Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal, Vol. 4#3, 2019

This issue includes the following articles:

Mālama nā makua i nā keiki me ka hānō: Native Hawaiian Parents Caring for Their Children with Asthma, (Part 2)
May K. Kealoha, Sandra L. Sinclair, and Karol K. Richardson

Impact of lactation support program on Initiation of Breastfeeding in Term Infants
Binu Ninan, Umamaheswari Balakrishnan, Asia Mohamed, Munusamy Manjula, Thangaraj Abiramalatha, Ashok Chandrasekaran, and Prakash Amboiram

It’s a Matter of Perspective: The Role of Aging Expectations and Self-Efficacy Towards Engagement in Healthy Lifestyles Among Older Adults
Johnny J. Yao Jr.

THE CORRELATION BETWEEN STIGMA AND FAMILY ACCEPTANCE WITH RELIGIOSITY OF PLWH MSM IN MEDAN, INDONESIA
I Nyoman Arya Maha Putra, Agung Waluyo, and Sri Yona

Is high maternal body mass index associated with caesarean section delivery in Mongolia? A prospective observational study
Naoko Hikita, Megumi Haruna, Masayo Matsuzaki, Emi Sasagawa, Minoru Murata, Ariunaa Yura, and Otgontogoo Oidovsuren


About the Journal

Asian Pacific Island Nursing Journal: Official Journal of the Asian American / Pacific Islander Nurses Association features research papers, empirical and theoretical articles, editorials, abstracts of recent dissertations, and conference summaries that relate to nursing care written by scientists and researchers in nursing and the social sciences, such as:

  • Clinical and Developmental Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Social Work, Public Health, Education, Genetics, Pharmacology, Infectious Disease, Oncology, Cardiovascular Disease, Pulmonary Function and Disease, Dermatology, Wound Healing, Immunology, Anesthesiology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Hematology, Neonatology, Nephrology, Pathology, Physiology, Nutrition, Pain Management, Sleep Disturbances, and Mental Health.

 

Indexed in Scopus, the DOAJ and EBSCO

Biography Vol. 42 No. 2 (2019)

Figure 8 from Philip Miletic’s essay “Playing a Life in Nina Freeman’s Automedia Game, Cibele.” Valtameri. The meter with the handshake in the upper right corner progresses as Nina (left) and Ichi (right) fight together.

Editor’s Note

ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE:

Wounded Cities: Topographies of Self and Nation in Fay Afaf Kanafani’s Nadia, Captive of Hope
Hager Ben Driss

Playing a Life in Nina Freeman’s Automedia Game, Cibele
Philip Miletic

Reading, Writing, and Resistance in Audre Lorde’s Zami: A New Spelling of My Name
Sarita Cannon

“Bad” Biography Exposed!: A Critical Analysis of American Super-Pop
Oline Eaton

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Shadow in the Garden: A Biographer’s Tale, by James Atlas
Reviewed by Carl Rollyson

Experiments in Life-Writing: Intersections of Auto/Biography and Fiction, edited by Lucia Boldrini and Julia Novak
Reviewed by Alexandra Effe

American Autobiography after 9/11, by Megan Brown
Reviewed by Elisabeth Hedrick-Moser

Letter to My Father: A Memoir, by G. Thomas Couser
Reviewed by Emily Hipchen

The Selfie Generation: How Our Self Images Are Changing Our Notions of Privacy, Sex, Consent, and Culture, by Alicia Eler
Reviewed by Teresa Bruś

Invented Lives, Imagined Communities: The Biopic and American National Identity, edited by William H. Epstein and R. Barton Palmer
Reviewed by Eric M. Thau

An Artisan Intellectual: James Carter and the Rise of Modern Britain, 1792–1853, by Christopher Ferguson
Reviewed by Anna Clark

Autobiographical Writing in Latin America: Folds of the Self, by Sergio R. Franco
Reviewed by Francisco Brignole

Getting Personal: Teaching Personal Writing in the Digital Age, edited by Laura Gray-Rosendale
Reviewed by Madeleine Sorapure

The Art of Confession: The Performance of Self from Robert Lowell to Reality TV, by Christopher Grobe
Reviewed by Lynda Goldstein

A History of Irish Autobiography, edited by Liam Harte
Reviewed by Taura Napier

Victorians Undone: Tales of the Flesh in the Age of Decorum, by Kathryn Hughes
Reviewed by Alison Booth

Doña Teresa Confronts the Spanish Inquisition: A Seventeenth-Century New Mexican Drama, by Frances Levine
Reviewed by Jorge Ca.izares-Esguerra

Clio’s Lives: Biographies and Autobiographies of Historians, edited by Doug Munro and John G. Reid
Reviewed by Jaume Aurell

The Decolonial Mandela: Peace, Justice and the Politics of Life, edited by Sabelo Ndlovu-Gatsheni
Reviewed by Nick Mdika Tembo

Creating Identity in the Victorian Fictional Autobiography, by Heidi L. Pennington
Reviewed by Anne Reus

A History of Irish Working-Class Writing, edited by Michael Pierse
Reviewed by Muireann Leech

Canadian Graphic: Picturing Lives, edited by Candida Rifkind and Linda Warley
Reviewed by Roc.o G. Davis

Life? or Theatre? ( Leben? oder Theater?), by Charlotte Salomon
Reviewed by Julia Watson

The Phenomenology of Autobiography: Making it Real, by Arnaud Schmitt
Reviewed by Bettina Stumm

On the Arab-Jew, Palestine, and Other Displacements: Selected Writings, by Ella Shohat
Reviewed by Joyce Zonana

Bird-Bent Grass: A Memoir, in Pieces, by Kathleen Venema
Reviewed by G. Thomas Couser

Private Lives Made Public: The Invention of Biography in Early Modern England, by Andrea Walkden
Reviewed by Julie A. Eckerle


About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

China Review International Vol. 24 no. 3 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 3 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 20 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEW

The Persistence and Significance of Small Urban Spaces in China (reviewing Di Wang, The Teahouse under Socialism: The Decline and Renewal of Public Life in Chengdu, 1950–2000)
Reviewed by Tim Simpson

REVIEWS

Jennifer Altehenger, Legal Lessons: Popularizing Laws in the People’s Republic of China, 1949–1989
Reviewed by Ji Li

Emily Baum, The Invention of Madness: State, Society, and the Insane in Modern China
Reviewed by Hsuan-Ying Huang

Yanjie Bian, Guanxi: How China Works
Reviewed by Jack Barbalet

Steve Chan, Trust and Distrust in Sino-American Relations: Challenge and Opportunity 
Reviewed by Richard Hu

Patricia P. Chu, Where I have Never Been: Migration, Melancholia, and Memory in Asian American Narratives of Return 
Reviewed by Shawn Higgins

Melissa Dale, Inside the World of the Eunuch: A Social History of the Emperor’s Servants in Qing China
Reviewed by Ellen Soullière

Joshua Eisenman, Red China’s Green Revolution: Technological Innovation, Institutional Change, and Economic Development under the Commune
Reviewed by Zhun Xu

Luke Habberstad, Forming the Early Chinese Court: Rituals, Spaces, Roles 
Reviewed by Christopher F. Kim

Kurtis Hagen and Steve Coutinho, translated with commentary, Philosophers of the Warring States: A Sourcebook in Chinese Philosophy 
Reviewed by Robin R. Wang

Derek Hird and Geng Song, editors, The Cosmopolitan Dream: Transnational Chinese Masculinities in a Global Age
Reviewed by Yinni Peng

Ming-sho Ho, Challenging Beijing’s Mandate of Heaven: Taiwan’s Sunflower Movement and Hong Kong’s Umbrella Movement 
Reviewed by Kevin Wei Luo

Hsiao-ting Lin, Accidental State: Chiang Kai-shek, the United States, and the Making of Taiwan 
Reviewed by Syaru Shirley Lin

Thomas Maissen and Barbara Mittler, Why China Did Not Have a Renaissance – And Why That Matters: An Interdisciplinary Dialogue 
Reviewed by Luke Clossey

Yuan-ning Wen and others, edited by Christopher Rea, Imperfect Understanding: Intimate Portraits of Modern Chinese Celebrities 
Reviewed by David N. C. Hull

William T. Rowe, Speaking of Profit: Bao Shichen and Reform in Nineteenth-Century China 
Reviewed by Margherita Zanasi

Michael Szonyi, The Art of Being Governed: Everyday Politics in Late Imperial China 
Reviewed by Masato Hasegawa

Jinping Wang, In the Wake of the Mongols: The Making of a New Social Order in North China, 1200–1600  Reviewed by Carl Déry

Bing Wang, Classical Chinese Poetry in Singapore: Witnesses to Social and Cultural Transformations in the Chinese Community 
Reviewed by Jing-yi Qu

Pu Wang, The Translatability of Revolution: Guo Moruo and Twentieth-Century Chinese Culture 
Reviewed by Haosheng Yang

Yun Via, Down with Traitors: Justice and Nationalism in Wartime China 
Reviewed by Patrick Fuliang Shan

Works Received


Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 3 (July 2019)

Preview volume 73 number 3 titles below and find content of all 8 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Stream Benthic Macroinvertebrate Assemblages Reveal the Importance of a Recently Established Freshwater Protected Area in a Tropical Watershed
Elfritzson M. Peralta, Alexis E. Belen, Gelsie Rose Buenaventura, Francis Godwin G. Cantre, Katharine Grace R. Espiritu, Jana Nicole A. De Vera, Cristine P. Perez, Aleziz Kryzzien V. Tan, Irisse Bianca B. De Jesus, Paul Palomares, Jonathan Carlo A. Briones, Tohru Ikeya, Francis S. Magbanua, Rey Donne S. Papa, and Noboru Okuda

Island Hopping in a Biodiversity Hotspot Archipelago: Reconstructed Invasion History and Updated Status and Distribution of Alien Frogs in the Philippines
Arman N. Pili, Emerson Y. Sy, Mae Lowe L. Diesmos, and Arvin C. Diesmos

Importance of Non-native Honeybees (Apis mellifera) as Flower Visitors to the Hawaiian Tree ‘Ōhi‘a Lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) Across an Elevation Gradient
Camila A. Cortina, Clare E. Aslan, and Stacey J. Litson

Screening and Biosecurity for White-nose Fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Ascomycota: Pseudeurotiaceae) in Hawai‘i
Violeta L. Zhelyazkova, Nia L. Toshkova, Serena E. Dool, Frank J. Bonaccorso, Corinna A. Pinzari, Kristina Montoya-Aiona, and Sebastien J. Puechmaille

Genetic and Morphological Diversity in Aphis gossypii  Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in the Pacific Basin
Ross H. Miller, Robert G. Foottit, Eric Maw, and Keith S. Pike

Age, Growth and Mortality of the Goldlined Seabream Rhabdosargus sarba in Waters off Southwestern Taiwan
Shoou-Jeng Joung, Yu-Yung Shyh, Kwang-Ming Liu, and Shyh-Bin Wang

Morphology and Behavior of Gametes and Zoospores from the Plant-Parasitic Green Algae, Cephaleuros  (Chlorophyta, Ulvophyceae)
Narasinee Thithuan, Penpadsorn Bunjonsiri, and Anurag Sunpapao

New Chromosome Number Reports for Angiosperms Native or Introduced to Hawai‘i, with Additional Reports for Fiji and Samoa
Michael Kiehn, and David H. Lorence


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Review of Japanese Culture and Society, vol. 29 (2017)

Distributed for Jōsai International Center for the Promotion of Art and Science, Jōsai University

READING SŌSEKI NOW

Editors’ Introduction: Sōseki Great and Small
Reiko Abe Auestad, Alan Tansman, J. Keith Vincent

What Sort of a Stone Was Sōseki? How to Become Who You Are Not
Tawada Yōko, J. Keith Vincent

Kokoro and the Economic Imagination
Brian Hurley

The Affect that Disorients Kokoro
Reiko Abe Auestad

Kokoro in the High School Textbook
Ken K. Ito

Doubled Visions of Desire: Fujimura Misao, Kusamakura, and Homosocial Nostalgia
Robert Tuck

Penning the Mad Man in the Attic: Queerness, Women Writers, and Race in Sōseki’s Sanshirō
Sayumi Takahashi Harb

Beach Boys in Manchuria: An Examination of Sōseki’s Here and There in Manchuria and Korea, 1909
Angela Yiu

The Relations Between Things and Three Types of People: A lecture sponsored by the Manshū Nichinichi Shimbun, September 12, 1909, in Dalian (translated by Angela Yiu)
Natsume Sōseki

“Why Was He…Well, Killed?” Natsume Sōseki, Empire, and the Open Secrets of Anticolonial Violence
Andre Haag

Impressions of Korea and Manchuria (1909) (translated by Andre Haag)
Natsume Sōseki

Judging a Book by Its Cover: Natsume Sōseki, Book Design, and the Value of Art
Pedro Thiago Ramos Bassoe

Death and Poetry: From Shiki to Sōseki (1992) (translated by Robert Tuck) 
Karatani Kōjin

From Postcolonial (2001) (translated by Andre Haag and Robert Tierney)
Komori Yōichi

Camellias and Vampires: Reading the Spermatic Economy in Natsume Sōseki’s And Then (2008) (translated by Kristin Sivak)
Miyazaki Kasumi

ART IN FOCUS: Matsuzawa Yutaka’s The Whole Works, 1961-1971

Introduction
Reiko Tomii

The Whole Works, 1961–71 (translated by Reiko Tomii)
Matsuzawa Tutaka

DESIGN IN FOCUS

Design in Japan: Contemporary Perspectives on Design Practice
Ignacio Adriasola

Interview with Sugiura Kōhei (2013) (translated by Mycah Braxton)

Report: From “Do It Yourself” to “Do It With Others” to “Do It For Others” —Can Fashion Be Renewed? Forum (2012) (translated by Yoonkyung Kim)

The Smart Design Award: The Always Convenient × Always Prepared Series (2012) (translated by Mycah Braxton)

The Essence of Social Design (2013) (translated by Elsa Chanez)
Kakei Yūsuke

FICTION

Butterfly (1889) (translated by Nicholas Albertson)
Yamada Bimyō

On the Contributors


About the Journal

The Review of Japanese Culture and Society is an annual English-language journal dedicated to the critical analysis of Japanese culture using thematic and interdisciplinary approaches to provide a broad perspective by combining the work of Japanese scholars and critics with that of non-Japanese writers. Dedicated to the translation of works written originally in Japanese, each issue also includes an original translation of a Japanese short story.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Manuscripts should be 7,000 to no more than 8,000 words including notes, and authors are responsible for obtaining rights and the cost of obtaining rights for any images included. Find submission guidelines here.

Review of Japanese Culture and Society
Volume 29 (2017)

U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal, Vol. 54, 2018

This issue includes the following scholarly articles:

Introduction: Representing Youth and Gender in Japanese Popular Culture Century
日本大衆文化におけるジェンダーと青春を再検討する:
イントロダクション
Jennifer Coates 

Rethinking the Young Female Cinema Audience: 
Postwar Cinema-Going in Kansai, 1945-1952

若い女性観客を再検討:戦後関西の映画観客1945−1952
Jennifer Coates 

Marketing the Panpan in Japanese Popular Culture: Youth, Sexuality, and Power
日本の大衆文化でパンパンを売り出す時:青春、性及び権力
Irene González-López 

The Desire and Disgust of Sweets: Consuming
Femininities through Shōjo Manga
スイーツの欲望と嫌悪:少女まんがを通して
フェミニニティを消費する
Grace En-Yi Ting 

Beyond Borders: Shōjo Manga and Gender
<越境する>少女マンガとジェンダー
Fusami Ogi 


About the Journal

The U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed, biannual publication, available in print and online that promotes scholarly exchange on social, cultural, political, and economic issues pertaining to gender and Japan. The U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal encourages comparative study among Japan, the United States, and other countries. We welcome contributions from all academic fields in the social sciences and humanities and proposals for special issues. Our mission is to foster the work of young researchers and to ensure that the achievements of established scholars are not forgotten.

Biography Vol. 42 No. 1 (2019)

From the front cover: He mau palapala aina, a me na niele e pili ana. Hookahi ke pai ana. Lahaina, 1840. Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/98687131/.

INTERNATIONAL YEAR IN REVIEW

The International Year in Review is a collection of short, site-specific essays on the year’s most influential publications in life writing. This year’s collection includes entries from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Estonia, France, the Gulf Cooperation Council, India, Italy, Korea, Lebanon, Mexico, the Netherlands, Palestine, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, South Africa, Spain, the UK, and two essays from the US, one on biography and one on memoir.

Contents

Editors’ Notes

Essays as Life Writing: The Year in Australia
Kylie Cardell

The Tercentenary of Maria Theresa (1717–1780): The Year in Austria and Germany
Tobias Heinrich

The Brazilian “I/Eye” at the IABA Global Conference: The Year in Brazil
Sergio da Silva Barcellos

Musicians’ Lives and National Identity: The Year in Canada
Alana Bell

Independent Biographical Documentaries: The Year in China
Chen Shen

Testigo de barbarie y resistencia: El año en Colombia
Gabriel Jaime Murillo-Arango

Life Writing’s Coming of Age: The Year in Estonia
Leena Kurvet-Käosaar and Maarja Hollo

The Ghosts of World War II: The Year in France
Joanny Moulin

Selves and Identities in the Arabian Gulf: The Year in the Gulf Cooperation Council
Szidonia Haragos

What the Stars Tell: The Year in India
Pramod K. Nayar

Biographies from the Alps to Capri: The Year in Italy
Ilaria Serra

Emergent Subjectivities: The Year in Korea
Heui-Yung Park

Archiving the Political, Narrating the Personal: The Year in Lebanon
Sleiman El Hajj

Politics and Violence: The Year in Mexico
Gerardo Necoechea Gracia

Mediators as the Subject of Dutch Biography: The Year in the Netherlands
Hans Renders and David Veltman

Voices against Erasure, Loss, and Dehumanization: The Year in Palestine
Adam Yaghi

A Time of Great Biographies—Gombrowicz and Herbert: The Year in Poland
Paweł Rodak

“No Coward Soul is Mine”: The Year in Portugal
Cláudia Faria

Auto/Biography After Disaster: The Year in Puerto Rico
Ricia Anne Chansky

Cultural Figures and the Biographical Turn: The Year in Romania
Ioana Luca

“Born-Frees” on South Africa’s Memory Traps: The Year in South Africa
Nick Mdika Tembo

Auto/Biography and Conflict: The Year in Spain
Ana Belén Martínez García

“The necessary disloyalty”: The Year in the UK
Tom Overton

#MeToo and the Memoir Boom: The Year in the US
Leigh Gilmore

American Biography: The Year in the US
Carl Rollyson

Annual Bibliography of Works about Life Writing, 2017–2018


About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

Journal of Korean Religions Vol. 10 No. 1 (2019)

Vol. 10 No. 1 is a special issue on Buddhism in the Colonial Period with Guest Editor Richard D. McBride II. From the Guest Editor’s Introduction:

The Korean colonial period (1910-1945) was a time of tumultuous transformation, not merely because Korea lost its sovereignty and suffered the humiliation of being subjugated by Japan–a country that Korean elites had long viewed  as culturally inferior–but because a whole host of social, educational, cultural, economic, and political changes were instituted that altered the fabric of life irrevocably. Although progressive reformers sought to introduce some changes by means of a failed coup d’état in 1884 (Kapsin chŏngbyŏn), and other reformers encouraged King Kojong (r. 1863-1907) to make changes known collectively as the Kabo Reforms (Kabo kaehyŏk, 1894-1896) in the late Chosŏn period and during the short-lived Great Han Empire (1897-1910), radical changes and challenges to traditional ways of life occurred primarily in the colonial period.

The Remains from Ancient Times: Newly Formed Connections with Buddhist Culture Designated as ‘‘Art’’ or ‘‘CulturalAssets’’
Hee-jung Kang

The Making of Modern Monastic Families in Colonial Korea: An Examination of Master-Disciple Relations in Monks’ Household Registers
Jeongeun Park

Must Read Texts for Buddhists and the Modernization of Korean Buddhist Ritual
Richard D.McBride II

Accounting for North Korea: Korean Reunification, the CCIA, and the Korean Christians Federation
Paul S. Cha

 


China Review International Vol. 24 No. 2 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 2 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 19 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEW

A Matter of Life and Death: The Translator Fou Lei (reviewing Mingyuan Hu, Fou Lei: An Insistence on Truth)
Reviewed by John Minford

REVIEWS

Roger T. Ames and Jinhua Jia, editors, Li Zehou and Confucian Philosophy
Reviewed by Anna Ghiglione

David G. Atwill, Islamic Shangri-La: Inter-Asian Relations and Lhasa’s Muslim Communities, 1600 to 1960
Reviewed by Morris Rossabi

Rostislav Berezkin, Many Faces of Mulian: The Precious Scrolls of Late Imperial China
Reviewed by Daniel L. Overmyer

Franck Billé and Sören Urbansky, editors, Yellow Perils: China Narratives in the Contemporary World
Reviewed by David Martinez-Robles

Renee Y. Chow, Changing Chinese Cities: The Potentials of Field Urbanism
Reviewed by Perry P. J. Yang

Stephen Durrant, Wai-yee Li, Michael Nylan, and Hans van Ess, The Letter to Ren An & Sima Qian’s Legacy
Reviewed by Allan H. Barr

Rania Huntington, Ink and Tears: Memory, Mourning, and Writing in the Yu Family
Reviewed by Cathy Silber

Roger B. Jeans, editor, The Letters and Diaries of Colonel John Hart Caughey, 1944–1945: With Wedemeyer in World War II China
Reviewed by Peter Chenmain Wang

Pei-Chia Lan, Raising Global Families: Parenting, Immigration, and Class in Taiwan and the US
Reviewed by Yu-chin Tseng

Gina Marchetti, Citing China: Politics, Postmodernism, and World Cinema
Reviewed by Yingjin Zhang

Max Oidtmann, Forging the Golden Urn: The Qing Empire and the Politics of Reincarnation in Tibet
Reviewed by Yingcong Dai

Patrick Fuliang Shan, Yuan Shikai: A Reappraisal 

Reviewed by Qiang Fang

Zhihua Shen and Yafeng Xia, A Misunderstood Friendship: Mao Zedong, Kim Il-sung, and Sino-North Korean Relations, 1949–1976
Reviewed by Adam Cathcart

Wendy Swartz, Reading Philosophy, Writing Poetry: Intertextual Modes of Making Meaning in Early Medieval China
Reviewed by Ping Wang

Kenneth M. Swope, On the Trail of the Yellow Tiger: War, Trauma, and Social Dislocation in Southwest China during the Ming-Qing Transition
Reviewed by Jodi L. Weinstein

Cai Xiang, Revolution & Its Narratives: China’s Socialist Literary and Cultural Imaginaries, 1949–1966
Reviewed by Yiju Huang

Victor Cunrui Xiong, Capital Cities and Urban Form in Pre-modern China: Luoyang, 1038 BCE to 938 CE  

Reviewed by Dong Wang

Xiaowei Zheng, The Politics of Rights and the 1911 Revolution in China
Reviewed by Edward McCord

Li Zhi, edited and translated by Rivi Handler-Spitz, Pauline C. Lee, and Haun Saussy, A Book to Burn & a Book to Keep (Hidden): Selected Writings
Reviewed by Nanxiu Qian

Works Received 


About the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.

China Review International
Vol. 24. No. 2 (2017)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture, Volume 12 (2019)

From Young-Jun Lee’s Editor’s Note

Last year, peace in Korea seemed imminent, thanks to cooperation between Trump and Kim, but now, with the subsequent failure of talks, that expectation has diminished. Still, perhaps because of that failure, it is very noisy in front of Seoul Station or at Gwanghwamun Square these days, where people gather every weekend to make their opinions known. This clamor can be seen as expressing Korea’s disorder, or it can be seen as evidence of Korea’s eagerness for change. Social energy in Korea is still very high. The same goes for Korean literature.

Writer in Focus: Kim Kyung-uk

Bruce and Ju-Chan Fulton
Introduction

Kim Kyung-uk
The Mailman, Olivia Hussey, and Robert Redford
Heaven’s Door
Mirror and Window
Excerpt from Man in the Mirror

Fiction

Kong Sŏn-ok
Single Mother

Choi Jinyoung
Nearly

Jeong Yi Hyun
Forever Summer

Yun Ko-Eun
The Chef’s Nail

Choi Eunyoung
Sister, My Little Soonae

Also in this issue:
Special Feature: Hansi by Ch’usa Kim Chŏng-hŭi,
Special Feature: Zainichi Literature and Film
Images by Too Bohnchang, an image index, and a Notes on Contributors section.

 

 


About the Journal

Azalea promotes Korean literature among English-language readers. Azalea introduces to the world new writers as well as promising translators, providing the academic community of Korean studies with well-translated texts for college courses. Writers from around the world also share their experience of Korean literature or culture with wider audiences.

Palapala: A Journal for Hawaiian Language and Literature- Volume 2 (2018)

Figure 2 from Kapali Lyon’s article “Some Thoughts on Demonstrative and Locative and the Loss of /ŋ/ in Hawaiian”: John Webber’s drawing of the heiau at Waimea, Kauaʻi, where William Anderson collected his list of Hawaiian words.

The University of Hawai‘i Press is proud to publish the second volume of a new, open-access resource for Hawaiian scholars, Palapala: A Journal for Hawaiian language and literatureIt is the first peer-reviewed Hawaiian language journal to be published exclusively online.

The entirety of Palapala Volume 2, which includes contemporary research in both Hawaiian and English, is available for free through UH library’s ScholarSpace:


Papa Kuhikuhi (Contents)

No Palapala / About Palapala

Nā ʻAtikala Noiʻi Hou / New Research

Nā Kuhia ma Hawaiian Antiquities: Nathaniel Emerson a me nā Kānaka ‘Ōiwi Hawai‘i i Kōkua ma ka ‘Ike Hawai‘i / The Notes to Hawaiian Antiquities: Nathaniel Emerson and His Native Hawaiian Consultants
Charles M. Langlas

Some Thoughts on Demonstrative and Locative and the Loss of /ŋ/ in Hawaiian
Jeffrey “Kapali” Lyon

Ke Kanawai (1902): J. Moku‘ōhai Poepoe’s Obscure Law Journal
A. Kuuipoleialoha Poai

Nā Palapala Paʻi Hou ʻIa / Reprints

“Nohea mai na Kanaka Hawaii” / “Where Do Hawaiians Originate” (1873, with English translation)
Lorenz Gonschor

“Ka u [sic] ka Iwa, he La Makani” / “The ‘Iwa Appears, It Is a Windy Day” (1887, with English translation)
Lorenz Gonschor

Ke Kanawai (1902), ho‘oponopono ‘ia e J. Moku‘ōhai Poepoe 
Buke 1, Helu 1 (Ianuari 1902) / Book 1, Number 1 (January 1902)

Buke 1, Helu 2 (Feberuari 1902) /  Book 1, Number 2 (February 1902) 
Buke 1, Helu 3 (Maraki 1902) / Book 1, Number 3 (March 1902)

Nā Mea Kākau / Contributors 

 

Palapala
Volume 2 (2018)

Korean Studies 43 (2019)

From Hong Kal’s article The Art of Witnessing: The Sewol Ferry Disaster in Hong Sung-dam’s Paintings: Fig. 2 Hong-Sung-dam, 10:20 AM April 16, 2014 (2016), 130 cm x 162 cm, acrylic on canvas. (Courtesy of the artist)

The 43rd volume of Korean Studies contains a special section of articles called Social Changes and Visual Culture in Contemporary Korea, 3 more articles, 6 book reviews, and a contributors list.

CONTENTS

Social Changes and Visual Culture in Contemporary Korea: An Introduction
Jooyeon Rhee and Hong Kal

Sonyŏsang Phenomenon: Nationalism and Feminism Surrounding the “Comfort Women” Statue
Vicki Sung-yeon Kwon

Protesting Grandmothers as Spatial Resistance in the Neo-developmental Era
Su Young Choi

Beyond Victims and Heroes: The 5.18 Cinema Across Gender Boundary
Jooyeon Rhee

The Art of Witnessing: The Sewol Ferry Disaster in Hong Sung-dam’s Paintings
Hong Kal

The Punishments of the 1728 Musin Rebellion Leaders
Andrew David Jackson

Muhammad Kkansu and the Diasporic Other in the Two Koreas
These Jun Yoo

Zainichi Korean Identity and Performing North Korean Music in Japan
Sunhee Koo

Book Reviews

Kōji Takazawa
Destiny: The Secret Operations of the Yodogō Exiles
Reviewed by John Cussen

Ross King
Seoul: Memory, Reinvention, and the Korean Wave
Reviewed by Keith Howard

Tae-Jin Yoon and Dal Yong Jin
The Korean Wave: Evolution, Fandom, and Transnationality
Reviewed by Roald Maliangkay

Dafna Zur
Figuring Korean Futures: Children’s Literature in Modern Korea
Reviewed by Sonya Zabala

Mark A. Nathan
From the Mountains to the Cities: A History of Buddhist Propagation in Modern Korea
Reviewed by James Grayson

Scott A. Snyder
South Korea at the Crossroads: Autonomy and Alliance in an Era of Rival Powers
Reviewed by Min Ye

Contributors


 

About the Journal

Korean Studies, edited at the University of Hawaiʻi Center for Korean Studies, seeks to further scholarship on Korea by providing a forum for discourse on timely subjects, and addresses a variety of scholarly topics through interdisciplinary and multicultural articles, book reviews, and essays in the humanities and social sciences. All scholarly articles on Korea and the Korean community abroad are welcomed, including topics of interest to the specialist and nonspecialist alike.

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