China Review International Vol. 24 No. 2 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 2 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 19 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEW

A Matter of Life and Death: The Translator Fou Lei (reviewing Mingyuan Hu, Fou Lei: An Insistence on Truth)
Reviewed by John Minford

REVIEWS

Roger T. Ames and Jinhua Jia, editors, Li Zehou and Confucian Philosophy
Reviewed by Anna Ghiglione

David G. Atwill, Islamic Shangri-La: Inter-Asian Relations and Lhasa’s Muslim Communities, 1600 to 1960
Reviewed by Morris Rossabi

Rostislav Berezkin, Many Faces of Mulian: The Precious Scrolls of Late Imperial China
Reviewed by Daniel L. Overmyer

Franck Billé and Sören Urbansky, editors, Yellow Perils: China Narratives in the Contemporary World
Reviewed by David Martinez-Robles

Renee Y. Chow, Changing Chinese Cities: The Potentials of Field Urbanism
Reviewed by Perry P. J. Yang

Stephen Durrant, Wai-yee Li, Michael Nylan, and Hans van Ess, The Letter to Ren An & Sima Qian’s Legacy
Reviewed by Allan H. Barr

Rania Huntington, Ink and Tears: Memory, Mourning, and Writing in the Yu Family
Reviewed by Cathy Silber

Roger B. Jeans, editor, The Letters and Diaries of Colonel John Hart Caughey, 1944–1945: With Wedemeyer in World War II China
Reviewed by Peter Chenmain Wang

Pei-Chia Lan, Raising Global Families: Parenting, Immigration, and Class in Taiwan and the US
Reviewed by Yu-chin Tseng

Gina Marchetti, Citing China: Politics, Postmodernism, and World Cinema
Reviewed by Yingjin Zhang

Max Oidtmann, Forging the Golden Urn: The Qing Empire and the Politics of Reincarnation in Tibet
Reviewed by Yingcong Dai

Patrick Fuliang Shan, Yuan Shikai: A Reappraisal 

Reviewed by Qiang Fang

Zhihua Shen and Yafeng Xia, A Misunderstood Friendship: Mao Zedong, Kim Il-sung, and Sino-North Korean Relations, 1949–1976
Reviewed by Adam Cathcart

Wendy Swartz, Reading Philosophy, Writing Poetry: Intertextual Modes of Making Meaning in Early Medieval China
Reviewed by Ping Wang

Kenneth M. Swope, On the Trail of the Yellow Tiger: War, Trauma, and Social Dislocation in Southwest China during the Ming-Qing Transition
Reviewed by Jodi L. Weinstein

Cai Xiang, Revolution & Its Narratives: China’s Socialist Literary and Cultural Imaginaries, 1949–1966
Reviewed by Yiju Huang

Victor Cunrui Xiong, Capital Cities and Urban Form in Pre-modern China: Luoyang, 1038 BCE to 938 CE  

Reviewed by Dong Wang

Xiaowei Zheng, The Politics of Rights and the 1911 Revolution in China
Reviewed by Edward McCord

Li Zhi, edited and translated by Rivi Handler-Spitz, Pauline C. Lee, and Haun Saussy, A Book to Burn & a Book to Keep (Hidden): Selected Writings
Reviewed by Nanxiu Qian

Works Received 


About the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.

China Review International
Vol. 24. No. 2 (2017)

Celebrating Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month with Free Journal Content

We are proud to publish an extensive list of Pacific, Asian, and Southeast Asian studies journals. This Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month, explore and enjoy the following free journal content online:

Open Access Journals:

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Language Documentation & Conservation

Palapala: a journal of Hawaiian language and literature

Free journal content online:

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific (46#1, 2007)

Asian Theatre Journal: Official Journal of the Association for Asian Performance (23#1, 2006)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture (1, 2007)

Buddhist-Christian Studies: Official Journal of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (27, 2007)

China Review International: Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies (15#1, 2008)

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs (15#1, 2003)

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review (3#1, 2014)

The Hawaiian Journal of History (49, 2015)

Journal of Daoist Studies (8, 2015)

Journal of Korean Religions (6#1, 2015)

Korean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans Abroad (29, 2005)

MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing: New Writing from America, the Pacific, and Asia (19#1, 2007)

Oceanic Linguistics: Current Research on Languages of the Oceanic Area (50#2, 2011)

Pacific Science: Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region (71#4, 2017)

Philosophy East & West: A Quarterly of Comparative Philosophy (53#3, 2007)

Rapa Nui Journal: The journal of the Easter Island Foundation (30#2, 2016)

Review of Japanese Culture and Society (24, 2012)

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (45, 2013)

Asian Perspectives 58-1
Asian Theatre Journal 36-1 cover

Visit our website to learn more about our publications or to subscribe.

 

China Review International Vol. 24 No. 1 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 4 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 19 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEW

Print Culture and Media in Late Imperial and Early Republican China
Reviewed by Yu Zhang

REVIEWS

Queer Comrades: Gay Identity and Tongzhi Activism in Postsocialist China by Hongwei Bao
Reviewed by Charlie Yi Zhang

Western Han: A Yangzhou Storyteller’s Script transed. by Vibeke Børdahl and Liangyan Ge
Reviewed by Jing Zhang

The Great Flowing River: A Memoir of China, from Manchuria to Taiwan by Chi Pang-yuan
Reviewed by Miya Xie

Staging Revolution: Artistry and Aesthetics in Model Beijing Opera during the Cultural Revolution by Xing Fan
Reviewed by Yawen Ludden

What Is China? Territory, Ethnicity, Culture, and History by Ge Zhaoguang
Reviewed by Agnieszka Joniak-Lüthi

Women and the Periodical Press in China’s Long Twentieth Century: A Space of Their Own? eds. by Michel Hockx, Joan Judge, and Barbara Mittler
Reviewed by Yan Xu

The CIA and Third Force Movements in China during the Early Cold War: The Great American Dream by Roger B. Jeans
Reviewed by Yafeng Xia

Gender, Power, and Talent: The Journey of Daoist Priestesses in Tang China by Jinhua Jia
Reviewed by Lucas Wolf

Haunted by Chaos: China’s Grand Strategy from Mao Zedong to Xi Jinping by Sulmaan Wasif Khan
Reviewed by Niv Horesh

The Spatiality of Emotion in Early Modern China: From Dreamscapes to Theatricality by Ling Hon Lam
Reviewed by Curie Virág

Comics Art in China by John A. Lent and Xu Ying
Reviewed by Hannes Rall

The Edge of the Island by Chen Li
Reviewed by Norbert Francis

Body, Society, and Nation: The Creation of Public Health and Urban Culture in Shanghaiby Chieko Nakajima
Reviewed by Ka-che Yip

The Taoism of Clarified Tenuity: Content and Intention by Florian C. Reiter
Reviewed by Jan De Meyer

Shanghai Sacred: The Religious Landscape of a Global City by Benoît Vermander, Liz Hingley, and Liang Zhang
Reviewed by Anning Hu

Violence and Order on the Chengdu Plain: The Story of a Secret Brotherhood in Rural China, 1939–1949 by Di Wang
Reviewed by Kelly Hammond

A New Literary History of Modern China ed. by David Der-wei Wang
Reviewed by Flair Donglai Shi

Returning Home with Glory: Chinese Villagers around the Pacific, 1849 to 1949 by Michael Williams
Reviewed by Gregor Benton

China in the Mix: Cinema, Sound, and Popular Culture in the Age of Globalization by Ying Xiao
Reviewed by Panpan Yang

Works Received


About the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.

China Review International
Volume 24 Number 1
(2017)

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Asian Studies

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Top downloads of new 2018 content in our Asian Studies journals include articles and reviews from quarterly China Review International and annual Korean Studies, which also publishes early release articles throughout the year. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Asian Studies”

China Review International Vol. 23 No. 4 (2016)

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Volume 23 Number 4 of China Review International begins with two featured reviews and 22 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEWS

Principles and Practices of Chinese Governance a Millennium Ago (reviewing Patricia Buckley and Paul J. Smith, eds. State Power in China, 900-1325) Reviewed by R. Bin Wong

Mao’s, China’s, or Confucius’s Tianxia? Reflections on Chinese Visions of World Order (reviewing Ban Wang, editor. Chinese Visions of World Order—Tianxia, Culture, and World Politics) Reviewed by Bai Tongdong Continue reading “China Review International Vol. 23 No. 4 (2016)”

China Review International vol. 23 no. 3 (2016)

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Volume 23 Number 3 of China Review International begins with three featured reviews and 27 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese studies.

FEATURES

Steven Sangren, Filiality, and the Holy Grail of Chinese Anthropology (reviewing P. Steven Sangren, Filial Obsessions: Chinese Patriliny and Its Discontents) Reviewed by Christopher Lupke

Confucianism With German Characteristics (reviewing Ming-huei Lee, Confucianism: Its Roots and Global Signicance) Reviewed by Stephen C. Angle

The Chinese Maritime Customs Service: A Chinese, Western, or Global Agency? (reviewing Felix Boecking, No Great Wall: Trade, Taris, and Nationalism in Republican China, 1927–1945) Reviewed by Chihyun Chang

Continue reading “China Review International vol. 23 no. 3 (2016)”

China Review International Vol. 23 No. 2 (2016)

Volume 23 #2 of China Review International begins with two featured reviews and a response, along with 20 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese studies.

FEATURES

RESPONSE

REVIEWS

…plus 15 more reviews and works received.


Browse the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about new issues from Project MUSE


00_23.1cover_Page_1

About the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.

China Review International Vol. 23 No. 1 (2016)

Volume 23 of China Review International begins with four featured reviews and a response, along with 15 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese studies.

FEATURES

RESPONSE

REVIEWS

  • Song-Chuan Chen’s Merchants of War and Peace: British Knowledge of China in the Making of the Opium War Reviewed by Emily Mokros

  • James Flath’s Traces of the Sage: Monument, Materiality, and the First Temple of Confucius (available from UH Press) Reviewed by Man Xu

  • Wu Hung’s Zooming In: Histories of Photography in China Reviewed by Shana J. Brown

  • Stuart Young’s Conceiving the Indian Buddhist Patriarchs in China (available from UH Press) Reviewed by Hans-Rudolf Kantor

  • Laura Madokoro’s Elusive Refuge: Chinese Migrants in the Cold War Reviewed by Glennys Young

…plus 10 more reviews and works received.


Browse the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about new issues from Project MUSE


00_23.1cover_Page_1

About the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.

China Review International Vol. 22 No. 3&4 (2015)

This double-issue issue of China Review International arrives with two features and more than 20 reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese studies, including seven reviews of University of Hawai`i Press books.

FEATURES

REVIEWS

…plus 10 more.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


CRI_22-3&4_cover_RGBAbout the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.

#LookItUP: Minority Voices in UHP Journals

 

upweekiconThis is Part 4 in a series of University of Hawai`i Press blog posts celebrating University Press Week and highlighting scholarship published by UH Press journals in the past year. Read our introductory blog post here. Our hope is that this series will shed new light on how UH Press “sells the facts,” so to speak, and the value our 24 journals bring to our very existence. Links to each journal and article are provided below.*


Minority Voices

U.S. -Japan Women’s JournalNumber 51, 2017usjwj
Article:
 “Building a Feminist Scholarly Community: Fifty-One Issues of U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal” by Jan Bardsley

Context: Like many of our scholarly journals, U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal is a community of minority voices in and of itself. This volume celebrates 50 issues of bringing women’s studies and scholars together across international boundaries.

 

 

aza

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and CultureVolume 10, 2017
Special Section: Writer in Focus: Kim Sagwa

Context: Azalea presents five pieces by Korean author Kim Sagwa, who was able to complete her first novel under the United States an Alien of Extraordinary Ability in the Arts visa in 2016. One must wonder, given the tide change in immigrant policies and arts funding under the current administration, if such visas will be available for international artists in the future.

 

bio

Biography: An Interdisciplinary QuarterlyVolume 39, Number 4, Fall 2016
Special Section: International Year in Review

Context: Biography launched a new annual section that provides reports on life writing from across the world. This new venue gives us a lens by which to see global shifts in personal identity, from authors writing out of the U.K.’s Brexit to memoirists lyrically documenting the U.S.’s transgender community to historical biographers nostalgic for pre-1949 Republican China.

 

Trans-Humanities JournalVolume 10, Number 1, 2017th
Article: “Mapping the Terrain of New Black Fatherhood in Contemporary African American Literature” by Set-Byul Moon

Context: Literature can bridge the great divide between knowing and understanding, and this article looks at how the African American father has been developed against negative stereotypes through the writings of “Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison to contemporary — and relatively young — authors such as Leonard Pitts Jr. and Bernice L. McFadden.”

 

Asian Theatre JournalVolume 34, Number 1, Spring 2017atj
Special Section: Founders in the Field

Context: Asian Theatre Journal‘s Spring 2017 issue highlights three founders in the field–all women: Rachel Cooper, Kathy Foley, and Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei. Editor Kathy Foley also makes this charge to reviewers: “To become a truly international journal, cross-border research that does not always detour to Western thinking is much needed. It is limiting when authors feel they have to routinely apply Western tropes of gender, class, or aesthetics.”

 

Oregon beautiful picture

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics SocietyVolume 10, 2017
Section: Submission Guidelines

Context: This journal stands out for not only making new research in the field of Southeast Asian linguistics available for free via open-access publishing, but for its commitment to the peer review process, which ensures the publication of accurate information. From its submission guidelines: “Each original article undergoes double-blind review by at least two scholars, usually a member of the [JSEALS] Advisory Board and one or more independent referees.”

 

cri

China Review International: A Journal of Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese StudiesVolume 22, Number 1, 2015
Article:
“Review of Ka-ming Wu’s Reinventing Chinese Tradition: The Cultural Politics of Late Socialism (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2015)” by Nyíri Pál

Context: New scholarship benefits from criticism, and in this issue of China Review International (published in 2017), reviewer Nyíri Pál offers a fresh analysis of Chinese folk traditions in light of economic developments and recent ethnographic studies of “culture workers.”

 

*Institutional access to online aggregators such as Project MUSE may be required for full-text reading. For access questions, please see the Project MUSE FAQ available here or contact your local library.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

China Review International, vol. 22, no. 2 (2015)

This issue of China Review International: A Journal of Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies opens with one feature and includes 15 reviews.

FEATURE

Herself an Autobiographer: Writing Women’s Self-Representation in the Qing (Reviewing Binbin Yang, Heroines of the Qing: Exemplary Women Tell Their Stories) Reviewed by Xu Ma

REVIEWS

Sarah Allan, The Heir and the Sage: Dynastic Legend in Early China, reviewed by Paul R. Goldin

Paul Bevan, A Modern Miscellany: Shanghai Cartoon Artists, Shao Xunmei’s Circle, and the Travels of Jack Chen, 1926–1938, reviewed by Hal Swindall

Susanne Bregnbæk, Fragile Elite: The Dilemmas of China’s Top University Students, reviewed by Chongmin Yang Continue reading “China Review International, vol. 22, no. 2 (2015)”

China Review International, vol. 22, no. 1 (2015)

This issue of China Review International: A Journal of Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies includes two features and more than 15 reviews:

FEATUREs

China’s Palace Women through the Dynasties (Reviewing Keith McMahon, Women Shall Not Rule: Imperial Wives and Concubines in China from Han to Liao; Keith McMahon, Celestial Women: Imperial Wives and Concubines in China from Song to Qing) Reviewed by Paul S. Ropp

Chinese Metaphysics: A New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking (Reviewing Chenyang Li and Franklin Perkins, editors, Chinese Metaphysics and Its Problems) Reviewed by Joseph E. Harroff

REVIEWS

Shehong Chen, Daughter of Good Fortune: A Twentieth-Century Chinese Peasant Memoir, reviewed by Guo Chao

Enze Han, Contestation and Adaption: The Politics of National Identity in China, reviewed by Elizabeth Van Wie Davis

Agnieszka Joniak-Lüthi, The Han: China’s Diverse Majority, reviewed by Yu Luo Continue reading “China Review International, vol. 22, no. 1 (2015)”