News and Events

Buddhist-Christian Studies Vol. 39

From “The Souls of Animals in Christianity and Mahāyāna Buddhism” by Junhyoung Michael Shin: Fig. 8 Giotto, St. Francis preaching to Birds, 1297-99, Upper Church, San Francesco, Assisi.

From the Editors’ Introduction:

This issue continues to open up new questions in Buddhist-Christian Studies from a variety of approaches. We have included papers from the panels from our 2017 Society of Buddhist-Christian Studies’ panels held concurrently with the American Academy of Religion annual meeting on “Uses and Misuses of Anger in Buddhism and Christianity”  and “What Buddhism and Christians Can Learn from Muslims,”  as well as papers that were presented at other conferences such as the World Parliament of Religions held in Toronto in November 2018, and a symposium organized by Denison University in February 2019 on “Confronting Mara and Mammon: Buddhist-Christian Dialogue for Resistance and Spirituality.”  The themes of human suffering, resiliency, and resistance to structural forms of oppression run through all of these sections, as our authors seek new models for sustaining us in these challenging global times.

Articles from this Volume:

Stopping At Hell’s Gate
by Carolyn M. Jones Medine

The Wrathful Guru: Exploring the Vajrayana Understanding of Anger
by Lama Rod Owens

Anger Makes Us Ugly: Reflections from Pāli Buddhism
by Carol S. Anderson

The Wind Blows Gently and Fiercely: A Pentecostal Perspective on Love and Anger
by Joel D. Daniels

Holy Anger, Holy Wrath: The Role of Anger and the Emotions in Early Christian Spirituality and the Mahāyāna Buddhist Tradition
by Tomas Cattoi

Tending the Fire of Anger: A Feminist Defense of a Much Maligned Emotion
by Alice A. Keefe

Radicalization and Bold Mercy: Christian Theological Learning in Dialogue with the 2014 Open Letter
by John N. Sheveland

A Buddhist-Christian-Muslim Reflection on the Concepts of Mercy, Surrender, and Union
by Bahar Davary

The Small Engage the Powerful: An American Buddhist–Liberation Theology–Quaker Trialogue
by Sallie B. King

Resilience and Interdependence: Christian and Buddhist Views of Social Responsibility Following Natural Disasters
by Beverley Foulks McGuire

…plus 10 more articles, a News and Views section, and 6 Book Reviews.

About the Journal

Buddhist-Christian Studies is a scholarly journal published annually by University of Hawai‘i Press. It presents research papers, book reviews, and news items on Buddhism and Christianity, their interrelation, and comparative study based on historical materials and contemporary experience.

Subscriptions

Annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions are available here. Individual subscription is also available through membership in the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (SBCS).

Submissions

The materials selected for publication will be balanced between historical research and contemporary practice, and, where possible, they should employ analytical and theoretical tools and be set within the framework of our shared human history. More information is available at the journal’s website.

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 3

The new issue of Philosophy East and West features a special section, “Politics, Nature, and Society — The Actuality of North African Philosopher Ibn Khaldūn,” guest edited by Tamara Albertini, as well as a book discussion on Vrinda Dalmiya’s Caring to Know: Comparative Care Ethics, Feminist Epistemology, and the Mahābhārata, along with other articles and reviews.



Ibn Khaldūn: A Philosopher for Times of Crisis
Tamara Albertini

Political Power, the Maghreb Space, and the “Arab Spring”: A Reading through Ibn Khaldūn’s Looking Glass
Ridha Chennoufi

Beyond the Fourth Generation: Constituting a Muslim State in the Thought of Ibn Khaldūn and Khayr al-Dīn al-Tūnisī
Jeremy Kleidosty

The (Re-)Introduction of Ibn Khaldūn to Spain: A Journey Passing through Ortega y Gasset’s Work
Cynthia Scheopner

Ibn Khaldūn’s Notion of ‘Umrān: An Alternative Unit of Analysis for Contemporary Politics?
M. Akif Kayapınar

The Refutation of Astrology in Ibn Khaldūn’s Muqaddima: A Study of His Multileveled Reasoning Capability
Mehdi Saiden

Ibn Khaldūn and the Immanence of Judgment
Lenn E. Goodman

Ibn al-Haytham, from Place to Space: A Comparative Approach
Yomna T. Elkholy

The Suberogation Problem for Lei Zhong’s Confucian Virtue Theory of Supererogation
Tsung-Hsing Ho

Scriptural Injunctivism: Reading Yeshayahu Leibowitz in the Light of Mīmāṃsā Philosophy
Dimitry Shevchenko

Buddhist Philosophy of Mind: Nāgārjuna’s Critique of Mind-Body Dualism from His Rebirth Arguments
Sonam Thakchoe

The Endless Pursuit of Self-Perfection: A Hidden Dialogue between Mou Zongsan and F. H. Bradley
Roy Tseng

Book Discussion

Comparative Epistemology
Linda Martín Alcoff

Caring about Care
Eva Feder Kittay

The Nature of the Disposition to Care: Discursive and Pre-discursive Dimensions
Keya Maitra

The Importance of Being Modest
Nilanjan Das

Caring to Know: Response to Commentators
Vrinda Dalmiya

Comment and Discussion

When Science is in Defense of Value-Linked Facts
Donald J. Munro

The Plasticity of the Human and Inscribing History within Biology: A Response to Donald J. Munro
Sonya N. Özbey

Online Book Reviews

Tarō Naka, Music: Selected Poems trans. by Andrew Houwen and Chikako Nihei (review)
Ryan Johnson

The Philosophy of the Bhagavad Gītā: A Contemporary Introduction by Keya Maitra (review)
Malcolm Keating

The Mandala Sutra and Its English Translation: The New Dunhuang Museum Version Revised by Yang Zengwen (review)
Ma Lijuan

Absent Mother God of the West: A Kali Lover’s Journey into Christianity and Judaism by Neela Bhattacharya Saxena (review)
Swami Narasimhananda

Confucianism for the Contemporary World: Global Order, Politial Plurality, and Social Action ed. by Tze-ki Ton and Kristin Stapleton (review)
Bin Song

Read more in Volume 69

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 2 is also available on Project MUSE.

Philosophy East and West 69-3
Philosophy East and West
vol. 69, no. 3

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 31 no. 2 (2019)

Featured art, this issue: Opening the hangi. Te Wake unveiling. Matihetihe Marae. During the tangihanga for Ralph Hotere, by Natalie Robertson, 2013. Presented as part of a collection titled The Headlands Await Your Coming, this image evokes the practices of ahi kaa roa (keeping the home fires burning) and manaakitanga (offering hospitality to visitors) through the provision of food—practices that proclaim and sustain mana whenua, or intergenerational authority, pride, and tribal connections to land.
Featured art, this issue: Opening the hangi. Te Wake unveiling. Matihetihe Marae. During the tangihanga for Ralph Hotere, by Natalie Robertson, 2013. Presented as part of a collection titled The Headlands Await Your Coming, this image evokes the practices of ahi kaa roa (keeping the home fires burning) and manaakitanga (offering hospitality to visitors) through the provision of food—practices that proclaim and sustain mana whenua, or intergenerational authority, pride, and tribal connections to land.

This issue of The Contemporary Pacific features the art of Natalie Robertson, remembers mentor Robert (Bob) C. Kriste, and the following articles and reviews.

Articles

“More than a Music, It’s a Movement”: West Papua Decolonization Songs, Social Media, and the Remixing of Resistance
By Camellia Webb-Gannon, Michael Webb

Unsettling SpongeBob and the Legacies of Violence on Bikini Bottom
By Holly M Barker

Elemental Eating: Samoan Public Health and Valuation in Health Promotion
By Jessica Hardin, Christina Ting Kwauk

Employment of the Weak: The Role of a Multinational Factory in the Life Trajectory of Early School Leavers in Sāmoa
By Masami Tsujita Levi

Rearticulating Diplomatic Relationships: Contextualizing Tuvalu-Taiwan Relations
By Jess Marinaccio

Dialogue

Robert (Bob) C Kriste: Mentor and Friend of the Pacific
By Brij V Lal

Political Reviews

Region in Review
By Nic Maclellan

Micronesia in Review
By Volker Boege, Mathias Chauchat, Joseph Daniel Foukona, Budi Hernawan, Michael Leach, and James Stiefvater

Book and Media Reviews

I Hinanao-ta Nu I Manaotao Tåno’ I CHamoru Siha (The Journey of the CHamoru People) (review)
By Teresita L Perez

Decolonisation and the Pacific: Indigenous Globalisation and the Ends of Empire by Tracey Banivanua Mar (review)
By Trish Tupou

Hope at Sea: Possible Ecologies in Oceanic Literature by Teresa Shewry (review)
By Erin Cheslow

The Cultural Animation Film Festival (review)
By Elizabeth Bennett

Ainikien Jidjid ilo Boñ, and: Batmon vs Majuro, and: Jilel: The Calling of the Shell, and: Lañinbwil’s Gift, and: Ña Noniep, and: Yokwe Bartowe (review)
By Tom Brislin

Crossing Spaces (review)
By Myjolynne Marie Kim

Tikopia Collected: Raymond Firth and the Creation of Solomon Island Cultural Heritage by Elizabeth Bonshek (review)
By David Lipset

Textilia Linnaeana: Global 18th Century Textile Traditions & Trade by Viveka Hansen (review)
By Alexander Mawyer

Ship of Fate: Memoir of a Vietnamese Repatriate by Trần Ðình Trụ (review)
By Mary Therese Perez Hattori

Uncovering Indigenous Models of Leadership: An Ethnographic Case Study of Samoa’s Talavou Clan by Leiataua Robert Jon Peterson (review)
By Luafata Simanu-Klutz

Contemporary Pacific 31-2
The Contemporary Pacific
Volume 31, Issue 2

The Journal of Burma Studies Vol 23, No. 1 (2019)

Featured in Caroline Ha Thuc's "Research as Strategy: Reactivating Mythologies and Building a Collective Memory in Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung's The Name (2008-)" this issue: Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung The Name (2008–). Detail: Portrait of Bo Cho. Multimedia installation. Image courtesy of the artists.
Featured in Caroline Ha Thuc’s “Research as Strategy: Reactivating Mythologies and Building a Collective Memory in Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung’s The Name (2008-)” this issue: Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung The Name (2008–). Detail: Portrait of Bo Cho. Multimedia installation. Image courtesy of the artists.

The new issue of The Journal of Burma Studies (JBS) promises a tour de force of ethnographic, historical, and artistic insight into religious practice and cultural
expression.

This issue marks the first in our new partnership with the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University. Find top articles from The Journal of Burma Studies‘ archive and enjoy the new issue today on Project MUSE.


Editor’s Note
By Jane M. Ferguson

Making Merit, Making Civil Society: Free Funeral Service Societies and Merit-Making in Contemporary Myanmar
By Mu-Lung Hsu

Thrice-Honored Sangharaja Saramedha (1801-1882): Arakan-Chittagong Buddhism across Colonial and Counter-Colonial Power
By D. Mitra Barua

Research as Strategy: Reactivating Mythologies and Building a Collective Memory in Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung’s The Name (2008-)
By Caroline Ha Thuc

Bottom-Up Explorations: Locating Rule of Law Intermediaries after Transition in Myanmar
By Kristina Simion

Smoke, No Fire 
By Richard M. Cooler

Imperial Intoxication: Alcohol and the Making of Colonial Indochina by Gerard Sasges (review)
By Luke Corbin

Constitutionalism and Legal Change in Myanmar ed. by Andrew Harding (review)
By Elliot Prasse-Freeman

Saffron Shadows and Salvaged Scripts: Literary Life in Myanmar under Censorship and in Transition by Ellen Wiles (review)
By Kenneth Wong

Journal of Burma Studies 23-1
The Journal of Burma Studies, Vol. 23, No. 1 (2019)

Asian Theatre Journal Vol. 36, No. 2, (2019)

From Troy, Troy. . . Taiwan, 2005 performed at Hobe Fort in Tamsui, featured in Sophia Yashih Liu's article, "Performing Intercultural Truama: State, Land, and Women in Troy, Troy. . . Taiwan" this issue.  Photo: Chen Shao-Wei
From Troy, Troy. . . Taiwan, 2005 performed at Hobe Fort in Tamsui, featured in Sophia Yashih Liu’s article, “Performing Intercultural Truama: State, Land, and Women in Troy, Troy. . . Taiwan” this issue. Photo: Chen Shao-Wei

The fall issue of Asian Theatre Journal opens with a special section on the 2016 quatercentenary celebration of Tang Xianzu and William Shakespeare, guest edited by Alexa Alice Joubin. The regular issue follows with scholarly articles and reviews, including three emerging scholar articles that offer perspectives from India, Taiwan, and Singapore.

From the Editor
By Siyuan Liu

Special Section: Tang Xianzu and William Shakespeare Quatercentenary Celebration

Performing Commemoration: The Cultural Politics of Locating Tang Xianzu and Shakespeare
By Alexa Alice Joubin

Intercultural and Cross-cultural Encounters during the Quatercentenary of Tang Xianzu and Shakespeare
By Mary Mazzilli

Looking for Common Ground: A Thematic Comparison between Tang Xianzu’s and Shakespeare’s Dramatic Imagination
By Letizia Fusini

Engaging Tang Xianzu and Shakespeare in the Quest for Self
By Liana Chen

Pansori Hamlet Project: Taroo’s New Pansori Shakespeare for the Local Audience
By Seokhun Choi

Regular Issue Articles

Politics and Tactics in Revolutionary Performance: A Sino-Burmese Arts Troupe in Transnational Circulation
By Tasaw Hsin-chun Lu

Bhuta Kola Ritual Performances: Locating Aesthetics in Collective Memory and Shared Experience
By Meera Baindur, Tapaswi H M

Tradition and Modernity: Two Modern Adaptations of the Chinese Opera Hezhu’s Match
By Shiao-ling Yu

Applying/Contesting the Brechtain “Model”: Calcutta Repertory Theatre’s Galileo Jibon (Life of Galileo)
By Dwaipayan Chowdhury

Performing Intercultural Trauma: State, Land, and Women in Troy, Troy… Taiwan
By Sophia Yashih Liu

Spaces of Citizenship in Contemporary Singaporean Theatre: Staging the 2011 General Election
By Nathan F. Bullock

Plus reviews.

Asian Theatre Journal 36-2
Asian Theatre Journal Vol. 36, No. 2, (2019)

Journal of Word History, Vol 30, No. 3 (2019)

Figure 2 from "Traveling Anthropophagy: The Depiction of Cannibalism in Modern Travel Writing, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries" by José María Hernández Gutiérrez, this issue: Ptolemaic Map of Africa (Geography, 1511). Anthropophagi are supposedly present in the southeast according to the map. Source: Rare Maps.
Figure 2 from “Traveling Anthropophagy: The Depiction of Cannibalism in Modern Travel Writing, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries” by José María Hernández Gutiérrez, this issue: Ptolemaic Map of Africa (Geography, 1511). Anthropophagi are supposedly present in the southeast according to the map. Source: Rare Maps.

 

This issue of the Journal of World History includes the following scholarly articles:

The Globalisation of Franciscan Poverty
By Julia McClure 

This article explores the Franciscans’ attempt to translate their local conception of poverty into a world order between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries. Studies of Franciscan poverty have generally been confined to Europe and to the Middle Ages, yet the pursuit of poverty also shaped the Franciscans’ global interactions across the medieval and early modern periods. This focus provides an alternative perspective not only on the history of the Franciscan Order but also on global history, which has often been conceptualised as the European expansion of commodities, money and markets. Economic expansion was in dialogue with an overlooked story of resistance to, and questioning of, the phenomena of money and markets, and the attempt to realise a vision of the world based upon a unifying, yet unequal, notion of poverty.

The First Global Turn: Chinese Contributions of Enlightenment World History
By Alexander Statman

This article argues that certain Enlightenment approaches to world history developed through engagement with Chinese texts. In the eighteenth century, two French savants, Michel-Ange le Roux Deshauterayes and Joseph de Guignes, read original Chinese language histories and deployed them to ask and answer world-historical questions. Deshauterayes drew from the sixteenth-century historian Nan Xuan to argue that the mariner’s compass was invented in ancient China and diffused to the west. De Guignes looked to Ma Duanlin’s fourteenth-century encyclopedia to explain how the Huns came from Central Asia to threaten the Roman Empire. Their conclusions and their methods contributed to Enlightenment historiography through the works of philosophes such as Voltaire and Edward Gibbon. Enlightenment authors not only learned about China; they also learned from China.

Traveling Anthropophagy: The Depiction of Cannibalism in Modern Travel Writing, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries
By José María Hernández Gutiérrez

Travel writing had a significant impact on the way cannibalism was to be interpreted and diffused from the sixteenth century onwards. By analyzing how much our current understanding of anthropophagy owes to the discourse of travel writing and the simultaneous interaction between concept and medium, a better understanding of its implications in philosophical, political and scientific discourse can be perceived. It also elaborates on how we built self-identification through the uses of fears and cultural stereotypes. A quick glance at the structure of travel writing helps conceptualize how the encounter with Native Americans by Christopher Columbus transformed the Western perceptions of cannibalism and determined relations with other peoples in the following centuries, from Polynesians to Africans. The repercussions of this dialectical process are still palpable today.

The War is Our War: Antifascism among Lebanese Leftist Intellectuals*
By Sana Tannoury-Karam

In the years preceding and during the Second World War, the Lebanese left founded and spearheaded a vibrant antifascist struggle in the Lebanese and wider Arab public sphere. Examining how Arab leftists organized against, debated, and rejected fascism and Nazism challenges the narrative of Arab cooperation with fascism. It also takes issue with viewing antifascism as simply reactive to fascism. Rather, this article shows that antifascists drew upon pre-war and interwar intellectual frameworks of nationalism and anticolonialism to create counterhegemonic discourses against fascism. It argues that those who opposed fascism were operating within a terrain of interconnected and overlapping structures of oppression that they saw facing their societies, specifically the nexus between colonialism and fascism, and their relation to Zionism. Lebanese antifascists built east-east networks of activism to create linkages between the Arab liberation struggle and other oppressed nations, thus converging their nationalist and internationalist projects.

Plus book reviews.

 

Journal of World History 30-3
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal, Vol. 4#3, 2019

This issue includes the following articles:

Mālama nā makua i nā keiki me ka hānō: Native Hawaiian Parents Caring for Their Children with Asthma, (Part 2)
May K. Kealoha, Sandra L. Sinclair, and Karol K. Richardson

Impact of lactation support program on Initiation of Breastfeeding in Term Infants
Binu Ninan, Umamaheswari Balakrishnan, Asia Mohamed, Munusamy Manjula, Thangaraj Abiramalatha, Ashok Chandrasekaran, and Prakash Amboiram

It’s a Matter of Perspective: The Role of Aging Expectations and Self-Efficacy Towards Engagement in Healthy Lifestyles Among Older Adults
Johnny J. Yao Jr.

THE CORRELATION BETWEEN STIGMA AND FAMILY ACCEPTANCE WITH RELIGIOSITY OF PLWH MSM IN MEDAN, INDONESIA
I Nyoman Arya Maha Putra, Agung Waluyo, and Sri Yona

Is high maternal body mass index associated with caesarean section delivery in Mongolia? A prospective observational study
Naoko Hikita, Megumi Haruna, Masayo Matsuzaki, Emi Sasagawa, Minoru Murata, Ariunaa Yura, and Otgontogoo Oidovsuren


About the Journal

Asian Pacific Island Nursing Journal: Official Journal of the Asian American / Pacific Islander Nurses Association features research papers, empirical and theoretical articles, editorials, abstracts of recent dissertations, and conference summaries that relate to nursing care written by scientists and researchers in nursing and the social sciences, such as:

  • Clinical and Developmental Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Social Work, Public Health, Education, Genetics, Pharmacology, Infectious Disease, Oncology, Cardiovascular Disease, Pulmonary Function and Disease, Dermatology, Wound Healing, Immunology, Anesthesiology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Hematology, Neonatology, Nephrology, Pathology, Physiology, Nutrition, Pain Management, Sleep Disturbances, and Mental Health.

 

Indexed in Scopus, the DOAJ and EBSCO

Philosophy East and West, vol. 69, no. 2

Vincent Shen, 1949–2018.
Vincent Shen, 1949–2018.

Vincent Shen submitted his paper, “Desire, Representing Process, and Translatability” for blind review in 2017. Unfortunately, he passed away on Nov. 14, 2018, while the paper was in the last stages of copyediting. In this issue, Mingran Tan remembers this inspiring mentor and the editors at Philosophy East and West are honored to publish one of Prof. Shen’s last essays.

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 2 includes the following scholarly works:

Remembering Vincent Shen
Mingran Tan

Desire, Representing Process, and Translatability
Vincent Shen

Paul Tillich, Zhuangzi, and the Creational Role of Nonbeing
David Chai

Wang Bi’s Commentary on the Analects: A Confucian-Daoist Critique of Effable Morality
Paul J. D’Ambrosio

The Theory of the Self in the Zhuangzi: A Strawsonian Interpretation
Jenny Hung

Things Endure While We Fade Away: Tao Yuanming on Being Himself
Michael D. K. Ing

The No-Self View and the Meaning of Life
Baptiste Le Bihan

Abhidharma Metaphysics and the Two Truths
Kris McDaniel

A Pro-Realist Account of Gongsun Long’s “White Horse Dialogue”
Yuan Ren, Yuyu Liu

This Strange Idea of Art
Joseph Tanke

Agent and Deed in Confucian Thought
George Tsai

Knowledge, Action, and Virtue in Zhu Xi
Matthew D. Walker

“A Rich Conception of the Surface”: On Feng Zikai’s Paintings to Protect Life
Hektor K. T. Yan

Book Discussion

Bell’s Model of Meritocracy for China: Two Confucian Amendments
Yong Huang

Missing Links in The China Model
Chenyang Li

Meritocracy as a Political System: A Commentary on Bell’s The China Model
Binfan Wang

Toward Confucian-Inspired Democratic Meritocracy: A Response to Yong Huang, Chenyang Li, and Binfan Wang
Daniel A. Bell

Beyond Philosophical Euromonopolism: Other Ways of—Not Otherwise than—Philosophy
Bret W. Davis

Undoing Western Hegemony, Unpacking the Particulars:Taking Back Philosophy: A Review of Bryan Van Norden’s Taking Back Philosophy A Multicultural Manifesto
David H. Kim

A Comparative Feminist Reflection on Race and Gender
Li-Hsiang Lisa Rosenlee

Response to Comments by Bret Davis, David Kim, and Lisa Rosenlee on Taking Back Philosophy
Bryan W. Van Norden

Online Book Reviews

Tang Junyi: Confucian Philosophy and the Challenge of Modernity by Thomas Fröhlich (review) Chor-yung Cheung

Order in Early Chinese Excavated Texts: Natural, Supernatural, and Legal Approaches by Zhongjiang Wang (review)
Thomas Michael

Philosophy in Colonial India ed. by Sharad Deshpande (review)
Swami Narasimhananda

The Emotions in Early Chinese Philosophy by Curie Virág (review)
Ellen Y. Zhang

Philosophy of Language, Chinese Language, Chinese Philosophy: Constructive Engagement ed. by Bo Mou (review)
Rohan Sikri

Read more in Volume 69

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 1 is also available on Project MUSE.

 

Philosophy East and West 69-2
Philosophy East and West, vol. 68, no. 2

Biography Vol. 42 No. 2 (2019)

Figure 8 from Philip Miletic’s essay “Playing a Life in Nina Freeman’s Automedia Game, Cibele.” Valtameri. The meter with the handshake in the upper right corner progresses as Nina (left) and Ichi (right) fight together.

Editor’s Note

ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE:

Wounded Cities: Topographies of Self and Nation in Fay Afaf Kanafani’s Nadia, Captive of Hope
Hager Ben Driss

Playing a Life in Nina Freeman’s Automedia Game, Cibele
Philip Miletic

Reading, Writing, and Resistance in Audre Lorde’s Zami: A New Spelling of My Name
Sarita Cannon

“Bad” Biography Exposed!: A Critical Analysis of American Super-Pop
Oline Eaton

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Shadow in the Garden: A Biographer’s Tale, by James Atlas
Reviewed by Carl Rollyson

Experiments in Life-Writing: Intersections of Auto/Biography and Fiction, edited by Lucia Boldrini and Julia Novak
Reviewed by Alexandra Effe

American Autobiography after 9/11, by Megan Brown
Reviewed by Elisabeth Hedrick-Moser

Letter to My Father: A Memoir, by G. Thomas Couser
Reviewed by Emily Hipchen

The Selfie Generation: How Our Self Images Are Changing Our Notions of Privacy, Sex, Consent, and Culture, by Alicia Eler
Reviewed by Teresa Bruś

Invented Lives, Imagined Communities: The Biopic and American National Identity, edited by William H. Epstein and R. Barton Palmer
Reviewed by Eric M. Thau

An Artisan Intellectual: James Carter and the Rise of Modern Britain, 1792–1853, by Christopher Ferguson
Reviewed by Anna Clark

Autobiographical Writing in Latin America: Folds of the Self, by Sergio R. Franco
Reviewed by Francisco Brignole

Getting Personal: Teaching Personal Writing in the Digital Age, edited by Laura Gray-Rosendale
Reviewed by Madeleine Sorapure

The Art of Confession: The Performance of Self from Robert Lowell to Reality TV, by Christopher Grobe
Reviewed by Lynda Goldstein

A History of Irish Autobiography, edited by Liam Harte
Reviewed by Taura Napier

Victorians Undone: Tales of the Flesh in the Age of Decorum, by Kathryn Hughes
Reviewed by Alison Booth

Doña Teresa Confronts the Spanish Inquisition: A Seventeenth-Century New Mexican Drama, by Frances Levine
Reviewed by Jorge Ca.izares-Esguerra

Clio’s Lives: Biographies and Autobiographies of Historians, edited by Doug Munro and John G. Reid
Reviewed by Jaume Aurell

The Decolonial Mandela: Peace, Justice and the Politics of Life, edited by Sabelo Ndlovu-Gatsheni
Reviewed by Nick Mdika Tembo

Creating Identity in the Victorian Fictional Autobiography, by Heidi L. Pennington
Reviewed by Anne Reus

A History of Irish Working-Class Writing, edited by Michael Pierse
Reviewed by Muireann Leech

Canadian Graphic: Picturing Lives, edited by Candida Rifkind and Linda Warley
Reviewed by Roc.o G. Davis

Life? or Theatre? ( Leben? oder Theater?), by Charlotte Salomon
Reviewed by Julia Watson

The Phenomenology of Autobiography: Making it Real, by Arnaud Schmitt
Reviewed by Bettina Stumm

On the Arab-Jew, Palestine, and Other Displacements: Selected Writings, by Ella Shohat
Reviewed by Joyce Zonana

Bird-Bent Grass: A Memoir, in Pieces, by Kathleen Venema
Reviewed by G. Thomas Couser

Private Lives Made Public: The Invention of Biography in Early Modern England, by Andrea Walkden
Reviewed by Julie A. Eckerle


About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

China Review International Vol. 24 no. 3 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 3 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 20 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEW

The Persistence and Significance of Small Urban Spaces in China (reviewing Di Wang, The Teahouse under Socialism: The Decline and Renewal of Public Life in Chengdu, 1950–2000)
Reviewed by Tim Simpson

REVIEWS

Jennifer Altehenger, Legal Lessons: Popularizing Laws in the People’s Republic of China, 1949–1989
Reviewed by Ji Li

Emily Baum, The Invention of Madness: State, Society, and the Insane in Modern China
Reviewed by Hsuan-Ying Huang

Yanjie Bian, Guanxi: How China Works
Reviewed by Jack Barbalet

Steve Chan, Trust and Distrust in Sino-American Relations: Challenge and Opportunity 
Reviewed by Richard Hu

Patricia P. Chu, Where I have Never Been: Migration, Melancholia, and Memory in Asian American Narratives of Return 
Reviewed by Shawn Higgins

Melissa Dale, Inside the World of the Eunuch: A Social History of the Emperor’s Servants in Qing China
Reviewed by Ellen Soullière

Joshua Eisenman, Red China’s Green Revolution: Technological Innovation, Institutional Change, and Economic Development under the Commune
Reviewed by Zhun Xu

Luke Habberstad, Forming the Early Chinese Court: Rituals, Spaces, Roles 
Reviewed by Christopher F. Kim

Kurtis Hagen and Steve Coutinho, translated with commentary, Philosophers of the Warring States: A Sourcebook in Chinese Philosophy 
Reviewed by Robin R. Wang

Derek Hird and Geng Song, editors, The Cosmopolitan Dream: Transnational Chinese Masculinities in a Global Age
Reviewed by Yinni Peng

Ming-sho Ho, Challenging Beijing’s Mandate of Heaven: Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement and Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement 
Reviewed by Kevin Wei Luo

Hsiao-ting Lin, Accidental State: Chiang Kai-shek, the United States, and the Making of Taiwan 
Reviewed by Syaru Shirley Lin

Thomas Maissen and Barbara Mittler, Why China Did Not Have a Renaissance – And Why That Matters: An Interdisciplinary Dialogue 
Reviewed by Luke Clossey

Yuan-ning Wen and others, edited by Christopher Rea, Imperfect Understanding: Intimate Portraits of Modern Chinese Celebrities 
Reviewed by David N. C. Hull

William T. Rowe, Speaking of Profit: Bao Shichen and Reform in Nineteenth-Century China 
Reviewed by Margherita Zanasi

Michael Szonyi, The Art of Being Governed: Everyday Politics in Late Imperial China 
Reviewed by Masato Hasegawa

Jinping Wang, In the Wake of the Mongols: The Making of a New Social Order in North China, 1200–1600  Reviewed by Carl Déry

Bing Wang, Classical Chinese Poetry in Singapore: Witnesses to Social and Cultural Transformations in the Chinese Community 
Reviewed by Jing-yi Qu

Pu Wang, The Translatability of Revolution: Guo Moruo and Twentieth-Century Chinese Culture 
Reviewed by Haosheng Yang

Yun Via, Down with Traitors: Justice and Nationalism in Wartime China 
Reviewed by Patrick Fuliang Shan

Works Received