News and Events

Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 2 (April 2019)

FIGURE 6 from Robert Perger’s article A New Species of Johngarthia from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae): Johngarthia oceanica sp. nov., Socorro I., body color in life (specimens not collected): (A) male (photograph by Jorge Ramón Reyes Olvera, Mexico); (B and C) males (photographs by Vince Scheidt, San Diego, U.S.A.); (D) female (photograph by Omar de Jesus Franco, Mexico); (E and F) gender unknown (photographs by Hartmut S. Walter, University of California, Los Angeles).

This second issue of volume 73 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article Seasonality and Prevalence of Pollen Collected from Hawaiian Nectarivorous Birds by Kathryn N. van Dyk, Kristina L. Paxton, Patrick J. Hart, and Even H. Paxton.

Preview volume 73 number 2 below and find a list of all 9 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Sympatric Invasive Rats Show Different Diets in a Tropical Rainforest of an Island Biodiversity Hotspot
Duron Quiterie, Bourguet Edouard, Thibault Martin, Scussel Sarah, Gouyet Raphaël, Méheut Mathilde, and Vidal Eric

Using DNA to Identify the Source of Invasive Mongooses, Herpestes auropunctatus (Carnivora: Herpestidae) Captured on Kaua‘i, Hawaiian Islands
Darren J. Wostenberg, Matthew W. Hopken, Aaron B. Shiels, and Antoinette J. Piaggio

Migration by the Japanese Wood Pigeon (Columba janthina) Across the Islands of East Asia: Direct Tracking by Satellite Telemetry
Soon Kyoo Choi, Yung Chul Park, Jong Chul Park, Gi Chang Bing, and Woo Yuel Kim

Environmental Correlates for Seed Desiccation Sensitivity of New Caledonian Plant Species
Octavie Toublanc-Lambault, Robin Pouteau, Marion Davezies, Manon Marron, Anthony Pain, Bruno Fogliani, and Philippe Marmey

Macrobenthic Biomass and Secondary Production in the Northern East China Sea and the Relative Importance of Environmental Variables
Qingxi Han, and Xiaobo Wang

Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Occurrence and Interactions with Marine Mammals Off Peru
Juan Pablo Testino, Andrea Petit, Belén Acorta, Aldo S. Pacheco, Sebastian Silva, Joanna Alfaro-Shigueto, David Sarmiento, Javier Quiñones, Alberto More Eche, Eduardo Motta, Sara Fernandez, Elizabeth Campbell, Geyby Carrillo, Maurice Epstein, Miguel Llapapasca, and Adriana González-Pestana

Apparent Low Densities of Small Cetaceans in Okinawa may be due to Uncontrolled Local Hunting
Thomas A. Jefferson, and Michael F. Richlen

A New Species of Johngarthia  from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae)
Robert Perger


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Pacific Science
Vol. 73 No. 2
April 2019

Merrie Monarch Sale 2019

The Merrie Monarch Festival is a week-long cultural festival that takes place annually in Hilo, Hawaii during the week after Easter. It honors King David Kalākaua, who was called the “Merrie Monarch” for his patronage of the arts and is credited with restoring many Hawaiian cultural traditions during his reign, including the hula. Many hālau hula (schools), including some from the U.S. mainland and some international performers, attend the festival each year to participate in exhibitions and competitions. The festival has received worldwide attention and is considered the most prestigious of all hula contests.

In honor of this festival, the University of Hawaii Press will be offering a 30% discount on the following titles:

Asian Theatre Journal, Vol. 36, No. 1 (2019)

An image from Red Poem, featured in Jae Kyoung Kim’s “2017 Black Tent Theatre Project in Gwangwamun Square: Staging Tragic Memory and Building Solidarity through Public Theatre,” this issue.

In addition to performance and book reviews, the spring issue of Asian Theatre Journal includes articles on ritual and religious theatre, contemporary theatre and the state, and the performance of identity.

Ras and Affect in Ramlila (and the Radheshyam Ramayan)
By Pamela Lothspeich

Rescuing Mulian’s Mother in the Xi Era: Reviving Ritual Xiqu in Contemporary Fujian
By Josh Stenberg

Desiring Spectacular Discipline: Aspiration, Fraternal Anxiety, and the Allure of Restraint in ‘s Dōjōji
By Reginald Jackson

Chinese Entertainment Industry, the Case of Folk Errenzhuan
By Haili Ma

Theatre on the Move: Sakurai Daizhou’s Tent Theatre in East Asia
By I-Yi Hsieh

2017 Black Tent Theatre Project in Gwanghwamun Square: Staging Tragic Memory and Building Solidarity through Public Theatre
By Jae Kyoung Kim

Mystic Lear and Playful Hamlet: The Critical Cultural Dramaturgy in the Iranian Appropriations of Shakespearean Tragedies
By Amin Azimi and Marjan Moosavi

Uncle Tom’s Cabin in China: Ouyang Yuqian’s Regret of a Black Slave and the Tactics of Impersonating Race, Gender, and Class
By Megan Ammirati

Trapping the Heron: The Curious Case of Sagi School Kyōgen
By Alex Rogals

Local Community Ritual Theatre in Guangxi, South China
By Jian Xie

Masks and Costumes of Purulia Chhau
By Deepsikha Chatterjee

 

Asian Theatre Journal 36-1 cover
Asian Theatre Journal, Vol. 36, No. 1 (2019)

Journal of World History, Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)

This issue of the Journal of World History includes the following scholarly articles:

Oil Boom: Agriculture, Chemistry, and the Rise of Global Plant Fat Industries, ca. 1850–1920
By Jonathan Robins

Fats extracted from plants and animals are an important and understudied part of the industrialization of the “global North” in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Demand for soap, lamp oil, candles, lubricants, and other products drove European and American efforts to extract fats from animals across the continents and oceans, and by the late nineteenth century a proportion of this fat entered the North’s food supply. Simultaneously, demand for edible and industrial fats appeared to be outstripping supplies. Plants emerged as an important source of fat in this period, as new technologies allowed plant fats to be transformed into more versatile and edible products. The transition to plant fats represented an important move down the food chain for Northern consumers, allowing for the efficient use of existing resources, as well as contributing to the ongoing extraction of raw materials from the tropics.

Spectacular Power in the Early Han and Roman Empires
By Rebecca Robinson

During their long reigns, Emperor Wu of the Western Han and Augustus of Rome respectively performed two spectacular ceremonies, the feng and shan sacrifices and the ludi saeculares. The performance of these ceremonies took place during a larger process of reforms to each state’s religious institutions and marked the culmination of these reforms. While there is no direct connection between the two rulers or their respective ceremonies, some of the salient characteristics can be compared. In both cases, the rulers claimed to revive ancient ceremonies, but incorporated new narratives of rulership into their performance. These spectacular ceremonies, performed in front of audiences, demonstrated the exalted position of the ruler, as well as the acceptance of the elites to the new order.

Beyond ‘Tribal Breakout’: Afghans in the History of Empire, ca. 1747–1818
By Jagjeet Lally

The narrative of ‘Tribal Breakout’ has allowed world historians to avoid narratives of the ‘decline of the East’ and the ‘rise of the West’—but only by casting Afghans as tribals whose incursions destabilized the Asian empires. This essay seeks to retrieve the constructive agency of Afghans during the so-called ‘colonial transition’ in South Asia. Their seizure of plunder was disbursed via the patronage of commercial groups, while careful economic management even led to economic expansion in a manner typical of some eighteenth-century states, thereby lubricating long-distance trade between south and central Asia. This was part of a process of Afghan state formation rooted in developments within the Mughal Empire, was typical of a process of imperial expansion evident in the histories of other empires, such as the Mughals, Ottomans, and Qing, and, thus, yields much to scholars interested in the patterns and processes of early-modern empires in general.

Plus book reviews.

Journal of World History 29-3 cover
Journal of World History, Volume 29, No. 3 (2018)

Arbor Day Sale 2019

To celebrate Arbor Day, the University of Hawaii Press is offering 30% off the following titles from April 25-26:

Trees of Hawaii,
by Angela Kay Kepler

Trees of Hawaii, by Angela Kay Kepler

Surrounded by a vast array of colorful trees and shrubs, many residents and visitors with scant knowledge of botany are unable to find out more about “that tree with the small, pink flowers” or “the one on the corner with the pale green leaves.” Kepler comes to our rescue with this easy-to-use guide and brings alive the kaleidoscopic flora that beautifies Hawai‘i.

 

 

 

 

 


Loulu: THe Hawaiian Palm,
by Donald R. Hodel

Loulu: The Hawaiian Palm, by Donald R. Hodel

Forewords by Paul R. Weissich and William S. Merwin
The only native palms in Hawai‘i, loulu are among the Islands’ most distinctive plants. Several of the 24 recognized species are rare and endangered and all make handsome and appropriate ornamentals to adorn gardens and landscapes with their dramatic foliage, colorful flower clusters, and conspicuous fruits. In this volume, Donald Hodel shares his expertise on loulu, having traveled extensively throughout Hawai‘i to research and photograph nearly all the species in their native habitat. In the course of his work, he described and named three loulu that were new to science.

Each of the 24 species is treated in detail and this book is handsomely illustrated with more than 200 color photographs that clearly show leaves, flower stalks, fruits, and habitat. Chapters on loulu history, botany, ecology, conservation, uses, and propagation and culture provide essential background information for readers, whatever their level of interest or expertise. In the appendices, they will find a concise summary of loulu, lists of species by island, and an illustrated compendium of exotic, naturalized palms of Hawai‘i and relatives of loulu found throughout the South Pacific.

As interest in growing and conserving native Hawaiian plants surges while their numbers and habitat continue to decline, Loulu: The Hawaiian Palm will be valued as one of the most comprehensive and thoroughly illustrated treatments of these exceptional plants.

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal, Vol. 4#1, 2019

This issue includes the following articles

Gender Differences in Predictors of Physical Activity among Korean College Students based on the Health Promotion Model
Jeong-Ja Seo and Yeongmi Ha

Air quality and employee hygiene-related behavior in a post anesthesia care unit in Thailand
Somphorn Kampan

A review of Technology-based Interventions in Improving Type-2 Diabetes Management in Chinese Americans
Wen-wen Li and Jenny Zhong

Association between neck circumference and coronary heart disease: a meta-analysis
Guang-Ran Yang, Timothy D. Dye, Martin Zand, Thomas T. Fogg, Shen-Yuan Yuan, Jin-Kui Yang, and Dongmei Li

Comparison of knowledge about smoking and passive smoking and urinary cotinine levels in pregnant women and their partners in Mongolia: A cross-sectional study
Naoko Hikita, Megumi Haruna, Masayo Matsuzaki, Mei Sasagawa, Minoru Murata, Ariana Yura, and Otgontogoo Oidovsuren

Association between alcohol consumption and body mass index in university students
Uraiporn Booranasuksakul, Alongkote Singhato, Narisa Rueangsri, and Piyapong Prasertsri

 

 


About the Journal

Asian Pacific Island Nursing Journal: Official Journal of the Asian American / Pacific Islander Nurses Association features research papers, empirical and theoretical articles, editorials, abstracts of recent dissertations, and conference summaries that relate to nursing care written by scientists and researchers in nursing and the social sciences, such as:

  • Clinical and Developmental Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Social Work, Public Health, Education, Genetics, Pharmacology, Infectious Disease, Oncology, Cardiovascular Disease, Pulmonary Function and Disease, Dermatology, Wound Healing, Immunology, Anesthesiology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Hematology, Neonatology, Nephrology, Pathology, Physiology, Nutrition, Pain Management, Sleep Disturbances, and Mental Health.

 

Indexed in Scopus, the DOAJ and EBSCO

Campus Center Pop-Up Book Sale

April 16, 10:00am – 2:00pm
Manoa Campus, Center Courtyard (near front steps)

The University of Hawaii Press is bringing books to you! Save up to 90% on select titles! We’ll also have specially priced $1.00 & $5.00 bargain books and discounts on new releases! Come see our great selection of titles on Hawaii, including Hiking guides, bird books, art, history , literature, journals and so much more! You can also pick up a 20% off coupon for ALL UH PRESS BOOKS online when you sign up for our mailing list at the event.

Event Sponsor

University of Hawaii Press, Manoa Campus

More Information

UH Press, (808) 956-8255, uhpbooks@hawaii.edu,
https://uhpress.hawaii.edu

Pioneers of Modern Japanese Poetry wins translation prize

Pioneers of Modern Japanese Poetry, Translated by Takako Lento

The Cornell East Asia Series publication Pioneers of Modern Japanese Poetry (Takako Lento, 2019) has won the 2018-2019 Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission prize for the translation of Japanese literature, which is coordinated by the Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture at Columbia University. An award ceremony was held Friday, March 29, 2019 at the C.V. Starr East Asian Library at Columbia University in New York City.

The Japan-United States Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature was established in 1979, and the award has been administered by the Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture at Columbia University since the Center was founded in 1986. The Prize is awarded annually to outstanding works of translation into English from the Japanese language.

Purchase this book and receive 30% off by entering coupon code PIONEERS30 at checkout. Offer expires 4/30/2019.

See Pioneers of Modern Japanese Poetry

Three International Journals Celebrate 30th Anniversary

(HONOLULU, Hawai‘i)  The University of Hawai‘i Press celebrates the 30th Anniversary for three influential university-based journals—The Contemporary Pacific, Journal of World History, and Mānoa—in collaboration with the Center for Pacific Island Studies, Department of History, and the Department of English at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

In the past three decades, these journals have attracted a growing, global audience for more than 6,300 articles read in over 170 countries. The Journal of World History served as a pioneer in the field of world history and continues to publish quality peer-reviewed articles and special issues quarterly. Research published in The Contemporary Pacific has shaped an entire field of Pacific Studies and has often demonstrated foresight and long-lasting relevance. Indeed, the journal kicked off its first issue in 1989 with an article on the potential impacts of climate change in the Pacific. Also among the journal’s most cited pieces are features published in its political reviews section which document the local and regional politics of Pacific Islands states. Mānoa brings to light new translations of international literature, highlighting the work of both emerging and established translators and authors, including Pulitzer Prize winners and Nobel laureates. In 2018 alone, works from the three journals garnered more than one-quarter million downloads.  

The journals were founded in 1989 in response to the university president’s call to expand the journals published by UH Press. “Since being awarded the modest, three-year start-up funding, these journals now annually reach tens of thousands of researchers, scholars, students, and the general public,” said Joel Cosseboom, Interim Press Director & Publisher.

A special celebration was held at College Hill on March 13, commemorating the 30th anniversary of their founding. Learn more about The Contemporary Pacific, Journal of World History, and Mānoa below and at www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals.

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs, edited by Alexander Mawyer

ISSN: 1043-898X  / E-ISSN: 1527-9464  Published twice a year.

Founding Editorial Team: Robert Kiste, Terence Wesley-Smith, David Hanlon, Brij Lal and Linley Chapman. Awarded Best New Journal (1990) from the Association of American Publishers. The journal editorial office is supported by the Center for Pacific Island Studies.

The journal covers a wide range of disciplines with the aim of providing comprehensive coverage of contemporary developments in the entire Pacific Islands region, including Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. It features refereed, readable articles that examine social, economic, political, ecological, and cultural topics, along with political reviews, book and media reviews, resource reviews, and a dialogue section with interviews and short essays. Each issue highlights the work of a Pacific Islander artist.

The Journal of World History: Official Journal of the World History Association, with editor-in-chief Fabio López Lázaro

ISSN: 1045-6007 / E-ISSN: 1527-8050  Published quarterly.

Founding Editor, Jerry Bentley with Imre Bard as Book Review Editor. Awarded Best New Journal (1990) from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals. The journal editorial office is supported by the Department of History.

JWH publishes research into historical questions requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. It is devoted to the study of phenomena that transcend the boundaries of single states, regions, or cultures, such as large-scale population movements, long-distance trade, cross-cultural technology transfers, and the transnational spread of ideas. Individual subscription is by membership in the World History Association.

Mānoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, edited by Frank Stewart

ISSN: 1045-7909 / E-ISSN: 1527-943X Published twice a year.

Founding Editors, Frank Stewart and Robert Shapard.  Works in MĀNOA have been cited for excellence by the editors of such anthologies as Best American Short Stories, Best American Poetry, Best American Essays, Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards, and Pushcart Prize. The journal editorial office is supported by the Department of English.

Mānoa is a unique, award-winning literary journal that includes American and international fiction, poetry, artwork, and essays of current cultural or literary interest. An outstanding feature of each issue is original translations of contemporary work from Asian and Pacific nations, selected for each issue by a special guest editor. Beautifully produced, Mānoa presents traditional alongside contemporary writings from the entire Pacific Rim, one of the world’s most dynamic literary regions.

University of Hawai‘i Press

The University of Hawai‘i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. It strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai‘i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications, the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

UH Press is a member of the Association of University Presses and the Hawai‘i Book Publishers Association. The Press has also partnered with museums and associations to bring new or out-of-print titles into circulation, and offers publishing services for authors and partnering organizations.

News Release Date: March 19, 2019
Media contact: Pamela Wilson, Journals Manager
Pwilson6@hawaii.edu 808-956-6790

Biography Vol. 41 No 4 (Fall 2018)


Figure 12 from Rasul A. Mowatt’s essay Black Lives As Snuff: The Silent Complicity in Viewing Black Death: Ebony G. Patterson’s “Invisible Presence: Bling Memories” performance on April 27, 2014 in Kingston, Jamaica. Photograph: Monique Gilpin and Philip Rhoden. Reproduction courtesy of the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago.

FROM THE GUEST CO-EDITORS’ INTRODUCTION:

This special issue is pro-Black. The pro-Blackness expressed by this tremendous collection of thinkers, healers, artists, and activists is one anchored in truth-telling. From a wide array of perspectives, what’s within these pages is an unapologetic centering of the critical matter of Black life. By critical matter, we mean the fleshy materiality of the Black body, as we encounter it in life, death, connections, and struggle. But in invoking a notion of criticality, we are also attuned to the ways that different communities of Black people have experienced this most recent onslaught of anti-Black state violence. We care here about feelings, impressions, relationships, forms of mourning and remembrance, epiphanies had in struggle—all of the “stuff” that regimes of racial terror are studiously interested in not being and/or disavowing. To be pro-Black is to care about all of these elements that help to make up any Black life and every Black life. Finally, to turn our attention to Black life as a critical matter is to remind us of the urgency of attending to Black lives; it is a reminder of the critical condition in which Black people continually find themselves, always gasping for breath, always figuring out how to survive, always forced to wrestle joy from the death-dealing clutches of white supremacy. Critical matters get top billing on political agendas. Our agenda in this special issue is, therefore, Black people and our ideas about what it looks like for our lives to matter.

-Brittney Cooper and Treva B. Lindsey

ARTICLES FROM THIS ISSUE:

Introduction to M4BL and the Critical Matter of Black Lives
by Brittney Cooper and Treva B. Lindsey

Movement for Black Love: The Building of Critical Communities through the Relational Geography of Movement Spaces
by Tabitha Jamie Mary Chester

Choreographies of the Ongoing: Episodes of Black Life, Events of Black Lives
by Rhaisa Kameela Williams

Black Lives as Snuff: The Silent Complicity in Viewing Black Death
by Rasul A. Mowatt

R.I.P. Shirts or Shirts of the Movement: Reading the Death Paraphernalia of Black Lives
by Robin Brooks

Black Lives Abroad: Encounters of Diasporic Solidarity in Brazil
by Gillian Maris Jones

Visible Black Motherhood Is a Revolution 
by Danielle Fuentes Morgan

Mama’s Gon’ Buy You a Mocking Bird: Why #BlackMothersStillMatter: A Short Genealogy of Black Mothers’ Maternal Activism and Politicized Care
by Kaila Adia Story

Restoring Optimal Black Mental Health and Reversing Intergenerational Trauma in an Era of Black Lives Matter
by Jameta Nicole Barlow

#BlackHealingMatters in the Time of #BlackLivesMatter
by Kai M. Green, Je Naé Taylor, Pascale Ifé Williams, and Christopher Roberts

From Ferguson to Palestine: Reimagining Transnational Solidarity Through Difference
by Marc Lamont Hill

Ferguson: An Identity Politics Liberation Manifesto
by Tef Poe

Contributors


About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.


Biography
Volume 41, Number 4
Fall 2018

China Review International Vol. 24 No. 1 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 4 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 19 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEW

Print Culture and Media in Late Imperial and Early Republican China
Reviewed by Yu Zhang

REVIEWS

Queer Comrades: Gay Identity and Tongzhi Activism in Postsocialist China by Hongwei Bao
Reviewed by Charlie Yi Zhang

Western Han: A Yangzhou Storyteller’s Script transed. by Vibeke Børdahl and Liangyan Ge
Reviewed by Jing Zhang

The Great Flowing River: A Memoir of China, from Manchuria to Taiwan by Chi Pang-yuan
Reviewed by Miya Xie

Staging Revolution: Artistry and Aesthetics in Model Beijing Opera during the Cultural Revolution by Xing Fan
Reviewed by Yawen Ludden

What Is China? Territory, Ethnicity, Culture, and History by Ge Zhaoguang
Reviewed by Agnieszka Joniak-Lüthi

Women and the Periodical Press in China’s Long Twentieth Century: A Space of Their Own? eds. by Michel Hockx, Joan Judge, and Barbara Mittler
Reviewed by Yan Xu

The CIA and Third Force Movements in China during the Early Cold War: The Great American Dream by Roger B. Jeans
Reviewed by Yafeng Xia

Gender, Power, and Talent: The Journey of Daoist Priestesses in Tang China by Jinhua Jia
Reviewed by Lucas Wolf

Haunted by Chaos: China’s Grand Strategy from Mao Zedong to Xi Jinping by Sulmaan Wasif Khan
Reviewed by Niv Horesh

The Spatiality of Emotion in Early Modern China: From Dreamscapes to Theatricality by Ling Hon Lam
Reviewed by Curie Virág

Comics Art in China by John A. Lent and Xu Ying
Reviewed by Hannes Rall

The Edge of the Island by Chen Li
Reviewed by Norbert Francis

Body, Society, and Nation: The Creation of Public Health and Urban Culture in Shanghaiby Chieko Nakajima
Reviewed by Ka-che Yip

The Taoism of Clarified Tenuity: Content and Intention by Florian C. Reiter
Reviewed by Jan De Meyer

Shanghai Sacred: The Religious Landscape of a Global City by Benoît Vermander, Liz Hingley, and Liang Zhang
Reviewed by Anning Hu

Violence and Order on the Chengdu Plain: The Story of a Secret Brotherhood in Rural China, 1939–1949 by Di Wang
Reviewed by Kelly Hammond

A New Literary History of Modern China ed. by David Der-wei Wang
Reviewed by Flair Donglai Shi

Returning Home with Glory: Chinese Villagers around the Pacific, 1849 to 1949 by Michael Williams
Reviewed by Gregor Benton

China in the Mix: Cinema, Sound, and Popular Culture in the Age of Globalization by Ying Xiao
Reviewed by Panpan Yang

Works Received


About the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.

China Review International
Volume 24 Number 1
(2017)

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 31 no. 1 (2019)

Contemporary Pacific 31-1 featured art. Pigs in the Yard, by Kalisolaite ‘Uhila, 2011.
Featured Art, this issue: Pigs in the Yard, by Kalisolaite ‘Uhila, 2011. 
Performance, Aotea Square Performance Arcade, Auckland.
In 2011, ‘Uhila lived with a piglet called Colonist for eight days in a shipping container in central Auckland’s Aotea Square, in full view of passersby and much to the amusement of audiences who have followed his work ever since. Pigs are valued commodities and symbols of status and prestige in numerous Pacific Island cultures, including in Tonga, where they can be gifted and eaten on special occasions and wander for much of the time in relative freedom. Evaluated in the wake of 2010 Tongan constitutional reforms, Pigs in the Yard also heeds a call for greater transparency and ongoing debate, if balancing Tongan values and systems of authority with inherited British legal conventions is to improve conditions for Tongan citizens. Photo courtesy of the artist and Michael Let

This issue of The Contemporary Pacific features the art of Kalisolaite ‘Uhila, Alan Howard’s resource “Creating an Archive for Rotuma: A Personal Account,” political reviews covering Micronesia and Polynesia, and the following articles and reviews.

Indigenous Well-Being and Development: Connections to Large-Scale Mining and Tourism in the Pacific
by Emma Richardson, Emma Hughes, Sharon McLennan, and Litea Meo-Sewabu

Indigenous Masculinities and the “Refined Politics” of Alcohol and Racialization in West Papua
by Jenny Munro

Tannese Chiefs, State Structures, and Global Connections in Vanuatu
by Marc Tabani

Epidemic Suicide in the Context of Modernizing Social Change in Oceania: A Critical Review and Assessment
by Edward D Lowe

Project Banaba (review)
by Mitiana Arbon

Holo Moana: Generations of Voyaging (review)
by Kelema Lee Moses

Anote’s Ark by Matthieu Rytz (review)
by David Lipset

Out of State (review)
by David Lipset

Island Soldier by Nathan Fitch (review)
by Emelihter Kihleng, Clement Yow Mulalap, Jacki Leota-Mua, and Vicente M Diaz


About the Journal

The Contemporary Pacific provides a publication venue for interdisciplinary work in Pacific studies with the aim of providing informed discussion of contemporary issues in the Pacific Islands region.

Submissions

Submissions must be original works not previously published and not under consideration or scheduled for publication by another publisher. Manuscripts should be 8,000 to 10,000 words, or no more than 40 double-spaced pages, including references. Find submission guidelines here.

The Contemporary Pacific
Volume 31, Issue 1