Special Features: Korean LGBTQ+ Literature, Remembering Linguists Robert Andrew Blust and Thomas Edward Dutton and more

Azalea

Volume 15 (2022)

From the editor Young-Jun Lee:

A century’s worth of change looks quite remarkable in Korean literature. Today’s young Koreans cannot read the same newspapers read by their grandparents’ generation. In less than a hundred years, the national written language has shifted from Chinese characters to Korean hangul, then briefly to Japanese as enforced under colonial rule, and then to the modern Korean language that we know today. During this process, remarkable sociocultural transformations dominated daily life. Over the first half of the 20th century, Koreans endured enormous political shifts most notably marked by colonization, the Korean War, and the ensuing divide of the country into separate political nations. Along the way, Korean literature registered these upheavals and fluctuations.

Notably, the literature of totalizing grand narrative, which concerned itself with the trajectory of nation-building, persisted in Korea until the 1980s. Ever since the end of the military dictatorship and the establishment of a civil government in the 1990s, however, that literature began to shift its focus to the lives of women. Now, those long ignored and marginalized—including queer women, as well as other queer people such as those who are non-binary— have also begun to emerge more strongly as published authors, even as they have been increasingly centered as subjects of literary narratives. The ongoing impact of this inclusive, expansionary shift
can be seen directly in AZALEA’s decision to focus on LGBTQ+ literature for its fifteenth issue.

Find more poetry, fiction, graphic shorts, and images at Project MUSE.

Oceanic Linguistics

Volume 61, Number 1 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

The Place of Space in Oceanic Linguistics
Leah Pappas and Alexander Mawyer

Semantics and Pragmatics of Voice in Central Malagasy Oral Narratives
Penelope Howe

On the Nature of Proto-Oceanic *o in Southern Vanuatu (and Beyond)
John Lynch

Rare, but Real: Native Nasal Clusters in Northern Philippine Languages
Robert Blust

The Greater West Bomberai Language Family
Timothy Usher and Antoinette Schapper

The Phonology and Typological Position of Waima’a Consonants
Kirsten Culhane

Find more research articles, squibs, and reviews at Project MUSE.

New Journal Issues: Aloha Shirt Aesthetics, Patterns of Mortuary Practice in Vanuatu, Taiwan Sugar in the 1600s + More

Asian Perspectives

Volume 61, Number 1 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

Lakheen-Jo-Daro, an Indus Civilization Settlement at Sukkur
in Upper Sindh (Pakistan): A Scrap Copper Hoard and
Human Figurine from a Dated Context

Paolo Biagi and Massimo Vidale

The Hamin Mangha Site: Mass Deaths and Abandonment
of a Late Neolithic Settlement in Northeastern China

Yawei Zhou, Xiaohui Niu, Ping Ji, Yonggang Zhu, Hong Zhu, and
Meng Zhang

Early Metal Age Settlement at the Site of Palemba, Kalumpang,
Karama Valley, West Sulawesi

Anggrreani

Patterns of Mortuary Practice over Millennia in Southern Vanuatu,
South Melanesia

Frédérique Valentin, Wanda Zinger, Alison Fenwick, Stuart Bedford,
James Flexner, Edson Willie, and Takaronga Kuautonga

Find more research articles and reviews at Project MUSE.

Biography

Volume 44, Issues 2 & 3 (2021)

Special Double Issue: Graphic Medicine

Graphic Medicine’s Possible Futures: Reconsidering Poetics and Reading
Erin La Cour and Anna Poletti

Conflict or Compromise?: An Imagined Conversation
with John Hicklenton and Lindsay Cooper about
Living with Multiple Sclerosis

John Miers

Out of Sync: Chronic Illness, Time, and Comics Memoir
Jared Gardner

Face as Landscape: Refiguring Illness, Disability,
and Disorders in David B.’s Epileptic

Erin La Cour

Graphic Confessions and the Vulnerability Hangover
from Hell

Safdar Ahmed

Drawn to History: Healing, Dementia, and the Armenian
Genocide in the Intertextual Collage of Aliceheimer’s

Crystal Yin Lie

Find more at Project MUSE.

Biography

Volume 44, Issue 4 (2021)

Open Forum Articles
Reviews

Editor Craig Howes embraces this volume as he explains:
“The latest issue of Biography qualifies as special because of its ordinariness. After a four-installment run featuring two special issues, an inaugural Forum, and the Annual Bibliography and International Year in Review, we now return to our regularly scheduled programming. Articles and book reviews—that’s all!
But the table of contents for this issue speaks to what has distinguished Biography for decades as a quarterly. First, the articles. Their geographic, historic, linguistic, and generic range is in keeping with our international and interdisciplinary profile. American celebrity biographies and philosophy, twentieth-century Indian regional autobiography, modernist Austrian psychoanalytic biography, post-WWII German-Romanian autofiction, contemporary Palestinian auto/biographical texts—our pages map out and tell the stories of the field.”

Find more articles and reviews at Project MUSE.

The Contemporary Pacific

Volume 34, Issue 1 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles, dialogues, political, media, and book reviews.

One Salt Water: The Storied Work of Trans-Indigenous Decolonial Imagining with West Papua
Bonnie Etherington

Making Sartorial Sense of Empire: Contested Meanings
of Aloha Shirt Aesthetics

Christen T Sasaki

The Compensation Page: News Narratives of Public Kinship in Papua New Guinea Print Journalism
Ryan Schram

“We Are So Happy EPF Came”: Transformations of Gender in Port Moresby Schools
Ceridwen Spark and Martha Macintyre

Pacific People Navigating the Sacred Vā to Frame Relational Care: A Conversation between Friends across Space and Time
Silia Pa‘usisi Finau, Mele Katea Paea, and Martyn Reynolds

Find more articles, dialogues, political, media, and book reviews at Project MUSE.

January is Kalaupapa Month

Published twice a year since 1989 by the University of Hawaiʻi Press, Mānoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing has two issues of special interest to readers this month, which has been designated Kalaupapa Month by the Hawaiʻi state government and celebrates two important figures. Father Damien, the Belgian priest who cared for victims of leprosy at Kalaupapa, Molokaʻi, was born on the 3rd, and civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was born on the 15th.


Mānoa vol. 23 no. 2 (2011) Almost Heaven

Almost Heaven: On the Human and Divine (winter 2011) presents Aldyth Morris’s play Damien in its entirety, plus a set of images reproduced from glass-plate negatives made at Kalaupapa in the early twentieth century. The images are from the collection of the Congregation of the Sacred Hearts United States Province. Morris was a Hawaiʻi playwright who received the Hawaiʻi Award for Literature in 1978 and worked for many years at UH Press.


Mānoa vol. 32 no. 1 (2020) Tyranny Lessons

Tyranny Lessons: International Prose, Poetry, and Performance (summer 2020) features photographs from the 1960s by Danny Lyon from his book Memories of the Southern Civil Rights Movement. Lyon was the first photographer of the Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee and was jailed alongside Martin Luther King Jr. Working next to activists such as Julian Bond and Howard Zinn, he captured sit-ins, church bombings, speeches by John Lewis and other leaders, and the arrest and jailing of protestors.

Members of the UH community can view these works for free at Project Muse.


Links:
• Star-Advertiser article on Kalaupapa Month https://www.staradvertiser.com/2022/01/07/hawaii-news/
in-january-kalaupapa-month-hawaiians-reclaim-loved-ones/

• Mānoa website https://manoa.hawaii.edu/manoajournal/
• Almost Heaven https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/25083
• Tyranny Lessons https://muse.jhu.edu/issue/42693

New Journal Issues: Schooling Journeys in the Southwestern Pacific, #KuToo Online Feminist Movement in Japan, Geographic Analysis of COVID-19 in L.A. + More

The Contemporary Pacific

Volume 22, Issue 2 (2021)

Special Issue: Schooling Journeys in the Southwestern Pacific

From the Guest Editors Rachel Emerine Hicks, Debra McDougall, and David Oakeshott in The Promise of Education: Schooling Journeys in the Southwester Pacific:

“Schooling journeys” is more than a metaphor in the southwestern Pacific. To step into a classroom, children and youth often travel hours each day or live for months at a time away from their families. The journey of schooling is rarely direct; it often winds between formal and informal learning and in and out of school, work, and home life. And the journey is expensive; many families struggle mightily to gather the money for fees, school supplies, uniforms, and transportation. Young people embark on these precarious journeys, and their families make sacrifices to support them, because schooling promises a better life—a move away from the backbreaking labor of subsistence agriculture toward a reliable salary that will better support their family and community. Because of the structural inequalities in school and a lack of jobs for those who complete schooling, however, few experience the socioeconomic advancement schooling promises. Still, students and their families continue to hope that schooling will lead to well-paid work. Even more important, though, going to school is seen as key to being a competent and effective person in society—increasingly for both women and men.

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers

Volume 83 (2021)

Editor Craig S. Revels reflects over the COVID-19 pandemic and how it has affected geographers and members as he states:

Last year’s volume was published in a time of great uncertainty as the COVID-19 pandemic swept across the world, and this year’s unfortunately arrives under similar conditions, slowly improving though they may be. The tragedies, disruptions, and general state of societal affairs during the pandemic will not soon be forgotten…

Geographers have been at the forefront of research into the spread of COVID-19 since the earliest days of the pandemic, and Steve Graves and Petra Nichols contribute an analytical perspective on infection rates in Los Angeles County. In particular, they statistically identify a causal relationship between infection and a range of key socioeconomic and demographic variables, a relationship influencing the location and rate of spread for the disease. They leave us to consider how those factors must be addressed in any preparations for future public health crises.

In a significantly different context, Ray Sumner and John Menary
demonstrate that taking students into the field, always a valuable exercise, is even more rewarding when it leads to unexpected discoveries and challenges our carefully laid plans. In this case, a straightforward field methods class oriented around the Los Angeles River instead became an open-ended, student-driven exploration into the social dimensions of heritage, ethnicity,
culture, and urban development.

New Journal Special Features: Gender Trouble in Korean Literature, Unsettling Korean Migration + Biography forum on Behrouz Boochani

Azalea 14 (2021)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture

Volume 14 (2021)

Special Feature: Korean Genre Fiction; O Chang-hwan; and Gender Trouble In Korean Literature

From the Editor Young Jung-Lee:

One of the most important recent shifts in Korean literature is found in gender conflict. This “Special Feature: Gender Trouble in Korean Literature and Society,” guest-edited by Hye-Ryoung Lee, shows a fundamentally new perspective through six scholars reading Korean Literature and Society. Over the past decade, the #MeToo Movement has shaken the world, and Korean society has been no exception, as can be seen in Choi Young-mi’s poem “En,”  introduced here with six critical essays. Even before its publication, “En” was the focus of media attention, and it remained a hot topic in Korean society for years due to Choi’s high-profile court battles.

biography

Volume 43, Number 4 (2020)

Special Feature: A Forum on Behrouz Boochani’s No Friend but the Mountains


From Coeditor Anna Poletti:

With this forum, we, the editors of Biography, inaugurate a new feature of the journal that aims to respond to and amplify specific examples of the power of life writing as a cultural, political, and social practice, and which document key moments in the evolution of that practice. In this forum, No Friend but the Mountains is discussed as both a profoundly localized text responding to, making knowledge about, and exposing a highly specific and complex set of conditions, and as a uniquely transnational text that speaks to and about a global phenomenon. Its highly innovative use of life writing as a narrative technique and epistemological practice warranted, in our minds, a concentrated response from the journal. Commissioning and editing this response has renewed my appreciation for the primary concerns of lifewriting scholarship: tracking the mercurial power of personal storytelling to crystalize the contemporary moment in such a way that new knowledge emerges from the entanglements it depicts, and the entanglements it drags its readers into.

Korean Studies

Volume 45 (2021)

Special Section: Unsettling Korean Migration: Multiple Trajectories and Experiences

From the Editor Cheehyun Harrison Kim:

This analytic potency of migration is superbly demonstrated in this volume’s Special Section Unsettling Korean Migration: Multiple Trajectories and Experiences, guest edited by Sunhee Koo (The University of Auckland) and Jihye Kim (The University of Central Lancashire). Sunhee Koo and Jihye Kim have brought together papers on labor (Yonson Ahn and Jihye Kim), ritual life (Marcus Bell), cultural identity (Sunhee Koo), and artistic production (Hee-seung Irene Lee and Soojin Kim). The six engrossing articles deal with how the Korean diaspora—in Argentina, Germany, Japan, China, and the United States—have shaped and represented their particular situations through negotiation, resilience, and creativity. The authors are highly critical of any national framework, and they see diasporic life as contexts of not only sorrow and sacrifice but also innovation and regeneration. Sunhee Koo and Jihye Kim offer a detailed explanation in their Introduction.

New Journal Special Issues: We Are Maunakea, Contemporary Japanese Theatre + Digital Methods, Empire Histories

Asian Theatre Journal

Volume 38, Number 1, (2021)

From the Editor Siyuan Liu:

This issue starts with Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei’s appreciation of Leonard Pronko (1927–2019), noted kabuki scholar and teacher who passed away late 2019. Building on her profile of Pronko for Asian Theatre Journal’s “founders of the fields” series (28: 2, 2011), Sorgenfrei offers a touching personal profile of her former professor as an extraordinary human being.
As evidence to the flourishing field of Japanese theatre studies pioneered by Pronko and his peers, this issue continues with a special section on contemporary Japanese theatre with a combination of articles, reports, a translation, and a performance review essay.

cover image

biography

Volume 43, Number 3 (2020)


We Are Maunakea: Aloha ʻĀina Narratives of Protest, Protection, and Place
Bryan Kamaoli Kuwada and Noʻu Revilla

From the guest editors’ introduction:

In the summer of 2019, kiaʻi (protectors) gathered at Puʻuhonua o Puʻuhuluhulu to defend Maunakea, a sacred mountain, against desecration by the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). Thousands gathered at Ala Hulu Kupuna, or Mauna Kea Access Road. Daily protocols were led by cultural practitioners and long-time protectors of Maunakea, intergenerational Native Hawaiian leadership was developed and empowered on Hawaiian terms, a community kitchen was organized, Puʻuhuluhulu University was established as an actual Hawaiian place of learning, and a collective commitment to ʻāina and kapu aloha rooted all who arrived and all who continue to stay in this movement.
The 2019 stand was also an unprecedented opportunity to witness the battle of narratives, as mainstream media and highly paid public relations firms were outmaneuvered by Kanaka- and ally-authored life writing. This special issue features first-hand accounts, academic reflections, creative works, photography, and interviews with kiaʻi from the 2019 front lines and members of the media team.

Journal of World History

Volume 32, Number 2 (2021)

Special Issue: Digital Methods, Empire Histories

Introduction from Guest Editor Antoinette Burton reads:

The technological evangelism of much of anglophone digital humanities discourse should sit uneasily with empire historians, who know what languages of discovery and “new frontiers” have meant in the context of world history, especially where data collection is concerned. To be sure, digitization has made myriad colonial archives, official and unofficial, available via open access platforms. This means that vast stores of knowledge are now at our fingertips—a proximity and immediacy that has reshaped the lived experience of archival research for many scholars, in this case bringing the imperial world not just closer to home but into the hands of anyone who has access to a cellphone. And the revolution in digital tools in the last twenty-five years has given rise to equally vast possibilities for gathering and visualizing evidence as well as for scaling and interpreting data: for worlding, mostly by aggregation and consolidation, what we aim to know about the kinds of colonial pasts that are available and capturable via text and image. Yet, this information empire is not exactly new. Digitization most often reassembles archival collections proper, sometimes remixing them with print and visual culture and typically organizing them through mechanisms and selection processes that are more or less visible depending on the commitment to transparency of the conglomerator. In some cases, those conglomerators are private individuals or government entities; in others, corporate sponsors; in still others, community-based activists. Inevitably perhaps, today’s digital imperial “data” are actually, more accurately, digitally transformed imperial sources. And for colonial subjects, as for the enslaved, data has more often than not meant terror at the scene of the crime.

Pacific Science 75#3, 2021

The most recent issue of Pacific Science is now available on Project MUSE and BioOne.

cover imageTable of Contents

Pollination Biology of an Endemic Hawaiian Tree, Erythrina sandwicensis (Fabaceae: Papilionoideae), in a Novel Ecosystem
By Emily F. Grave, Timothy I. Kroessig, and Tamara Ticktin

Bi-Hemispheric Distribution and Ecology of the Commensal Amphipod Leucothoe nagatai Ishimaru, 1985 (Crustacea: Leucothoidae)
By James Darwin Thomas, Donald B. Cadien, and Kristine N. White

A Century of Wake Fish Surveys: Comprehensive Annotated Checklist of the Fishes of Wake Atoll
By D. Paul Brown

Evaluation of the Humphead Wrasse, Cheilinus undulatus, in Shallow Water Habitats in Saipan Lagoon, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands
By Michael S. Trianni, John E. Gourley, and Scott R. Vogt

Nest Architecture of an Endangered Hawaiian Yellow-Faced Bee, Hylaeus anthracinus (Hymenoptera: Colletidae) and Potential Nest-Site Competition from Three Introduced Solitary Bees
By Jason R. Graham, Joshua W. Campbell, Sheldon Plentovich, and Cynthia B. A. King

Fly on the Wall: Comparing Arthropod Communities Between Islands With and Without House Mice (Mus musculus)
By Wieteke A. Holthuijzen, Susan L. Durham, Elizabeth N. Flint, Jonathan H. Plissner, Kaylee J. Rosenberger, Coral A. Wolf, and Holly P. Jones

Cetaceans of the Northern Bismarck Sea, Papua New Guinea
By Cara Miller and Vagi Rei

New Faunal Records from A World Heritage Site in Danger: Rennell Island, Solomon Islands
By Tyrone H. Lavery, Lucas H. DeCicco, Jonathan Q. Richmond, Ikuo G. Tigulu, Michael J. Andersen, David Boseto, and Robert G. Moyle

Event-Based Stable Isotope Analysis of Precipitation Along a High Resolution Transect on the South Face of O’ahu, Hawai’i
By Honour Booth, Nicole Lautze, Diamond Tachera, and Daniel Dores

Association Affairs: Pacific Science Association

 

For more information on Pacific Science please visit the journal homepage.

Hawaiʻi Conservation Conference 2021

 

SELECT TITLES BELOW ARE 20% OFF WITH CODE

 
 

 

















 


 
 


 


 





Pacific Science, Vol. 75#2, 2021

Special issue dedicated to Dr. Isabella Abbott 
Guest editor: Celia Smith


Isabella Kauakea Yau Yung Aiona Abbott: Contributions to a Celebration of the Centennial of her Birth
By Rosie Alegado, Cindy Hunter, Celia Smith

Biodiversity of Hawaiian Peyssonneliales (Rhodophyta). 1. Two New Species in the Genus Ramicrusta from Lehua Island
By Alison R. Sherwood, Monica O. Paiano, Rachael M. Wade, Feresa C. Cabrera, Heather L. Spalding, Randall K. Kosaki

Caulerpa bikinensis (Chlorophyta) Preference for the Mesophotic Depths of Pacific Atolls
By Roy T. Tsuda

Introduced Mangroves Along the Coast of Moloka‘i, Hawai‘i may Represent Novel Habitats for Megafaunal Communities
By Bryan A. Nakahara, Amanda W. J. Demopoulos, Yoshimi M. Rii, Rosanna A. Alegado, Kauaoa M. S. Fraiola, Craig R. Smith

Examining the UV-Absorbing Properties of Scaevola taccada (Goodeniaceae) and its Potential Use as a Sunscreen
By Keanu Rochette-Yu Tsuen, Claire Lager, Michael C. Ross, Mary Hagedorn

Ethelia hawaiiensis (Etheliaceae, Rhodophyta), a New Mesophotic Marine Alga from Manawai (Pearl and Hermes Atoll), Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, Hawai‘i
By Alison R. Sherwood, Monica O. Paiano, Feresa P. Cabrera, Heather L. Spalding, Brian B. Hauk, Randall K. Kosaki

Molecular Systematics of the Native Seagrass, Ruppia cf. maritima (Ruppiaceae, Alismatales), on Hawai‘i Island
By Brandie A. Colwell, Ronald P. Kittle III, Renee L. Corpuz, Karla J. McDermid

Cryptic Cryptogam Revealed: Hypnea corona (Gigartinales: Cystocloniaceae), A New Red Algal Species Described From the Hypnea cornuta Complex
By John M. Huisman, Roberta D’Archino, Wendy Nelson, Sung Min Boo, Antonella Petrocelli

Reduction in Cover of Two Introduced Invasive Macroalgae by Herbivores on Coral Reefs of Kāne‘ohe Bay, Hawai‘i
By John Stimson, Scott T. Larned

For more information about Pacific Science, the Official Journal of the Pacific Science Association, please visit the journal homepage.

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal – CALL FOR ABSTRACTS

SPECIAL ISSUE:
Student and Community Abstracts
Guest Editor: May Kealoha, PhD
Co-Editor: Jillian Inouye, PhD, FAAN

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal cover

This special issue will feature abstracts of papers from students and/or community members who are interested in disseminating new knowledge and practices for Asian and Pacific Islanders. 

Please submit your abstracts in the format of formal papers. The format should contain these or other approved headings of:  Introduction, Problem/Significance of Topic, Methods, Results, Discussion, and Recommendations  all relative to Asian/Pacific Islanders and nursing and health. Papers should be one to two pages in length and will be peer reviewed. For this special issue, we are particularly interested in the following but not limited to topics that are:

  • Culturally specific
  • Focuses on equity and diversity
  • Pilot studies
  • Evidence based practice projects
  • Description of community programs
  • Suggestions for policy changes to improve health/education for Asian and Pacific Islanders
  • Other related topics 

Original and empirical pilot studies using qualitative, quantitative, or mixed-methods are welcome. Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal is the only journal focused specifically on health and health care of and for this group. This journal publishes peer-reviewed articles that include, but are not limited to: 

  • Methods, interventions, instrumentation, and educational techniques that are unique to this group. 
  • Theoretical foundations that increase understanding of the unique response to changes in health and illness. 
  • Bio psychosocial, spiritual, and ecological impacts on practice, education, and research.
  • Policy issues as a result of rigorous research outcomes. 

Author Guidelines

All submitted papers must be written in English and contain only original work, which has not been published by or is currently under review at another journal (electronic or print). Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal rules governing the formatting of the final submission can be found at: 

Manuscript Preparation Guidelines https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/apin/styleguide.html

All manuscripts and any supplementary material should be submitted through https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/apin/

For more detailed guidelines, go to https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/apin/policies.html

The authors must select as “Special Issue” when they reach the “Article Type” step in the submission process. 

All papers will be peer-reviewed by two independent reviewers. Requests for additional information should be addressed to the guest editors. 

For more detailed, go to https://kahualike.manoa.hawaii.edu/university-press/

Article Processing Charge

There is no charge for submitting a paper to Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Upon acceptance of your manuscript, you will be charged a one-time Article Processing Charge of $100 for first author members; first author student members $80; and nonmember rates would be $150

Editorial Contact Information

Contact the guest editor with queries about appropriate topics or works in progress for the special issue: 

May Kealoha, PhD, MPHKapi’olani Community College Nursing Department.
Email:  kealohab@hawaii.edu 
Jillian Inouye, PhD, FAANEmeritus Professor, University of Hawaii John A Burns School of Medicine.
Email: jinouye@hawaii.edu


Contact the editor with questions about the manuscript submission process: 

Jillian Inouye Editor in Chief

Email: jinouye@hawaii.edu

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal, Vol. 4#3, 2019

This issue includes the following articles:

Mālama nā makua i nā keiki me ka hānō: Native Hawaiian Parents Caring for Their Children with Asthma, (Part 2)
May K. Kealoha, Sandra L. Sinclair, and Karol K. Richardson

Impact of lactation support program on Initiation of Breastfeeding in Term Infants
Binu Ninan, Umamaheswari Balakrishnan, Asia Mohamed, Munusamy Manjula, Thangaraj Abiramalatha, Ashok Chandrasekaran, and Prakash Amboiram

It’s a Matter of Perspective: The Role of Aging Expectations and Self-Efficacy Towards Engagement in Healthy Lifestyles Among Older Adults
Johnny J. Yao Jr.

THE CORRELATION BETWEEN STIGMA AND FAMILY ACCEPTANCE WITH RELIGIOSITY OF PLWH MSM IN MEDAN, INDONESIA
I Nyoman Arya Maha Putra, Agung Waluyo, and Sri Yona

Is high maternal body mass index associated with caesarean section delivery in Mongolia? A prospective observational study
Naoko Hikita, Megumi Haruna, Masayo Matsuzaki, Emi Sasagawa, Minoru Murata, Ariunaa Yura, and Otgontogoo Oidovsuren


About the Journal

Asian Pacific Island Nursing Journal: Official Journal of the Asian American / Pacific Islander Nurses Association features research papers, empirical and theoretical articles, editorials, abstracts of recent dissertations, and conference summaries that relate to nursing care written by scientists and researchers in nursing and the social sciences, such as:

  • Clinical and Developmental Psychology, Sociology, Anthropology, Social Work, Public Health, Education, Genetics, Pharmacology, Infectious Disease, Oncology, Cardiovascular Disease, Pulmonary Function and Disease, Dermatology, Wound Healing, Immunology, Anesthesiology, Endocrinology, Gastroenterology, Hematology, Neonatology, Nephrology, Pathology, Physiology, Nutrition, Pain Management, Sleep Disturbances, and Mental Health.

 

Indexed in Scopus, the DOAJ and EBSCO

Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 3 (July 2019)

Preview volume 73 number 3 titles below and find content of all 8 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Stream Benthic Macroinvertebrate Assemblages Reveal the Importance of a Recently Established Freshwater Protected Area in a Tropical Watershed
Elfritzson M. Peralta, Alexis E. Belen, Gelsie Rose Buenaventura, Francis Godwin G. Cantre, Katharine Grace R. Espiritu, Jana Nicole A. De Vera, Cristine P. Perez, Aleziz Kryzzien V. Tan, Irisse Bianca B. De Jesus, Paul Palomares, Jonathan Carlo A. Briones, Tohru Ikeya, Francis S. Magbanua, Rey Donne S. Papa, and Noboru Okuda

Island Hopping in a Biodiversity Hotspot Archipelago: Reconstructed Invasion History and Updated Status and Distribution of Alien Frogs in the Philippines
Arman N. Pili, Emerson Y. Sy, Mae Lowe L. Diesmos, and Arvin C. Diesmos

Importance of Non-native Honeybees (Apis mellifera) as Flower Visitors to the Hawaiian Tree ‘Ōhi‘a Lehua (Metrosideros polymorpha) Across an Elevation Gradient
Camila A. Cortina, Clare E. Aslan, and Stacey J. Litson

Screening and Biosecurity for White-nose Fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Ascomycota: Pseudeurotiaceae) in Hawai‘i
Violeta L. Zhelyazkova, Nia L. Toshkova, Serena E. Dool, Frank J. Bonaccorso, Corinna A. Pinzari, Kristina Montoya-Aiona, and Sebastien J. Puechmaille

Genetic and Morphological Diversity in Aphis gossypii  Glover (Hemiptera: Aphididae) in the Pacific Basin
Ross H. Miller, Robert G. Foottit, Eric Maw, and Keith S. Pike

Age, Growth and Mortality of the Goldlined Seabream Rhabdosargus sarba in Waters off Southwestern Taiwan
Shoou-Jeng Joung, Yu-Yung Shyh, Kwang-Ming Liu, and Shyh-Bin Wang

Morphology and Behavior of Gametes and Zoospores from the Plant-Parasitic Green Algae, Cephaleuros  (Chlorophyta, Ulvophyceae)
Narasinee Thithuan, Penpadsorn Bunjonsiri, and Anurag Sunpapao

New Chromosome Number Reports for Angiosperms Native or Introduced to Hawai‘i, with Additional Reports for Fiji and Samoa
Michael Kiehn, and David H. Lorence


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.