Palapala: A Journal for Hawaiian Language and Literature- Volume 2 (2018)

Figure 2 from Kapali Lyon’s article “Some Thoughts on Demonstrative and Locative and the Loss of /ŋ/ in Hawaiian”: John Webber’s drawing of the heiau at Waimea, Kauaʻi, where William Anderson collected his list of Hawaiian words.

The University of Hawai‘i Press is proud to publish the second volume of a new, open-access resource for Hawaiian scholars, Palapala: A Journal for Hawaiian language and literatureIt is the first peer-reviewed Hawaiian language journal to be published exclusively online.

The entirety of Palapala Volume 2, which includes contemporary research in both Hawaiian and English, is available for free through UH library’s ScholarSpace:


Papa Kuhikuhi (Contents)

No Palapala / About Palapala

Nā ʻAtikala Noiʻi Hou / New Research

Nā Kuhia ma Hawaiian Antiquities: Nathaniel Emerson a me nā Kānaka ‘Ōiwi Hawai‘i i Kōkua ma ka ‘Ike Hawai‘i / The Notes to Hawaiian Antiquities: Nathaniel Emerson and His Native Hawaiian Consultants
Charles M. Langlas

Some Thoughts on Demonstrative and Locative and the Loss of /ŋ/ in Hawaiian
Jeffrey “Kapali” Lyon

Ke Kanawai (1902): J. Moku‘ōhai Poepoe’s Obscure Law Journal
A. Kuuipoleialoha Poai

Nā Palapala Paʻi Hou ʻIa / Reprints

“Nohea mai na Kanaka Hawaii” / “Where Do Hawaiians Originate” (1873, with English translation)
Lorenz Gonschor

“Ka u [sic] ka Iwa, he La Makani” / “The ‘Iwa Appears, It Is a Windy Day” (1887, with English translation)
Lorenz Gonschor

Ke Kanawai (1902), ho‘oponopono ‘ia e J. Moku‘ōhai Poepoe 
Buke 1, Helu 1 (Ianuari 1902) / Book 1, Number 1 (January 1902)

Buke 1, Helu 2 (Feberuari 1902) /  Book 1, Number 2 (February 1902) 
Buke 1, Helu 3 (Maraki 1902) / Book 1, Number 3 (March 1902)

Nā Mea Kākau / Contributors 

 

Palapala
Volume 2 (2018)

Korean Studies 43 (2019)

From Hong Kal’s article The Art of Witnessing: The Sewol Ferry Disaster in Hong Sung-dam’s Paintings: Fig. 2 Hong-Sung-dam, 10:20 AM April 16, 2014 (2016), 130 cm x 162 cm, acrylic on canvas. (Courtesy of the artist)

The 43rd volume of Korean Studies contains a special section of articles called Social Changes and Visual Culture in Contemporary Korea, 3 more articles, 6 book reviews, and a contributors list.

CONTENTS

Social Changes and Visual Culture in Contemporary Korea: An Introduction
Jooyeon Rhee and Hong Kal

Sonyŏsang Phenomenon: Nationalism and Feminism Surrounding the “Comfort Women” Statue
Vicki Sung-yeon Kwon

Protesting Grandmothers as Spatial Resistance in the Neo-developmental Era
Su Young Choi

Beyond Victims and Heroes: The 5.18 Cinema Across Gender Boundary
Jooyeon Rhee

The Art of Witnessing: The Sewol Ferry Disaster in Hong Sung-dam’s Paintings
Hong Kal

The Punishments of the 1728 Musin Rebellion Leaders
Andrew David Jackson

Muhammad Kkansu and the Diasporic Other in the Two Koreas
These Jun Yoo

Zainichi Korean Identity and Performing North Korean Music in Japan
Sunhee Koo

Book Reviews

Kōji Takazawa
Destiny: The Secret Operations of the Yodogō Exiles
Reviewed by John Cussen

Ross King
Seoul: Memory, Reinvention, and the Korean Wave
Reviewed by Keith Howard

Tae-Jin Yoon and Dal Yong Jin
The Korean Wave: Evolution, Fandom, and Transnationality
Reviewed by Roald Maliangkay

Dafna Zur
Figuring Korean Futures: Children’s Literature in Modern Korea
Reviewed by Sonya Zabala

Mark A. Nathan
From the Mountains to the Cities: A History of Buddhist Propagation in Modern Korea
Reviewed by James Grayson

Scott A. Snyder
South Korea at the Crossroads: Autonomy and Alliance in an Era of Rival Powers
Reviewed by Min Ye

Contributors


 

About the Journal

Korean Studies, edited at the University of Hawaiʻi Center for Korean Studies, seeks to further scholarship on Korea by providing a forum for discourse on timely subjects, and addresses a variety of scholarly topics through interdisciplinary and multicultural articles, book reviews, and essays in the humanities and social sciences. All scholarly articles on Korea and the Korean community abroad are welcomed, including topics of interest to the specialist and nonspecialist alike.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press

Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 2 (April 2019)

FIGURE 6 from Robert Perger’s article A New Species of Johngarthia from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae): Johngarthia oceanica sp. nov., Socorro I., body color in life (specimens not collected): (A) male (photograph by Jorge Ramón Reyes Olvera, Mexico); (B and C) males (photographs by Vince Scheidt, San Diego, U.S.A.); (D) female (photograph by Omar de Jesus Franco, Mexico); (E and F) gender unknown (photographs by Hartmut S. Walter, University of California, Los Angeles).

This second issue of volume 73 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article Seasonality and Prevalence of Pollen Collected from Hawaiian Nectarivorous Birds by Kathryn N. van Dyk, Kristina L. Paxton, Patrick J. Hart, and Even H. Paxton.

Preview volume 73 number 2 below and find a list of all 9 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Sympatric Invasive Rats Show Different Diets in a Tropical Rainforest of an Island Biodiversity Hotspot
Duron Quiterie, Bourguet Edouard, Thibault Martin, Scussel Sarah, Gouyet Raphaël, Méheut Mathilde, and Vidal Eric

Using DNA to Identify the Source of Invasive Mongooses, Herpestes auropunctatus (Carnivora: Herpestidae) Captured on Kaua‘i, Hawaiian Islands
Darren J. Wostenberg, Matthew W. Hopken, Aaron B. Shiels, and Antoinette J. Piaggio

Migration by the Japanese Wood Pigeon (Columba janthina) Across the Islands of East Asia: Direct Tracking by Satellite Telemetry
Soon Kyoo Choi, Yung Chul Park, Jong Chul Park, Gi Chang Bing, and Woo Yuel Kim

Environmental Correlates for Seed Desiccation Sensitivity of New Caledonian Plant Species
Octavie Toublanc-Lambault, Robin Pouteau, Marion Davezies, Manon Marron, Anthony Pain, Bruno Fogliani, and Philippe Marmey

Macrobenthic Biomass and Secondary Production in the Northern East China Sea and the Relative Importance of Environmental Variables
Qingxi Han, and Xiaobo Wang

Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Occurrence and Interactions with Marine Mammals Off Peru
Juan Pablo Testino, Andrea Petit, Belén Acorta, Aldo S. Pacheco, Sebastian Silva, Joanna Alfaro-Shigueto, David Sarmiento, Javier Quiñones, Alberto More Eche, Eduardo Motta, Sara Fernandez, Elizabeth Campbell, Geyby Carrillo, Maurice Epstein, Miguel Llapapasca, and Adriana González-Pestana

Apparent Low Densities of Small Cetaceans in Okinawa may be due to Uncontrolled Local Hunting
Thomas A. Jefferson, and Michael F. Richlen

A New Species of Johngarthia  from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae)
Robert Perger


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Pacific Science
Vol. 73 No. 2
April 2019

Biography Vol. 41 No 4 (Fall 2018)


Figure 12 from Rasul A. Mowatt’s essay Black Lives As Snuff: The Silent Complicity in Viewing Black Death: Ebony G. Patterson’s “Invisible Presence: Bling Memories” performance on April 27, 2014 in Kingston, Jamaica. Photograph: Monique Gilpin and Philip Rhoden. Reproduction courtesy of the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago.

FROM THE GUEST CO-EDITORS’ INTRODUCTION:

This special issue is pro-Black. The pro-Blackness expressed by this tremendous collection of thinkers, healers, artists, and activists is one anchored in truth-telling. From a wide array of perspectives, what’s within these pages is an unapologetic centering of the critical matter of Black life. By critical matter, we mean the fleshy materiality of the Black body, as we encounter it in life, death, connections, and struggle. But in invoking a notion of criticality, we are also attuned to the ways that different communities of Black people have experienced this most recent onslaught of anti-Black state violence. We care here about feelings, impressions, relationships, forms of mourning and remembrance, epiphanies had in struggle—all of the “stuff” that regimes of racial terror are studiously interested in not being and/or disavowing. To be pro-Black is to care about all of these elements that help to make up any Black life and every Black life. Finally, to turn our attention to Black life as a critical matter is to remind us of the urgency of attending to Black lives; it is a reminder of the critical condition in which Black people continually find themselves, always gasping for breath, always figuring out how to survive, always forced to wrestle joy from the death-dealing clutches of white supremacy. Critical matters get top billing on political agendas. Our agenda in this special issue is, therefore, Black people and our ideas about what it looks like for our lives to matter.

-Brittney Cooper and Treva B. Lindsey

ARTICLES FROM THIS ISSUE:

Introduction to M4BL and the Critical Matter of Black Lives
by Brittney Cooper and Treva B. Lindsey

Movement for Black Love: The Building of Critical Communities through the Relational Geography of Movement Spaces
by Tabitha Jamie Mary Chester

Choreographies of the Ongoing: Episodes of Black Life, Events of Black Lives
by Rhaisa Kameela Williams

Black Lives as Snuff: The Silent Complicity in Viewing Black Death
by Rasul A. Mowatt

R.I.P. Shirts or Shirts of the Movement: Reading the Death Paraphernalia of Black Lives
by Robin Brooks

Black Lives Abroad: Encounters of Diasporic Solidarity in Brazil
by Gillian Maris Jones

Visible Black Motherhood Is a Revolution 
by Danielle Fuentes Morgan

Mama’s Gon’ Buy You a Mocking Bird: Why #BlackMothersStillMatter: A Short Genealogy of Black Mothers’ Maternal Activism and Politicized Care
by Kaila Adia Story

Restoring Optimal Black Mental Health and Reversing Intergenerational Trauma in an Era of Black Lives Matter
by Jameta Nicole Barlow

#BlackHealingMatters in the Time of #BlackLivesMatter
by Kai M. Green, Je Naé Taylor, Pascale Ifé Williams, and Christopher Roberts

From Ferguson to Palestine: Reimagining Transnational Solidarity Through Difference
by Marc Lamont Hill

Ferguson: An Identity Politics Liberation Manifesto
by Tef Poe

Contributors


About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.


Biography
Volume 41, Number 4
Fall 2018

China Review International Vol. 24 No. 1 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 4 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 19 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEW

Print Culture and Media in Late Imperial and Early Republican China
Reviewed by Yu Zhang

REVIEWS

Queer Comrades: Gay Identity and Tongzhi Activism in Postsocialist China by Hongwei Bao
Reviewed by Charlie Yi Zhang

Western Han: A Yangzhou Storyteller’s Script transed. by Vibeke Børdahl and Liangyan Ge
Reviewed by Jing Zhang

The Great Flowing River: A Memoir of China, from Manchuria to Taiwan by Chi Pang-yuan
Reviewed by Miya Xie

Staging Revolution: Artistry and Aesthetics in Model Beijing Opera during the Cultural Revolution by Xing Fan
Reviewed by Yawen Ludden

What Is China? Territory, Ethnicity, Culture, and History by Ge Zhaoguang
Reviewed by Agnieszka Joniak-Lüthi

Women and the Periodical Press in China’s Long Twentieth Century: A Space of Their Own? eds. by Michel Hockx, Joan Judge, and Barbara Mittler
Reviewed by Yan Xu

The CIA and Third Force Movements in China during the Early Cold War: The Great American Dream by Roger B. Jeans
Reviewed by Yafeng Xia

Gender, Power, and Talent: The Journey of Daoist Priestesses in Tang China by Jinhua Jia
Reviewed by Lucas Wolf

Haunted by Chaos: China’s Grand Strategy from Mao Zedong to Xi Jinping by Sulmaan Wasif Khan
Reviewed by Niv Horesh

The Spatiality of Emotion in Early Modern China: From Dreamscapes to Theatricality by Ling Hon Lam
Reviewed by Curie Virág

Comics Art in China by John A. Lent and Xu Ying
Reviewed by Hannes Rall

The Edge of the Island by Chen Li
Reviewed by Norbert Francis

Body, Society, and Nation: The Creation of Public Health and Urban Culture in Shanghaiby Chieko Nakajima
Reviewed by Ka-che Yip

The Taoism of Clarified Tenuity: Content and Intention by Florian C. Reiter
Reviewed by Jan De Meyer

Shanghai Sacred: The Religious Landscape of a Global City by Benoît Vermander, Liz Hingley, and Liang Zhang
Reviewed by Anning Hu

Violence and Order on the Chengdu Plain: The Story of a Secret Brotherhood in Rural China, 1939–1949 by Di Wang
Reviewed by Kelly Hammond

A New Literary History of Modern China ed. by David Der-wei Wang
Reviewed by Flair Donglai Shi

Returning Home with Glory: Chinese Villagers around the Pacific, 1849 to 1949 by Michael Williams
Reviewed by Gregor Benton

China in the Mix: Cinema, Sound, and Popular Culture in the Age of Globalization by Ying Xiao
Reviewed by Panpan Yang

Works Received


About the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.

China Review International
Volume 24 Number 1
(2017)

Pacific Science Vol. 73 No. 1 (January 2019)

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Figure 4 from the article “Taiwan’s Dacini Fruit Flies: Rare Endemics and Abundant Pests, along Altitudinal Gradients” by Camiel Doorenwerd, Luc Leblanc, Yu-Feng Hsu, Chia-Lung Huang, Yu-Chi Lin, Michael San Jose, and Daniel Rubinoff. Bactrocera dorsaloides, voucher number ms4389, first recorded for Taiwan. (A) dorsal view, (B) head, frontal view, (C) abdomen detail photo, dorsal view, (D) lateral view, (E) detail photo of the wing.

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The first issue in volume 73 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article “Talāsiga Lands in Fiji: Their Potential Expansion through Modern Farming Activities” by R.J. Morrison, and eight more research articles.

Preview volume 73 number 1 below and find a list of all articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE. Continue reading “Pacific Science Vol. 73 No. 1 (January 2019)”

China Review International Vol. 23 No. 4 (2016)

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Volume 23 Number 4 of China Review International begins with two featured reviews and 22 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

FEATURE REVIEWS

Principles and Practices of Chinese Governance a Millennium Ago (reviewing Patricia Buckley and Paul J. Smith, eds. State Power in China, 900-1325) Reviewed by R. Bin Wong

Mao’s, China’s, or Confucius’s Tianxia? Reflections on Chinese Visions of World Order (reviewing Ban Wang, editor. Chinese Visions of World Order—Tianxia, Culture, and World Politics) Reviewed by Bai Tongdong Continue reading “China Review International Vol. 23 No. 4 (2016)”

Biography 41-3 (Summer 2018)

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Figure 2 from Kenneth Chan’s essay “Bad Gal” And The “Bad” Refugee: Refugee Narratives, Neoliberal Violence, and Musical Autobiography in Honey Cocaine’s Cambodian Canadian Hip-Hop: The “Orientalist” scene in Honey Cocaine’s “Bad Gal.” Reprinted by permission of Honey Cocaine Music.

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From Biography Coeditor John David Zuern’s Editor’s Note:

The format of this issue represents something of a departure for Biography. For many years we have published what we call “clusters” of essays focused on a particular theme alongside our individual open-forum articles. While our editorial staff typically determines the topics and invites the guest editors for our annual special issues, the cluster model gives us the opportunity to consider unsolicited proposals from colleagues who would like to present an edited collection of related essays to Biography’s readership. In the past two years, we have received a number of compelling pitches, and for the first time we are running two clusters in the same issue. These projects have emerged within different geopolitical and cultural contexts, but both address the question of how life stories are crafted and disseminated in media other than print. Continue reading “Biography 41-3 (Summer 2018)”

Hawaiian Journal of History Vol. 52 (2018)

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Figure 1 (from the article “Kalākaua and the British Press: The King’s Visit to Europe, 1881”): Kalākaua in uniform wearing the collar, star, badge, and sash of the Order of St. Michael and St. George awarded to him by Queen Victoria during the king’s world tour in 1881. No Date. Courtesy of Bishop Museum.

From page 40 of the article:

The [Whitehall Review] reporter concluded from his interview with the king that Hawaiʻi under Kalākaua was an extremely highly developed country. Indeed, the writer observed, “I parted from his Majesty with regret, envying his subjects” and “hoping that the king would move to England.” Continue reading “Hawaiian Journal of History Vol. 52 (2018)”

Buddhist-Christian Studies Vol. 38

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Figure 2. Bhavacakra, painting on cloth; Nepal, nineteenth to twentieth century. From Massimiliano Alessandro Polichetti’s article The Sorrowful Fates of Rebirth: Ippolito Desideri Encounters Tibetan Sacred Art.

“[T]he bhavacakra (a kind of mental map of the concepts placed at the basis of Buddhist psycho-cosmology, made graphic with small images set in place in a circular manner that represents the “wheel of rebirths”) is set against the “world of becoming,” samsāra devoured by forgetfulness, represented by Yama, the god of the dead in Buddhist cosmology, who holds all within his jowls as a sign of immanent sorrow.”

 

From the Editors’ Introduction:

October 14–15, 2017, the city of Pistoia in Tuscany hosted an international symposium to honor the legacy of Fr. Ippolito Desideri (1684–1733), the first Jesuit missionary to Tibet who engaged in sustained interreligious dialogue with local Buddhists and whose extraordinary command of the local language even enabled him to author Christian theological treatises in Classical Tibetan.

Continue reading “Buddhist-Christian Studies Vol. 38”

Early Release Articles: Korean Studies (October 2018)

University of Hawaiʻi Press is proud to present the early release of the following articles and book reviews from Korean Studies through a partnership with Project MUSE.

EARLY RELEASE ARTICLES

Review of Ross King’s Seoul: Memory, Reinvention, and the Korean Wave. University of Hawaiʻi Press, 2018.
by Keith Howard

Review of The Korean Wave: Evolution, Fandom, and Transnationality, edited by Tae-Jin Yoon and Dal Long Jin. Lexington Books, 2017.
by Roald Maliangkay

Review of Dafna Zur’s Figuring Korean Futures: Children’s Literature in Modern Korea. Stanford University Press, 2017
by Sonya F. Zabala

Review of Kōji Takazawa’s Destiny: The Secret Operations of the Yodogō Exiles. University of Hawaiʻi Press, 2017.
by John Cussen

The Punishments of the 1728 Musin Rebellion Leaders (article)
by Andrew David Jackson

Muhammad Kkansu and the Diasporic Other in the Two Koreas (article)
by Theodore Jun Yoo

Browse all Korean Studies early release articles online here.

Please note: Early release manuscripts have been through our rigorous peer-review process, accepted for publication, and copyedited. These articles will be published in a forthcoming issue of the journal. These articles have not yet been through the full production process and therefore may contain errors. These articles will be removed from the early release page once they are published as part of an issue.

Stay tuned for more early release articles from UH Press journals.

Pacific Science Vol. 72 No. 4 (October 2018)

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From the article “New Distribution Records of Cetaceans from the Federated States of Micronesia,” by Donald W. Buden and Allain Bourgoin. Cetaceans recorded on Pohnpei for the first time: Kogia sp., A, whole body, ventral view; B, undersurface of head showing teeth and jaws. Globicephala macrorhynchusC, whole body; D, oblique view of head showing teeth and jaws.

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The fourth issue in volume 72 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article “Nocturnal Visual Census of Pelagic Fauna Using Scuba near Kona, Hawaiʻi”, eight more research articles, plus an index to all of volume 72. Continue reading “Pacific Science Vol. 72 No. 4 (October 2018)”