New Journal Issues: Biography’s International Year in Review, Buddhist-Christian Studies, China Review International + More

Biography

Volume 44, Issue 1 (2021)

Special Issue: International Year in Review

Remembering Lauren Berlant

Contributors Riva Lehrer, Anna Poletti, and Rebecca Wanzo graciously provided this issue with estate artwork and tributes to Lauren Berlant.

From Anna Poletti’s More Flailing in Public:

For me, Berlant’s publications and their way of speaking with colleagues enacted and theorized core tensions that preoccupy lifewriting studies: what it means to be a person in public—sometimes alone, sometimes in a collective, sometimes in search of collectivity. Always thinking from, and beyond, psychoanalytic insights into the disorganizing experience of desire (largely through object-relations), Berlant explicated the kinds of stories about the good life that permeated American culture, and explored what happened to people’s belief in culture, politics, and themselves when they tried to live those narratives, or discovered those narratives were structurally unlivable (The Female Complaint; Cruel Optimism). Berlant’s early work on trauma (“Trauma and Ineloquence”) and their interviews (with Jay Prosser, and with Julie Rak and me) are the places where the relevance of their deep attention to the politics of “fantasies of the good life” are most clearly connected to lifewriting scholarship. Margaretta Jolly’s special issue of Biography on “Life Writing and Intimate Publics,” published ten years ago, shows us how productive Berlant’s theory of the importance of being and feeling intimate in public can be for studying life writing, particularly online.

Oceanic Linguistics

Volume 60, Number 20 (2021)

This new issue contains a squib titled, “Three Puzzles for Phonological Theory in Philippine Minority Languages” by Jason W. Lobel, Robert Blust, and Erik Thomas.

An excerpt from this squib reads as follows:

In viewing language as an object of scientific inquiry, description alone has never been enough to satisfy most researchers. Once observations about one language are compared with those about another, there is a desire to generalize, to make statements about what is common and what is not, and therefore about what is expected and what is surprising in language content, structure, or change. In terms of theory construction, expected observations follow from basic assumptions about how language works and how it is embedded in the larger context of human neurophysiology and behavior. Much progress has been made in recent decades concerning the phonetic forces that give rise to phonological processes, and there is widespread agreement about many of these. This note describes three well-documented phonological processes in languages spoken by aboriginal Filipino populations along the Pacific coast of Luzon that do not conform to current theoretical expectations about what is a likely or even a possible diachronic process. Each of these is part of a larger context of sound change which does conform to theoretical expectation, although the details are complex, and still not widely reported in the literature. For this reason, a brief background survey of vocalic changes triggered by voiced stops will be given first, followed by the puzzling changes that depart from this more general pattern.

Find more research articles, squibs, and reviews at Project MUSE.

Pacific Science

Volume 65, Number 4 (2021)

The new issue includes the following articles and reviews:

Population Divergence and Evolution of the Hawaiian Endemic Sesbania tomentosa (Fabaceae)
David M. Cole and Clifford W. Morden

Eleotris (Teleostei: Eleotridae) from Indonesia with Description of Three New Species Within the ‘melanosoma’ Neuromast Pattern Group
Marion I. Mennesson, Philippe Keith, Sopian Sauri, Frédéric Busson, Erwan Delrieu-Trottin, Gino Limmon, Tedjo Sukmono, Jiran, Renny Risdawati, Hadi Dahruddin, and Nicolas Hubert.

Three New Records of Marine Macroalgae from Viet Nam Based on Morphological Observations and Molecular Analyses by
Xuan-Vy Nguyen, Nhu-Thuy Nguyen-Nhat, Xuan-Thuy T. Nguyen, My-Ngan T. Nguyen, Viet-Ha Dao, and Karla J. McDermid.

The Structure and Dynamics of Endangered Forest Bird Communities in the Mariana Islands
Robert J. Craig

And the following article is available on Open Access:
Modeling Scenarios for the Management of Axis Deer in Hawai‘i
Steven C. Hess and Seth W. Judge

Find more research articles at Project MUSE.

New Journal Special Features: Gender Trouble in Korean Literature, Unsettling Korean Migration + Biography forum on Behrouz Boochani

Azalea 14 (2021)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture

Volume 14 (2021)

Special Feature: Korean Genre Fiction; O Chang-hwan; and Gender Trouble In Korean Literature

From the Editor Young Jung-Lee:

One of the most important recent shifts in Korean literature is found in gender conflict. This “Special Feature: Gender Trouble in Korean Literature and Society,” guest-edited by Hye-Ryoung Lee, shows a fundamentally new perspective through six scholars reading Korean Literature and Society. Over the past decade, the #MeToo Movement has shaken the world, and Korean society has been no exception, as can be seen in Choi Young-mi’s poem “En,”  introduced here with six critical essays. Even before its publication, “En” was the focus of media attention, and it remained a hot topic in Korean society for years due to Choi’s high-profile court battles.

biography

Volume 43, Number 4 (2020)

Special Feature: A Forum on Behrouz Boochani’s No Friend but the Mountains


From Coeditor Anna Poletti:

With this forum, we, the editors of Biography, inaugurate a new feature of the journal that aims to respond to and amplify specific examples of the power of life writing as a cultural, political, and social practice, and which document key moments in the evolution of that practice. In this forum, No Friend but the Mountains is discussed as both a profoundly localized text responding to, making knowledge about, and exposing a highly specific and complex set of conditions, and as a uniquely transnational text that speaks to and about a global phenomenon. Its highly innovative use of life writing as a narrative technique and epistemological practice warranted, in our minds, a concentrated response from the journal. Commissioning and editing this response has renewed my appreciation for the primary concerns of lifewriting scholarship: tracking the mercurial power of personal storytelling to crystalize the contemporary moment in such a way that new knowledge emerges from the entanglements it depicts, and the entanglements it drags its readers into.

Korean Studies

Volume 45 (2021)

Special Section: Unsettling Korean Migration: Multiple Trajectories and Experiences

From the Editor Cheehyun Harrison Kim:

This analytic potency of migration is superbly demonstrated in this volume’s Special Section Unsettling Korean Migration: Multiple Trajectories and Experiences, guest edited by Sunhee Koo (The University of Auckland) and Jihye Kim (The University of Central Lancashire). Sunhee Koo and Jihye Kim have brought together papers on labor (Yonson Ahn and Jihye Kim), ritual life (Marcus Bell), cultural identity (Sunhee Koo), and artistic production (Hee-seung Irene Lee and Soojin Kim). The six engrossing articles deal with how the Korean diaspora—in Argentina, Germany, Japan, China, and the United States—have shaped and represented their particular situations through negotiation, resilience, and creativity. The authors are highly critical of any national framework, and they see diasporic life as contexts of not only sorrow and sacrifice but also innovation and regeneration. Sunhee Koo and Jihye Kim offer a detailed explanation in their Introduction.

New Journal Special Issues: We Are Maunakea, Contemporary Japanese Theatre + Digital Methods, Empire Histories

Asian Theatre Journal

Volume 38, Number 1, (2021)

From the Editor Siyuan Liu:

This issue starts with Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei’s appreciation of Leonard Pronko (1927–2019), noted kabuki scholar and teacher who passed away late 2019. Building on her profile of Pronko for Asian Theatre Journal’s “founders of the fields” series (28: 2, 2011), Sorgenfrei offers a touching personal profile of her former professor as an extraordinary human being.
As evidence to the flourishing field of Japanese theatre studies pioneered by Pronko and his peers, this issue continues with a special section on contemporary Japanese theatre with a combination of articles, reports, a translation, and a performance review essay.

cover image

biography

Volume 43, Number 3 (2020)


We Are Maunakea: Aloha ʻĀina Narratives of Protest, Protection, and Place
Bryan Kamaoli Kuwada and Noʻu Revilla

From the guest editors’ introduction:

In the summer of 2019, kiaʻi (protectors) gathered at Puʻuhonua o Puʻuhuluhulu to defend Maunakea, a sacred mountain, against desecration by the construction of the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT). Thousands gathered at Ala Hulu Kupuna, or Mauna Kea Access Road. Daily protocols were led by cultural practitioners and long-time protectors of Maunakea, intergenerational Native Hawaiian leadership was developed and empowered on Hawaiian terms, a community kitchen was organized, Puʻuhuluhulu University was established as an actual Hawaiian place of learning, and a collective commitment to ʻāina and kapu aloha rooted all who arrived and all who continue to stay in this movement.
The 2019 stand was also an unprecedented opportunity to witness the battle of narratives, as mainstream media and highly paid public relations firms were outmaneuvered by Kanaka- and ally-authored life writing. This special issue features first-hand accounts, academic reflections, creative works, photography, and interviews with kiaʻi from the 2019 front lines and members of the media team.

Journal of World History

Volume 32, Number 2 (2021)

Special Issue: Digital Methods, Empire Histories

Introduction from Guest Editor Antoinette Burton reads:

The technological evangelism of much of anglophone digital humanities discourse should sit uneasily with empire historians, who know what languages of discovery and “new frontiers” have meant in the context of world history, especially where data collection is concerned. To be sure, digitization has made myriad colonial archives, official and unofficial, available via open access platforms. This means that vast stores of knowledge are now at our fingertips—a proximity and immediacy that has reshaped the lived experience of archival research for many scholars, in this case bringing the imperial world not just closer to home but into the hands of anyone who has access to a cellphone. And the revolution in digital tools in the last twenty-five years has given rise to equally vast possibilities for gathering and visualizing evidence as well as for scaling and interpreting data: for worlding, mostly by aggregation and consolidation, what we aim to know about the kinds of colonial pasts that are available and capturable via text and image. Yet, this information empire is not exactly new. Digitization most often reassembles archival collections proper, sometimes remixing them with print and visual culture and typically organizing them through mechanisms and selection processes that are more or less visible depending on the commitment to transparency of the conglomerator. In some cases, those conglomerators are private individuals or government entities; in others, corporate sponsors; in still others, community-based activists. Inevitably perhaps, today’s digital imperial “data” are actually, more accurately, digitally transformed imperial sources. And for colonial subjects, as for the enslaved, data has more often than not meant terror at the scene of the crime.

New Journal Issues: Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal, Journal of Burma Studies, Language Documentation & Conservation + More (July 2020)

Front cover of Biography 42-4 (2020)

Biography

Academic Freedom, Academic Lives, Guest Edited by Bill V. Mullen and Julie Rak

Volume 42, Issue 4 (2019)

From the guest editors’ introduction:

Academic freedom is currently highly public and highly contested terrain. What academic freedom actually means has become an urgent question, as alt-right activists have turned the tenets of academic freedom to their own ends, whether on college and university campuses, or through the actions of right-wing governments as they move to suppress dissent. We want to reclaim the concept of academic freedom for the left and for academic activism, not through a debate about the concept as an abstraction, but in connection to what we see as the radical potential of academic lives. Thinking of academic lives as interpretation and critique is a way to disrupt the current alt-right control of public discourse about freedom of speech. Read the special issue introduction free here.

Journal of Burma Studies 24-1

The Journal of Burma Studies

Special Issue: Environment and Resources: Burma/Myanmar and the (Un)Natural

Volume 24, Issue 1 (2020)

The editor’s note for this special issue begins:

From touristic impressions to geopolitical analyses, ubiquitous are the tremendous and varied natural resources of Myanmar. Teak forests, oil and gas reserves, precious gemstones, biodiversity, and the list goes on. The very meaning of the concept of resource, however, suggests that the country contains things of tremendous potential human, economic use, and therefore value. With the resources, mapping, and study of them, there is the seemingly boundless potential for greater wealth to be accumulated. On the other hand, discourse regarding natural beauty and wonder can be a purposeful distraction from ongoing issues of war and exploitation. Discussing the country’s abundance of resources, however, is never a neutral proposition: for outsiders looking in, there is frequently a value-laden assumption which guides the observation that the various regimes and economic interests are not responsibly conserving these resources for the greater good (however nebulous that may be). Life itself (before we even label it a natural resource) is already an active zone of economic production, engineering, banking, commodification, and exchange (Palsson 2016:4). The definition, mapping, laws, and social relationships which name and frame resources in Myanmar are of ongoing heuristic, cultural, economic, and inevitably political concern.

With this problematic in mind, in this Special Issue of The Journal of Burma Studies (JBS) we have gathered together an interdisciplinary set of research articles surrounding questions of what nature is and what its resources might be. With the four authors’ varied focus on historical and contemporary Myanmar, this set of papers offers challenging new vistas for the exploration and interrogation of how resources and the environment have been approached and brokered by local and transnational actors. Read the special issue introduction free here.

Biography Vol. 42 No. 3 (2019)

Figure 3 from “Call My Name: Using Biographical Storytelling to Reconceptualize the History of African Americans at Clemson University” by Rhondda Robinson Thomas: Inventory of Slaves, Fort Hill Farm Deed, 15 May 1854, Thomas Green Clemson Papers, Special Collections and Archives, Clemson University Libraries, box 1, folder 25.

ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE:

Introduction to Biographic Mediation: On the Uses of Personal Disclosure in Bureaucracy and Politics
Ebony Coletu, guest editor

Biographic Mediation and the Formerly Incarcerated: How Dissembling and Disclosure Counter the Extended Consequences of Criminal Convictions
Michelle Jones

A Complaint Biography
Sara Ahmed

Lives on the Line: An Interview with Aly Wane
Aly Wane interviewed by Ebony Coletu

The Securitate File as a Record of Psuchegraphy
Cristina Plamadeala

“Has someone taken your passport?”: Everyday Surveillance of the Migrant Laborer as Trafficked Subject
Annie Isabel Fukushima

Guidelines for Squatting: Concerned Citizens of North Camden, 1978–1990
Mercy Romero

Frames of Witness: The Kavanaugh Hearings, Survivor Testimony, and #MeToo
Leigh Gilmore

Call My Name: Using Biographical Storytelling to Reconceptualize the History of African Americans at Clemson University
Rhondda Robinson Thomas

Mirror Memoirs: Amita Swadhin on Survivor Storytelling and the Mediation of Rape Culture
Amita Swadhin interviewed by Ebony Coletu

The Consumption of Adoption and Adoptees in American Middlebrow Culture
Kimberly McKee

(Un)Reasonable, (Un)Necessary, and (In)Appropriate: Biographic Mediation of Neurodivergence in Academic Accommodations
Aimée Morrison

About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

 

 

Biography:
An Interdisciplinary Quarterly
Vol. 42 No. 3
2019

Biography Vol. 42 No. 2 (2019)

Figure 8 from Philip Miletic’s essay “Playing a Life in Nina Freeman’s Automedia Game, Cibele.” Valtameri. The meter with the handshake in the upper right corner progresses as Nina (left) and Ichi (right) fight together.

Editor’s Note

ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE:

Wounded Cities: Topographies of Self and Nation in Fay Afaf Kanafani’s Nadia, Captive of Hope
Hager Ben Driss

Playing a Life in Nina Freeman’s Automedia Game, Cibele
Philip Miletic

Reading, Writing, and Resistance in Audre Lorde’s Zami: A New Spelling of My Name
Sarita Cannon

“Bad” Biography Exposed!: A Critical Analysis of American Super-Pop
Oline Eaton

BOOK REVIEWS:

The Shadow in the Garden: A Biographer’s Tale, by James Atlas
Reviewed by Carl Rollyson

Experiments in Life-Writing: Intersections of Auto/Biography and Fiction, edited by Lucia Boldrini and Julia Novak
Reviewed by Alexandra Effe

American Autobiography after 9/11, by Megan Brown
Reviewed by Elisabeth Hedrick-Moser

Letter to My Father: A Memoir, by G. Thomas Couser
Reviewed by Emily Hipchen

The Selfie Generation: How Our Self Images Are Changing Our Notions of Privacy, Sex, Consent, and Culture, by Alicia Eler
Reviewed by Teresa Bruś

Invented Lives, Imagined Communities: The Biopic and American National Identity, edited by William H. Epstein and R. Barton Palmer
Reviewed by Eric M. Thau

An Artisan Intellectual: James Carter and the Rise of Modern Britain, 1792–1853, by Christopher Ferguson
Reviewed by Anna Clark

Autobiographical Writing in Latin America: Folds of the Self, by Sergio R. Franco
Reviewed by Francisco Brignole

Getting Personal: Teaching Personal Writing in the Digital Age, edited by Laura Gray-Rosendale
Reviewed by Madeleine Sorapure

The Art of Confession: The Performance of Self from Robert Lowell to Reality TV, by Christopher Grobe
Reviewed by Lynda Goldstein

A History of Irish Autobiography, edited by Liam Harte
Reviewed by Taura Napier

Victorians Undone: Tales of the Flesh in the Age of Decorum, by Kathryn Hughes
Reviewed by Alison Booth

Doña Teresa Confronts the Spanish Inquisition: A Seventeenth-Century New Mexican Drama, by Frances Levine
Reviewed by Jorge Ca.izares-Esguerra

Clio’s Lives: Biographies and Autobiographies of Historians, edited by Doug Munro and John G. Reid
Reviewed by Jaume Aurell

The Decolonial Mandela: Peace, Justice and the Politics of Life, edited by Sabelo Ndlovu-Gatsheni
Reviewed by Nick Mdika Tembo

Creating Identity in the Victorian Fictional Autobiography, by Heidi L. Pennington
Reviewed by Anne Reus

A History of Irish Working-Class Writing, edited by Michael Pierse
Reviewed by Muireann Leech

Canadian Graphic: Picturing Lives, edited by Candida Rifkind and Linda Warley
Reviewed by Roc.o G. Davis

Life? or Theatre? ( Leben? oder Theater?), by Charlotte Salomon
Reviewed by Julia Watson

The Phenomenology of Autobiography: Making it Real, by Arnaud Schmitt
Reviewed by Bettina Stumm

On the Arab-Jew, Palestine, and Other Displacements: Selected Writings, by Ella Shohat
Reviewed by Joyce Zonana

Bird-Bent Grass: A Memoir, in Pieces, by Kathleen Venema
Reviewed by G. Thomas Couser

Private Lives Made Public: The Invention of Biography in Early Modern England, by Andrea Walkden
Reviewed by Julie A. Eckerle


About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

Biography Vol. 42 No. 1 (2019)

From the front cover: He mau palapala aina, a me na niele e pili ana. Hookahi ke pai ana. Lahaina, 1840. Library of Congress, www.loc.gov/item/98687131/.

INTERNATIONAL YEAR IN REVIEW

The International Year in Review is a collection of short, site-specific essays on the year’s most influential publications in life writing. This year’s collection includes entries from Australia, Austria, Brazil, Canada, China, Colombia, Estonia, France, the Gulf Cooperation Council, India, Italy, Korea, Lebanon, Mexico, the Netherlands, Palestine, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Romania, South Africa, Spain, the UK, and two essays from the US, one on biography and one on memoir.

Contents

Editors’ Notes

Essays as Life Writing: The Year in Australia
Kylie Cardell

The Tercentenary of Maria Theresa (1717–1780): The Year in Austria and Germany
Tobias Heinrich

The Brazilian “I/Eye” at the IABA Global Conference: The Year in Brazil
Sergio da Silva Barcellos

Musicians’ Lives and National Identity: The Year in Canada
Alana Bell

Independent Biographical Documentaries: The Year in China
Chen Shen

Testigo de barbarie y resistencia: El año en Colombia
Gabriel Jaime Murillo-Arango

Life Writing’s Coming of Age: The Year in Estonia
Leena Kurvet-Käosaar and Maarja Hollo

The Ghosts of World War II: The Year in France
Joanny Moulin

Selves and Identities in the Arabian Gulf: The Year in the Gulf Cooperation Council
Szidonia Haragos

What the Stars Tell: The Year in India
Pramod K. Nayar

Biographies from the Alps to Capri: The Year in Italy
Ilaria Serra

Emergent Subjectivities: The Year in Korea
Heui-Yung Park

Archiving the Political, Narrating the Personal: The Year in Lebanon
Sleiman El Hajj

Politics and Violence: The Year in Mexico
Gerardo Necoechea Gracia

Mediators as the Subject of Dutch Biography: The Year in the Netherlands
Hans Renders and David Veltman

Voices against Erasure, Loss, and Dehumanization: The Year in Palestine
Adam Yaghi

A Time of Great Biographies—Gombrowicz and Herbert: The Year in Poland
Paweł Rodak

“No Coward Soul is Mine”: The Year in Portugal
Cláudia Faria

Auto/Biography After Disaster: The Year in Puerto Rico
Ricia Anne Chansky

Cultural Figures and the Biographical Turn: The Year in Romania
Ioana Luca

“Born-Frees” on South Africa’s Memory Traps: The Year in South Africa
Nick Mdika Tembo

Auto/Biography and Conflict: The Year in Spain
Ana Belén Martínez García

“The necessary disloyalty”: The Year in the UK
Tom Overton

#MeToo and the Memoir Boom: The Year in the US
Leigh Gilmore

American Biography: The Year in the US
Carl Rollyson

Annual Bibliography of Works about Life Writing, 2017–2018


About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

Biography Vol. 41 No 4 (Fall 2018)


Figure 12 from Rasul A. Mowatt’s essay Black Lives As Snuff: The Silent Complicity in Viewing Black Death: Ebony G. Patterson’s “Invisible Presence: Bling Memories” performance on April 27, 2014 in Kingston, Jamaica. Photograph: Monique Gilpin and Philip Rhoden. Reproduction courtesy of the artist and Monique Meloche Gallery, Chicago.

FROM THE GUEST CO-EDITORS’ INTRODUCTION:

This special issue is pro-Black. The pro-Blackness expressed by this tremendous collection of thinkers, healers, artists, and activists is one anchored in truth-telling. From a wide array of perspectives, what’s within these pages is an unapologetic centering of the critical matter of Black life. By critical matter, we mean the fleshy materiality of the Black body, as we encounter it in life, death, connections, and struggle. But in invoking a notion of criticality, we are also attuned to the ways that different communities of Black people have experienced this most recent onslaught of anti-Black state violence. We care here about feelings, impressions, relationships, forms of mourning and remembrance, epiphanies had in struggle—all of the “stuff” that regimes of racial terror are studiously interested in not being and/or disavowing. To be pro-Black is to care about all of these elements that help to make up any Black life and every Black life. Finally, to turn our attention to Black life as a critical matter is to remind us of the urgency of attending to Black lives; it is a reminder of the critical condition in which Black people continually find themselves, always gasping for breath, always figuring out how to survive, always forced to wrestle joy from the death-dealing clutches of white supremacy. Critical matters get top billing on political agendas. Our agenda in this special issue is, therefore, Black people and our ideas about what it looks like for our lives to matter.

-Brittney Cooper and Treva B. Lindsey

ARTICLES FROM THIS ISSUE:

Introduction to M4BL and the Critical Matter of Black Lives
by Brittney Cooper and Treva B. Lindsey

Movement for Black Love: The Building of Critical Communities through the Relational Geography of Movement Spaces
by Tabitha Jamie Mary Chester

Choreographies of the Ongoing: Episodes of Black Life, Events of Black Lives
by Rhaisa Kameela Williams

Black Lives as Snuff: The Silent Complicity in Viewing Black Death
by Rasul A. Mowatt

R.I.P. Shirts or Shirts of the Movement: Reading the Death Paraphernalia of Black Lives
by Robin Brooks

Black Lives Abroad: Encounters of Diasporic Solidarity in Brazil
by Gillian Maris Jones

Visible Black Motherhood Is a Revolution 
by Danielle Fuentes Morgan

Mama’s Gon’ Buy You a Mocking Bird: Why #BlackMothersStillMatter: A Short Genealogy of Black Mothers’ Maternal Activism and Politicized Care
by Kaila Adia Story

Restoring Optimal Black Mental Health and Reversing Intergenerational Trauma in an Era of Black Lives Matter
by Jameta Nicole Barlow

#BlackHealingMatters in the Time of #BlackLivesMatter
by Kai M. Green, Je Naé Taylor, Pascale Ifé Williams, and Christopher Roberts

From Ferguson to Palestine: Reimagining Transnational Solidarity Through Difference
by Marc Lamont Hill

Ferguson: An Identity Politics Liberation Manifesto
by Tef Poe

Contributors


About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.


Biography
Volume 41, Number 4
Fall 2018

Biography 41-3 (Summer 2018)

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Figure 2 from Kenneth Chan’s essay “Bad Gal” And The “Bad” Refugee: Refugee Narratives, Neoliberal Violence, and Musical Autobiography in Honey Cocaine’s Cambodian Canadian Hip-Hop: The “Orientalist” scene in Honey Cocaine’s “Bad Gal.” Reprinted by permission of Honey Cocaine Music.

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From Biography Coeditor John David Zuern’s Editor’s Note:

The format of this issue represents something of a departure for Biography. For many years we have published what we call “clusters” of essays focused on a particular theme alongside our individual open-forum articles. While our editorial staff typically determines the topics and invites the guest editors for our annual special issues, the cluster model gives us the opportunity to consider unsolicited proposals from colleagues who would like to present an edited collection of related essays to Biography’s readership. In the past two years, we have received a number of compelling pitches, and for the first time we are running two clusters in the same issue. These projects have emerged within different geopolitical and cultural contexts, but both address the question of how life stories are crafted and disseminated in media other than print. Continue reading “Biography 41-3 (Summer 2018)”

Biography vol. 41, no. 2 (Spring 2018)

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Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly volume 41, number 2 (Spring 2018) focuses on the concept of interviewing as a creative practice. In their introduction, “Putting Things Together: Introduction to Interviewing as Creative Practice,” guest editors Anneleen Masschelein and Rebecca Roach write:

[W]e consider the interview as an encounter, as an assemblage of heterogeneous elements. It promises access to an interior but ultimately remains unruly: resisting interpretative truth, it reveals things other than what it may promise. Thus, in this special issue as it now stands, our interest has shifted from questions of genre to the notion of the interview as an “unconcept”: ambiguous, paradoxical, the interview belongs everywhere and nowhere.

Continue reading “Biography vol. 41, no. 2 (Spring 2018)”

Call for Papers: Rapa Nui Journal

Edited by Dr. Mara A. Mulrooney, Director of Cultural Resources, Bishop Museum

The Rapa Nui Journal (RNJ) is the official, peer-reviewed journal, of the Easter Island Foundation (EIF). The journal serves as a forum for interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities and social sciences on Easter Island and the Eastern Polynesian region. Each issue may include Research Articles, Research Reports, Commentaries or Dialogues, Book or Media Reviews and EIF News.

rnj_cover
Cover Image courtesy of:
© Stephen, Jesse W. (2005, July 28). The Traveling Moai [At Tongariki near Rano Raraku, Rapa Nui].
RNJ is published twice a year and welcomes contributions from a wide range of social, cultural, indigenous and historical disciplines on topics related to the lives and cultures of the peoples of Rapa Nui and Eastern Polynesia. Abstracts for articles may be published in English, Spanish, and Rapanui. We welcome submissions from scholars across Oceania, North and South America, and beyond.

File Format and Manuscript structure
Article manuscripts are peer-reviewed, and should be 3000 to 9000 words in length. Reports, Reviews and commentaries are not peer-reviewed, and should be 1000 to 6000 words in length.

Manuscripts should be double-spaced with margins of at least 1 inch (2.5 cm) on each side, and submitted as a single Microsoft Word (or similar) file with the following structure:

  1. Article title
  2. Author’s name(s) and contact details for publication
  3. Abstract
  4. Keywords 3-6
  5. Text
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. References
  8. Figures with captions
  9. Tables with captions

Manuscripts should be submitted online.  You may review journal policies and author guidelines on the journal submission site.

Please send inquiries to the Rapa Nui Journal editor at (rapanuijournal@gmail.com).

Subscribe to Rapa Nui Journal through UH Press or browse full-text issues online .

 

Biography Vol. 41 No. 1 (Winter 2018)

Photograph of Prince's star on the wall of the First Avenue nightclub in Minneapolis by Lizzy Shramko. Reproduced with permission.
Photograph of Prince’s star on the wall of the First Avenue nightclub in Minneapolis by Lizzy Shramko. Reproduced with permission.

Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly volume 41, number 1 (Winter 2018) arrives with a purple cover and includes a special section, On Prince: A Labor of Love, Loss, and Freedom, guest edited by Andreana Clay.

From the abstract:

With the death of Prince Rogers Nelson on April 21, 2016, many people’s lives were changed forever. In efforts both big and small, those of us left have tried to recall, feel deeply, and write down what his life and death meant to us individually and in community. This special feature explores the feelings of four writers—Andreana Clay, Greg Tate, Steven W. Thrasher, and Scott Poulson-Bryant—who have written about music, race, and Blackness and turn that gaze to Prince and his impact. Each paper was part of the American Studies Association special panel on Prince titled “Prince in Revue.” Here, as we did there, we draw upon a personal and political relationship to Prince in an effort to understand his impact on music, identity, and community.

Editor’s Note by John David Zuern

Lyric Acknowledgments

Special Section: On Prince

Introduction: On Prince: A Labor of Love, Loss, and Freedom by Andreana Clay

Prince and the Erotics of Democracy by Greg Tate

Obituarizing Black Maleness, Obituarizing Prince by Steven W. Thrasher

Prince, Queerness, and the Both/And of “Or” by Scott Poulson-Bryant

Keywords: Light Skin-ded Free Black Sex, Girlfriend by Andreana Clay

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