China Review International Vol. 24 No. 4 (2017)

Volume 24 Number 4 of China Review International begins with three feature reviews and 19 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

Featured Reviews:

Changing Clothes in Chang’an (reviewing BuYun Chen, Empire of Style: Silk and Fashion in Tang China)  Reviewed by Shao-yun Yang

The Local and Global Politics of Contemporary Art (reviewing Frank Vigneron, Hong Kong Soft Power: Art Practices in the Special Administrative Region, 2005–2014)
Reviewed by John Zarobell

The Monkey King, 4-EVER (reviewing Hongmei Sun, Transforming Monkey: Adaptation and Representation of a Chinese Epic)
Reviewed by Dore J. Levy

Reviews:

Barry Allen, Vanishing into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition
Reviewed by Aaron B. Creller

Nadine Amsler, Jesuits & Matriarchs: Domestic Worship in Early Modern China
Reviewed by Anthony E. Clark

Kent E. Calder, Super Continent: The Logic of Eurasian Integration
Reviewed by Mark Henderson

Xiaomei Chen, Staging Chinese Revolution: Theater, Film, and the Afterlives of Propaganda
Reviewed by Emily Wilcox

Michael Dillon, Lesser Dragons: Minority Peoples of China
Reviewed by Kaitlin Banfill

Prasenjit Duara and Elizabeth J. Perry, editors, Beyond Regimes: China and India Compared
Reviewed by Sreemati Chakrabarti

Jia-Chen Fu, The Other Milk: Reinventing Soy in Republican China
Reviewed by Veronica, Sau-Wa Mak

Robyn R. Iredale and Fei Guo, editors, Handbook of Chinese Migration: Identity and Wellbeing
Reviewed by C. Cindy Fan

Paul Kendall, The Sounds of Social Space: Branding, Built Environment, and Leisure in Urban China 
Reviewed by Han Li

Elisabeth Koll, Railroads and the Transformation of China
Reviewed by Rudi Volti

Norman A. Kutcher, Eunuch and Emperor in the Great Age of Qing Rule
Reviewed by Carl Déry

Wendy Larson, Zhang Yimou: Globalization and the Subject of Culture
Reviewed by Kun Qian

Hsiao-t’i Li, Opera, Society, and Politics in Modern China
Reviewed by Jonathan P. J. Stock

Michał Lubina, Russia and China: A Political Marriage of Convenience–Stable and Successful
Reviewed by Paul Bolt

Klaus Mühlhahn, Making China Modern: From the Great Qing to Xi Jinping
Reviewed by Thoralf Klein

Sarah Schneewind, Shrines to Living Men in the Ming Political Cosmos
Reviewed by Ying Zhang

Hsueh-man Shen, Authentic Replicas: Buddhist Art in Medieval China
Reviewed by Xiao Yang

Edward Vickers and Zeng Xiaodong, Education and Society in Post-Mao China
Reviewed by Yun You

Yan Xu, The Soldier Image and State-Building in Modern China, 1924–1945
Reviewed by Nicolas Schillinger

Works Received

China Review International
Vol. 24. No. 4
2017

U.S.-Japan Women’s Journal, Vol. 54, 2018

This issue includes the following scholarly articles:

Introduction: Representing Youth and Gender in Japanese Popular Culture Century
日本大衆文化におけるジェンダーと青春を再検討する:
イントロダクション
Jennifer Coates 

Rethinking the Young Female Cinema Audience: 
Postwar Cinema-Going in Kansai, 1945-1952

若い女性観客を再検討:戦後関西の映画観客1945−1952
Jennifer Coates 

Marketing the Panpan in Japanese Popular Culture: Youth, Sexuality, and Power
日本の大衆文化でパンパンを売り出す時:青春、性及び権力
Irene González-López 

The Desire and Disgust of Sweets: Consuming
Femininities through Shōjo Manga
スイーツの欲望と嫌悪:少女まんがを通して
フェミニニティを消費する
Grace En-Yi Ting 

Beyond Borders: Shōjo Manga and Gender
<越境する>少女マンガとジェンダー
Fusami Ogi 


About the Journal

The U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal is an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed, biannual publication, available in print and online that promotes scholarly exchange on social, cultural, political, and economic issues pertaining to gender and Japan. The U.S.–Japan Women’s Journal encourages comparative study among Japan, the United States, and other countries. We welcome contributions from all academic fields in the social sciences and humanities and proposals for special issues. Our mission is to foster the work of young researchers and to ensure that the achievements of established scholars are not forgotten.

From the Backstage of Publishing: Memories of Milton Murayama

headshot of Milton MurayamaOriginally this post was a way to mark this month’s Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month by sharing personal memories from an editorial perspective of a pioneering Asian American literary icon, Milton Murayama. It has grown to include other remembrances from a marketing perspective. We are all proud to be the publisher of his bestselling novels.

Masako Ikeda, Acquisitons:

I only met Milton Murayama once, at the Asian American studies conference held in Honolulu in 1991. I tagged along with Sharon Yamamoto, who acquired his manuscripts for Five Years on a Rock and then Plantation Boy. Nothing at that meeting was particularly memorable as I sort of stood in the background, but I ended up enjoying serving as his managing editor for those two books. We wrote letters back and forth and continued to do so even as the century changed. Most of the time all he said in his letters was that he wanted to buy copies of his books or he was writing a new book, which wouldn’t be finished for a while.

After Five Years our production department held onto an old computer drive knowing that Milton had not updated his system and refused to do so. Our marketing staff coaxed him a number of times: “Milton, I’ll help you set it all up.” He kept sending me hard copy manuscripts with perforations on both ends along with five-inch floppy disks. The manuscript wasn’t complete so he wanted everything back, including the floppy disks, which he couldn’t find anymore. Right before he sent the 4 books by Murayama, standing upright on deskvery final manuscript, which eventually became Dying in a Strange Land, we had gotten rid of the drive, and there was no way to read his WordPerfect files. I ended up asking our Production staffer to keystroke everything, which she did in three days.

Communication with Milton was always interesting and often a little strange. He’d call to complain about the copy editor who didn’t understand that “Pidgin English doesn’t have ellipses points, or letter spaces in between.” He would also hesitate to say “Okay bye” and hang up the phone, so our conversation would go on for a long time with several seconds of dead silence breaking our talks in the most uncomfortable way.

Milton passed away in July 2016, and I didn’t know it until a month later when we saw the obituary in the Sunday paper. I felt guilty for not staying in touch. I do think of him quite often just as I think about Sharon, his true editor, whose passing was almost fourteen years earlier.

Steven Hirashima, Marketing:

My fondest memories of Milton would be visiting his fudge brown three-story home in the hillside area of Glen Park of San Francisco. Whenever I was in town I would always make a point to book a visit. The ritual was always the same. I would call to say I’m leaving the hotel and heading for the Union Square BART Station. Once at Glen Park, I would call to say I arrived and no more than five minutes later Milton would arrive in his old Toyota and we would head up the steep and winding road to his “retreat in the hills.”

5 people, including Murayama and wife Dawn, wearing lei.
L to R: Steven Hirashima, Marie Hara, Milton Murayama, Dawn Murayama, Carol Abe after the “Revisiting Murayama” presentation, November 2008.

Overlooking the flatlands of the city with Candlestick Park and SFO to the west, I would always be given a tour as to what was updated or repurposed around the house since my last visit (the actor Lou Diamond Phillips’s childhood family had been a previous neighbor), from a newly reapportioned sunroom downstairs to a section outside with a bed of spring flowers to Milton’s designated writing room where tucked in a corner would be his antique word processor (a Commodore 64), which I almost convinced him to ditch in favor of a newfangled Mac but he never wavered and remained forever faithful to his trusty machine.

Any trip to the Murayamas would invariably end in the kitchen where Milton and Dawn were the most gracious of hosts. We would often gather around the large formal dinner table for spirited conversation from his next book project or his time in the 442nd, feasting on a bowl of delicious Alaskan King crab legs and steamed garlic brussels sprouts, masterfully prepared by Milton only minutes before. Looking back, they were wonderful and precious times. How I long for another afternoon with Milton. Until then, God Speed and Aloha.

Carol Abe, Marketing:

My very first encounter with Milton was in 1975, the year his original edition of All I Asking for Is My Body published, the green one with the bamboo forest on the cover and an overly large “$3” printed on the back All 5 of Murayama's books, surrounded by clippings and letterscover. He and wife Dawn lined up signings at Honolulu Book Shops, at which I was a bookstore clerk (we weren’t called “booksellers” until twenty years later). Of course I bought a copy with my generous employee discount and had it signed, but didn’t otherwise have a personal connection to him. Jump to 2008: I’d been at UH Press for ten years and we released Milton’s fourth and final novel in his tetralogy about the Oyama family. Steve Hirashima had switched to managing our Asian studies list and I did the same for our Hawai‘i, Pacific, and Asian American titles.

Dying in a Strange Land had a pub date of June but Milton called and said he would wait to visit in the fall, when it’d be cooler, and he only wanted to do low-key promotion of a few bookstore signings. Then, as now, the Press had no travel funds to support a book tour anyway. He finally decided November would be a good time to come and would do Maui and O‘ahu signings, but no readings or talks. So I booked a combination of Barnes & Noble and Borders stores that followed his wishes and filled his itinerary. We corresponded by snail mail and exchanged letters. In one of these, Milton revealed some of the real-life equivalents to the characters in his books. He wrote, “There’s more fact than fiction in my stories.”

After a fan of his scolded me for not paying for his travel and doing him justice, a series of serendipitous things happened that culminated in an event more befitting of a literary icon, “Revisiting Murayama: From Plantation to Diaspora.” Gary Pak, as it happened, had videotaped an interview with Milton that he still needed to screen; the amazing Marie Hara agreed to be co-organizer and was a conduit to both UHM English department and Bamboo Ridge; Craig Howes put me in touch with Phyllis 3 books opened to page showing author signed the bookLook, who had directed a play of All I Asking. The program developed further by recruiting Arnold Hiura, Lee Cataluna, and one of our student employees, Tricia Tolentino, all tied together with Steve as emcee. (And, by rolling the dice, we obtained funding from SEED and Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities, including an honorarium for Milton.)

During their visit, I had chauffeured Milton and Dawn to four or five appearances, perhaps being a bit manic in my driving. At the end, I asked Milton to sign my copy of Dying in a Strange Land. We all laughed warmly as I read his inscription: “It’s been fun getting to know you. I love smart flaky women, who’re also good drivers.” It was my honor and pleasure to have been a tiny part of his life.

+++

Each of Milton’s novels can be read separately and not in sequence. Dying in a Strange Land is on sale now, at a very special price—click here to order.

Samuel Hideo Yamashita on the “Japanese Turn” and Hawaii Regional Cuisine

Five people after library talk, including Samuel Yamashita and Roy Yamaguchi, with librarians
(L to R) Tokiko Bazzell, Monica Ghosh, Mire Koikari, Samuel Yamashita, Roy Yamaguchi

Pomona College history professor Samuel Yamashita‘s lecture on what he calls the “Japanese Turn” in fine dining drew a full house to University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Hamilton Library last week (April 17). Audience members included well-known chef Roy Yamaguchi, who was part of this “turn” during his years in Los Angeles when he pioneered Euro-Asian cuisine. As a tie-in, advance copies and flyers were displayed of Professor Yamashita’s cover of book, Hawaii Regional Cuisinenew UH Press book, HAWAI‘I REGIONAL CUISINE: The Food Movement That Changed the Way Hawai‘i Eats. His talk was related to the library’s exhibit by Japan collection librarian Tokiko Bazzell, “Washoku: Japanese Foods & Flavors,” Yamashita next to Washoku displaywhich is on display until May 27 in Hamilton Library’s First Floor Elevator Gallery.

Read the wonderfully comprehensive information and view more photos on the event here. Yamashita will be returning to Honolulu in mid-July to launch Hawai‘i Regional Cuisine; meanwhile, order the book here. If you would like to be notified of the July events, contact Carol Abe in the UH Press marketing department. Mahalo to the UH Libraries and other sponsors for hosting Professor Yamashita during his UH Mānoa visit: UHM Center for Japanese Studies, UHM Department of American Studies, UHM Department of Women’s Studies, Kapi‘olani Community College, and UHM Student Equity, Excellence and Diversity (SEED).

Mary Sia’s Chinese Cooking Legacy Lives On

Mary Sia at her YWCA cooking classFond memories of grandmother’s kitchen have been brought to life with the republication of Mary Sia’s Classic Chinese Cookbook earlier this year. Two of Mary Sia’s granddaughters, Laura Ing Baker and Louise Ing, will share bits of family history (some quite remarkable), while teaching a class tomorrow using a selection of popo‘s recipes. The CookSpace Hawaii class quickly sold out weeks ago but you can still listen to this morning’s HPR interview with Louise and Laura to celebrate the legacy of Mary Li Sia—hear a mouth-watering description of noodles with Hoisin sauce (find the recipe on page 164 of the cookbook) and match your memories of growing up in 1960s Honolulu with theirs. For another fun blast from the past, see the photo on this earlier post on the HI SPY tumblr blog.

Here’s a sample recipe from page 58 of Mary Sia’s Classic Chinese Cookbook:

BRAISED PRAWNS
6 prawns
4 tablespoons oil
4 tablespoons soy sauce
1 tablespoon sugar
1½ tablespoons sherry
1 tablespoon chopped fresh ginger
1 small onion, sliced
1 bamboo shoot, sliced
¼ cup water

Remove legs but not shell from prawns. Heat pan, add oil, and fry prawns until they turn pink. Add soy sauce, sugar, and sherry. Sauté 2 minutes. Add ginger, onion, and bamboo shoot, and sauté ½ minute. Add water and simmer 1 minute.
Serves 2.

Enjoy!

New Edition of a Classic Cookbook

Mary Sia's Classic Chinese CookbookMary Sia’s Chinese Cookbook has been a classic of Chinese cookery since it was first published in 1956. This fourth edition features all 300 of the original recipes, ranging from simple, everyday fare to more elaborate dishes for entertaining, as well as essays by Mary Sia. An all-new food glossary provides up-to-date names for ingredients along with advice on appropriate substitutions and sources for 21st-century cooks. The work also includes an introduction by Rachel Laudan, renowned food historian and author of The Food of Paradise: Exploring Hawai‘i’s Culinary Heritage.

December 2012 / ISBN 978-0-8248-3738-9 / $16.99 (PAPER)