New Journal Issues: Azalea, Journal of Burma Studies, JSEALS + More (May 2020)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture

Volume 13 (2020)

The special feature of this issue of Azalea carries a feast of research: eight essays on modern Korean poetry, thanks to the endeavors of the two guest editors, Jae Won Chung and Benoit Berthelier. From the beginning period of the 1920s, described by Ku In-mo and David Krolikoski, to the genealogy of modernism, written by Jae Won Edward Chung, to North Korean poetry, covered by Benoit Berthelier and Sonja Haeussler, to twenty-first-century South Korean poetry, examined by Cho Kang-sŏk and Ivanna Sang Een Yi, this feature evinces that the field of modern Korean poetry has gotten in firm stakes.

—Young-Jun Lee, editor

Journal of Burma Studies 24-1

The Journal of Burma Studies

Special Issue: Environment and Resources: Burma/Myanmar and the (Un)Natural

Volume 24, Issue 1 (2020)

[I]n this Special Issue of The Journal of Burma Studies (JBS) we have gathered together an interdisciplinary set of research articles surrounding questions of what nature is and what its resources might be. With the four authors’ varied focus on historical and contemporary Myanmar, this set of papers offers challenging new vistas for the exploration and interrogation of how resources and the environment have been approached and brokered by local and transnational actors.

—Jane M. Ferguson, editor

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Open Access

Volume 13, Issue 1 (2020)

This issue includes five research articles and one data paper:

  • Reduction in Burmese Compounds by Dan Cameron Burgdorf
  • Situation Types in Thai Sign Language by Cassie Wallace,
  • Variation of Oral and Nasal Stops by English and Japanese Learners of Thai by Sugunya Ruangjaroon
  • Reconsidering the Diachrony of Tone in Rma by Nathaniel A. Sims
  • A Look at Diachronic Phonological Processes in Inthii Oy by Jennifer L. Daniell
  • “Ethnolinguistic Notes on the Language Endangerment Status of Mintil, an Aslian Language” by Teckwyn Lim
JSEALS Special Publication: Studies in the Anthropology of Language in Mainland Southeast Asia

Studies in the Anthropology of Language in Mainland Southeast Asia

Open Access

New JSEALS Special Publication

The papers in this special issue were first written for a workshop held at the University of Sydney in August 2019, titled The Anthropology of Language in Mainland Southeast Asia. Of special interest in the workshop was the fact that only a tiny fraction of the area’s languages have national language status. These national languages are far better researched and understood than the vast majority of languages spoken in the area. New research on minority languages (mostly in descriptive and historical linguistics) is beginning to redress this imbalance, but much work remains if we are going to achieve a full picture of human language in mainland Southeast Asia.

—N. J. Enfield, Jack Sidnell, and Charles H. P. Zuckerman, editors

Korean Studies

Volume 44 (2020)

The new issue includes the following research articles:

  • How Did Buddhists Venerate the Avataṃsaka-sūtra in Late Premodern Korea? Insights from Two Manuscript Ritual Texts by Richard D. McBride II
  • A Population Genetic Perspective on Korean Prehistory by Choongwon Jeong
  • From Catch-up to Convergence? Re-casting the Trajectory of Capitalism in South Korea by Keun Lee, Ho-Chul Shin, Jongho Lee
  • Qing China’s Misguided Foreign Policy and the Struggle to Dominate Korea (According to the Russian Archive) by Larisa Zabrovskaia
  • Mobile North Korean Women and Long-Distance Motherhood: The (Re)Construction of Intimacy and the Ambivalence of Family by Sung Kyung Kim
  • North Korean Migrants in South Korea: “Multicultural” or “Global” Citizens? by Young-a Park
Language Documentation & Conservation

Language Documentation & Conservation

Open Access

Volume 14 (2020)

In May, Language Documentation & Conservation added two new articles:

  • What is “natural” speech? Comparing free narratives and Frog stories in Indonesia
    By Marian Klamer, Francesca R. Moro
  • Contrasting statistical indicators of Māori language revitalization: Conversational ability, speaking proficiency, and first language
    By Chris Lane

Find the 2019 LD&C annual report here.

Philosophy East and West PEW 70-2

Philosophy East & West

Volume 70, Issue 2 (2020)

This issue of Philosophy East & West opens with a remembrance of Gerald James Larson, known more widely as Gerry Larson, who passed away suddenly on April 27, 2019 at the age of 81. His death was unexpected because he was just getting ready to leave for India in connection with a meeting centered on his recently published magnum opus Classical Yoga Philosophy and the Legacy of Sāṁkhya. Sadly, he experienced some sharp abdominal pain and passed away two weeks later.

Read Joseph Prabhu’s reflect on Gerry Larson and the issue’s articles, discussions, and reviews here.

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society – Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 25

JSEALS: Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 25

This special publication of the Journal of Southeast Asian Linguistics, edited by Henry Y. Chang and Hui-chuan J. Huang, grew out of the 25th annual meeting of AFLA held at Academia Sinica, Taiwan, 10-12 May, 2018.

Contributions in this volume cover a wide variety of topics in Austronesian linguistics. Chen and Jiang argue that in Bunun, -in- is an existential past tense marker while =in is a change-of-state marker at the discourse level, in contrast to the dominant view in the literature. Focusing on the prosody of Kanakanavu, Cheng spells out a number of phonological conditions and identifies the morphemes that could either attract or repel prominence. Socolof and Shimoyama propose a split ergative analysis of Māori genitive relative construction while showing that this construction is more widely distributed than generally described. Sommerlot’s article shows that the ber-V-nya constructions in Indonesian do not fit into any functions of these affixes in previous descriptions and they instead resemble a type of presentational-there construction. Tanenbaum adopts a syntactically-grounded account of Tagalog second-position clitics, based on obligatory V-to-C head movement. Wu explores the constructions of noun incorporation (NI) in Northern Paiwan, including both lexical and syntactic NI, and examines their morphosyntactic behaviors. Yang and Wong study how Malay məN- prefixation interacts with reduplication and propose a new markedness constraint against word-initial nasals to account for the data.


Ways of talking about the past: The semantics of –in- and =in in Bunun
By Sihwei Chen and Haowen Jiang

More on Kanakanavu word-level prosody: Cyclic and postcyclic processes
By Yi-Yang Cheng

The distribution of the Māori genitive relative construction
By Michael Socolof and Junko Shimoyama

A presentational construction in Indonesian
By Carly J. Sommerlot

Untangling the Tagalog clitic cluster
By Russell Tanenbaum

Two types of noun incorporation in Northern Paiwan
By Chunming Wu

Malay verbal reduplication with the məN- prefix
By Meng Yang and Deborah J.M. Wong

This open-access special publication and the first articles in Vol. 13 issue 1 are available via ScholarSpace.

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society – Volume 12:2 (2019) + Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 24

Figure 5 in this issue’s “The Munda Maritime Hypothesis” by Felix Rau and Paul Sidwell: Archaeological sites in the Mahanadi-Brahmani Delta.

The second issue of Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society‘s 12th volume is complete and available on the university open-access platform, ScholarSpace.

JSEALS also offers a new special publication, Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 24.

Research Articles (Peer-Reviewed)

The Compatibility between Expressive Elements: Kinship Terms, Pronouns, and Racial Slurs in Vietnamese
By Juliet Huynh and Suwon Yoon

Variation in the Voiced Coronals of Two Fataluku-speaking Villages
By Tyler M. Heston

The Vietnamese Polyfunctional Marker Mà as a Generalized Linker: A Multilevel Approach
By Danh Thành Do-Hurinville and Huy Linh Dao

The Munda Maritime Hypothesis
By Felix Rau and Paul Sidwell

Numeral Classifiers in Tai Lue (Xishuangbanna)
By Audra Phillips and William J. Hanna

Data Papers, Book Reviews, and Other Notes

Muak Sa-aak: Challenges of an Extensive Phoneme Inventory for a Contained Latin-Based Orthography
By Elizabeth Hall

Special Publication

Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 24
By Matt Pearson

 

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society – Volume 12:1 (2019)

Figure 1: Location of the Dejing dialect area where Yang is spoken
Location of the Dejing dialect area where Yang is spoken, a figure in Eric Jackson’s “Two-Part Negation in Yang Zhuang” this issue.

The first issue of Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society‘s 12th volume is complete and available on the university open-access platform, ScholarSpace.

Research Papers (Peer-Reviewed)

Spatial Relations along the In-On Continuum in Thai Sign Language
Cassie Wallace

Vietnamese Initial Consonant Clusters in Quốc Ngữ Documents from the 17th to Early 19th Centuries
Duc Nghieu Vu

Types and Functions of Reduplication in Palembang
Mardheya Alsamadani and Samar Taibah

Request Modifications Used by Chinese Learners and Native Speakers of Thai
Yingyot Kanchina and Sujaritlak Deepadung

Two-part Negation in Yang Zhuang
Eric Jackson

Tonal Variation in Pyen
Christina Scotte Hornéy

The Labial Causative In Trans-Himalayan
Guillaume Jacques

Non-finite Clauses in Thai
Pornsiri Singhapreecha

Data Papers, Book Reviews, and Other Notes

Proposing a Facilitated Participatory Approach for Southeast Asian Minority Language Orthography Design
Sigrid Lew

Tones in the Cuoi Language of Tan Ki District in Nghe An Province, Vietnam
Huu Hoanh Nguyen and Van Loi Nguyen

Book Notice: Mainland Southeast Asian Languages – A Concise Typological Introduction, by N. J. Enfield

In Memoriam: Thomas M. Tehan (1951-2019)
Brian Migliazza

A View on Proto-Karen Phonology and Lexicon
Theraphan Luangthongkum

Celebrating Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month with Free Journal Content

We are proud to publish an extensive list of Pacific, Asian, and Southeast Asian studies journals. This Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month, explore and enjoy the following free journal content online:

Open Access Journals:

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Language Documentation & Conservation

Palapala: a journal of Hawaiian language and literature

Free journal content online:

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific (46#1, 2007)

Asian Theatre Journal: Official Journal of the Association for Asian Performance (23#1, 2006)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture (1, 2007)

Buddhist-Christian Studies: Official Journal of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (27, 2007)

China Review International: Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies (15#1, 2008)

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs (15#1, 2003)

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review (3#1, 2014)

The Hawaiian Journal of History (49, 2015)

Journal of Daoist Studies (8, 2015)

Journal of Korean Religions (6#1, 2015)

Korean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans Abroad (29, 2005)

MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing: New Writing from America, the Pacific, and Asia (19#1, 2007)

Oceanic Linguistics: Current Research on Languages of the Oceanic Area (50#2, 2011)

Pacific Science: Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region (71#4, 2017)

Philosophy East & West: A Quarterly of Comparative Philosophy (53#3, 2007)

Rapa Nui Journal: The journal of the Easter Island Foundation (30#2, 2016)

Review of Japanese Culture and Society (24, 2012)

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (45, 2013)

Asian Perspectives 58-1
Asian Theatre Journal 36-1 cover

Visit our website to learn more about our publications or to subscribe.

 

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Language and Linguistics

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Today, the 6th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC), Connecting Communities, Languages & Technology kicked off at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. The conference features keynote talks, talk story sessions, workshops, papers, and posters. Two of our linguistic journal editors, Language Documentation & Conservation editor Nick Thieberger and Oceanic Linguistics co-editor Daniel Kaufman, are featured in the program.

In 2018, new content from Language Documentation & Conservation, Oceanic Linguistics, and the Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society garnered nearly 11,000 downloads worldwide on both Project MUSE and the University of Hawai‘i’s open access digital repository, ScholarSpace. Find the most downloaded 2018 articles from these three journals below. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Language and Linguistics”

Special Publication: Papers from the Seventh International Conference on Austroasiatic Linguistics, JSEALS

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The Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society recently published its third special publication. “Papers from the Seventh International Conference on Austro-Asiatic Linguistics” is a collection of nine papers.

The conference, held every two years, took place in Kiel, Germany in Fall 2017. This is the fourth published conference proceedings since the conference’s inception at the University of Hawai‘i in 1973. The first was an Oceanic Linguistics special issue in 1976, followed by publications in 2011 and 2014.

“With this special issue we return full circle to publication under the University of Hawai’i Press, and are extremely excited to be part of a new wave of Austroasiatic [AA] studies,” writes editors Hiram Ring and Felix Rau. “There is much work yet to be done on these languages with all their diversity and complexity, but given the multiple perspectives and insights represented by the authors in this volume, and the increasing focus by AA researchers on making underlying data accessible, the outlook for AA studies in the coming century is incredibly positive.” Continue reading “Special Publication: Papers from the Seventh International Conference on Austroasiatic Linguistics, JSEALS”

Special Publication on Southeast Asian Linguistics (Chulalongkorn International Student Symposium 2017, JSEALS)

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The Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society recently published its second special publication. “Papers from the Chulalongkorn International Student Symposium on Southeast Asian Linguistics” is a collection of 19 papers.

The symposium organizers and volume editors invited authors to submit their manuscripts, which were then assessed by two anonymous reviewers to ensure high quality. Editors Pittayawat Pittayaporn, Sujinat Jitwiriyanont, Pavadee Saisuwan, and Bhimbasistha Tejarajanya say that all these student papers are “outstanding and reflects the authors’ high potential to become great linguists. Importantly, the number of promising young scholars that contributed to this volume suggests a very bright future for Southeast Asian linguistics as a field.” Continue reading “Special Publication on Southeast Asian Linguistics (Chulalongkorn International Student Symposium 2017, JSEALS)”

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society – Volume 10:2 (2017)

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society (JSEALS) recently published three new articles online as part of volume 10, number 2 (2017):

In addition, the editors provided a Book Notice: A Grammar Of Papuan Malay.

JSEALS is a peer-reviewed, open-access, electronic journal. All journal content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license. Sponsor: Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

 

#LookItUP: Minority Voices in UHP Journals

 

upweekiconThis is Part 4 in a series of University of Hawai`i Press blog posts celebrating University Press Week and highlighting scholarship published by UH Press journals in the past year. Read our introductory blog post here. Our hope is that this series will shed new light on how UH Press “sells the facts,” so to speak, and the value our 24 journals bring to our very existence. Links to each journal and article are provided below.*


Minority Voices

U.S. -Japan Women’s JournalNumber 51, 2017usjwj
Article:
 “Building a Feminist Scholarly Community: Fifty-One Issues of U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal” by Jan Bardsley

Context: Like many of our scholarly journals, U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal is a community of minority voices in and of itself. This volume celebrates 50 issues of bringing women’s studies and scholars together across international boundaries.

 

 

aza

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and CultureVolume 10, 2017
Special Section: Writer in Focus: Kim Sagwa

Context: Azalea presents five pieces by Korean author Kim Sagwa, who was able to complete her first novel under the United States an Alien of Extraordinary Ability in the Arts visa in 2016. One must wonder, given the tide change in immigrant policies and arts funding under the current administration, if such visas will be available for international artists in the future.

 

bio

Biography: An Interdisciplinary QuarterlyVolume 39, Number 4, Fall 2016
Special Section: International Year in Review

Context: Biography launched a new annual section that provides reports on life writing from across the world. This new venue gives us a lens by which to see global shifts in personal identity, from authors writing out of the U.K.’s Brexit to memoirists lyrically documenting the U.S.’s transgender community to historical biographers nostalgic for pre-1949 Republican China.

 

Trans-Humanities JournalVolume 10, Number 1, 2017th
Article: “Mapping the Terrain of New Black Fatherhood in Contemporary African American Literature” by Set-Byul Moon

Context: Literature can bridge the great divide between knowing and understanding, and this article looks at how the African American father has been developed against negative stereotypes through the writings of “Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison to contemporary — and relatively young — authors such as Leonard Pitts Jr. and Bernice L. McFadden.”

 

Asian Theatre JournalVolume 34, Number 1, Spring 2017atj
Special Section: Founders in the Field

Context: Asian Theatre Journal‘s Spring 2017 issue highlights three founders in the field–all women: Rachel Cooper, Kathy Foley, and Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei. Editor Kathy Foley also makes this charge to reviewers: “To become a truly international journal, cross-border research that does not always detour to Western thinking is much needed. It is limiting when authors feel they have to routinely apply Western tropes of gender, class, or aesthetics.”

 

Oregon beautiful picture

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics SocietyVolume 10, 2017
Section: Submission Guidelines

Context: This journal stands out for not only making new research in the field of Southeast Asian linguistics available for free via open-access publishing, but for its commitment to the peer review process, which ensures the publication of accurate information. From its submission guidelines: “Each original article undergoes double-blind review by at least two scholars, usually a member of the [JSEALS] Advisory Board and one or more independent referees.”

 

cri

China Review International: A Journal of Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese StudiesVolume 22, Number 1, 2015
Article:
“Review of Ka-ming Wu’s Reinventing Chinese Tradition: The Cultural Politics of Late Socialism (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2015)” by Nyíri Pál

Context: New scholarship benefits from criticism, and in this issue of China Review International (published in 2017), reviewer Nyíri Pál offers a fresh analysis of Chinese folk traditions in light of economic developments and recent ethnographic studies of “culture workers.”

 

*Institutional access to online aggregators such as Project MUSE may be required for full-text reading. For access questions, please see the Project MUSE FAQ available here or contact your local library.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu. To receive table-of-contents email alerts for these publications, please click here to sign up at Project MUSE.

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society – Volume 10:2 (2017)

From Quality of Javanese and Sundanese Vowels in this issue. Map of Traditional Languages in Java Island.

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society has published three new articles now available online for volume 10, number 2 (2017).

From On the Linguistics Affiliation for ‘Tai Loi’ in this issue. Locations of groups referred to as ‘Tai Loi’.

Quality of Javanese and Sundanese Vowels by Arum Perwitasari, Marian Klamer, Jurriaan Witteman, and Niels O. Schiller

On the Linguistic Affiliation of ‘Tai Loi’ by Elizabeth Hall

Sources of Written Burmese –ac and related questions in Burmese historical phonology by Rudolph Yanson

Old Burmese ry- – a Remark on Proto-Lolo-Burmese Resonant Initials by Yoshio Nishi

JSEALS is an open access publication. All journal content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license. Sponsor: Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

JSEALS Special Publication No. 1: Issues in Austronesian Historical Linguistics (2017)

Cover photo courtesy of Alexander Smith


Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society has released Special Publication No. 1: Issues in Austronesian Historical Linguistics. Editor-in-Chief Mark J. Alves writes in the introduction,

This is the first JSEALS special publication since JSEALS became a University of Hawai‘i Press publication as of January 2017. The goal of JSEALS special publications is to share collections of linguistics articles, such as select papers from conferences or other special research agendas, as well as to offer a way for linguistic researchers in the greater Southeast Asian region to publish monograph-length works. In this instance, Hsiu-chuan Liao, the primary editor of this publication, requested that papers from the 2015 13-ICAL meeting be published through JSEALS, which we were able to complete in a timely manner. The five papers include works by prominent names in the field of Austronesian historical linguistics.

Papers

Mora, Vowel Length, and Diachrony: the Case of Arta, a Philippine Negrito Language by Yukinori Kimoto

Re-evaluating the Position of Iraya Among Philippine Languages by Lawrence A. Reid

Reconstructing Proto Kenyah Pronouns and the Development of a True Five Number System by Alexander D. Smith

Linguistic Evidence for Prehistory: Oceanic Examples by Malcolm Ross

Classifying Old Rapa: Linguistic Evidence for Contact Networks in Southeast Polynesia by Mary Walworth


Open Access: Read JSEALS issues and special publications here


About the Journal

Devoted to a region of extraordinary linguistic diversity, the journal features papers on the languages of Southeast Asia, including Austroasiatic, Austronesian, Hmong-Mien, Tibeto-Burman, and Tai-Kadai.

Open Access

JSEALS is an open access publication. All journal content is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical-NoDerivatives 4.0 International license. Sponsor: Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Submissions

Find Submission Guidelines here.