News and Events

Pacific Science 75#3, 2021

The most recent issue of Pacific Science is now available on Project MUSE and BioOne.

cover imageTable of Contents

Pollination Biology of an Endemic Hawaiian Tree, Erythrina sandwicensis (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae), in a Novel Ecosystem
By Emily F. Grave, Timothy I. Kroessig, and Tamara Ticktin

Bi-Hemispheric Distribution and Ecology of the Commensal Amphipod Leucothoe nagatai Ishimaru, 1985 (Crustacea: Leucothoidae)
By James Darwin Thomas, Donald B. Cadien, and Kristine N. White

A Century of Wake Fish Surveys: Comprehensive Annotated Checklist of the Fishes of Wake Atoll
By D. Paul Brown

Evaluation of the Humphead Wrasse, Cheilinus undulatus, in Shallow Water Habitats in Saipan Lagoon, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
By Michael S. Trianni, John E. Gourley, and Scott R. Vogt

Nest Architecture of an Endangered Hawaiian Yellow-Faced Bee, Hylaeus anthracinus (Hymenoptera: Colletidae) and Potential Nest-Site Competition from Three Introduced Solitary Bees
By Jason R. Graham, Joshua W. Campbell, Sheldon Plentovich, and Cynthia B. A. King

Fly on the Wall: Comparing Arthropod Communities Between Islands With and Without House Mice (Mus musculus)
By Wieteke A. Holthuijzen, Susan L. Durham, Elizabeth N. Flint, Jonathan H. Plissner, Kaylee J. Rosenberger, Coral A. Wolf, and Holly P. Jones

Cetaceans of the Northern Bismarck Sea, Papua New Guinea
By Cara Miller and Vagi Rei

New Faunal Records from A World Heritage Site in Danger: Rennell Island, Solomon Islands
By Tyrone H. Lavery, Lucas H. DeCicco, Jonathan Q. Richmond, Ikuo G. Tigulu, Michael J. Andersen, David Boseto, and Robert G. Moyle

Event-Based Stable Isotope Analysis of Precipitation Along a High Resolution Transect on the South Face of O’ahu, Hawai’i
By Honour Booth, Nicole Lautze, Diamond Tachera, and Daniel Dores

Association Affairs: Pacific Science Association

 

For more information on Pacific Science please visit the journal homepage.

Journal of World History, Vol 32#3

Special Issue: Development in World History – Development as World History
Guest Editor: Iris Borowy

Table of Contents

Introduction by Iris Borowy 
The introduction to this issue is free to read online!

Children in the Development Debate: The Role of UNICEF from 1947 to the First UN Development Decade 
by Angela Villani

Socialist Internationalism, World Capitalism, and the Global South: Soviet Foreign Economic Policy and India in Times of Cold War and Decolonization, 1950s–1960s
by Andreas Hilger

The Middle Zone: The 1964 UN Conference on Trade and Development and the Australian Responsecover image
by Nicholas Ferns

From Bullets to Bricks: Chinese Foreign Aid to Guyana During the Mao-Era, 1972-1976
by Jared Ward

Human Excreta: Hazardous Waste or Valuable Resource? Shifting Views of Modernity
by Iris Borowy

Book Reviews

Escape from Rome: The Failure of Empire and the Road to Prosperity by Walter Scheidel
Reviewed by Benjamin Reilly

Lost Maps of the Caliphs: Drawing the World in Eleventh-Century Cairo by Yossef Rapoport and Emilie Savage-Smith
Reviewed by Pinar Emiralioğlu

Indian Migration and Empire: A Colonial Genealogy of the Modern State by Radhika Mongia, and: Singapore, Chinese Migration and the Making of the British Empire, 1819–67 by Stan Neal
Reviewed by Jamie Banks

Contested Territory: Dien Bien Phu and the Making of Northwest Vietnam by Christian C. Lentz
Reviewed by Matthew Masur

 

The Journal of World History publishes research into historical questions requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. It is devoted to the study of phenomena that transcend the boundaries of single states, regions, or cultures, such as large-scale population movements, long-distance trade, cross-cultural technology transfers, and the transnational spread of ideas. Individual subscription is by membership in the World History Association.

For information on how to submit your manuscript or to subscribe, please visit the journal homepage.

Celebrating Buwan ng Wikang Pambansa (Philippines National Language Month)


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Hawaiʻi Conservation Conference 2021

 

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Pacific Science, Vol. 75#2, 2021

Special issue dedicated to Dr. Isabella Abbott 
Guest editor: Celia Smith


Isabella Kauakea Yau Yung Aiona Abbott: Contributions to a Celebration of the Centennial of her Birth
By Rosie Alegado, Cindy Hunter, Celia Smith

Biodiversity of Hawaiian Peyssonneliales (Rhodophyta). 1. Two New Species in the Genus Ramicrusta from Lehua Island
By Alison R. Sherwood, Monica O. Paiano, Rachael M. Wade, Feresa C. Cabrera, Heather L. Spalding, Randall K. Kosaki

Caulerpa bikinensis (Chlorophyta) Preference for the Mesophotic Depths of Pacific Atolls
By Roy T. Tsuda

Introduced Mangroves Along the Coast of Moloka‘i, Hawai‘i may Represent Novel Habitats for Megafaunal Communities
By Bryan A. Nakahara, Amanda W. J. Demopoulos, Yoshimi M. Rii, Rosanna A. Alegado, Kauaoa M. S. Fraiola, Craig R. Smith

Examining the UV-Absorbing Properties of Scaevola taccada (Goodeniaceae) and its Potential Use as a Sunscreen
By Keanu Rochette-Yu Tsuen, Claire Lager, Michael C. Ross, Mary Hagedorn

Ethelia hawaiiensis (Etheliaceae, Rhodophyta), a New Mesophotic Marine Alga from Manawai (Pearl and Hermes Atoll), Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, Hawai‘i
By Alison R. Sherwood, Monica O. Paiano, Feresa P. Cabrera, Heather L. Spalding, Brian B. Hauk, Randall K. Kosaki

Molecular Systematics of the Native Seagrass, Ruppia cf. maritima (Ruppiaceae, Alismatales), on Hawai‘i Island
By Brandie A. Colwell, Ronald P. Kittle III, Renee L. Corpuz, Karla J. McDermid

Cryptic Cryptogam Revealed: Hypnea corona (Gigartinales: Cystocloniaceae), A New Red Algal Species Described From the Hypnea cornuta Complex
By John M. Huisman, Roberta D’Archino, Wendy Nelson, Sung Min Boo, Antonella Petrocelli

Reduction in Cover of Two Introduced Invasive Macroalgae by Herbivores on Coral Reefs of Kāne‘ohe Bay, Hawai‘i
By John Stimson, Scott T. Larned

For more information about Pacific Science, the Official Journal of the Pacific Science Association, please visit the journal homepage.

Philosophy East and West, 71#3

This special issue of the journal is now available online with a freely available introduction.
 
Wisdom?cpver {EW

Guest Editors: Michael Hampe and Kai Marchal

Table Of Contents

Wisdom: Introduction to Special Issue
Michael Hampe, Kai Marchal
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0039

The Art of Dying is the Art of Living: Rationality in Theravada Buddhism
Susan E. Babbitt
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0040

The Wisdom of Insight
Ondřej Beran
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0041

Wisdom, Deep Deference, and the Problem of Autonomy: Engaging with Being Cheng
Philippe Brunozzi
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0042

Philosophers, Mystics, and Other Sages: Wisdom in Early Islamic Thought
Nadja Germann
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0043

Wisdom in Individual, Political, and Cultural Transformations: Brecht, Nietzsche, and the Limits of Academic Philosophy
Michael Hampe, Karsten Schoellner
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0044

Wisdom: A Murdochian Perspective
Kai Marchal
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0045

Who Is a Wise Person? Zhuangzi and Epistemological Discussions of Wisdom
Shane Ryan, Karyn Lai
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0046

Birds of Wisdom
Mario Wenning
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0047

Mulla Sadra’s Practical Philosophy: A Return to Platonic Phronesis
Sahar Kavandi, Maryam Ahmadi, Ahmad Hosseini
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0048

Putting Ruist and Hegelian Social Thought in Dialogue
Andrew James Komasinski
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0049

Ming 名 in the Laozi Daodejing 老子道德經: Interpretations and Translations of the Opening Verse
Yumi Suzuki
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0050

An Islamic Account of Reformed Epistemology
Jamie B. Turner
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0051

Discussion

Wilhelm Halbfass and the Purposes of Cross-Cultural Dialogue
Dimitry Shevchenko
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0052

After Comparative Philosophy: A Discussion of “Wilhelm Halbfass and the Purposes of Cross-Cultural Dialogue,” by Dimitry Shevchenko
Purushottama Bilimoria
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0053

Online Book Reviews

The Non-Existence of the Real World by Jan Westerhoff (review)
Ricki Bliss
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0054

Ratnakīrti’s Proof of Exclusion by Patrick McAllister (review)
Joel Feldman
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0055

Human Being, Bodily Being: Phenomenology from Classical India by Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad (review)
Sonam Kachru
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0056

Classical Indian Philosophy: A History of Philosophy Without Any Gaps by Peter Adamson and Jonardon Ganeri (review)
Joerg Tuske
DOI: 10.1353/pew.2021.0057

30% OFF Select World History Titles

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Offer ends September 30, 2021

Find a digital-only special issue, “Health, Globally,” of the Journal of World History FREE HERE.


Continue reading “30% OFF Select World History Titles”

Journal of World History Special Issue: Health, Globally – Free!

Next week, the World History Association hosts its annual meeting virtually, from July 5 to 9, on the theme “Health, Globally.” The Journal of World History offers an accompanying special collection, free on the Project MUSE platform through summer. Attendees can also receive 30% off select world history titles.

The “Health, Globally” special issue draws together some of the journal’s most frequently cited and downloaded material alongside some less well-known contributions. Together, these articles present a multivalent approach to the study of global health. Some are driven by new scientific breakthroughs that allow previously held assumptions to be challenged and even rewritten. Some consider the history of health to be a debate about culture or the method of communicating knowledge. Some take a global approach to consider issues that touched every corner of the world, and others begin with specific local circumstances and consider how these episodes inform greater debates in world history. 

This special issue provides accessible resources for scholars and teachers worldwide, pulled together by editor Matthew P. Romaniello, who discusses the issue below.  

Matthew P. Romaniello, editor of the Journal of World History
Matthew P. Romaniello, editor of the Journal of World History

University of Hawai‘i Press: Tell us how this special issue came together.

Matthew P. Romaniello: The World History Association’s President, Laura Mitchell, let me know that the annual conference was going to be organized around the theme of “Health, Globally,” and it just seemed like a perfect fit for a special collection. Pandemics have been a recurring threat throughout history, making this theme not only reflective of the ongoing pandemic but also one with deep roots in the journal’s past.

UHP: Why is this issue important now?

MPR: I’m just going to quote from the WHA’s original call for papers for the conference this summer because it’s so apt: “The urgency of global public health crises, economic hardship, famine and food insecurity, political instability, ongoing violence, and environmental disasters demand immediate attention and invite measured analysis over long time horizons—a move along temporal scales at which world historian excel.”

UHP: How do you hope people will use this issue?

MPR: We are extremely fortunate that the University of Hawai‘i Press has once again worked with Project MUSE to make the special collection available open access until the end of September. My hope is that these articles will be brought into world history classes this fall to have students critically engage with the impact of health crises throughout history. We all know students are grappling with how their lives have changed in the past year, and these case studies can speak meaningfully to the way past societies have responded to, and recovered from, pandemics.

UHP: In addition to this year’s World History Association meeting, what resources would you point your colleagues to?

MPR: There’s a tremendous wealth of resources available to study responses to past pandemics, both other scholarly works and an enormous body of primary sources. Harvard University made available some of its resources through “Contagion: Historical Views of Diseases and Epidemics,” which is a curated collection for the classroom. Many scholars are probably familiar with the open access collection available through PubMed, but the National Library of Medicine (NLM) has rich digital resources available on its website. Between the NLM and the Wellcome Library in London, there’s just an enormous variety of primary sources available. I also recommend browsing the resources identified at the American Association for the History of Medicine, particularly the Syllabus for “A History of Anti-Black Racism in Medicine,” which lays out a plan for integrating two of the defining issues of the past year—structural racism and health—in one class.

UHP: Finally, a year in, how has the pandemic affected your own research and teaching?

MPR: It’s been a long year. I’ve learned a lot about how to approach virtual and online teaching, but I’m mostly relieved to be back in the classroom this fall. And I’ve enjoyed the time I’ve had to focus on both editing and writing, but I’m optimistic about a return to the archive next year. There’s no doubt we have incredible access to online materials compared to only a few years ago, but there’s nothing quite like being in the archive and making an unexpected discovery!

Join Matthew P. Romaniello for a roundtable discussion with special issue authors Gregory D. Smithers, Nükhet Varlik, and Stephanie Anne Boyle on July 8 at the World History Association meeting.

Recently Published Journal Issues

Journal of Korean Religions

Journal of Korean Religions

Volume 12, Issue 1 (2021)

The new issue includes the following articles:

Going Global: The Transformation of the Korean Catholic Church
Denis WS Kim

Japanese Buddhist Modernism and the Thought of Sŏn Master Toeong Seongcheol (1912–1993)
Cho Myungje and Bernard Senécal S.J. (SeoMyeonggweon)

Calm Water is a Mirror: Neo-Confucian Meditation in the Chosŏn
Dynasty 
Guy S. Shababo

A Buddhist Critique of Neo-Confucianismin Seventeenth-Century Chosŏn Korea
Kim Jong Wook

Book Review

Gender Politics at Home and Abroad: Protestant Modernity in Colonial-Era Korea, by Hyaeweol Choi
Reviewed by Choi Hee An

 

cover image issue 58

U.S. -Japan Women’s Journal

Issue 58 (2020)

Includes the following articles:

Plotting Illness: Cancer in Ogino Anna’s “Nue” and
Yamauchi Reinan’s The Spirit of Cancer
Amanda C. Seaman

Nue.
by Ogino Anna. Translated by Amanda C. Seaman

Performativity of Gender in Speech: Life Experiences
of Japanese Trans Women
Hideko Abe

Natsume Fusanosuke, Panel Configurations in Sho¯jo
(Girls’) Manga.
by Natsume Fusanosuke. Translated and Introduced by
Jon Holt and Teppei Fukuda

Pacific Science

Pacific Science

Volume 75, Issue 1 (2021)

Includes the following articles:

The Historical Ecology of Game Species Introductions in Hawai’i
Deidre J. Duffy, Christopher A. Lepczyk

A Terrestrial Vertebrate Palaeontological Reconnaissance of Lord Howe Island, Australia
Julian P. Hume, Ian Hutton, Greg Middleton, Jacqueline M.T. Nguyen, John Wylie

Light-Level Geolocators Reveal That White-Throated Needletails (Hirundapus caudacutus) Follow a Figure-Eight Migration Route Between Japan and Australia
Noriyuki M. Yamaguchi, Sayaka Mori, Hiroshi Yonekawa, Daichi Waga, Hiroyoshi Higuchi

Fine-Scale Distribution, Abundance, and Foraging Behavior of Salvin’s, Buller’s, and Chatham Albatrosses in the Northern Humboldt Upwelling System
Javier Quiñones, Ana Alegre, Cynthia Romero, Massiel Manrique, Luis Vásquez

Influence of Light and Substrate Conditions on Regeneration of Native Tree Saplings in the Hawaiian Lowland Wet Forest
Susanne Kandert, Holger Kreft, Nicole DiManno, Amanda Uowolo, Susan Cordell, Rebecca Ostertag

Potential Distribution and Environmental Niche of the Black Corals Antipathes galapagensis and Myriopathes panamensis in the Eastern Tropical Pacific
Antonella Lavorato, Silvia Stranges, Hector Reyes Bonilla

Investigating the Diel Occurrence of Odontocetes Around the Maui Nui Region Using Passive Acoustic Techniques
Marian Howe, Marc O. Lammers

Limnological Characterization of Three Tropical Crater Lakes in the Archipelago of Samoa (Lanoto’o, Olomaga, Mataulano)
Robert Schabetsberger, Christian D. Jersabek, Zlatko Levkov, Bianca Ehrenfellner, Laulu Fialelei Enoka, Seumalo Afele Faiilagi

Association Affairs: Pacific Science Association

 

cover image vol. 54

Hawaiian Journal of History

Volume 54 (2020)

Includes the following articles:

The Lasting Significance of the Majors-Palakiko Case
Jonathan Y. Okamura

A Rock in the Park: The Key to a Remarkable Historical Tale
Hugh R. Montgomery

Ne Tentes aut Perfice: Early Hawaiian Diplomacy in the Southwestern Pacific and the Creation of Hawai‘i’s First Royal Order
Lorenz Gonschor

Reconnecting to Kawaiaha‘o Female Seminary: The Lives of the Students at the End of the Nineteenth Century
Deborah Day

Our Royal Guest: American Press Coverage of King Kalākaua’s Visit to the United States, 1874–1875
Douglas V. Askman

The Watchers: How Espionage Doomed the Counter-Revolution of 1895
Ralph Thomas Kam

Book Reviews

Aloha Rodeo: Three Hawaiian Cowboys, the World’s Greatest Rodeo, and a Hidden History of the American West by David Wolman and Julian Smith
Reviewed by Elyssa Ford

Unsustainable Empire: Alternative Histories of Hawai‘i Statehood by Dean Itsuji Saranillio
Reviewed by Sarah Miller-Davenport

American Sutra: A Story of Faith and Freedom in the Second World War by Duncan Ryūken Williams 
Reviewed by Kelli Y. Nakamura

Gateway State: Hawai‘i and the Cultural Transformation of American Empire by Sarah Miller-Davenport
Reviewed by JoAnna Poblete

Bibliography

Hawaiiana in 2019: A Bibliography of Titles of Historical Interest
Jodie Mattos

 

 

 

 

Virtual AAS2021 Annual Conference

Virtual AAS2021 We're Exhibiting badge

This week, March 21–26, the 2021 Association for Asian Studies (AAS) annual conference is taking place virtually. While most sessions require registration, there is also an open-access element to the conference, with plenary presentations accessible simply by signing up for a basic account. Be inspired by experiencing the opening ceremony and speech by AAS president Christine Yano (a University of Hawai‘i professor and UH Press author/series editor). The exhibit hall is also open to all—check out our virtual booth and explore its variety of offerings, including a conference discount and a jazzy video of our latest titles and books in series.

If you’re registered for the conference, there is much more to discover and absorb. For those who have a book proposal, please contact our acquisitions editors by email, after viewing this page that specifies their focus areas. As always, follow our Facebook and Twitter pages for our #AAS2021 posts. We look forward to the 2022 conference to be held (in-person, we hope) here in Honolulu!

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, Issues 30 and 31 Now Available

cover RJCS 30

Issue 30, 2018- Scholar, Poet, Educator: Festschrift Issue in Honor of Mizuta Noriko

“One of Noriko’s brilliant endeavors was to imagine, and then bring about, a truly unique new educational institution in Japan, namely Josai International University. On my first visit to Japan in 1987 for the Japanese publication of Women in Film Noir, Noriko mentioned that she hoped Josai University could build on available land near Tokyo Airport. But it was just a dream. Only a few years later, however, Josai International University was up and running, bringing life and energy to the Chiba area. The buildings were beautifully designed and organized, and a delight to be in. Despite already being Vice Chancellor of the long established Josai University Educational Corporation, Noriko became President of Josai International University from 1996 to 2009 (She then became Chancellor of Josai University Educational Corporation from 2004 to 2017). Her masterstroke was to make this new International University unique in combining degrees in Business Studies with an M.A. in Women’s Studies. This was a time when there were very few Women’s Studies degrees being offered in Japan, so Noriko was charting new ground, perhaps partly inspired by American feminist research. I was honored to be invited to teach the first courses at Josai on Women and Film. At first I thought this was to be just for the one year, 1994; however, to my surprise and delight, Noriko in fact had arranged for me to teach a course or two once a year for four consecutive years.”   Excerpt from, In Honor of Noriko Mizuta by E. Ann Kaplan

Issue 30 also includes:

In Her Footsteps: The Legacy of Professor Mizuta Noriko by Linda Flores

Mizuta Noriko by  Ueno Chizuko, James Garza

Mizuta Noriko: Biocritical Essay of a Literary Feminist and Global Scholar by Alisa Freedman

Mizuta Noriko: Selected Bibliography by Linda Galvane, Rebecca Corbett

Feminine Failure and the Modern Hero: Mad Women in Sylvia Plath’s The Bell Jar and Joan Didion’s Play It As It Lays by Mizuta Noriko

Natsume Sōseki on Poe  by Mizuta Noriko

Literature, Ideology and Women’s Happiness: The Autobiographical Novels of Miyamoto Yuriko by Mizuta Noriko

Women’s Self-Representation and Transformation of the Body: Kōno Taeko and Ogawa Yōko by Mizuta Noriko

Beyond Home And City: Poems By Ishigaki Rin And Shiraishi Kazuko by Mizuta Noriko and Eiji Sekine

The Desolate Self and Its Circular Search for The Absolute Other: Transgression and Dream in the Work of Takahashi Takako by Mizuta  Noriko and Alessandro Castellini

When Women Narrate the Self: Personal Narratives in Modern Women’s Literaturebby Mizuta Noriko and Nadeschda Bachem

The Dream of the Yamanba—An Overview by Mizuta Noriko and Luciana Sanga

The Girl Double: On the Shōjo as Archetype in Modern Women’s Self-Expression by Mizuta Noriko and James Garza

Urashimasō: Memory as Trauma and Recovery in Literature by Mizuta Noriko and Hannah Osborne

Aesthetics and the Archive: The Poetry of Mizuta Noriko by Jordan A. Y. Smith

Selected Poems by Mizuta Noriko by Jordan A. Y. Smith

Dear Kojien Dictionary: Tomorrow Girls Troop by Reiko Tomii

 

RJCS 31 cover

Issue 31, 2019- Photography of the Heisei Era (1989-2019): Memory and Transformation, Crises and Opportunities

“In this introductory essay, I frame and contextualize shifts in the practices of Japanese photography during the Heisei era, examining how new themes and changing subjects of self-presentation, the dramatic change in power relations, responsibility, and political valence, and a new assortment of artists, multiple new subjects, and iconographies appeared on the stage and rose to prominence. This text primarily focuses on a single aspect of the changes that took place in photography and video art during the Heisei period, not as an established corpus or a specific canon, but as a process that defines itself through the multiple changes of that era. My appraisal of this process centers on the relationship between the photographer and the photographed, highlighting problems of identity and representation, as they appear in the works that are discussed throughout this issue. In this context, the present essay emphasizes the crucial changes enacted by the growing participation of women photographers, who have contributed to the rise of imagery related to marginalized subjects and have taken on a prominent role in defining the terms of photographic practice, such as the acknowledgement of minority groups, an openness toward sexual and gender identities, and a new legitimization of traditionally domestic subjects, such as old age, family, motherhood, etc.”  Excerpt from the Introduction: Between the Viewfinder and the Lens—A Journey into the Performativity of Self-Presentation, Gender, Race, and Class in Heisei Photography (1989–2019)  by Ayelot Zohar

Also in issue 31:

Preface: A Difficult New Dawn by Frank Feltens

Introduction: Between the Viewfinder and the Lens—A Journey into the Performativity of Self-Presentation, Gender, Race, and Class in Heisei Photography (1989–2019) by Ayelet Zohar

Yoneda Tomoko by Lena Fritsch

Twice Infinity: Sugimoto Hiroshi’s Architecture Series by Jonathan M. Reynolds.

Ghost in the Shell: An After-Thought on Pierre Huygue’s Human Mask by Michio Hayashi

Watanabe Toshiya by Kakishima Takashi

The Predicament and the Reflexive Turn: Japanese Street Photography since 1990 by Yoshiaki Kai

Cardboard Houses and Miyamoto Ryūji’s Visualization of Alternative Urban Realities in Heisei Japan by Carrie Cushman

Kitano Ken by Ishida Katsuya

Sudo Ayano’s Portrait Photography: Artificially Modified Beauties and the Uncanny by Nava Astrachan

The Position of Ninoshima by Kuraishi Shino, Ellen Takata, Jason Beckman, and Mikiko Hirayama

Linking Disaster to Natural History, A Visit to Sasaoka Keiko’s Exhibition: Tanesashi, Ninoshima (Hachinohe City Museum of Art) by Kuraishi Shino and Daryl Maude

The Story of Two Women: Ishiuchi Miyako and Iwasaki Chihiro (Excerpts from a Conversation between Ishiuchi Miyako and Ueno Chizuko—On Mother’s and Hiroshima) by Tajima Miho, Ayelet Zohar, and Frank Feltens

Arai Takashi and Nagashima Yurie through the Historical Frame of “Japanese Photography” by Nakamura Fumiko, Mai Hayano, and Kevin Niehaus

Photography as Embalming: Yokota Daisuke’s Post-Production Process by Hoshino Futoshi

A Memorandum on the Photograph: Movement and Time in Blurs and Stills and Kanai Mieko and Hannah Osborne

The Story of The Inflated Man by Kanai Mieko and Hannah Osborne

Postwar Japanese Photography: A Selected Bibliography by Thomas F. O’Leary, Anat Icar-Shoham, Patricia Lenz, and Shir Yeffet

To subscribe to Review of Japanese Culture and Society, please visit the journal homepage.

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