. 62) on “Girls and Literature.” This issue evolved from a panel titled “The Shōjo Genre and Gendered Discursive Practices: The Rise and Decline of Girls’ Novels in Japan” at the Association for Japanese Literary Studies (AJLS) annual conference held at Emory University in January 2020. Our goal was to discuss issues of genre categorization in literature, particularly as they pertain to shōjo shōsetsu, or girls’ fiction (short stories, novellas, and novels).

Find more articles, discussions, and reviews at Project MUSE.

Korean Studies Special Section: Music That Moves

This year’s issue of Korean Studies (Volume 46) features a special section, “Music That Moves: Sonic Narratives in Modern Korea,” guest edited by Dafna Zur and Susan Hwang. The six articles that comprise this section explore transnational religiosity and Cold War politics, resistance in protest songs, North Korea’s sonic culture, South Korea’s use of K-pop in marketing and more.

Here guest editors Dafna Zur and Susan Hwang discuss the “Music that Moves.”

Left: Susan Hwang (courtesy of author). Right: Dafna Zur (Do Pham / Stanford University)


University of Hawai‘i Press: Tell us how this special section came together.

Zur and Hwang: We have been working together for the last few years as members of the LLC Korean Forum at the Modern Language Association. When it was our turn to brainstorm panel ideas for the MLA’s annual convention, we landed on music. We realized that we had a lot in common—we were both trained as literary scholars, but we wanted to explore the relationship between music and text. Our panelists presented their work in January 2021, and this volume is a result of that panel.

UHP: This special section engages with Korean music from a multi-disciplinary perspective. Why was this important to you?

Editors: Although the contributors in our special section come from different disciplinary backgrounds—musicology, ethnomusicology, history, literature, and cultural studies—music is our common denominator. We gathered a group of scholars who were keen on engaging with different musical forms—music as scores, as voices coming from the throats of children and protesters, as part of mass consumption, as background tracks to epic narratives—and who were willing to cross disciplinary boundaries and think about music as a manifestation of cultural and historical phenomena. As many of us were scholars of text rather than music, we often found ourselves outside our comfort zone—at one point, Dafna consulted her father, a composer, on her musical analysis (he is acknowledged in the footnotes!). We hope to encourage others to take up the study of music in its multiple forms.

An early score of "March for the Beloved" (Source: The May 18th Memorial Foundation).
An early score of “March for the Beloved” (Source: The May 18th Memorial Foundation).

UHP: In addition to multiple disciplines, the articles cover a substantial period of time, from the colonial period to the 21st century. Overall, do you see any patterns in Korean music over time? Or perhaps change or conflicts?

Editors: Our project demonstrates that a broad historical perspective can highlight both the transnational and local qualities of Korean music. We cover, for instance, the impact of Western music on Korean composers who wrote children’s songs, the mobilization of affect through Christian hymns and sounds of war, and the revitalization of kut in modern practice of “folk” culture and the branding power of K-pop. Besides bringing attention to the qualities of music across time and in different geographic locations, our project also stays attentive to the richness of musical genres—songs, sound effects, accents and vocalization, background tracks—that lend themselves to textual and musical analysis. 

Burl Ives and the World Vision Korean Orphan Choir Sing of Faith and Joy album cover. Word Records W-3259-LP, 1963, LP. Featured in “From Waifs to Songbirds: The World Vision Korean Orphan Choir” by Katherine In-Young Lee, this issue.
Burl Ives and the World Vision Korean Orphan Choir Sing of Faith and Joy album cover. Word Records W-3259-LP, 1963, LP. Featured in “From Waifs to Songbirds: The World Vision Korean Orphan Choir” by Katherine In-Young Lee, this issue.

UHP: Why, in your opinion, is this special section important now?

Editors: For the last 15-20 years, Korean studies has enjoyed a surge of interest in the study of Korean culture and language, especially among high-school and college students. This success is largely thanks to the explosive popularity of K-pop around the globe. We continue to witness the power of music, such as civic engagement and political solidarity, that emerges from K-pop fandom. Two interrelated questions that the papers in this special section address are, how did the forces of social change and technological innovations impact the way people engage with music, and how did music as an affective force facilitate paradigmatic shifts in modern Korean history? It was important for us to show alternative forms of Korean music that have contributed to its enduring power.

UHP: How do you hope readers will utilize this special section in their own work?

The articles in the special section deal with a wide range of genres and sonorities from different historical periods. There are YouTube links to music in many of them. We hope scholars will find our articles accessible and teachable, and that the articles will contribute to our ongoing efforts to contextualize the current moment of Korean music’s success.

Graphic Medicine: Life Writing and Comics from Biography

In Graphic Medicine, the new monograph from the Biography quarterly, comics artists and scholars of life writing, literature, and comics explore the lived experience of illness and disability through original texts, images, and the dynamic interplay between the two.

The essays and autobiographical comics in this collection respond to the medical humanities’ call for different perceptions and representations of illness and disability than those found in conventional medical discourse. The collection expands and troubles our understanding of the relationships between patients and doctors, nurses, social workers, caregivers, and family members, considering such encounters in terms of cultural context, language, gender, class, and ethnicity. By treating illness and disability as an experience of fundamentally changed living, rather than a separate narrative episode organized by treatment, recovery, and a return to “normal life,” Graphic Medicine asks what it means to give and receive care.

During the past decade, graphic medicine comics have proliferated—an outpouring accelerated recently by the greatest health crisis in a century. Here, guest editors Erin La Cour and Anna Poletti discuss the collection.


University of Hawai‘i Press: Tell us how this special issue came together.

La Cour and Poletti: The idea for the special issue came from the Amsterdam Comics Conference in 2018, where there were a number of papers that explored graphic medicine. We became interested in bringing scholars and artists together to think about how the discourse of graphic medicine had developed and what future directions it might move in. We wanted to create an opportunity for interdisciplinary and intergenerational conversations about narratives of illness and disability in comics form, as well as consider what the limits of graphic medicine might be.

The final page of John Miers’s comic “Conflict Compromise?: An Imagined Conversation with John Hicklenton and Lindsay Cooper about Living with Multiple Sclerosis” in Graphic Medicine, pp. 25–38
The final page of John Miers’s comic “Conflict Compromise?: An Imagined Conversation with John Hicklenton and Lindsay Cooper about Living with Multiple Sclerosis” in Graphic Medicine, pp. 25–38

UHP: In the introduction, you pose the questions, “What can lifewriting scholars add to the burgeoning interest in life writing in comics form, and how might this new field of interest provoke lifewriting scholars to think differently about life writing?” How do you think this collection might provide an answer?

Editors: Our hope is that the special issue answers these questions by demonstrating that practitioners who reflect on their creative work are some of the most important theorists of graphic medicine’s potential uses and limitations. We also think that the investment in graphic medicine as a way of intervening in how medicine is practiced provides life writing scholars with fresh challenges in terms of thinking about how life writing is used, and the kinds of stakes people and institutions have in personal storytelling.

“Frame of Mind #1” by Nancy K. Miller in her essay “‘Is This Recover?’: Chronicity and Closure in Graphic Illness Memoir” in Graphic Medicine, pp. 53–70


“Frame of Mind #1” by Nancy K. Miller in her essay “‘Is This Recover?’: Chronicity and Closure in Graphic Illness Memoir” in Graphic Medicine, pp. 53–70

UHP: The cover features the work of Grant Gronewold, whose work does not “seek to translate the experience of chronic illness” but offers the “opportunity to learn the language” the artist developed to describe his world. Why did you choose to feature Gronewold on the cover, and how does this image serve as an entry to the collection?

Editors: We chose to commission an original image from Grant because of his highly developed symbolism: his images reward close attention and repeated viewing. We believe his work powerfully demonstrates that comics can (and do) communicate something of the experience of illness and disability that prose or poetry cannot. The way he places the figure in a landscape alongside objects of medical treatment (the giant scalpel, the bag of “patient clothes”) registers the social and political position of someone who is ill very evocatively and, we think, signals the thought-provoking nature of the comics and articles the special issue contains.

 “Disability Daily Drawn: A Comics Collaboration” by JoAnn Purcell in collaboration with Simone Purcell Randmaa in Graphic Medicine, pp. 97–115
“Disability Daily Drawn: A Comics Collaboration” by JoAnn Purcell in collaboration with Simone Purcell Randmaa in Graphic Medicine, pp. 97–115

UHP: What was the most challenging thing about creating this collection?

Editors: Without doubt, the pandemic. We had originally planned to bring all our contributors together for a physical meeting where the pieces would be workshopped, and we had to move that online. Our contributors were generous and flexible in finding other ways to read and respond to each other’s work.

Final page of Safdar Ahmed’s “Graphic Confessions and the Vulnerability Hangover from Hell” in Graphic Medicine, pp. 133–146
Final page of Safdar Ahmed’s “Graphic Confessions and the Vulnerability Hangover from Hell” in Graphic Medicine, pp. 133–146

 

UHP:  Since its publication, how has the response been?

Editors: We are getting lots of positive feedback about how beautiful the book is. A number of colleagues have commented on how much they like the range of contributions and the critical perspective the contributors bring to graphic medicine in terms of ethics and aesthetics.

UHP:  How do you hope to see this collection exist in your field and the wider community?

Editors: Our hope is that some of the graphic medicine programs in medical schools might adopt the collection so that health communicators and doctors can continue to reflect on their role as readers and distributors of life writing about illness and disability.

Cover of Graphic Medicine the Manoa Journal Volume 32 Issue (2020)
Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly, vol. 44, nos. 2 & 3, 2021

Get Graphic Medicine for 30% off

Buy the book today with code GMED30 for 30% off, valid until Dec. 31, 2022

Subscribe to Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly

Subscribe now and get Graphic Medicine as part of your Biography subscription.

Read Graphic Medicine on Project MUSE.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Publishing in Academic Journals: Pro Tips from an Editor

An experienced editor offers authors practical advice about navigating the journal publishing process in an open access guide, “Publishing in Academic Journals: Pro Tips from U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal.”

Alisa Freedman gathers her experience as editor-in-chief of U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal from 2016-2022 to create this pragmatic how-to guide that details the process from submission to publication, what to expect and when, and who does what. Her suggestions draw from the humanities and qualitative social sciences, but the advice is also useful to scholars in other fields. 

This guide addresses the following common questions and more:

  • How long it takes to publish a peer reviewed article
  • How to choose the right journal for your article
  • How a journal article’s structure differs from a dissertation chapter
  • What happens when two reviewers offer differing recommendations
  • Obtaining permissions to use images in an article
  • What happens after an article is accepted for publication

Thanks to Alisa Freedman for illuminating this editing and production process for prospective authors! Find the publishing guide on Project MUSE.

USJWJ62

Call for Papers: U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal


The U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal welcomes contributions from all academic fields in the social sciences and humanities. The journal publishes new research, review articles, and translations. Manuscripts should be between 6,000 and 10,000 words, including the alphabetical list of Works Cited and endnotes. Submissions will be reviewed by the USJWJ editors and anonymously by outside reviewers. Please review the complete Submission Guidelines.

Free Special Issue: Celebrating 60+ Issues of U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal

A new digital-only special issue from U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal is now available free to readers on Project MUSE. 

“Celebrating 60+ Issues of U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal centers on three themes that often appear in the journal: mobility, storytelling, and activism. The journal is the world’s oldest periodical devoted to the study of gender and Japan and was founded in 1988 by Japanese feminists who were educated in the United States.

The issue brings together seven previously published articles of significance, which:

  • Profiles women from diverse backgrounds who worked abroad during different historical moments and changed how people in Japan, the United States, and France regarded each other 
  • Explores how cancer disrupts women’s life courses and relationships, including the first English translation of Ogino Anna’s quasi-autobiographical short story, “Nue / 鵺”
  • Analyzes the prevalent images of sweets and desserts in shōjo manga in how they symbolize power relationships and essentialize girls
  • Investigates the online feminist movement #KuToo, which disclosed exploitative workplace and political cultures and empowered women to try to change them

“All of these seven articles explain that, due to laws, social conventions, business practices, and other factors, women have faced different choices in work and family and different access to education, jobs, and politics than people of other genders. They show how women have coped with public and personal traumas, initiated movements for change and equality, and formed communities. They account for diversity among Japanese women and dispel stereotypes. They capture accounts omitted from historical records,” writes Alisa Freedman in the special issue’s introduction.

Alisa Freedman served as the the journal’s editor-in-chief from 2016-2022, is a professor of Japanese literature, cultural studies, and gender at the University of Oregon, and author of several books. She dedicates the commemorative issue to the journals’ previous editors: Drs. Yoko Kawashima, Noriko Mizuta, Sally A. Hastings, and Jan Bardsley.

Read the commemorative issue free on Project MUSE here.

Q & A with Editor in Chief of Pacific Science David Duffy

Photograph provided by David Duffy
Photograph provided by David Duffy

David Duffy has been editor of Pacific Science since January of 2021, however he has articles published within the journal for over a decade including “Biology and Impacts of Pacific Island Invasive Species. 7. The Domestic Cat (Felis catus)” (Volume 66, Number 2) and “Has the Small Indian Mongoose Become Established on Kaua‘i Island, Hawai‘i?” (Volume 69, Number 4)Outside of Pacific Science, Duffy has authored more than 100 scientific publications and is the founding editor of the journal Waterbirds.

On the School of Life Sciences page for the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa, Duffy characterizes himself as “a jack of all trades having worked on seabirds, Lyme Disease, fish schooling, old growth forest, El Niño, and mapping biodiversity. Here in Hawaiʻi, I ran the Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit for two decades, bringing in over a quarter of a billion dollars to UH and helping to grow basic and applied conservation biology. I am continuing my studies of the Peruvian upwelling and Alaskan seabirds, editing Pacific Science, and trying to sustain and improve the research environment at UH.”

Below Duffy shares with UH Press what its been like these last two years as the editorial head for Pacific Science:

University of Hawai‘i Press: You took on the editor role starting with our January 2021 issue, not even a year into the pandemic.  What were some of the challenges you faced then, and is that still an issue with the creation of these articles and research now?

David Duffy: The last two years have been very rough on researchers who could not get to their study sites. They are now catching up, which means there will be a lag before they go to publish their results so we aren’t seeing as many submissions as before COVID-19.  Researchers are extra busy so many journals including ours are finding it is harder to get peers to review manuscripts to vet them for publication. 

UHP: How do you see Pacific Science having the most relevance, in the classroom or in the field?

DD: Pacific Science is more aimed at the working scientist but it continues to be useful as a classroom resource to introduce students to scientific writing.

UHP: Is there an issue or article you are particularly proud of?

DD: The next one! We want to keep getting better.

UHP: What is next for Pacific Science? Any special issues in the works? 

DD: We depend on workers sending us good papers of general interests to Pacific scientists. We will make the submission process as efficient as possible. We are also increasing our efforts to offer editorial support for those for whom English is not their first language. Finally we hope to produce a memorial volume honoring a scientist who played a major role in Pacific Science.

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS:

Established in 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Manuscript submissions on topics such as Pacific biodiversity, conservation, and sustainability are also encouraged. In addition to publishing original research, the journal features review articles providing a synthesis of current knowledge. Please review the complete Author Guidelines, available online. Manuscripts can be submitted online here:

New: Journal of Polynesian Archaeology and Research

As the state celebrates Hawai‘i Archaeology Week (Sept. 26-Oct. 2), two non-profit organizations join forces to launch the Journal of Polynesian Archaeology and Research, an open-access title that will soon accept submissions for its inaugural issue.

For more than three decades, both the Society for Hawaiian Archaeology (SHA) and the Easter Island Foundation (EIF) have been committed to promoting research and dialogue on the archaeology of Polynesia. While distribution of previous publications was limited to members, this new journal will be published open-access and freely available to all readers. Distributed by the University of Hawai‘i Press, the journal will publish peer-reviewed research articles, commentaries, and reviews that are of relevance to stakeholders and practitioners of archaeology and related research in Polynesia.

The Journal of Polynesian Archaeology and Research will be co-edited by Dr. Mara Mulrooney (board member of the EIF and current president of SHA) and Dr. Jillian Swift (board member and publications chair of SHA). The two editors developed the new journal as a forum to bring together important research and conversations around archaeology, history, and heritage management in Polynesia that are of significant relevance to both organizations. The new journal also brings into alignment several shared goals of the EIF and SHA, which include:

  • Encouraging research and dialogue about Polynesian archaeology, historic preservation, and public outreach among researchers, heritage professionals, and other stakeholders
  • Encouraging public education and appreciation of the aims and limitations of archaeological research, particularly through ethical archaeological practices and collaborative work with communities
  • Advocating for and assisting with the preservation, interpretation, and respectful treatment of archaeological sites and material culture

“The Journal of Polynesian Archaeology and Research will continue the tradition of publishing cutting-edge results of archaeological research in Hawai’i and throughout Polynesia, as well as providing a forum for discussion and debate regarding archaeological practice in the region,” notes Professor Patrick V. Kirch of UH Mānoa. Kirch has been involved with both of the organizations’ previous publications as a previous Editor and Editorial Board Member, and will serve on the Editorial Board for the new journal. “I expect that the Journal will be an essential resource for both scholars and the engaged public.”

This fall, the editors will review manuscripts through the journal submission system (forthcoming), and in 2023 the first issue will be published on eVols, the University of Hawai‘i’s open-access, digital institutional repository for both the university community and researchers around the world.

The Journal of Polynesian Archaeology and Research will replace two journals that will cease publication, Hawaiian Archaeology (published by SHA) and Rapa Nui Journal (published by UH Press in collaboration with the EIF). Over the past 30 years, Rapa Nui Journal published more than 33 volumes and Hawaiian Archaeology published 15 volumes and four special publications. The archive of both publications will also be freely available via eVols.

For more information, visit uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/jpar

About the Easter Island Foundation

The Easter Island Foundation was founded in 1989 with the aim of creating a library on Rapa Nui (Easter Island) to house the collections of anthropologist William Mulloy and to encourage study and research about the island. The Foundation’s mission is to work towards the conservation and protection of Rapa Nui and its history, culture, and environment.  Its scholarship program annually provides assistance to college students of Rapanui ancestry to help with their educational costs. Additionally, the Foundation works to promote, stimulate, and disseminate research on Rapa Nui and other Polynesian islands by members of scientific, historical, and cultural disciplines.

About the Society for Hawaiian Archaeology

Founded in 1980, the Society for Hawaiian Archaeology’s mission is to promote and stimulate interest and research in the archaeology of the Hawaiian Islands through an annual conference, workshops, and other networking opportunities for its membership. It also seeks to serve as a bond among those interested in Hawaiian archaeology, both professionals and non-professionals, and aid in directing their efforts into more scientific channels as well as encourage the publication of their results.