News and Events

China Review International Vol. 24 No. 4 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 4 of China Review International begins with three feature reviews and 19 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

Featured Reviews:

Changing Clothes in Chang’an (reviewing BuYun Chen, Empire of Style: Silk and Fashion in Tang China)  Reviewed by Shao-yun Yang

The Local and Global Politics of Contemporary Art (reviewing Frank Vigneron, Hong Kong Soft Power: Art Practices in the Special Administrative Region, 2005–2014)
Reviewed by John Zarobell

The Monkey King, 4-EVER (reviewing Hongmei Sun, Transforming Monkey: Adaptation and Representation of a Chinese Epic)
Reviewed by Dore J. Levy

Reviews:

Barry Allen, Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition
Reviewed by Aaron B. Creller

Nadine Amsler, Jesuits & Matriarchs: Domestic Worship in Early Modern China
Reviewed by Anthony E. Clark

Kent E. Calder, Super Continent: The Logic of Eurasian Integration
Reviewed by Mark Henderson

Xiaomei Chen, Staging Chinese Revolution: Theater, Film, and the Afterlives of Propaganda
Reviewed by Emily Wilcox

Michael Dillon, Lesser Dragons: Minority Peoples of China
Reviewed by Kaitlin Banfill

Prasenjit Duara and Elizabeth J. Perry, editors, Beyond Regimes: China and India Compared
Reviewed by Sreemati Chakrabarti

Jia-Chen Fu, The Other Milk: Reinventing Soy in Republican China
Reviewed by Veronica, Sau-Wa Mak

Robyn R. Iredale and Fei Guo, editors, Handbook of Chinese Migration: Identity and Wellbeing
Reviewed by C. Cindy Fan

Paul Kendall, The Sounds of Social Space: Branding, Built Environment, and Leisure in Urban China 
Reviewed by Han Li

Elisabeth Koll, Railroads and the Transformation of China
Reviewed by Rudi Volti

Norman A. Kutcher, Eunuch and Emperor in the Great Age of Qing Rule
Reviewed by Carl Déry

Wendy Larson, Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture
Reviewed by Kun Qian

Hsiao-t’i Li, Opera, Society, and Politics in Modern China
Reviewed by Jonathan P. J. Stock

Michał Lubina, Russia and China: A Political Marriage of Convenience–Stable and Successful
Reviewed by Paul Bolt

Klaus Mühlhahn, Making China Modern: From the Great Qing to Xi Jinping
Reviewed by Thoralf Klein

Sarah Schneewind, Shrines to Living Men in the Ming Political Cosmos
Reviewed by Ying Zhang

Hsueh-man Shen, Authentic Replicas: Buddhist Art in Medieval China
Reviewed by Xiao Yang

Edward Vickers and Zeng Xiaodong, Education and Society in Post-Mao China
Reviewed by Yun You

Yan Xu, The Soldier Image and State-Building in Modern China, 1924–1945
Reviewed by Nicolas Schillinger

Works Received

China Review International
Vol. 24. No. 4
2017

Biography Vol. 42 No. 3 (2019)

Figure 3 from “Call My Name: Using Biographical Storytelling to Reconceptualize the History of African Americans at Clemson University” by Rhondda Robinson Thomas: Inventory of Slaves, Fort Hill Farm Deed, 15 May 1854, Thomas Green Clemson Papers, Special Collections and Archives, Clemson University Libraries, box 1, folder 25.

ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE:

Introduction to Biographic Mediation: On the Uses of Personal Disclosure in Bureaucracy and Politics
Ebony Coletu, guest editor

Biographic Mediation and the Formerly Incarcerated: How Dissembling and Disclosure Counter the Extended Consequences of Criminal Convictions
Michelle Jones

A Complaint Biography
Sara Ahmed

Lives on the Line: An Interview with Aly Wane
Aly Wane interviewed by Ebony Coletu

The Securitate File as a Record of Psuchegraphy
Cristina Plamadeala

“Has someone taken your passport?”: Everyday Surveillance of the Migrant Laborer as Trafficked Subject
Annie Isabel Fukushima

Guidelines for Squatting: Concerned Citizens of North Camden, 1978–1990
Mercy Romero

Frames of Witness: The Kavanaugh Hearings, Survivor Testimony, and #MeToo
Leigh Gilmore

Call My Name: Using Biographical Storytelling to Reconceptualize the History of African Americans at Clemson University
Rhondda Robinson Thomas

Mirror Memoirs: Amita Swadhin on Survivor Storytelling and the Mediation of Rape Culture
Amita Swadhin interviewed by Ebony Coletu

The Consumption of Adoption and Adoptees in American Middlebrow Culture
Kimberly McKee

(Un)Reasonable, (Un)Necessary, and (In)Appropriate: Biographic Mediation of Neurodivergence in Academic Accommodations
Aimée Morrison

About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

 

 

Biography:
An Interdisciplinary Quarterly
Vol. 42 No. 3
2019

Hawaiian Journal of History Vol. 53 (2019)

Figure 1 from the article Remembering the Committee of Safety: Identifying the Citizenship, Descent and Occupations of the Men Who Overthrew the Monarchy by Ralph Thomas Kam and Jeffrey K. Lyons: A collage of the Committee of Safety January 1893. Henry E. Cooper, Chairman, (center) Clockwise, starting with the picture directly above the top of the diamond around Cooper: Henry Waterhouse, Lorrin A. Thurston, Ed Suhr, F.W. McChesney, John Emmeluth, Wm. R. Castle, Wm. O. Smith, J.A. McCandless, C. Bolte, W.C. Wilder, Andrew Brown and Theodore F. Lansing. Courtesy Hawaiʻi Archives [PP-28-7-003]

Articles:

The Case of Leslie Satoru Nakashima and His Breaking News Dispatch
Crystal Uchino

Remembering the Committee of Safety: Identifying the Citizenship, Descent and Occupations of the Men Who Overthrew the Monarchy
Ralph Thomas Kam and Jeffrey K. Lyons

The Establishment of Kilauea Military Camp: The Early Years 1898–1921
Jadelyn J. Moniz Nakamura and Geoffrey Mowrer

An Extraordinary Troop: The Boy Scouts Program at Kalaupapa
Fred E. Woods and Anita Manning

“Doing Our Duty”: Dancing, Dating, and the Limits of Tolerance in Wartime Hawaiʻi
Lori Pierce

Notes and Queries: 

“Ea Mai Hawaiʻinuiākea”: Marking the Global Diplomatic Presence of the Nineteenth-century Hawaiian Kingdom
Ronald Williams, Jr.

An Inquiry Into Kawaiahaʻo Seminary’s “Melting Pot” Photograph Published in The National Geographic Magazine in 1924
Tomiko Conner

The Kamehameha III Statue in Thomas Square
John Clark

Father Damien’s First Photograph at Kalaupapa Reveal Its Secrets
Ruben Boon and Patrik Jaspers

Book Reviews:

Hawaiian By Birth: Missionary Children, Bicultural Identity, and U.S. Colonialism in the Pacific
Reviewed by Lori Pierce

Light in the Queen’s Garden: Ida May Pope, Pioneer for Hawaiʻi’s Daughters, 1862–1914
Reviewed by Derek Taira

Return to Kahiki: Native Hawaiians in Oceania
Reviewed by Lorenz Gonschor

Kalaupapa Place Names: Waikolu to Nihoa
Reviewed by Christine Thomas

Sharks upon the Land: Colonialism, Indigenous Health, and Culture in Hawai’i, 1778–1855
Reviewed by Juliet Nebolon

Hawaiiana in 2018: A Bibliography of Titles of Historical Interest
Jodie Mattos

 

About the Journal

Published annually since 1967, the Journal presents original articles on the history of Hawai‘i, Polynesia, and the Pacific area as well as book reviews and an annual bibliography of publications related to Island history. The Hawaiian Historical Society publishes books in both English and Hawaiian, and HJH is a leading peer-reviewed journal that focuses on the history of Native Hawaiians and all other cultures in Hawai‘i during both pre- and post-contact times.

Subscriptions

Individuals may receive the journal by joining the Hawaiian Historical Society.

Submissions

The HJH welcomes scholarly submissions from all writers. See the Guidelines for Contributors.

You can also read more about this issue at the Hawaiian Historical Society’s website.

The Hawaiian Journal of History
Vol. 53
2019

12 Bundles of Christmas Sale 2019!

University of Hawai‘i Press is pleased to offer discounts on the following bundles of books from December 9th through December 24th!

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers Vol. 81 (2019)

Figure 4 from Paul F. Starr's "Plus ça change: Vignettes of Landscape Change" this issue—A wonderfully enhanced postcard captures leaky flumes in winter along the Truckee River. Geographer Matt Fockler wrote a 2007 ground-breaking master’s thesis at the University of Nevada on distribution systems attached to the Truckee River of California and Nevada (an origin at Lake Tahoe that concludes at Pyramid Lake). Lurid colors aside, waters provide recreation for summer boaters and a drinking water supply for hundreds of thousands of residents in Reno-Sparks. (Collection of the author, n.d.)
Figure 4 from Paul F. Starr’s “Plus ça change: Vignettes of Landscape Change” this issue—A wonderfully enhanced postcard captures leaky flumes in winter along the Truckee River. Geographer Matt Fockler wrote a 2007 ground-breaking master’s thesis at the University of Nevada on distribution systems attached to the Truckee River of California and Nevada (an origin at Lake Tahoe that concludes at Pyramid Lake). Lurid colors aside, waters provide recreation for summer boaters and a drinking water supply for hundreds of thousands of residents in Reno-Sparks. (Collection of the author, n.d.)

This year’s Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers includes the following scholarly works:

ARTICLES

Plus ça change: Vignettes of Landscape Change
by Paul F. Starrs

Because Rivers Are Life
by Sean J. Pries

Encounters with Confluences
by Ray Sumner

The Drought Is Over—Now What?
by Martin McCarthy, Suzanne Dallman

Achieving Water Sustainability through Coordination among Stakeholders: Vertical and Horizontal Governance Interactions in Arizona’s Central Highlands
by Deborah O. Ayodele-Olajire, Bob Bolin

A Spatial Analysis of Officer-Involved Shootings in Los Angeles
by Debbie Ma, Steven Graves, Jonathan Alvarado

A Comparison of Water Indices and Binary Thresholding Techniques for Water Surface Delineation for St. Croix Watershed Area
by Sanchayeeta Adhikari

Station-Based Climate Model Evaluation Comparison for Joshua Tree National Park, California, and Tucson, Arizona, with New Surface Air Temperature Data
by Ryan Heintzman

The Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers
Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers Vol. 81 (2019)

Journal of World History, Vol 30, No. 4 (2019)

This issue of the Journal of World History includes the following scholarly articles:

Economic Conquest of the Pacific: Revisiting the Tacna-Arica Plebiscite of 1925–1926
By Robert Niebuhr

This article surveys the Tacna-Arica plebiscite period (1925–1926) by taking into consideration the regional history alongside increasingly important global trends. While the contest between Peru and Chile highlights the battle between primordial versus constructed nationalism, it also places contested notions of nationalism alongside a growing spirit of internationalism. Woodrow Wilson’s proclamations at the end of World War I, especially his focus on self-determination and justice, directly inspired leaders in Bolivia, Chile, and Peru to seek a finalization of the Tacna-Arica dispute. Despite the hope that Wilsonian principals would win the day, traditional concepts such as economics and power proved victorious, which underscored the fragility of humanitarian rights and justice between the world wars. This investigation into how global trends influenced Tacna-Arica are placed alongside contemporary comparisons of plebiscites held in Europe between the world wars.

Igniting Change in Colonial Indonesia: Soemarsono’s Contestation of Colonial Hegemony in a Global Context
By Arnout H. C. Van Der Meer

In 1913, Javanese public prosecutor Soemarsono clashed with his colonial superior by refusing him traditional deference, donning European clothes, and actively engaging in nationalist associations. These actions culminated in an overhaul of the appearance of Dutch hegemony and a widespread emancipatory social change in colonial Indonesia. This history is best appreciated from a world historical perspective that includes both long-term historical processes that shaped Soemarsono’s world, such as the Indianization of Indonesia, the spread of Islam, and Western colonialism, as well as contemporary global developments, such as the rise of Japan, the Chinese revolution, Islamic Modernism, and the appeal of democratic principles. Soemarsono’s awareness of these global perspectives enabled him to successfully ignite change in colonial Indonesia. His story provides an approach that allows historians to emphasize how individual agents make history in a world historical context.

Playing Politics with the Youth: Aga Khan III’s Use of Colonial Education and the Ismaili Girl Guide Movement in British Colonial Tanganyika, 1920–1940
By Alia Paroo

This article assesses how Ismaili Muslim leaders in British colonial Tanganyika utilized Guiding and Victorian schooling philosophies in an attempt to negotiate for advancement within the colonial structure. Aga Khan III understood the role that followers were expected to play in the “Great Game” of imperialism and attempted to use cooperation to broker for increased opportunities within the system of subjugation. This article sets out to analyze then how the Aga Khan and his representative leaders in British colonial Tanganyika used youth programs to operate within these liminal spaces, in turn revealing the ongoing negotiations that took place between colonizer and the colonized.

Bombs in Beijing and Delhi: The Global Spread of Bomb-Making Technology and the Revolutionary Terrorism in Modern China and India
By Yin Cao

In early 1910, Chinese revolutionaries attempted to assassinate the regent of the Qing Empire by planting a bomb near his residence in Beijing. Two years later, an explosive of a similar type was used by Indian revolutionaries in their attempted assassination of the viceroy of the British Raj in Delhi. Investigating these two seemingly unconnected events demonstrates that radical political activists in both China and India acquired their explosive-making skills from diasporic Russian revolutionaries in Japan and France respectively after the failure of the 1905 Russian Revolution. Although both assassination attempts failed and have largely been marginalized in the national narratives in both countries, the transnational connections between Chinese and Indian revolutionaries in their pursuit of learning the portable dynamite technology overseas sheds light on how modern Chinese and Indian history can be analyzed in a single framework. Staging Chinese and Indian revolutionary terrorism in the context of the cross-boundary circulation of dissident ideologies and technologies in the early twentieth century reexamines marginalized aspects of China’s 1911 Revolution and the Indian Nationalist Revolution that can be written as connected transnational history.

Putting Words in the Emperor’s Mouth: A Genealogy of Colonial Potential in the Study of Qing Chinese Diaspora
By Nicholas McGee

The Qing emperor Qianlong’s supposed response to the 1740 massacre of roughly 8,000 Chinese civilians in Dutch Batavia represents perhaps the most famous quotation by any Chinese emperor concerning the diaspora. Tracing a genealogy of the quote, this article contends that it was in fact invented and deployed by eighteenth and nineteenth century British authors in service of a discourse that framed Chinese migrants as ideal potential colonial recruits and the Qing state as secretly desiring their recruitment. Only in the twentieth century was it taken up by Chinese authors, who mourned the Qing’s failure to capitalize on this colonial potential in their efforts to construct a diaspora-centered national identity. Legacies of this translingual discourse endure, especially in the narrative that the Qing state forbade its subjects from going overseas, and disowned those who did so, until forced to allow Chinese indentured labor recruitment following the Second Opium War (1856–1860).

Plus book reviews.

Journal of World History 30-4
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)

Journal of Korean Religions Vol. 10, No. 2 (2019)

A Comparative Study of Sudden and Gradual in Sŏn 禪 and the New Testament
by Bernard Senécal S.J.

Chinul’s Empty and Quiescent Spiritual Knowing (kongjŏk yŏngji 空寂靈知) and Ignatius of Loyola’s Indifference and Discernment of Spirits
by Yon-dahm Kwon

The Re-emergence of Chosŏn Buddhism in the 17th Century: A Question of Institutional Development and Legitimation
by Sung-Eun T. Kim

Kyŏnghŏ Sŏngu and the Existential Dimensions of Modern Korean Buddhism
by Jin Y. Park

The Real Face of Korean Buddhism under Japanese Colonial Rule
by Kue-jin Song

Four Pillars and Four Diviners: Fate, Fluidity, and Invention in Horoscopic Saju Divination in Contemporary South Korea
by David J. Kim

Religious and Philosophical Traditions of Korea by Kevin N. Cawley (review)
by David W. Kim

The Journal of Korean Religions is the only English-language academic journal dedicated to the study of Korean religions. The publication aims to stimulate interest in and research on Korean religions across a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Launched in 2010 by the Institute for the Study of Religion at Sogang University in Korea, the journal is peer-reviewed and published twice yearly, in April and October.

Journal of Korean Religions Vol. 10, No. 2 (2019)

Access Now: Trending Journal Articles, Fall 2019

Contemporary Pacific 31-2

Philosophy East and West 69-3

Buddhist-Christian Studies 37

Individuals can now access many of our journal articles and issues previously only available to those with institutional access, thanks to a new program on the Project MUSE platform.

Since spring, readers have purchased nearly 100 full issues or articles from our archive, including The Journal of Daoist Studies, Biography, China Review International, Korean Studies, and Rapa Nui Journal.

Recently downloaded articles include:


Find journal issues and articles for sale on Project MUSE.

Romaniello returns to the Journal of World History

The University of Hawai‘i Press welcomes Matthew P. Romaniello back to the Journal of World History. Romaniello, a Russian and world historian at Weber State University, was first appointed as associate editor by founding editor Jerry Bentley in 2011. Following Bentley’s retirement, Romaniello produced volumes 23 through 25 and served as the Center for World History director.

Romaniello now takes over the helm from editor-in-chief Fabio López Lázaro. Professor López Lázaro, from the University of Hawai‘i, edited the journal from 2014 to 2019 along with co-editors Kerry Ward from Rice University and Cátia Antunes from Leiden University. Michele Louro from Salem State University served as managing editor and Wensheng Wang from the University of Hawai‘i as Book Reviews Coordinating Editor.

The Journal of World History, which recently celebrated its 30th anniversary, has long been the leading research journal in the field of world history, often featuring approaches to economic and world systems. Looking ahead, Romaniello sees the opportunity for the Journal of World History to further include the scholarship of other comparative and transnational subfields of history, including medical, environmental, and social and gender history.

Prior to Weber, Romaniello spent eleven years at the University of Hawai‘i, where he was promoted to full professor. He has published two monographs,  Enterprising Empires: Russia and Britain in Eighteenth-Century Eurasia (Cambridge University Press, 2019) and The Elusive Empire: Kazan and the Creation of Russia, 1552-1671 (University of Wisconsin Press, 2012), and is currently finishing a monograph on a study of health and illness in the Russian Empire, examining state regulation of colonial bodies. He is also the co-editor of four volumes of collected essays, with two more currently in production, and twenty articles on a variety of topics, but particularly in commodities history and material culture, the history of medicine and knowledge exchanges, and colonialism. In addition to his previous work with the Journal of World History, Romaniello has served as editor at Sibirica: Interdisciplinary Journal of Siberia Studies


The Journal of World History publishes research into historical questions requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. It is devoted to the study of phenomena that transcend the boundaries of single states, regions, or cultures, such as large-scale population movements, long-distance trade, cross-cultural technology transfers, and the transnational spread of ideas. Individual subscription is by membership in the World History Association.

Matthew P. Romaniello, editor of the Journal of World History
Matthew P. Romaniello, editor of the Journal of World History
Journal of World History 30-4

UH Press releases 90 classic books as open-access titles

University of Hawai‘i Press celebrated International Open Access Week (October 21–27) with the announcement of Hawai‘i Open Books—a collection of ninety newly digitized and freely available academic titles from UH Press’s backlist, many of which have been out of print or unavailable for years.

Titles include seminal works of scholarship in Hawaiian, Pacific, and Asian studies, as well as grammars, dictionaries, and other resources for languages from throughout the Asia-Pacific region. The works are accessible from various online platforms, including UH’s institutional repository ScholarSpace, the newly created Hawai‘i Open Books website, JSTOR, and Project MUSE.

Hawai‘i Open Books is the culmination of over two years of work funded by two generous grants totaling $190,000 from the Humanities Open Book program, a joint initiative of the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

“We are extremely excited about the renewed availability of so many classic UH Press books,” said UH Press interim director Joel Cosseboom. “The Press has long been recognized as a leading publisher in Hawaiian, Pacific, and Asian studies, and this collection of titles represents a significant resource to the university community and students and scholars around the globe.”

Trond Knutsen, principal investigator and digital publishing manager, added, “Open access is becoming an increasingly prominent feature of academic publishing, and we’re thankful to the Mellon Foundation for allowing us to explore this model so thoroughly.”

To revive the ninety books, UH Press’s digital-publishing team, including digital specialist Noah Perales-Estoesta, worked closely with faculty and library staff to identify the books best suited for republication. The team subsequently contacted authors, editors, and others to clear rights, collaborated with the university library on scanning, and liaised with ebook converters to create digital reproductions of the original print copies. Among the titles revived are:

·       Over thirty grammars, dictionaries, and other language resources for Fijian, Tagalog, Carolinian, Cebuano, Marshallese, Bikol, and other languages of the Asia-Pacific region.

·       Ancient Tahitian Society by Douglas L. Oliver: A three-volume ethnography of Tahiti, foundational to the anthropological study of Polynesia.

·       China’s Old Dwellings by Ronald G. Knapp: A heavily illustrated study of domestic architecture from throughout different periods in Chinese history.

·       Da Kine Talk: From Pidgin to Standard English in Hawaii by Elizabeth Ball: A detailed exploration of Hawai‘i’s unique relationship to the English language.

·       The Path of the Ocean: Traditional Poetry of Polynesia edited by Marjorie Sinclair: The first anthology of poetry from throughout Polynesia presented as literature rather than anthropology.

About University of Hawai‘i Press

From its modest beginnings in 1947, University of Hawai‘i Press has grown from a regional operation into one of the most respected publishers of Asian, Hawaiian, and Pacific studies titles in the world. Located in historic Mānoa Valley on the island of O‘ahu, UH Press publishes approximately 70 new books and 40 new journal issues annually in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences. More than 3,000 UH Press titles are currently in print, and a growing selection of content is being made available online, including open-access publications and digital archives. Additionally, the Press markets and distributes a range of titles from University of Hawai‘i departments, and scholarly and educational institutions around the world.

About the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation endeavors to strengthen, promote, and, where necessary, defend the contributions of the humanities and the arts to human flourishing and to the well-being of diverse and democratic societies.  To this end, the Foundation supports exemplary institutions of higher education and culture as they renew and provide access to an invaluable heritage of ambitious, path-breaking work.

Asian Perspectives Vol. 58, No. 2 (2019)

From Yang Qian's "Conflict and Identity: The Ritual of Wall Construction in Early China," this issue of Asian Perspectives. Fig. 1: Character for yi on front of oracle bone No. 7854 (Heji 1978:1192, photo used by permission from Zhonghua Book Company).
From Yang Qian’s “Conflict and Identity: The Ritual of Wall Construction in Early China,” this issue of Asian Perspectives. Fig. 1: Character for yi on front of oracle bone No. 7854 (Heji 1978:1192, photo used by permission from Zhonghua Book Company).

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific is the leading peer-reviewed archaeological journal devoted to the prehistory of Asia and the Pacific region. The new issue features the following scholarly articles:

Articles

A Bioarchaeological Study of Trauma at Late Iron Age to Protohistoric Non Ban Jak, Northeast Thailand
by Lucille T. Pedersen, Kate M. Domett, Nigel J. Chang, Siân E. Halcrow, Hallie R. Buckley, Charles F. W. Higham, Dougald J. W. O’reilly, Louise Shewan

Austronesian Expansions and the Role of Mainland New Guinea: A New Perspective
by Glenn R. Summerhayes

Ritual, Landscapes of Exchange, and the Domestication of Canarium: A Seram Case Study
by Roy Ellen

Conflict and Identity: The Ritual of Wall Construction in Early China
by Yang Qian

Last-Millennium Settlement on Yadua Island, Fiji: Insights into Conflict and Climate Change
by Piérick C. M. Martin, Patrick D. Nunn, Niko Tokainavatu, Frank Thomas, Javier Leon, Neil Tindale

Household Ethnoarchaeology and Social Action in a Megalith-Building Society in West Sumba, Indonesia
by Ron L. Adams

On Craft Production and the Settlement Pattern of the Jinsha Site Cluster on the Chengdu Plain
by Kuei-chen Lin

Book Reviews

World Heritage Craze in China: Universal Discourse, National Culture, and Local Memory by Haiming Yan (review)
by Magnus Fiskesjö

Archaeology and Buddhism in South Asia by Himanshu Prabha Ray (review)
by Lars Fogelin

Yungang: Art, History, Archaeology, Liturgy by Joy Lidu Yi (review)
by Denise Patry Leidy

Khao Sam Kaeo: An Early Port-City between the Indian Ocean and the South China Sea ed. by Bérénice Bellina (review)
by Michèle H. S. Demandt

Women in Ancient China by Bret Hinsch (review)
by Sheri A. Lullo

Asian Perspectives 58-2
Asian Perspectives Vol. 58, No. 2 (2019)