Biography Vol. 42 No. 3 (2019)

Figure 3 from “Call My Name: Using Biographical Storytelling to Reconceptualize the History of African Americans at Clemson University” by Rhondda Robinson Thomas: Inventory of Slaves, Fort Hill Farm Deed, 15 May 1854, Thomas Green Clemson Papers, Special Collections and Archives, Clemson University Libraries, box 1, folder 25.

ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE:

Introduction to Biographic Mediation: On the Uses of Personal Disclosure in Bureaucracy and Politics
Ebony Coletu, guest editor

Biographic Mediation and the Formerly Incarcerated: How Dissembling and Disclosure Counter the Extended Consequences of Criminal Convictions
Michelle Jones

A Complaint Biography
Sara Ahmed

Lives on the Line: An Interview with Aly Wane
Aly Wane interviewed by Ebony Coletu

The Securitate File as a Record of Psuchegraphy
Cristina Plamadeala

“Has someone taken your passport?”: Everyday Surveillance of the Migrant Laborer as Trafficked Subject
Annie Isabel Fukushima

Guidelines for Squatting: Concerned Citizens of North Camden, 1978–1990
Mercy Romero

Frames of Witness: The Kavanaugh Hearings, Survivor Testimony, and #MeToo
Leigh Gilmore

Call My Name: Using Biographical Storytelling to Reconceptualize the History of African Americans at Clemson University
Rhondda Robinson Thomas

Mirror Memoirs: Amita Swadhin on Survivor Storytelling and the Mediation of Rape Culture
Amita Swadhin interviewed by Ebony Coletu

The Consumption of Adoption and Adoptees in American Middlebrow Culture
Kimberly McKee

(Un)Reasonable, (Un)Necessary, and (In)Appropriate: Biographic Mediation of Neurodivergence in Academic Accommodations
Aimée Morrison

About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

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Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

 

 

Biography:
An Interdisciplinary Quarterly
Vol. 42 No. 3
2019

Gender and Law in the Japanese Imperium

Gender and Law in the Japanese ImperiumArguing against the popular stereotype of Japan as a non-litigious society, an international group of contributors from Japan, Taiwan, Germany, and the U.S. explores how in Japan and its colonies, as elsewhere in the modern world, law became a fundamental means of creating and regulating gendered subjects and social norms in the period from the 1870s to the 1950s. In Gender and Law in the Japanese Imperium, the authors suggest that legal discourse was subject to negotiation, interpretation, and contestation at every level of their formulation and deployment.

With this as a shared starting point, they explore key issues such reproductive and human rights, sexuality, prostitution, gender and criminality, and the formation of the modern conceptions of family and conjugality, and use these issues to complicate our understanding of the impact of civil, criminal, and administrative laws upon the lives of both Japanese citizens and colonial subjects. The result is a powerful rethinking of not only gender and law, but also the relationships between the state and civil society, the metropole and the colonies, and Japan and the West.