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Review of Japanese Culture and Society, Issues 30 and 31 Now Available

cover RJCS 30

Issue 30, 2018- Scholar, Poet, Educator: Festschrift Issue in Honor of Mizuta Noriko

“One of Noriko’s brilliant endeavors was to imagine, and then bring about, a truly unique new educational institution in Japan, namely Josai International University. On my first visit to Japan in 1987 for the Japanese publication of Women in Film Noir, Noriko mentioned that she hoped Josai University could build on available land near Tokyo Airport. But it was just a dream. Only a few years later, however, Josai International University was up and running, bringing life and energy to the Chiba area. The buildings were beautifully designed and organized, and a delight to be in. Despite already being Vice Chancellor of the long established Josai University Educational Corporation, Noriko became President of Josai International University from 1996 to 2009 (She then became Chancellor of Josai University Educational Corporation from 2004 to 2017). Her masterstroke was to make this new International University unique in combining degrees in Business Studies with an M.A. in Women’s Studies. This was a time when there were very few Women’s Studies degrees being offered in Japan, so Noriko was charting new ground, perhaps partly inspired by American feminist research. I was honored to be invited to teach the first courses at Josai on Women and Film. At first I thought this was to be just for the one year, 1994; however, to my surprise and delight, Noriko in fact had arranged for me to teach a course or two once a year for four consecutive years.”   Excerpt from, In Honor of Noriko Mizuta by E. Ann Kaplan

Issue 30 also includes:

In Her Footsteps: The Legacy of Professor Mizuta Noriko by Linda Flores

Mizuta Noriko by  Ueno Chizuko, James Garza

Mizuta Noriko: Biocritical Essay of a Literary Feminist and Global Scholar by Alisa Freedman

Mizuta Noriko: Selected Bibliography by Linda Galvane, Rebecca Corbett

Feminine Failure and the Modern Hero: Mad Women in Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar and Joan Didion’s Play It As It Lays by Mizuta Noriko

Natsume Sōseki on Poe  by Mizuta Noriko

Literature, Ideology and Women’s Happiness: The Autobiographical Novels of Miyamoto Yuriko by Mizuta Noriko

Women’s Self-Representation and Transformation of the Body: Kōno Taeko and Ogawa Yōko by Mizuta Noriko

Beyond Home And City: Poems By Ishigaki Rin And Shiraishi Kazuko by Mizuta Noriko and Eiji Sekine

The Desolate Self and Its Circular Search for The Absolute Other: Transgression and Dream in the Work of Takahashi Takako by Mizuta  Noriko and Alessandro Castellini

When Women Narrate the Self: Personal Narratives in Modern Women’s Literaturebby Mizuta Noriko and Nadeschda Bachem

The Dream of the Yamanba—An Overview by Mizuta Noriko and Luciana Sanga

The Girl Double: On the Shōjo as Archetype in Modern Women’s Self-Expression by Mizuta Noriko and James Garza

Urashimasō: Memory as Trauma and Recovery in Literature by Mizuta Noriko and Hannah Osborne

Aesthetics and the Archive: The Poetry of Mizuta Noriko by Jordan A. Y. Smith

Selected Poems by Mizuta Noriko by Jordan A. Y. Smith

Dear Kojien Dictionary: Tomorrow Girls Troop by Reiko Tomii

 

RJCS 31 cover

Issue 31, 2019- Photography of the Heisei Era (1989-2019): Memory and Transformation, Crises and Opportunities

“In this introductory essay, I frame and contextualize shifts in the practices of Japanese photography during the Heisei era, examining how new themes and changing subjects of self-presentation, the dramatic change in power relations, responsibility, and political valence, and a new assortment of artists, multiple new subjects, and iconographies appeared on the stage and rose to prominence. This text primarily focuses on a single aspect of the changes that took place in photography and video art during the Heisei period, not as an established corpus or a specific canon, but as a process that defines itself through the multiple changes of that era. My appraisal of this process centers on the relationship between the photographer and the photographed, highlighting problems of identity and representation, as they appear in the works that are discussed throughout this issue. In this context, the present essay emphasizes the crucial changes enacted by the growing participation of women photographers, who have contributed to the rise of imagery related to marginalized subjects and have taken on a prominent role in defining the terms of photographic practice, such as the acknowledgement of minority groups, an openness toward sexual and gender identities, and a new legitimization of traditionally domestic subjects, such as old age, family, motherhood, etc.”  Excerpt from the Introduction: Between the Viewfinder and the Lens—A Journey into the Performativity of Self-Presentation, Gender, Race, and Class in Heisei Photography (1989–2019)  by Ayelot Zohar

Also in issue 31:

Preface: A Difficult New Dawn by Frank Feltens

Introduction: Between the Viewfinder and the Lens—A Journey into the Performativity of Self-Presentation, Gender, Race, and Class in Heisei Photography (1989–2019) by Ayelet Zohar

Yoneda Tomoko by Lena Fritsch

Twice Infinity: Sugimoto Hiroshi’s Architecture Series by Jonathan M. Reynolds.

Ghost in the Shell: An After-Thought on Pierre Huygue’s Human Mask by Michio Hayashi

Watanabe Toshiya by Kakishima Takashi

The Predicament and the Reflexive Turn: Japanese Street Photography since 1990 by Yoshiaki Kai

Cardboard Houses and Miyamoto Ryūji’s Visualization of Alternative Urban Realities in Heisei Japan by Carrie Cushman

Kitano Ken by Ishida Katsuya

Sudo Ayano’s Portrait Photography: Artificially Modified Beauties and the Uncanny by Nava Astrachan

The Position of Ninoshima by Kuraishi Shino, Ellen Takata, Jason Beckman, and Mikiko Hirayama

Linking Disaster to Natural History, A Visit to Sasaoka Keiko’s Exhibition: Tanesashi, Ninoshima (Hachinohe City Museum of Art) by Kuraishi Shino and Daryl Maude

The Story of Two Women: Ishiuchi Miyako and Iwasaki Chihiro (Excerpts from a Conversation between Ishiuchi Miyako and Ueno Chizuko—On Mother’s and Hiroshima) by Tajima Miho, Ayelet Zohar, and Frank Feltens

Arai Takashi and Nagashima Yurie through the Historical Frame of “Japanese Photography” by Nakamura Fumiko, Mai Hayano, and Kevin Niehaus

Photography as Embalming: Yokota Daisuke’s Post-Production Process by Hoshino Futoshi

A Memorandum on the Photograph: Movement and Time in Blurs and Stills and Kanai Mieko and Hannah Osborne

The Story of The Inflated Man by Kanai Mieko and Hannah Osborne

Postwar Japanese Photography: A Selected Bibliography by Thomas F. O’Leary, Anat Icar-Shoham, Patricia Lenz, and Shir Yeffet

To subscribe to Review of Japanese Culture and Society, please visit the journal homepage.

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Celebrating Barry Lopez: Special Print Bundle Sale + Free Digital Special Issue

Barry Lopez passed away on Christmas Day 2020 at age seventy-five. He was celebrated and admired as a writer of fiction, nonfiction, essays, and memoir.

Barry was an ardent friend of MĀNOA. In addition to giving MĀNOA stories and essays, he co-edited two important international issues: Maps of Reconciliation: Literature and the Ethical Imagination in 2007, and its companion issue, Gates of Reconciliation, in 2008.

To celebrate Barry’s life and work, we offer 5 print titles for $30 (or $10 each) and also a selection of his work free via the Project MUSE platform.

Special Print Bundle Sale

The 5 MĀNOA titles (pictured, right) featuring Barry Lopez’s work as writer and editor are now available for $30 (or $10 per title) through the end of February 2021.

Buy the Special Print Bundle Now.

Free Digital Special Issue

Read Now: Remembering Barry Lopez (1945-2020): Stories and Essays in MĀNOA

To celebrate his work and in gratitude for his life, friendship, and support, we offer this selection of work by Barry Lopez that appeared in MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing.

These articles will be free on Project MUSE through May 2021.

Introduction: Barry Lopez (1945-2020) (Open Access)

Editors’ Note
Originally published: Volume 19, Number 2, 2007

The Leadership Imperative: An Interview with Oren Lyons
Originally published: Volume 19, Number 2, 2007

¡Nunca Más!
Originally published: Volume 20, Number 1, 2008

Epilogue
Originally published: Volume 20, Number 1, 2008

The Letters of Heaven
Originally published: Volume 23, Number 2, 2011

In the Great Bend of the Souris River
Originally published: Volume 25, Issue 1, 2013

Print Bundle Sale

Titles included in bundle.

9780824832681
Cascadia: The Life and Breath of the World
Almost Heaven: On the Human and Divine
9780824833206
Wild Hearts: Literature

Buy Special Bundle Now

Acting My Age: Thomas Farber’s new book from MĀNOA

Thomas Farber, 2020. Photograph by Andrea Young
Thomas Farber, 2020. Photograph by Andrea Young

Elegant, exuberant, and idiosyncratic, Acting My Age is a memoir and meditation by one of America’s most playful and inventive writers.

Acting My Age is the newest volume from MĀNOA. In the words of Mary Mackey (The Jaguars That Prowl Our Dreams), “in Acting My Age, Thomas Farber gives us an unflinching, luminous, cleverly conceived meditation on his own mortality as well as on the extinction of the coral reefs, snow leopards, dolphins, and, ultimately the human species. Couching his observations in a series of short, interconnected, almost-epigrammatic essays that read like prose poems, Farber creates a narrative style reminiscent of Joyce and Melville: oceanic in depth and all-encompassing in range.”

Below, Thomas Farber shares how this book came together, water friendships, and how he’s faring a year into the COVID-19 pandemic. 


University of Hawai‘i Press: You describe Acting My Age as an “interim report.” When and where did Acting My Age begin?

Thomas Farber: I’d finished Here and Gone in early 2015. The concluding chapter of its third person nonfiction has “the writer” confronting open heart surgery in seven days. Acting My Age picks up, in the first person, where that left off.

UHP: You sign your author’s note that opens Acting My Age from both Berkeley and Honolulu. Tell us about your relationship to these places.

TF: Born and raised in Boston, I first came to Berkeley in 1964 at age twenty. I’ve been based there most of the time since, albeit with long absences, and have taught at the University of California, Berkeley since the mid-1990s.

I first came to Hawai‘i in 1971, have had long stays every year since, often for half the year. Surfing and Pacific Island post-colonial writing have been two of my persistent interests. I’ve been visiting writer at the University of Hawai‘i, Manoa; visiting fellow at the East-West Center; and have traveled extensively in the South Pacific.

Gill net pyramid,   Keauhou Bay, Hawai‘i, 2009. Photograph by Wayne Levin
Gill net pyramid, Keauhou Bay, Hawai‘i, 2009. Photograph by Wayne Levin

UHP: How do you feel Wayne Levin and Geoffrey Fricker’s photography complements your work?

TF: Water friendships! I first saw Wayne’s marvelous ocean photographs when I was dreaming toward the book that became On Water (1994). My collaborations with Wayne include Through A Liquid MirrorOther Oceans (UH Press), and Akule. As for freshwater, I’d been part of a Geoff Fricker project about the upper Sacramento River. Then in the late 1990s Geoff asked me write text for his haunting photographs of the ruined Hamakuapoko sugar mill.

Sugar water-cooling system, Pu‘unēnē, Maui, 1997. Photograph by Geoffrey Fricker
Sugar water-cooling system, Pu‘unēnē, Maui, 1997. Photograph by Geoffrey Fricker

UHP: As the author of more than 25 books, how does Acting My Age differ from your other work?

TF: A return to first person nonfiction, something I’d not done for many years, it picks up after the impending heart surgery looming at the end of Here and GoneActing My Age is, not surprisingly, much concerned with aging and mortality—author seventy-one to seventy-five in the telling—but also speaks from my ongoing love of and fear for the ocean. My dismay with the mess humans can make of things. As for how the stories are told, well, I’ve had a long love affair with words, tried to draw on all I’ve learned in my writing life.

UHP: The revisions for Acting My Age were completed in the first days of the COVID-19 pandemic. How does this find you—and your writing—nearly a year later?

TF: Like everyone, I’m much sobered by the pandemic. Too many apprehensions realized.

Meanwhile, no one writes or lives forever. About to turn seventy-seven, clearing books and papers from my garage library, I feel like a surfer in a long lull. Waiting for the next set. Staying very close to home, perforce, has encouraged me to be the kind of reader I was as a child—(re)reading for the deep pleasure of it. No product quite yet in mind. Savoring company I’ve kept. Jim Harrison’s late poems, Dead Man’s Float. J.A. Baker’s The Peregrine.  Calvino’s Invisible Cities. These “colleagues” I’ve learned from, have tried to measure up to.


THOMAS FARBER has been a Fulbright Scholar, awarded a Guggenheim fellowship and three times National Endowment fellowships for fiction and creative nonfiction, recipient of the Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize, and Rockefeller Foundation scholar at Bellagio. His recent books include Here and Gone, The End of My Wits, Brief Nudity, and The Beholder. Former visiting writer at Swarthmore College and the University of Hawai‘i, he teaches at the University of California, Berkeley. www.thomasfarber.org

Manoa MA 32-2 Acting My Age Cover Thomas Farber
MĀNOA Vol. 32 Issue 2 (2020)

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Author’s Note

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Print copy of Acting My Age, $24.99

Subscribe to MĀNOA

Like Acting My Age? MĀNOA publishes two compelling issues annually of international literature. Subscribe here. 

Tyranny Lessons: 60 International Writers on Contemporary Tyranny (MĀNOA Vol. 32 Issue 1)

In Tyranny Lessons, the newest volume from MĀNOA, international writers from two dozen countries in Asia, the Middle East, Europe, and the Americas address the challenges of contemporary tyranny as only literary writing can: through the perspective of lived experiences, imagined futures, and personal struggles.

Tyranny Lessons also features the photography of Danny Lyon, the first photographer of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee, whose work documented the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s.

Alok Bhalla and Ming Di guest edited this issue alongside MĀNOA editor Frank Stewart, who shares how this issue came together and some of the pieces in the issue.


University of Hawai‘i Press: Tell us how this special issue came together.

MĀNOA: As an international literary publication, MĀNOA tries to engage with the most urgent issues of our time. We have compiled volumes on freedom, unending wars, reconciliation, and, most recently the displacement of people due to climate change, ethnic conflicts, and other causes. Tyranny Lessons grew out of these global concerns.

UHP: Why is this issue important now?

MĀNOA: Literary writing is often about individuals, not statistics or abstract groups. Many millions of people have been displaced around the world, and tens of millions are living under authoritarian governments or in intolerant communities. These numbers blur the fact that they comprise individuals, each of whom struggles, suffers, or is hurt. Good literature helps us live through the experiences of everyday people in difficult circumstances, enlarging our understanding and compassion.

UHP: How do you see this issue being used in the world?

MĀNOA: Writers from nearly two dozen countries contributed to this volume—many from places that Americans seldom hear from: India, Indonesia, Tibet, Latvia, Slovenia, Estonia, the Czech Republic, Syria, and others. Their experiences, languages, and viewpoints are diverse. When American readers see them side-by-side in MĀNOA—and when the writers themselves see their work in this international context, across political and national boundaries—lives of others become more immediate, and our feelings of kinship grow larger and more inclusive.

UHP: Walk us through your table of contents: What’s not to miss?

MĀNOA: Well, there are more than sixty writers in the volume so it’s hard to answer this briefly. There are many excellent writers from the PRC, Hong Kong, and Tibet. Tang Danhong’s “Chairman Mao Is Dead!” is a wonderful, acerbic, and at times funny essay about a time in her childhood when a death in China turned the country, and her life, on its head. Other writers from China recall events in the recent past, the outbreak of the COVID-19 virus. There are two wonderful allegorical tales by an Indonesian writer, Rio Johan, living in Paris. There are some unexpected pieces, such as an essay by Walter White, who headed the NAACP, on lynching, and some union songs by Joe Hill.

UHP: What was the most challenging thing about creating this issue?

MĀNOA: It was important to us that Tyranny Lessons not have an agenda or or be predictable. We wanted to understand tyranny as a condition that is common in our lives, in ways we don’t think about in that way—and not just government oppression. There’s a moving story in the issue by Ann Pancake, who lives in West Virginia, about a brother whose opioid addiction tyrannizes the well-being of a family. An essay by Thomas Farber comments on the scientific practice of capturing and experimenting on dolphins—surely an example of humans tyrannizing non-humans. And there’s a fine play by Catherine Filloux, “whatdoesfreemean,” concerning incarcerated women of color.

UHP: How does the artwork complement the written content?

MĀNOA: Acclaimed photographer Danny Lyon, the first official photographer of the Civil Rights Movement, gave us a suite of photographs from his book The Movement: Documentary of a Struggle for Equality. The images underscore the reality that tyranny is not something that happens only in totalitarian foreign countries. Communal violence and intolerance are present in the U.S. as well. And Americans too have lessons to teach the world about tyranny.

 

Manoa 32-1 Tyranny Lessons

Tyranny Lessons

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Editor’s Note

Poem: “Cry Out in Sorrow,” by Lin Zi
This poem was written for Li Wenliang (1986–2020), the Wuhan doctor who alerted his colleagues about the coronavirus in December 2019, and died of the disease in February 2020. When punished by the police for “spreading rumors,” he said, “A healthy society should allow more than one voice.” The poem calls for public mourning as a protest against censorship.

Buy the Volume

Print copy of Tyranny Lessons, $25

eBook of Tyranny Lessons, $9.99 (through Oct. 2020)
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Subscribe to MĀNOA

Like Tyranny Lessons? MĀNOA publishes two compelling issues annually of international literature. Subscribe here.

Journal of World History Special Issue: Crossing Companies (Vol. 31, Issue 3)

The September issue of the Journal of World History is a special issue, “Crossing Companies,” guest edited by Felicia Gottmann, a Senior Lecturer in History at Northumbria University, Newcastle,  and Philip Stern, the Gilhuly Family Associate Professor of History at Duke University. The issue includes five research articles, in addition to Gottmann and Stern’s introduction to the issue and a special digital-only afterword by Julia Adams and Isaac Ariail Reed (both available free on Project MUSE).

Here, Gottmann and Stern discuss how this special issue came together, editing during a pandemic, why this subject continues to interest scholars and students, and how teachers can use the issue in their classrooms.


University of Hawai‘i Press: Tell us how this special issue came together.

Gottmann and Stern: The issue was the result of many conversations among a number of scholars researching various novel ways chartered companies crossed national boundaries, some together as part of larger collaborative research projects. We decided that taken together our research would make for an interesting discussion and offered it as a panel for the 2017 American Historical Association annual meeting in Denver. This raised so many interesting points that we decided to we just had to publish the discussion as articles, and commissioned others to supplement. We proposed it as a dedicated special issue to JWH, and the rest is history. This took us three years, but we think it was worth it.

UHP: What was the most challenging thing about creating this issue as editors? 

Gottmann and Stern: For a subject as broad and involved as that of early modern chartered companies the greatest challenge was that even among all of us, one special journal issue could only skim the surface of what is a broad and expansive subject, so we were constantly feeling like we were leaving out far more than we were putting in. And of course, the final stages of a collaborative issue are hard under normal circumstances; when we started this together in Denver years ago, no one could have anticipated we would be doing it in the midst of a global pandemic. Both of us have small children, which made co-authoring and editing that much more demanding. Even meant even finding times to meet virtually across five time zones when one of us was not on childcare duty or utterly exhausted was… a challenge. Honestly, we couldn’t have gotten through it without the remarkable contributors, and of course the immensely patient and accommodating editors and staff at JWH.

UHP: Why do you think early-modern trading companies continue to interest scholars and students?

Gottmann and Stern: The subject was actually one of great interest many decades ago—in some ways, our special issue is somewhat inspired by the fabulous book on Companies and Trade co-edited by Leo Blussé and Femme Gaastra in 1981. Around the same time, the fantastic work to “bring the state back in,” (to quote another important volume from the 1980s), certainly led to a generation of work that exposed the connections between state and empire formation across the globe. But since then, our attention has been drawn back to the ways in which private enterprises govern like states, making connections around the globe and building empires. While the analogy can be taken too far, the comparison—whether in terms of similarities or contrasts—with a similar phenomenon in the early modern world certainly promises fascinating insights into the origins of modern capitalism and globalization and raises questions about the role and nature of states and multinational companies. The past several decades have also seen increasingly broader interest in, and sophisticated approaches to colonial, imperial, and world history, which has no doubt been part of the renewed interest in colonial companies.

UHP: How do you see this special issue contributing to the field?

Gottmann and Stern: While scholars working on the theaters in which these companies operated, be that the Indian Ocean or the Atlantic World, have long since shown that their operations were resolutely transnational on the ground, those who study the companies qua companies continue to do so with the kind of “methodological nationalism” that Ulrich Beck has taught us to abandon long ago. Our special issue firmly demonstrates that these were transnational enterprises not just on the ground in Asia, Africa, or the Americas but that they were transnational through and through, from their very inception in Europe. So we turn the lens of World History back on Europe, demonstrating it to be part of much wider, not merely, national histories.

UHP: What advice would you give to a teacher who was interested in using your issue in their classroom?

Gottmann and Stern: We would encourage teachers to use this issue as a way into studying history away from national narratives of empire: as a way to motivate students to challenge their modernist assumptions about the coherence of notions of “nations”, “states”, and “companies”. Paired with some of the many surviving great primary sources, be that Ananda Ranga Pillai’s Diary or Bolt’s Considerations on India Affairs, this can be a brilliant way to get students to rethink world history as a history of more than just a world of nation-states.

Read the Journal of World History special issue, “Crossing Companies” on Project MUSE here.

 

New Journal Issues: Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal, Journal of Burma Studies, Language Documentation & Conservation + More (July 2020)

Front cover of Biography 42-4 (2020)

Biography

Academic Freedom, Academic Lives, Guest Edited by Bill V. Mullen and Julie Rak

Volume 42, Issue 4 (2019)

From the guest editors’ introduction:

Academic freedom is currently highly public and highly contested terrain. What academic freedom actually means has become an urgent question, as alt-right activists have turned the tenets of academic freedom to their own ends, whether on college and university campuses, or through the actions of right-wing governments as they move to suppress dissent. We want to reclaim the concept of academic freedom for the left and for academic activism, not through a debate about the concept as an abstraction, but in connection to what we see as the radical potential of academic lives. Thinking of academic lives as interpretation and critique is a way to disrupt the current alt-right control of public discourse about freedom of speech. Read the special issue introduction free here.

Journal of Burma Studies 24-1

The Journal of Burma Studies

Special Issue: Environment and Resources: Burma/Myanmar and the (Un)Natural

Volume 24, Issue 1 (2020)

The editor’s note for this special issue begins:

From touristic impressions to geopolitical analyses, ubiquitous are the tremendous and varied natural resources of Myanmar. Teak forests, oil and gas reserves, precious gemstones, biodiversity, and the list goes on. The very meaning of the concept of resource, however, suggests that the country contains things of tremendous potential human, economic use, and therefore value. With the resources, mapping, and study of them, there is the seemingly boundless potential for greater wealth to be accumulated. On the other hand, discourse regarding natural beauty and wonder can be a purposeful distraction from ongoing issues of war and exploitation. Discussing the country’s abundance of resources, however, is never a neutral proposition: for outsiders looking in, there is frequently a value-laden assumption which guides the observation that the various regimes and economic interests are not responsibly conserving these resources for the greater good (however nebulous that may be). Life itself (before we even label it a natural resource) is already an active zone of economic production, engineering, banking, commodification, and exchange (Palsson 2016:4). The definition, mapping, laws, and social relationships which name and frame resources in Myanmar are of ongoing heuristic, cultural, economic, and inevitably political concern.

With this problematic in mind, in this Special Issue of The Journal of Burma Studies (JBS) we have gathered together an interdisciplinary set of research articles surrounding questions of what nature is and what its resources might be. With the four authors’ varied focus on historical and contemporary Myanmar, this set of papers offers challenging new vistas for the exploration and interrogation of how resources and the environment have been approached and brokered by local and transnational actors. Read the special issue introduction free here.

AAAS Virtual Book Fair

We are pleased to participate in the inaugural AAAS Virtual Book Fair (August 10–14, 2020) organized by the Association for Asian American Studies (AAAS) to highlight recent titles released by university presses, especially ones by AAAS members. With the cancellation of the in-person annual meeting, this virtual event fills the gap to celebrate the fine works published in Asian American and Pacific Islander studies. Here is a selection of our new and recent titles in the field:

Beyond Ethnicity: New Politics of Race in Hawai‘i
Edited by Camilla Fojas, Rudy P. Guevarra Jr., and Nitasha Tamar Sharma

L. Miwa’s diary, August 6, 1945

pages show diary written in Japanese characters
Two-page spread showing the entry for August 6, 1945, from Lawrence Fumio Miwa’s diary kept as a fourteen-year-old schoolboy in Hiroshima. [Japanese]

[English translation]
August 6, 1945 Up at 5:40 a.m. In bed at 9:00 p.m.
Assignment: Work at Maehata
Others: Prayed for my parents’ safety on learning of air raids on Hiroshima City. Gambare (Hang on), Hiroshima!

Air-raid alarms went off three times–at 9:00 p.m., after midnight and this morning. We witnessed B-29s (U.S. bombers) flying over our area as we were heading to Maehata. We instinctively shouted that we could shoot them down if we had a fighter. The anger within us filled the silence. “Let’s move on,” my comrade encouraged me. We walked and stopped frequently. According to the teacher, the enemy raided Hiroshima City with napalm bombs. However, Hiroshima will stand firm. Gambare! That is all I can say. All of us are worried they could see the results of our deep commitment to our work. “I’ll work as hard as I can,” I told myself. I swear I will work harder than ever to contribute toward increased production and to work as hard as my parents do. Anyway, I am concerned about my parents and I wrote them this morning. I hope the letter is delivered quickly. I further vowed to do my best so my parents would be reassured. Who is afraid of air raids? Just dig in and work!

[Note: The diary image appears as the background on the cover of Tadaima! I Am Home: A Transnational Family History by Tom Coffman (University of Hawai‘i Press, 2018).

New Journal Issues: Asian Theatre Journal, Cross-Currents, Journal of Korean Religions + More (June 2020)

Asian Theatre Journal 37-1

Asian Theatre Journal

The Field of Ramila, guest edited by Pamela Lothspeich

Volume 37, Issue 1 (2020)

This special issue is intended to briefly introduce the field of Ramlila, as a performance practice and as an idea. It is designed to give a taste of its geographic range and a sample of its multiple and diverse manifestations in India and the Indian diaspora. The Introduction briefly discusses the literary sources of Ramlila, its history, chief styles, and emerging trends. It also includes a synopsis of the story of Ram in Ramlila. Following this, a translation of three scenes from the Lav-Kush Ramlila in Old Delhi, with a critical introduction, sheds light on the mounting politicization of Ramlila by the Hindu Right. Two articles, one on Nautanki and one on Ramayan Gaan, illustrate that Ramlila is a form of theatre very much in dialogue with other forms of popular performance in the Hindi belt and along its linguistic borders, narratively, aesthetically, and ideologically. A review-essay of two documentaries and an interview with an expert on Kumaoni Ramlila further demonstrate the diversity of Ramayan-themed performance, despite the continued homogenization and commercialization of Ramlila. An article on a distinctive Ramlila in Trinidad and another in the United States (North Carolina) speak to the global reach of Ramlila, and its important role in “homemaking.” Finally, a report on a festival to commemorate a Ramayan-themed dance drama (wayang wong) at Prambanan recalls the Ramayan’s early journey from South to Southeast Asia.

Cross-Currents 9-1 CC Cover

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review

Global Island: Taiwan and the World, guest edited by James Lin, Graeme Read, and Peter Thilly

Volume 9, Issue 1 (2020)

In October 2018, the University of Washington Taiwan Studies Program hosted a workshop featuring a wide range of diverse humanities and social science research centered on the theme of “Global Island: Taiwan and the World.” The impetus for the workshop was to reimagine Taiwan outside the traditional confines of comparative and cross-Strait studies that have predominated in academic research on Taiwan. The articles that emerged from the workshop and have been assembled in this issue instead understand Taiwan as an actor embedded within global networks and spaces or, alternatively, as a unique site or producer of globally circulating knowledge. At a time when Taiwan studies is gaining increased visibility, exploring Taiwan’s linkages to the greater world showcases underexplored facets of Taiwan and the potential contributions of this field to interdisciplinary studies of society and culture.

Journal of Korean Religions JKR 11-1

Journal of Korean Religions

Yogācāra Studies of Silla, guest edited by A. Charles Muller

Volume 11, Issue 1 (2020)

One area in particular wherein interest in Korea has been relatively strong since earlier days is that of Silla-period Buddhist scholarship. Within Silla scholasticism, one of the most influential areas has been that of Yogācāra and related studies—which in Korea, tends to include much of what is usually categorized as the Buddhological strain of Tathāgatagarbha. Silla-period scholars were in close contact with their Chinese colleagues on the mainland, reading and writing the same Sinitic script. They had ready access to newly composed texts and translations soon after their production in Chang’an and elsewhere, and they were intimately aware of all of the most pertinent doctrinal discussions and debates occurring in the Tang capital and its surroundings, and were deeply engaged in all of these. One of Silla’s own sons, Wŏnch’ŭk 圓測 (613–696), was situated in the Tang capital and was working directly with Xuanzang and his team, although sometimes not seeing eye-to-eye with other of Xuanzang’s followers, such as Kuiji 窺基 (632–682). Other Silla scholars, such as Chajang 慈藏 (sixth-seventh centuries) and Ŭisang 義湘 (625–702) (just to name a few of the better-known figures) went to Tang for serious and sustained study, making their own mark, and bringing their new knowledge home to the peninsula.

Journal of World History

Volume 31, Issue 2 (2020)

Research articles for this issue include:

  • The Prestige Makers: Greek Slave Women in Ancient India by Kathryn A. Hain
  • The Medieval Origin of the Factory or the Institutional Foundations of Overseas Trade: Toward a Model for Global Comparison by Louis Sicking
  • Between the Red Sea Slave Trade and the Goa Inquisition: The Odyssey of Gabriel, a Sixteenth-Century Ethiopian Jew by Matteo Salvadore
  • Greatness is Like a Rubbish Hole: Social Frictions and Global Connections in the Early-Swahili World by David Bresnahan
  • How Civic Virtue Became Republican Honor: Revolution and Republicanism in Venezuela, 1800–1840 by Reuben Zahler
  • Decolonizing Global History? A Latin American Perspective (Open Access) by Gabriela De Lima Grecco, Sven Schuster

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From
Perspectives on the Global Past Series


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