Hawaiian Journal of History Vol. 53 (2019)

Figure 1 from the article Remembering the Committee of Safety: Identifying the Citizenship, Descent and Occupations of the Men Who Overthrew the Monarchy by Ralph Thomas Kam and Jeffrey K. Lyons: A collage of the Committee of Safety January 1893. Henry E. Cooper, Chairman, (center) Clockwise, starting with the picture directly above the top of the diamond around Cooper: Henry Waterhouse, Lorrin A. Thurston, Ed Suhr, F.W. McChesney, John Emmeluth, Wm. R. Castle, Wm. O. Smith, J.A. McCandless, C. Bolte, W.C. Wilder, Andrew Brown and Theodore F. Lansing. Courtesy Hawaiʻi Archives [PP-28-7-003]

Articles:

The Case of Leslie Satoru Nakashima and His Breaking News Dispatch
Crystal Uchino

Remembering the Committee of Safety: Identifying the Citizenship, Descent and Occupations of the Men Who Overthrew the Monarchy
Ralph Thomas Kam and Jeffrey K. Lyons

The Establishment of Kilauea Military Camp: The Early Years 1898–1921
Jadelyn J. Moniz Nakamura and Geoffrey Mowrer

An Extraordinary Troop: The Boy Scouts Program at Kalaupapa
Fred E. Woods and Anita Manning

“Doing Our Duty”: Dancing, Dating, and the Limits of Tolerance in Wartime Hawaiʻi
Lori Pierce

Notes and Queries: 

“Ea Mai Hawaiʻinuiākea”: Marking the Global Diplomatic Presence of the Nineteenth-century Hawaiian Kingdom
Ronald Williams, Jr.

An Inquiry Into Kawaiahaʻo Seminary’s “Melting Pot” Photograph Published in The National Geographic Magazine in 1924
Tomiko Conner

The Kamehameha III Statue in Thomas Square
John Clark

Father Damien’s First Photograph at Kalaupapa Reveal Its Secrets
Ruben Boon and Patrik Jaspers

Book Reviews:

Hawaiian By Birth: Missionary Children, Bicultural Identity, and U.S. Colonialism in the Pacific
Reviewed by Lori Pierce

Light in the Queen’s Garden: Ida May Pope, Pioneer for Hawaiʻi’s Daughters, 1862–1914
Reviewed by Derek Taira

Return to Kahiki: Native Hawaiians in Oceania
Reviewed by Lorenz Gonschor

Kalaupapa Place Names: Waikolu to Nihoa
Reviewed by Christine Thomas

Sharks upon the Land: Colonialism, Indigenous Health, and Culture in Hawai’i, 1778–1855
Reviewed by Juliet Nebolon

Hawaiiana in 2018: A Bibliography of Titles of Historical Interest
Jodie Mattos

 

About the Journal

Published annually since 1967, the Journal presents original articles on the history of Hawai‘i, Polynesia, and the Pacific area as well as book reviews and an annual bibliography of publications related to Island history. The Hawaiian Historical Society publishes books in both English and Hawaiian, and HJH is a leading peer-reviewed journal that focuses on the history of Native Hawaiians and all other cultures in Hawai‘i during both pre- and post-contact times.

Subscriptions

Individuals may receive the journal by joining the Hawaiian Historical Society.

Submissions

The HJH welcomes scholarly submissions from all writers. See the Guidelines for Contributors.

You can also read more about this issue at the Hawaiian Historical Society’s website.

The Hawaiian Journal of History
Vol. 53
2019

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review


The journal offers its readers up-to-date research findings, emerging trends, and cutting-edge perspectives concerning East Asian history and culture from scholars in both English-speaking and Asian language-speaking academic communities. The journal seeks to balance issues traditionally addressed by Western humanities and social science journals with issues of immediate concern to scholars in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam.  Cross-Currents includes material from the sixteenth century to the present day that have significant implications for current models of understanding East Asian history and culture.

Cross-Currents is indexed in the Emerging Sources Citation Index (ESCI), Scopus, the Bibliography of Asian Studies, and Project MUSE.

Print Issues available for purchase:

8#1, 2019 includes special sections on Diasporic Art and Korean Identity, guest edited by Hijoo Son and Jooyeon Rhee.

This special section, titled “Diasporic Art and Korean Identity,” is the fruit of a two-day conference on “Korean Diaspora and the Arts” held at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in May 2017. The contributors explore new delineations of the political, social, cultural, and emotional landscapes inhabited by Koreans living in diaspora. Korean diasporic artists investigate the meaning of “Koreanness” through their paintings, political cartoons, theater, film, documentary, photographs, and multimedia art. The topic of diaspora—which Gabriel Sheffer defines as “ethnic minority groups residing and acting in host countries while maintaining material and sentimental ties to their homelands”—has received impressive scholarly attention in the humanities and social sciences, and Korean diaspora studies has been part of this trend (Sheffer 1986, 3).

Special Section, Air-Water-Land-Human: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health and Environment in East Asia, guest edited by Ruth Rogaski.

If East Asia has been defined by particular ideas about the intertwining of humans and the environment, it also gives us a reality in which humans and the environment are frequently at odds. Philosophies may have preached the harmony of the macrocosm and human microcosm, but this did not stop people from exploiting and harming the environment for centuries with catastrophic impact on human health (Elvin 2008; Perdue 1987; Totman 1989). The advent of capitalist development and its accompanying neoliberal philosophies have accelerated these processes to unimaginable effect. Indeed, it is impossible to think about East Asia today without touching on destructive links between humans and the environment, whether manifest in the nuclear catastrophe at Fukushima, cancer villages in Sichuan, or bird flu pandemics emerging from Vietnam (Walker 2010; Lora-Wainwright 2013a; Porter forthcoming 2019). Historian Brett Walker’s observation about Japan holds true for all of East Asia: scholars “can no longer be content to ruminate on Japan’s exquisite harmony with nature” but must instead “explain how it has contributed to regional ecological collapse and global climate change” (Walker 2013, xiii).

Also available online in Project MUSE!

Other recent back issues:

7#2 Recent Research on North and South Korea

Writing Revolution Across Northeast Asia, guest edited by Steven S. Lee

7#1 Binding Maritime China: Control, Evasion, and Interloping, guest editors Eugenio Menegon, Philip Thai, and Xing Hang

6#2 Maps and Their Contexts: Reflections on Cartography and Culture in Premodern East Asia, guest edited by Robert Goree

Naming Modernity: Rebranding and Neologisms during China’s Interwar Global Moment in Eastern Asia, guest edited by Anna Belogurova

Order print copies by contacting: University of Hawai’i Press, 2840 Kolowalu Street, Honolulu, HI 96822, Toll-free (U.S. & Canada):  Tel. 1-808-956-8833    Fax 1-808-988-6052 Tel. 1-888-UHPRESS  Fax 1-800-650-7811 Email: uhpjourn@hawaii.edu $25.00 per issue

Call for a Co-Editor for Rapa Nui Journal

Applications are invited for the position of co-editor of Rapa Nui Journal: The Journal of the Easter Island Foundation (RNJ). The journal is published by the University of Hawai‘i Press in partnership with the Easter Island Foundation. Dr. Mara Mulrooney has served as the journal editor for the past several years and is looking forward to sharing the editorial duties with one or two co-editors.

The journal, launched in 1986 as Rapa Nui Notes, serves as a forum for interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities and social sciences on Easter Island and the Eastern Polynesian region. Each issue may include Research Articles, Research Reports, Commentaries or Dialogues, Book or Media Reviews and EIF News.

RNJ is published twice a year and welcomes contributions from a wide range of social, cultural, indigenous and historical disciplines on topics related to the lives and cultures of the peoples of Rapa Nui and Eastern Polynesia. Abstracts for articles may be published in English, Spanish, and Rapanui. We welcome submissions from scholars across Oceania, North and South America, and beyond.

The editors are expected to assist in raising the profile of the journal, provide support increasing submissions, and secure timely and appropriate peer-review of articles. Editors will make the final decision on manuscripts, informing both the author(s) and reviewers of the final disposition. The editors must show openness to communicating with scholars about diverse ideas, openness to a diverse range of methodologies, and eagerness to continue building the journal’s reputation.

In accordance with the University of Hawai‘i Press’ mission to publish high quality scholarship, the following criteria are considered in selecting editors:

  • established record of scholarship
  • evidence of understanding the mission of the journal and its operation
  • a vision for the journal’s future
  • record of responsible service to scholarly publishing
  • evidence of organizational skill and intellectual leadership

The actual costs associated with production and the online submission system for the journal are covered by the publisher.

Selection Process: (1) Applications will be received by the UH Press Journals Manager by Sept. 4, 2019.  (2) The applicants will be reviewed and ranked by the current journal editor and UH Press Journals Manager. (3) The top two candidates will be contacted by phone for an interview and to discuss the journal editorial workflow by Sept. 25, 2019. (4) The candidate selection will be made by Oct. 10, 2019. (5) The new editor(s) will begin working with the current editor and UH Press no later than January 2020. (6) All other applicants will be notified of the final selection.

Applications: The applications should include the following:

Vision Statement: Set forth your goals and plans for the content of the journal.

Co-Editors Background Information: Describe the qualifications and experience of each person on the editorial team that supports their inclusion. There is no need to include names of individuals that you would like to include on the larger editorial board. If you wish to include names of nominees for Book Review editors, you may; these individuals will be appointed by the editors after they are selected, so you are not required to include them in your application.

Institutional Support: It is important for candidates to examine the feasibility of serving as co-editor in light of the resources provided by the publisher and their own home university. If candidates expect to receive support from their host institution, we request a preliminary letter of support from a dean or other appropriate institutional official.

CVs for all potential co-editors (and if applicable, any associate editors).

For questions and further information about the application process, please contact: Pamela Wilson, Journals Manager, pwilson6@hawaii.edu. We encourage anyone who is considering an application and wants to discuss ideas or ask questions, to get in touch. The application packet should be no more than five (5) pages (excluding CVs), and must be received by Sept. 4, 2019.

Applications may be emailed as PDFs to Pamela Wilson, Journals Manager at pwilson6@hawaii.edu.

University of Hawaii Press, 2840 Kolowalu Street Honolulu, HI 96822

Tel: (808) 956-6790

https://www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals/


UH Press to publish The Journal of Burma Studies in partnership with the Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies

The University of Hawai‘i Press will publish and distribute The Journal of Burma Studies, one of the only scholarly peer-reviewed journals that focus exclusively on Burma/Myanmar. This new partnership with the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University begins with volume 23, 2019. The complete content of the journal is available online in Project MUSE.

UH Press Interim Director and Publisher, Joel Cosseboom, said: “We are pleased to partner with the NIU Center for Burma Studies on this important and unique journal.”

Edited by Catherine Raymond from Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies and Jane M. Ferguson from Australian National University, The Journal of Burma Studies seeks to publish the best scholarly research focused on Burma/Myanmar and its minority and diasporic cultures from a variety of disciplines, ranging from art history and religious studies, to economics and law.

Dr. Ferguson looks forward to collaborating with UH Press to launch innovative and engaging issues of The Journal of Burma Studies. “University of Hawai‘i Press has consistently produced some of the most exciting publications on Southeast Asia as well as Burma/Myanmar Studies, so I am delighted that JBS will now work with them,” she said.

The journal is jointly sponsored by the Burma Studies Group and the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University. Published since 1997, the journal draws together research and critical reflection on Burma/Myanmar from scholars across Asia, North America and Europe.

Content is available on the Project MUSE platform.

Subscribe at: https://uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/jbs/

Submit your manuscript at: https://jbs.scholasticahq.com/for-authors

The Journal of Burma Studies joins UH Press’s extensive list of Asian and Southeast Asian studies journals including: Asian Perspectives, Korean Studies, Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society, Review of Japanese Culture and Society, and others.

About UH Press

 The University of Hawai‘i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. It strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Hawaiian, Pacific, Asian American and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai‘i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

About Northern Illinois University, Center for Burma Studies

 Founded in 1987, the Center collects and preserves information and artifacts of all kinds concerning the study of the peoples and cultures of Burma/Myanmar, and makes these materials broadly available for research and study.

The Center enjoys a unique relationship with the Burma Studies Foundation, which assures that all Burma/Myanmar-related items donated to the foundation will be offered to the center for inclusion and conservation within the university’s collections. Oversight by the foundation combines strong support of the center with lasting responsibility to the field of Burma/Myanmar studies.

The Center for Burma Studies is a non-political, non-degree granting, administrative and academic unit within Northern Illinois University. The Center has the following goals:

  • The maintenance and expansion of a comprehensive research library to sustain the field of Burma studies
  • The collection, care, and exhibition of the arts of Burma
  • The support and promotion of undergraduate and graduate teaching concerning Burma
  • The organization and hosting of self-supporting national and international conferences on Burma studies
  • The publication of relevant scholarship on Burma
  • The care and enhancement of archival resources such as photographs, music records, oral histories, personal papers, and field notes
  • The promotion of outreach activities to schools and communities
  • Encouraging the performance of Burmese arts
  • The securing of educational opportunities through scholarships, internships, and fellowships

Celebrating Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month with Free Journal Content

We are proud to publish an extensive list of Pacific, Asian, and Southeast Asian studies journals. This Asian / Pacific American Heritage Month, explore and enjoy the following free journal content online:

Open Access Journals:

Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Language Documentation & Conservation

Palapala: a journal of Hawaiian language and literature

Free journal content online:

Asian Perspectives: The Journal of Archaeology for Asia and the Pacific (46#1, 2007)

Asian Theatre Journal: Official Journal of the Association for Asian Performance (23#1, 2006)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature and Culture (1, 2007)

Buddhist-Christian Studies: Official Journal of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (27, 2007)

China Review International: Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies (15#1, 2008)

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs (15#1, 2003)

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review (3#1, 2014)

The Hawaiian Journal of History (49, 2015)

Journal of Daoist Studies (8, 2015)

Journal of Korean Religions (6#1, 2015)

Korean Studies: A Multidisciplinary Journal on Korea and Koreans Abroad (29, 2005)

MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing: New Writing from America, the Pacific, and Asia (19#1, 2007)

Oceanic Linguistics: Current Research on Languages of the Oceanic Area (50#2, 2011)

Pacific Science: Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region (71#4, 2017)

Philosophy East & West: A Quarterly of Comparative Philosophy (53#3, 2007)

Rapa Nui Journal: The journal of the Easter Island Foundation (30#2, 2016)

Review of Japanese Culture and Society (24, 2012)

U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal (45, 2013)

Asian Perspectives 58-1
Asian Theatre Journal 36-1 cover

Visit our website to learn more about our publications or to subscribe.

 

March–April 2017 UHP Author Events

When it comes to listing events, we can’t miss first mentioning our exhibit booth at the Association for Asian Studies annual conference taking place March 16–19 in Toronto. Acquisitions editors Pamela Kelley and Stephanie Chun, and marketing managers Royden Muranaka and Steven Hirashima make up our staffing contingent at this important meeting, which is attended by numerous UHP authors (and prospective authors) of Asian studies titles.

* * * * * * * * *

Below is the current lineup of author appearances scheduled for the coming weeks—including a couple already past—mostly for our Hawai‘i-related titles. Unless otherwise noted, these events are free and the public is invited to attend; books will be available for sale and signing.

Wednesday, March 15, 3:30 to 5:30 pm, at the Faculty Center, Chaminade University, 201 Eiben Hall
Chapter contributors Jonathan Dial, Bianca Isaki, and Brian Richardson will speak on the issues addressed in Tourism Impacts West Maui, the latest book from North Beach-West Maui Benefit Fund Inc., distributed by UH Press.

Wednesday, March 15, 6:00 to 7:30 pm, at Waianae Public Library (85-625 Farrington Hwy)
Former investigative reporter Jim Dooley will give an illustrated talk about the lively behind-the-headlines stories in his book, Sunny Skies, Shady Characters. See more details on the Hawaiʻi State Public Library System site.

Thursday, March 16, 7:00 to 9:00 pm, Volcano Art Center, Volcano Village,  Island of Hawai‘i
Hawai‘i’s Kōlea coauthors Oscar “Wally” Johnson and Susan Scott will give a slideshow presentation on the amazing migratory bird at the Volcano Art Center Niaulani campus. While the event is free, a $5 donation would be appreciated. See more details on the VAC website. Wally leaves the next day to return to Montana, while Susan will stay on to do a signing on Saturday at Basically Books, before heading home to O‘ahu.

Saturday, March 18, 1:00 to 2:00 pm, Basically Books, Hilo
Susan Scott will sign copies of Hawai‘i’s Kōlea: The Amazing Transpacific Life of the Pacific Golden-Plover, as well as her sailing memoir, Call Me Captain. For future events with Susan, check out her website.

Thursday, March 23, 2017, 7:00 pm, Ciné in Athens, Georgia (234 W Hancock Avenue)
UH Mānoa creative writing professor Rodney Morales heads to the Deep South to do a reading of his latest novel, For A Song. His visit is hosted by the University of Georgia Creative Writing Program and books will be sold by Avid Bookshop.

Saturday, March 25, three separate events in Kamuela and Hilo on the Big Island of Hawai‘i
Dr. Billy Bergin and his son Dr. Brady Bergin, both respected equine veterinarians, will do a marathon book launch and signings for their new book, The Hawaiian Horse. The schedule and locations include:

• 9:00 am to 12 noon, Parker Ranch Store, 67-1185 Mamalahoa Hwy., Kamuela (phone 808-885-5669).
• 1:00 to 2:45 pm, Basically Books, 160 Kamehameha Avenue, Hilo (phone 808-961-0144). Includes a short talk.
• 3:00 to 4:30 pm, Lyman Museum, 276 Haili Street, Hilo (phone 808-935-5021). The authors will do a talk as part of the museum’s Patricia E. Saigo series of public programs. The cost is free for museum members and $3.00 for nonmembers. Read more on the event here.
Wednesday, March 29, 10 to noon, at the Waimea Midweek Farmers Market , Paniolo Heritage Center at Pukalani Stables, Parker Ranch, 67-139 Pukalani Road, Kamuela (phone 808-854-1541).
Drs. Bergin will be available to sign books at this outdoor market hosted by the Paniolo Preservation Society.

Saturday, April 1, starting at 2:00 pm, Hawaii Japanese Center, Hilo (751 Kanoelehua Avenue)
Hawaii Japanese Center,
in partnership with the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i, presents a program based around author Barbara Kawakami and her recent book, Picture Bride Stories, which was recently announced as the winner of the Asian/Pacific American Librarians (APALA) Literature Award for adult nonfiction (the award will be presented in June) . The HJC program will include a dance performance of holehole bushi and a screening of excerpts from the Rice & Roses television series that previously aired on PBS Hawai‘i. See complete details on the HJC flyer.

Ms. Kawakami has scheduled additional presentations on Picture Bride Stories, including one on Thursday, April 13, 12:00 to 1:45 pm, at Kaua‘i Community College’s International Education Center (Office of Continuing Education and Training Bldg., Room 106 C/D). On Saturday, April 29, she will be at Temari‘s annual “BOLTS of Fabric & Fun” sale to participate in the 11:00 am Textile Talk Stories with Ann Asakura, and will sign books before and after her presentation. The BOLTS event is being held at Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i (which has its own Things Japanese annual sale the same day).

Thursday, April 13, 12 noon to 1:15 pm, Kuykendall Hall 410, UH Mānoa
At this Brown Bag series sponsored by the Center for Biographical Research, David Hanlon‘s talk, “‘You Did What, Mr. President?!?!’ Writing a Biography of the Federated States of Micronesia’s Tosiwa Nakayama” explores his work behind Making Micronesia.

Saturday, April 22, 12 noon to 4:oo pm, Santa Rosa City Hall (100 Santa Rosa Avenue)
Copperfield’s Books will have a booth with a mini stage for its “Women Writers Talk Environment” event at the Earth Day festival in Santa Rosa. The Charm Buyers author Lillian Howan will join Rebecca Lawton, Farnaz Fatemi, and others to read, discuss, and sign books. For insight into Lillian’s writing, read the Writer in Residence interview with her on Rebecca Lawton’s blog.
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As always, to keep up with UHP author talks and other event news, please follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

UHP in Washington, DC | Native American and Indigenous Studies Association Conference

82ca886f-033c-47fa-8716-dd8d086db199Native American and Indigenous Studies Association
2015 Conference

June 4-6, 2015 | Washington, DC
Find more information here.
Contact mpd4@hawaii.edu for an editor meeting

 

 

 


 

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Articulating Rapa Nui: Polynesian Cultural Politics in a Latin American Nation-State
Riet Delsing

304 pages
Cloth | 978-0-8248-5168-2 | $59.00


Huihui: Navigating Art and Literature in the Pacific
Jeffrey Carroll, Brandy Nalani McDougall, and Georganne Nordstrom

320 pages
Paper | 978-0-8248-3895-9 | $29.00


The Pearl Frontier: Indonesian Labor and Indigenous Encounters in Australia’s Northern Trading Network
Julia Martínez and Adrian Vickers

240 pages
Cloth | 978-0-8248-4002-0 | $50.00


The Pacific Festivals of Aotearoa New Zealand: Negotiating Place and Identity in a New Homeland
Jared Mackley-Crump

232 pages
Cloth | 978-0-8248-3871-3 | $58.00