News and Events

Special Features: Korean LGBTQ+ Literature, Remembering Linguists Robert Andrew Blust and Thomas Edward Dutton and more

Azalea

Volume 15 (2022)

From the editor Young-Jun Lee:

A century’s worth of change looks quite remarkable in Korean literature. Today’s young Koreans cannot read the same newspapers read by their grandparents’ generation. In less than a hundred years, the national written language has shifted from Chinese characters to Korean hangul, then briefly to Japanese as enforced under colonial rule, and then to the modern Korean language that we know today. During this process, remarkable sociocultural transformations dominated daily life. Over the first half of the 20th century, Koreans endured enormous political shifts most notably marked by colonization, the Korean War, and the ensuing divide of the country into separate political nations. Along the way, Korean literature registered these upheavals and fluctuations.

Notably, the literature of totalizing grand narrative, which concerned itself with the trajectory of nation-building, persisted in Korea until the 1980s. Ever since the end of the military dictatorship and the establishment of a civil government in the 1990s, however, that literature began to shift its focus to the lives of women. Now, those long ignored and marginalized—including queer women, as well as other queer people such as those who are non-binary— have also begun to emerge more strongly as published authors, even as they have been increasingly centered as subjects of literary narratives. The ongoing impact of this inclusive, expansionary shift
can be seen directly in AZALEA’s decision to focus on LGBTQ+ literature for its fifteenth issue.

Find more poetry, fiction, graphic shorts, and images at Project MUSE.

Oceanic Linguistics

Volume 61, Number 1 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

The Place of Space in Oceanic Linguistics
Leah Pappas and Alexander Mawyer

Semantics and Pragmatics of Voice in Central Malagasy Oral Narratives
Penelope Howe

On the Nature of Proto-Oceanic *o in Southern Vanuatu (and Beyond)
John Lynch

Rare, but Real: Native Nasal Clusters in Northern Philippine Languages
Robert Blust

The Greater West Bomberai Language Family
Timothy Usher and Antoinette Schapper

The Phonology and Typological Position of Waima’a Consonants
Kirsten Culhane

Find more research articles, squibs, and reviews at Project MUSE.

New Journal Issues: Aloha Shirt Aesthetics, Patterns of Mortuary Practice in Vanuatu, Taiwan Sugar in the 1600s + More

Asian Perspectives

Volume 61, Number 1 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

Lakheen-Jo-Daro, an Indus Civilization Settlement at Sukkur
in Upper Sindh (Pakistan): A Scrap Copper Hoard and
Human Figurine from a Dated Context

Paolo Biagi and Massimo Vidale

The Hamin Mangha Site: Mass Deaths and Abandonment
of a Late Neolithic Settlement in Northeastern China

Yawei Zhou, Xiaohui Niu, Ping Ji, Yonggang Zhu, Hong Zhu, and
Meng Zhang

Early Metal Age Settlement at the Site of Palemba, Kalumpang,
Karama Valley, West Sulawesi

Anggrreani

Patterns of Mortuary Practice over Millennia in Southern Vanuatu,
South Melanesia

Frédérique Valentin, Wanda Zinger, Alison Fenwick, Stuart Bedford,
James Flexner, Edson Willie, and Takaronga Kuautonga

Find more research articles and reviews at Project MUSE.

Biography

Volume 44, Issues 2 & 3 (2021)

Special Double Issue: Graphic Medicine

Graphic Medicine’s Possible Futures: Reconsidering Poetics and Reading
Erin La Cour and Anna Poletti

Conflict or Compromise?: An Imagined Conversation
with John Hicklenton and Lindsay Cooper about
Living with Multiple Sclerosis

John Miers

Out of Sync: Chronic Illness, Time, and Comics Memoir
Jared Gardner

Face as Landscape: Refiguring Illness, Disability,
and Disorders in David B.’s Epileptic

Erin La Cour

Graphic Confessions and the Vulnerability Hangover
from Hell

Safdar Ahmed

Drawn to History: Healing, Dementia, and the Armenian
Genocide in the Intertextual Collage of Aliceheimer’s

Crystal Yin Lie

Find more at Project MUSE.

Biography

Volume 44, Issue 4 (2021)

Open Forum Articles
Reviews

Editor Craig Howes embraces this volume as he explains:
“The latest issue of Biography qualifies as special because of its ordinariness. After a four-installment run featuring two special issues, an inaugural Forum, and the Annual Bibliography and International Year in Review, we now return to our regularly scheduled programming. Articles and book reviews—that’s all!
But the table of contents for this issue speaks to what has distinguished Biography for decades as a quarterly. First, the articles. Their geographic, historic, linguistic, and generic range is in keeping with our international and interdisciplinary profile. American celebrity biographies and philosophy, twentieth-century Indian regional autobiography, modernist Austrian psychoanalytic biography, post-WWII German-Romanian autofiction, contemporary Palestinian auto/biographical texts—our pages map out and tell the stories of the field.”

Find more articles and reviews at Project MUSE.

The Contemporary Pacific

Volume 34, Issue 1 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles, dialogues, political, media, and book reviews.

One Salt Water: The Storied Work of Trans-Indigenous Decolonial Imagining with West Papua
Bonnie Etherington

Making Sartorial Sense of Empire: Contested Meanings
of Aloha Shirt Aesthetics

Christen T Sasaki

The Compensation Page: News Narratives of Public Kinship in Papua New Guinea Print Journalism
Ryan Schram

“We Are So Happy EPF Came”: Transformations of Gender in Port Moresby Schools
Ceridwen Spark and Martha Macintyre

Pacific People Navigating the Sacred Vā to Frame Relational Care: A Conversation between Friends across Space and Time
Silia Pa‘usisi Finau, Mele Katea Paea, and Martyn Reynolds

Find more articles, dialogues, political, media, and book reviews at Project MUSE.

Call For Submissions: HICCS 2023 Conference

Hawaiʻi International Conference on Chinese Studies

The Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa

JANUARY 4-6, 2023

The third annual Hawai‘i International Conference on Chinese Studies (HICCS), organized by the Center for Chinese Studies at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, will be held in-person from January 4 (Wednesday) through January 6 (Friday), 2023. This conference will bring together educators and professionals from a wide range of fields in Chinese Studies to present papers on various aspects of Chinese culture and society in mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Macau, and among overseas Chinese societies. The goal of the conference is to create an interdisciplinary atmosphere for our understanding of the past, present, and future of Chinese society. Papers can address issues within China and in Chinese communities throughout the world.

Honolulu is a vibrant city in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. Its central location provides a meeting point where researchers within various disciplines of Chinese Studies can meet, discuss, and network with scholars around the globe. Paper submission in either English and Chinese is acceptable.

TOPICS: Papers might address one or more of the following fields of Chinese Studies:

Anthropology
Art and Art History
Business
Comparative Literature
Cultural Studies
Economics
Family and Consumer
Sciences
Film/Media Studies
Finance
Health Sciences
History
Journalism and Communication
Language Pedagogy
Law
Library Sciences
Linguistics
Literature
Marketing
Philosophy
Political Science
Psychology
Public Administration
Religion
Sociology
Theater, Music, and Performance Studies
Translation Studies
Travel Industry Management

The 2023 HICCS will be held in-person on the University of Hawaiʻi campus.

Participants must submit a paper title and an abstract (no more than 500 words)
by September 15, 2022.

Chinese and English papers are allowed. Please submit your abstract to:

https://manoa.hawaii.edu/hiccs/abstract-submissions/

Questions?: Email hiccs@hawaii.edu

China Review International is sponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies, host of the annual HICCS conference.

Call For Papers: U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal

Established in 1988, the U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed, biannual publication, available in print and online, that promotes scholarly exchange on social, cultural, political, and economic issues pertaining to gender and Japan. The U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal encourages comparative study among Japan, the United States, and other countries. We welcome contributions from all academic fields in the social sciences and humanities. The journal publishes new research, review articles, and translations.

All articles are printed in English, and all submissions must be in English following the submission guidelines available from the journal home page. Manuscripts should be between 6,000 and 10,000 words, including the alphabetical list of Works Cited and endnotes. Submissions will be reviewed by the USJWJ editors and anonymously by outside reviewers. The review process takes around three months. Please review the complete Submission Guidelines, available online.

Submit manuscripts digitally to Jennifer Cullen, usjwj@hawaii.edu.

Subscribe to the U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal through UH Press or browse full-text issues online via Project MUSE and JSTOR.

Editor-in-Chief: Noriko Mizuta, The International Institute for Media and Women’s Studies

Managing Editor: Jennifer Cullen, Northeastern University

30% OFF Select World History Titles

USE CODE WHA2022

Free U.S. domestic shipping on orders of $100 or more
Offer ends September 30, 2022

Find a digital-only special issue, “Missions & Conversions in World History,” of the Journal of World History FREE HERE.


Continue reading “30% OFF Select World History Titles”

Journal of World History Special Issue: Missions & Conversions in World History – Free!

The World History Association will be hosting its annual meeting in-person and virtually in Bilbao, Spain from June 23 to 25, on the theme “Distance, Mobility, and Migration.” The Journal of World History offers this accompanying special collection “Missions and Conversions in World History,” free on the Project MUSE platform through September 30. Select World History Titles in our Books Department will also be 30% July 1 through September 30 with coupon code WHA2022.

Missionary efforts are usually enacted on a global scale and have been an important force within world history. This special collection of articles seeks to enhance our understanding of missionaries and conversion and their place in the discourse on religion in world history. Some of the articles in this special collection focus on the religious beliefs of the missionaries and converts, and how those beliefs adapted to the cultures of parties. Other contributors analyze the political ramifications of missionary undertakings, while still others explore the varied cultural exchanges and entanglements which result from these encounters, many of which extended beyond the religious.

This special issue provides accessible resources for scholars and teachers worldwide and features Guest Editor Stephen S. Francis, who discusses the issue below.  

Stephen S. Francis, guest editor for this Special Edition of “Missions & Conversions in World History” for Journal of World History
(Photo courtesy of Stephen S. Francis)

 

University of Hawai‘i Press: Tell us how this special issue came together.

Stephen S. Francis: My personal area of research is the history of religion and society, and also family relations and material culture, so I was drawn to these articles that not only dealt with the personal ideological conversion of peoples, but also how missionaries and religion affected other aspects of society and culture beyond the intended reasons for proselyting. 

UHP: Why is this issue important now?

SSF: Since the latter half of the twentieth century and the beginning of the twenty-first, religion throughout the world has undergone radical change, but perhaps no more so than in the past.  So, I think it is beneficial for us to look at the impact and effects of past encounters to place the current developments in context. 

UHP: How do you hope people will use this issue?

SSF: One of the goals of Journal of World History is to show broader interconnections of ideas that go beyond nations and regions, and in editing this volume, I gained greater insight into my own localized study by seeing the similarities and how my own work fits into this larger discourse.  I hope that other scholars will do the same, and that it will enhance their own research and world view. 

UHP:   How are things changing as the world has reopened slowly? Are there many ways the pandemic has affected your own research and teaching?

SSF: Specifically regarding the topic of this issue, I know that several churches have altered the way they have proselyted during the pandemic, and I am eager to see how some of those changes will be kept and what ones will be discarded as the world reopens, which in several years will be fascinating to research.  I, like many, had to cancel research trips due to the pandemic, but it also gave me time to reflect and focus on ideas that I may have ignored if life had continued as “normal.”  


The World History Association will host its annual meeting both in-person and virtually, from June 23 to 25, on the theme “Distance, Mobility, and Migration.” The Journal of World History offers this digital special issue “Missions and Conversions in World History” free on the Project MUSE platform through the end of September 2022. Select World History Titles in our Books Department will also be 30% July 1 through September 30 with coupon code WHA2022.

New Journal Special Issues: The Religiosity of Tonghak, Vietnamese Linguistics + More

Oregon beautiful picture

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistic Society

Special Issue:

Vietnamese Linguistics: State of the Field

The new issue features the following introduction by Trang Phan, John Phan, and Mark J. Alves

The current issue is the result of a workshop held at the Harvard Yenching Institute in April of 2021, entitled Vietnamese Linguistics, Typology and Language Universals, and which featured nineteen linguists working on diverse aspects of the Vietnamese language, ranging from semantics to historical phonology. Our purpose in gathering was to take stock of the great leaps in Vietnamese linguistic research that have occurred over the past few decades, to bring together cutting-edge research from each subdiscipline, and to begin a new collaborative dialogue on Vietnamese linguistics, typology, and language universals. Most of all, it was our belief that the time had come to reconsider Vietnamese linguistics as a unified field of inquiry. As a result, a new academic organization was founded: the International Society of Vietnamese Linguistics.
In the past twenty years, research into the Vietnamese language has advanced exponentially, in tandem with developments in our understanding of syntax, semantics, phonetics, and phonology—both on the synchronic and diachronic levels. Specific work on the Vietnamese language now informs and even leads broader linguistic inquiry in a number of unprecedented ways. These new developments invite a concentration of state-the-field research into a single volume, one that will serve not only to summarize current issues in each subdiscipline of Vietnamese linguistics, but also to initiate a longer, more collaborative conversation about the Vietnamese language.
Our goals in this special issue are thus twofold: first, we seek to provide a snapshot of current research into Vietnamese syntax, semantics, phonology, and phonetics, from both the historical and synchronic points of view, that may serve as a resource for linguists interested in exploring our current understanding of the Vietnamese language. Second, we hope that this issue will also serve as an invitation to all linguists working on the Vietnamese language or related languages to contribute to a broader, more cosmopolitan discussion—one in which discoveries of one subdiscipline may serve to inform or enlighten another.


Find more articles at eVols.

New Journal Issues: “Contagious Magic” in Japanese Theatre, Logistics of the Natural History Trade, Hawai‘i’s Toxic Plants + More

New Journal Issues: Water as a Symbol of the Great Dao, #KeepOurLanguagesStrong + More

 

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society (JSEALS)

Papers from the 30th Conference of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society: Special Publication (2021)

The new issue is introduced by Editor in Chief Mark Alves, who states:

The volume contains 21 papers in total: five papers on historical linguistics, eleven papers on syntax and/or morphology, and five papers on phonetics/phonology. The languages covered in this volume are spoken in throughout the greater Southeast Asian region: Mainland Southeast Asia, Insular Southeast Asia, Southern China, and the Indian Subcontinent. The papers range from detailed descriptions of linguistic aspects of understudied languages to probing questions related to multiple groups of languages in the region.

Find more research articles and reviews at eVols.

Recognizing Black History Month with Free Journal Content in February

In recognition of Black History Month, we offer the following journals, articles, and reviews. We invite you to explore and enjoy the following journal content online free through February 2022.

Journals Issues:

cover image 41-4

biography: an interdisciplinary quarterly

Volume 41, Number 4 (Fall 2018)

Special Issue: M4BL and the Critical Matter of Black Lives

Introduction by Guest Editors Britney Cooper and Treva B. Lindsey:

Understanding the stories presented in this special issue as simultaneously about violence, resistance, (in)justice, and freedom, we center interrogations and representations of individual and collective Black lives to unearth both the possibilities and potential challenges for those living and fighting in the era of the Movement for Black Lives. In our call for papers, we offered these questions: What does “life” mean in the context of M4BL? What is the fundamental
meaning of “lives” when centering those on the margins? Each of these pieces directly and indirectly responds to these questions. As editors, we continually converse about the distinction between Black lives and Black life, while always connecting through our unwavering commitment to both.

Find more research articles and reviews at Project MUSE.

biography: an interdisciplinary quarterly

Volume 36, Issue 3 (Summer 2013)

Special Issue: “He the One We All Knew”

Guest Contributor Njoroge Njoroge reflects on this issues dedication on the life and thought of El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz known to most of Malcolm X. In reference to the compilation of articles in this issue Njoroge explains:

This cluster of essays is another re-discovery of Malcolm, one that attempts to give context and feeling to the life, world, words, and works of Malcolm. The collection is a modest contribution to the ongoing discussion, reevaluation, and interpretation of the life and political thought of Malcolm X. By examining the man and his times, in light of old wisdom and new scholarship, we can come to a better appreciation of Malcolm, the man and the myth. Each of the authors presents us with different “Malcolms”: He the one we all knew.

Find more research articles and reviews at Project MUSE.

Journal Articles:

biography: an interdisciplinary quarterly

Black Biography in the Service of a Revolution: Martin R. Delany in Afro-American Historiography
By Tunde Adeleke
Volume 17, Number 3, Summer 1994

African American Pioneers in Anthropology (review)
By B. C. Harrison
Volume 23, Number 2, Spring 2000

Biography and the Political Unconscious: Ellison, Toomer, Jameson, and the Politics of Symptomatic Reading
By Barbara Foley
Volume 36, Number 4, Fall 2013

Digression, Slavery, and Failing to Return in the Narrative of the Sufferings of Lewis Clarke
By Michael A. Chaney
Volume 39, Number 4, Fall 2016

Obituarizing Black Maleness, Obituarizing Prince
By Steven W. Thrasher
Volume 41, Number 1, Winter 2018

Call My Name: Using Biographical Storytelling to Reconceptualize the History of African Americans at Clemson University
By Rhondda Robinson Thomas
Volume 42, Number 3, Summer 2019

Buddhist-Christian Studies: Official Journal of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies

The Practice of Double Belonging and Afro-Buddhist Identity in Jan Willis’s Dreaming Me
By, Carolyn Medine
Volume 40, 2020

Black and Buddhist: What Buddhism Can Teach Us About Race, Resilience, Transformation, and Freedom ed. by Pamela Ayo Yetunde and Cheryl Giles, and: Buddhist-Christian Dialogue, U.S. Law, and Womanist Theology for Transgender Spiritual Care by Pamela Ayo Yetunde (review)
By Carolyn Jones Medine
Volume 41, 2021

Journal of World History: Official Journal of the World History Association

Coloring Universal History: Robert Benjamin Lewis’s Light and Truth (1843) and William Wells Brown’s The Black Man (1863)
By Marnie Hughes-Warrington
Volume 20, Number 1, March 2009

Jazz and the Evolution of Black American Cosmopolitanism in Interwar Paris
By Rachel Gillett
Volume 21, Number 3, September 2010

“Town of God”: Ota Benga, the Batetela Boys, and the Promise of Black America
By Karen Sotiropoulos
Volume 26, Number 1, March 2015

MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing 

Six Poems from Harlem Shadows
By Claude McKay
Volume 31, Number 2, (2019)

whatdoesfreemean?
By Catherine Filloux
Volume 32, Number 1 (2020)

Passing the Fire
By Wayne Karlin
Volume 32, Number 1 (2020)

I Investigate Lynchings
Walter White
Volume 32, Number 1 (2020)

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers

The Black Settlers on Saltspring Island, Canada, in the Nineteenth Century
By Charles C. Irby
Volume 36, 1974

January is Kalaupapa Month

Published twice a year since 1989 by the University of Hawaiʻi Press, Mānoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing has two issues of special interest to readers this month, which has been designated Kalaupapa Month by the Hawaiʻi state government and celebrates two important figures. Father Damien, the Belgian priest who cared for victims of leprosy at Kalaupapa, Molokaʻi, was born on the 3rd, and civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was born on the 15th.


Mānoa vol. 23 no. 2 (2011) Almost Heaven

Almost Heaven: On the Human and Divine (winter 2011) presents Aldyth Morris’s play Damien in its entirety, plus a set of images reproduced from glass-plate negatives made at Kalaupapa in the early twentieth century. The images are from the collection of the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts United States Province. Morris was a Hawaiʻi playwright who received the Hawaiʻi Award for Literature in 1978 and worked for many years at UH Press.


Mānoa vol. 32 no. 1 (2020) Tyranny Lessons

Tyranny Lessons: International Prose, Poetry, and Performance (summer 2020) features photographs from the 1960s by Danny Lyon from his book Memories of the Southern Civil Rights Movement. Lyon was the first photographer of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee and was jailed alongside Martin Luther King Jr. Working next to activists such as Julian Bond and Howard Zinn, he captured sit-ins, church bombings, speeches by John Lewis and other leaders, and the arrest and jailing of protestors.

Members of the UH community can view these works for free at Project Muse.


Links:
• Star-Advertiser article on Kalaupapa Month https://www.staradvertiser.com/2022/01/07/hawaii-news/
in-january-kalaupapa-month-hawaiians-reclaim-loved-ones/

• Mānoa website https://manoa.hawaii.edu/manoajournal/
• Almost Heaven https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/25083
• Tyranny Lessons https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/42693

New Journal Issues: Schooling Journeys in the Southwestern Pacific, #KuToo Online Feminist Movement in Japan, Geographic Analysis of COVID-19 in L.A. + More

The Contemporary Pacific

Volume 22, Issue 2 (2021)

Special Issue: Schooling Journeys in the Southwestern Pacific

From the Guest Editors Rachel Emerine Hicks, Debra McDougall, and David Oakeshott in The Promise of Education: Schooling Journeys in the Southwester Pacific:

“Schooling journeys” is more than a metaphor in the southwestern Pacific. To step into a classroom, children and youth often travel hours each day or live for months at a time away from their families. The journey of schooling is rarely direct; it often winds between formal and informal learning and in and out of school, work, and home life. And the journey is expensive; many families struggle mightily to gather the money for fees, school supplies, uniforms, and transportation. Young people embark on these precarious journeys, and their families make sacrifices to support them, because schooling promises a better life—a move away from the backbreaking labor of subsistence agriculture toward a reliable salary that will better support their family and community. Because of the structural inequalities in school and a lack of jobs for those who complete schooling, however, few experience the socioeconomic advancement schooling promises. Still, students and their families continue to hope that schooling will lead to well-paid work. Even more important, though, going to school is seen as key to being a competent and effective person in society—increasingly for both women and men.

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers

Volume 83 (2021)

Editor Craig S. Revels reflects over the COVID-19 pandemic and how it has affected geographers and members as he states:

Last year’s volume was published in a time of great uncertainty as the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the world, and this year’s unfortunately arrives under similar conditions, slowly improving though they may be. The tragedies, disruptions, and general state of societal affairs during the pandemic will not soon be forgotten…

Geographers have been at the forefront of research into the spread of COVID-19 since the earliest days of the pandemic, and Steve Graves and Petra Nichols contribute an analytical perspective on infection rates in Los Angeles County. In particular, they statistically identify a causal relationship between infection and a range of key socioeconomic and demographic variables, a relationship influencing the location and rate of spread for the disease. They leave us to consider how those factors must be addressed in any preparations for future public health crises.

In a significantly different context, Ray Sumner and John Menary
demonstrate that taking students into the field, always a valuable exercise, is even more rewarding when it leads to unexpected discoveries and challenges our carefully laid plans. In this case, a straightforward field methods class oriented around the Los Angeles River instead became an open-ended, student-driven exploration into the social dimensions of heritage, ethnicity,
culture, and urban development.