Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 58 no. 2 (2019)

Journal of World History, Vol 31, No. 1 (2020)

Special Issue

Liberal and Illiberal Internationalisms

Edited by Philippa Hetherington and Glenda Sluga

The twenty-first century is awash with diagnoses of the end of liberal internationalism. In both popular and academic manifestations, declarations of liberal internationalism’s ‘crisis’ tend to assume that the term has a stable meaning that is clearly differentiated from illiberal internationalist variants. The aim of this special issue of the Journal of World History is to interrogate this assumption. We argue that a historical view of internationalism highlights the interrelation between and the mutual dependence of liberal and illiberal internationalisms since 1880. Taken together, the essays collected here position the politics of internationalism at the centre of a new historiography that rejects an axiomatic relationship between the liberal and the international. They seek to rethink how liberal and illiberal cooperated, co-mingled and co-produced one another on the international plane.

Research Articles

Liberal and Illiberal Internationalisms
Philippa Hetherington, Glenda Sluga

Liberals, Socialists, Internationalists, Jews
Abigail Green

“Neither East Nor West,” Neither Liberal Nor Illiberal? Iranian Islamist Internationalism in the 1980s
Timothy Nunan

Urban Planning and the Politics of Expert Internationalism, 1920s–1940s
Phillip Wagner

The Crisis of Liberal Internationalism: The Legacies of the League of Nations Reconsidered
David Petruccelli

Constructing the ‘City of International Solidarity’: Non-Aligned Internationalism, the United Nations and Visions of Development, Modernism and Solidarity, 1955–1975
Ljubica Spaskovska

Liberal and Illiberal Internationalism in the Making of the League of Nations Convention on Broadcasting in the Cause of Peace
David Goodman

India, Apartheid and the New World Order at the UN, 1946–1962
Alanna O’Malley

Book Reviews

The Little Ice Age and the Demise of Rome: Lessons for the Anthropocene?
Roger L. Albin

A Primer for Teaching Environmental History: Ten Design Principles by Emily Wakild and Michelle K. Berry (review)
Frank Zelko

Europe and the European Union in Times of Growing Scepticism
Martijn Lak

Barbed-Wire Imperialism: Britain’s Empire of Camps, 1876–1903 by Aidan Forth (review)
Mark Condos

Trading in Faith: Christianity and Globalization?
Philip Jenkins

 

Journal of World History 31-1
Journal of World History,
Vol. 31, Issue 1

Pictured on the cover: Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah, photograph taken in June 2019. The photograph marks a transition for the Journal of World History, highlighting Utah as the new home of the journal office as well as the site of World History Association annual conference in 2020. The image is a precursor of a complete cover redesign in 2021.

Philosophy East and West Vol. 70, No. 1

The first issue of Philosophy East & West’s 70th volume includes the following scholarly articles:

Articles

Spiritual Discipline, Emotions, and Behavior during the Song Dynasty: Zhu Xi’s and Qisong’s Commentaries on the Zhongyong in Comparative Perspective
Diana Arghirescu

Eckhartian Neologisms and the Tathātā Framework: Istic/Isticheit in Conversation with The Awakening of Faith
John Becker

Dōgen’s “Leaving Home Life” (Shukke 出家): A Study of Aesthetic Experience and Growth in John Dewey and Dōgen
Jacob Bender

Is Free Will Confucian? Li Zehou’s Confucian Revision of the Kantian Will
Robert A. Carleo III

The Nondualistic Aesthetics of Qi 氣 in Antoni Tàpies’ Holistic Conception of Art
Mei-Hsin Chen

Wu-Wei, Merleau-Ponty, And Being Aware of What We Do
Marcus Lee

Sarvamukti: Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan’s Aporetic Metaphysics of Collective Salvation
Ayon Maharaj

The King’s Slaughterer—or, The Royal Way of Nourishing Life
Hans-Georg Moeller

Freedom of the Mind: Buddhist Soft Compatibilism
Rick Repetti

Virtue as Desire: Mengzi 6A In Light of the Kongzi Shilun
Boqun Zhou

Book Discussion

The Exclusion of Chinese Philosophy: “Ten Don’ts,” “Three Represents,” and “Eight Musts”
Carine Defoort

Intercultural Encounter in the Age of Hybridity: A Response to Eric S. Nelson
Mario Wenning

A Few Thoughts on the Possibility of Intercultural Thinking in a Global Age
Kai Marchal

Intercultural Philosophy and Intercultural Hermeneutics: A Response to Defoort, Wenning, and Marchal
Eric S. Nelson

Online Book Reviews

The Third Revolution: Xi Jinping and the New Chinese State by Elizabeth C. Economy (review)
Martin Schönfeld

Japanese Philosophy in the Making 1: Crossing Paths with Nishida by John C. Maraldo (review)
Bradley Park

Shen Gua’s Empiricism by Ya ZUO (review)
James D. Sellmann

 

 

Philosophy East and West cover 70-1
Philosophy East and West,
Vol. 70 Issue 1

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society – Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 25

JSEALS: Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 25

This special publication of the Journal of Southeast Asian Linguistics, edited by Henry Y. Chang and Hui-chuan J. Huang, grew out of the 25th annual meeting of AFLA held at Academia Sinica, Taiwan, 10-12 May, 2018.

Contributions in this volume cover a wide variety of topics in Austronesian linguistics. Chen and Jiang argue that in Bunun, -in- is an existential past tense marker while =in is a change-of-state marker at the discourse level, in contrast to the dominant view in the literature. Focusing on the prosody of Kanakanavu, Cheng spells out a number of phonological conditions and identifies the morphemes that could either attract or repel prominence. Socolof and Shimoyama propose a split ergative analysis of Māori genitive relative construction while showing that this construction is more widely distributed than generally described. Sommerlot’s article shows that the ber-V-nya constructions in Indonesian do not fit into any functions of these affixes in previous descriptions and they instead resemble a type of presentational-there construction. Tanenbaum adopts a syntactically-grounded account of Tagalog second-position clitics, based on obligatory V-to-C head movement. Wu explores the constructions of noun incorporation (NI) in Northern Paiwan, including both lexical and syntactic NI, and examines their morphosyntactic behaviors. Yang and Wong study how Malay məN- prefixation interacts with reduplication and propose a new markedness constraint against word-initial nasals to account for the data.


Ways of talking about the past: The semantics of –in- and =in in Bunun
By Sihwei Chen and Haowen Jiang

More on Kanakanavu word-level prosody: Cyclic and postcyclic processes
By Yi-Yang Cheng

The distribution of the Māori genitive relative construction
By Michael Socolof and Junko Shimoyama

A presentational construction in Indonesian
By Carly J. Sommerlot

Untangling the Tagalog clitic cluster
By Russell Tanenbaum

Two types of noun incorporation in Northern Paiwan
By Chunming Wu

Malay verbal reduplication with the məN- prefix
By Meng Yang and Deborah J.M. Wong

This open-access special publication and the first articles in Vol. 13 issue 1 are available via ScholarSpace.

Pacific Science: Call for Submissions



20% Discount: Subscribe and submit now with code
PS2020J


Pacific Science: A Quarterly Devoted to the Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region celebrates its 75th anniversary in 2021 and welcomes submissions as we approach this important moment.

The University of Hawai‘i Press has increased access to published research in Pacific Science to better support both authors and readers.

Article-by-Article Publishing

This year (2020), Pacific Science will move to an article-by-article publishing model, reducing publication times from submission until online publication in both the BioOne and Project MUSE content databases. All authors are encouraged to submit color images with their articles, which will be included in the online version at no additional charge. All articles will be included in the print issues on a quarterly basis.

No Fees, Open Access Discount

Thanks to increased online usage, Pacific Science no longer charges submission fees or page charges for accepted articles that do not require the Open Access publishing option.

If authors would like to make their article Open Access upon publication, there is a one-time fee of $1,800, which also now includes the option to have images printed in color.

For a limited time, we are providing a discount code that will save you 20% on the Open Access publishing fee. This reduces the fee to only $1,440. The 20% discount is also good on subscription orders through April 30. Subscriptions may be ordered through our website. The discount code to use is PS2020J.

Submit

Please review the submission guidelines on our website by clicking on the tab labeled “AUTHOR GUIDELINES.”

Journal topics may focus on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.  Manuscript submissions on topics such as Pacific biodiversity, conservation, and sustainability are also encouraged. In addition to publishing original research, the journal also accepts review articles, which provide a synthesis of current knowledge.

Submissions may be emailed directly to Editor Curtis Daehler, Dept. of Botany at the University of Hawai‘i daehler@hawaii.edu.

Displaced Lives: MĀNOA Vol. 31, No. 2 (2019)

  Four Generations of a Tibetan Family. Majnu Ka Tilla Diaries (007), 2007 Serena Chopra  © courtesy sepiaEYE
Four Generations of a Tibetan Family. Majnu Ka Tilla Diaries (007), 2007 Serena Chopra © courtesy sepiaEYE

The dislocation of people in the twenty-first century has been unprecedented. At the end of 2019, over 260 million people were living outside their countries of birth. Some are voluntary migrants, but others have been forced to relocate by violence, wars, persecution, hunger, or extreme weather events. Millions more are mentally and spiritually uprooted and isolated because of PTSD, depression, addiction, and aging.

The displaced are a statistical category, but their lives, emotions, and hopes are made vividly real in these powerful and intimate works of literature by more than thirty writers from four continents. Many of the authors are themselves exiles, members of immigrant families, or witnesses to the effects of displacement on loved ones. Authors are from Bangladesh, Canada, Cuba, China, Germany, India, Ireland, Iran, Israel, Macedonia, Mexico, the Netherlands, Pakistan, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, South Africa, Spain, and the U.S.

Alok Bhalla and Ming Di guest edited this new issue of Mānoa featuring fiction, poetry, memoirs and plays, and also Serena Chopra’s photographs from Majnu Ka Tilla Diaries.


Explore Displaced Lives

Editor’s Note

Images

Borderlands
Anna Badkhen

Statue of Liberty
Mario Bojórquez, Don Cellini

The Traveler
José Manuel Cardona, Hélène Cardona

Good Night
Chang Yao, Ming Di, Kerry Shawn Keys

Bhasha India
Siddharth Chowdhury

The Missing
Mangalesh Dabral, Asad Zaidi

Pig
Jose Dalisay

Werewolf
Patrick Deeley

Neve Shalom, September 2014
Batsheva Dori-Carlier, Lisa Katz

Wulkan
Ulrike Draesner, Iain Galbraith

Vanilla Crumble
Asif Farrukhi, Durdana Soomro

turning your body into a compass
Catherine Filloux

Return of the Exiles
Huang Fan, Ming Di, Frank Stewart

In a Silent City
Ilya Kaminsky

The Serpent
Wayne Karlin

The Speculative Fiction Writer
Jee Leong Koh

At Wagah
Sukrita Paul Kumar

Two Poems
Nikola Madzirov, Peggy and Graham W. Reid, Magdalena Horvat

Something Growing
Julia Martin

Fox-Sparrow
James McCorkle

Claude McKay Describes His Own Life
Claude Mckay

Six Poems from Harlem Shadows
Claude McKay

Bread
Mihaela Moscaliuc

Yesterday and Today
Masud Mufti, Durdana Soomro

The Subhuman and His Habitat
Ramsey Nasr, David Colmer

Lament for Mrs. Mones
Víctor Rodríguez Núñez, Katherine M. Hedeen

The Rehearsal
Manjula Padmanabhan

Big White Bird
Ann Pancake

Dera Baba Nanak
Joginder Paul, Naghma Zafir

Grandmas
Joginder Paul, Asif Farrukhi

Tonghui River in Beijing
Qing Ping, Ming Di, Frank Stewart

Gilt
Chloe Garcia Roberts

Two Poems
Françoise Roy, Amanda Fuller

Self
K. Satchidanandan

Two Poems
Aleš Šteger, Brian Henry

Five Prose Poems
Udayan Vajpeyi, Alok Bhalla

The Souls of Shah Alam Camp
Asghar Wajahat, Alok Bhalla

The White Night Photo Studio
Wang Suxin, Chen Zeping, Karen Gernant

Two Poems
Sholeh Wolpé

The Flower of All Water
Robert Wrigley

Refused a Visa at the U.S. Embassy
Yi Sha, Frank Stewart, Ming Di

About the Photographer

About the Contributors

 

Philosophy East and West Vol. 69, No. 4

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 4 includes the following scholarly works:

Articles

Russell and Jin Yuelin on Facts: From the Perspective of Comparative Philosophy
Chen Bo

A Kantian Reading of the Mūlamadhyamakakārikā: The Philosophical basis And advantages
Justin P. Holder

On the Sit-Chûn Scholars of Taiwanese Philosophy
Tzu-wei Hung

In Defense of Beauty: Gao Ertai’s Aesthetics of Resistance
Maciej Kurzynski

Levels of Time in the Zhuangzi: A Leibnizian Perspective
Georg Northoff, Kai-Yuan Cheng

Muhammad Iqbal’s “Indirect Communication” with the Reader
Sevcan Ozturk

Releasing Boundaries, Relieving Suffering, Becoming Pained: An Engagement with Indian Buddhism and Martin Heidegger
Roshni Patel

Wandering in the Ruler’s Cage: Zhuangzi as a Political Philosopher
Lincoln Rathnam

Bu Ren 不忍 (Cannot Bear to Harm) in the Mencius
Winnie Sung

Book Discussion

No-Selves and Persons
Monima Chadha

Paying Attention to Buddhaghosa and Pāli Buddhist Philosophy
Sean M. Smith

Response to Monima Chadha and Sean M. Smith Reviews of Attention, Not Self
Jonardon Ganeri

Online Book Reviews

Islamic Spirituality: Theology and Practice for the Modern World by Zeki Saritoprak (review)
Adnan Aslan

Omnicide: Mania, Fatality, and Future-in-Delirium by Jason Bahbak Mohaghegh (review)
Ekin Erkan

An Investigation of Wang Fuzhi’s Study on the Zhuangzi: Focusing on the Zhuangzijie by Tan Mingran (review)
Li Huanyou

The Significance of Indeterminacy: Perspectives from Asian and Continental Philosophy ed. by Robert H. Scott and Gregory S. Moss (review)
Jingwen Zheng

The Journal of Burma Studies, vol. 23 no. 2 (2019)

Figure 2: Front cover of the pirate edition of The Thirty-Seven Nats, from “Counting to 37:Sir Richard Carnac Temple and the Thirty-Eighth Nat” by Sally Bamford, this issue.

The three articles in the new issue of The Journal of Burma Studies offer a compelling picture of accounting: nats, coins, and people.

Editor’s Note
Jane M. Ferguson

Counting to 37: Sir Richard Carnac Temple and the Thirty-Eighth Nat
Sally Bamford

Burma’s nats have formed part of that country’s spiritual and material culture for centuries, and first came to the attention of the West via traveler and colonial memoirs. The most notable of these such accounts is undoubtedly Sir Richard Carnac Temple’s The Thirty-Seven Nats: A Phase of Spirit-Worship Prevailing in Burma, published in 1906 and still cited by scholars today.

This article argues that the reliance by Western (and some Burmese) authors on Temple’s book has led to several misconceptions concerning the nats. These include, for example, that the pantheon known in the West as “The Thirty-Seven Nats” is a royal pantheon constituted by Anawrahta in the 11th century, under the leadership of Thakya Min (Sakka), in order to enfold the nats into Buddhism. Yet primary sources, including Burmese court documents, paint a much fuller picture of the nats, detailing three separate pantheons of 37. Each pantheon contains very different types of nat, each of which played a specific role throughout Burma’s history.

Following a clarification of these pantheons, this paper draws on extant primary sources to suggest a different interpretation of the “Thirty-Seven Nats” and their role vis-à-vis Burma’s kings. The source material available to R.C. Temple is also considered, which reveals significant information which Temple overlooked when writing his book. This led, in turn, to wrongly identified illustrations included in his book, which obscured the identity of a “Thirty-Eighth Nat.” These errors have also had an impact on how one of the most prominent nats is depicted in more recent publications.

King Bodawpaya’s Effort at a Konbaung Coinage
Philip Hauret

In 1797 King Bodawpaya became the first Konbaung king to introduce a national coinage by issuing copper and silver coins minted in both Calcutta and Amarapura. A British envoy, Hiram Cox, delivered the Calcutta coins and additional minting equipment to Amarapura and witnessed first-hand the roll-out of the new monetary system. Deriding the effort as incompetent and avaricious, Cox’s account has served as the basis for all subsequent historical and numismatic treatments. This paper examines this effort in a new light, and with the support of additional evidence uncovered in the 20th century, paints a picture far less negative than British accounts. The kingdom’s efforts, arguably inadequate to the task, nonetheless demonstrated a certain degree of planning and logical action. And despite Cox’s characterizations, the new coinage was apparently based upon an existing system of monetary value, resulting in coinage that continued to circulate throughout most of the 19th century.

Thinking Through Heterogeneity: An Anthropological Look at Contemporary Myanmar
François Robinne

Anchored in an ethnic-state structure since the 1947 Panglong Agreement, ethnic politics and ethnic determinism in Burma have become imprescriptible in the eyes of various actors, especially ethnic and religious elites, the military junta, civilian authorities, civil society, academics and international bodies. Based on years of field surveys devoted to the study of multiethnic crossroads and the de facto landscapes of hybridity in the highlands of Burma, the anthropological perspective of this paper invites us to leave the identity trap. An essentialist notion of ethnicity is not only at the root of the country’s ongoing civil war, but also continues to dictate parliamentary politics in the country. This paper will also consider how the democratic transition is itself caught up in this identity trap.

Journal Special Issues Published in 2019

Asian Perspectives 58-1
Asian Theatre Journal 36-2

Asian Perspectives Vol. 58, issue 1
Special Issue: Boundaries and Identities Through Material culture: Multi-Disciplinary Approaches from Early Korea, guest edited by Jack Davey and Dennis Lee

Asian Theatre Journal Vol. 36, issue 2
Special section: Tang Xianzu and William Shakespeare Quatercentenary Celebration, guest edited by Alexa Alice Joubin

Biograhy Vol 41, issue 4
M4BL and the Critical Matter of Black Lives, guest edited by Brittney Cooper and Treva B. Lindsey

Biography Vol 42, issue 3
Biographic Mediation: On the Uses of Personal Disclosure in Bureaucracy and Politics, guest edited by Ebony Coletu

Cross-Currents 8-1
Cross-Currents 8-2

Cross-Currents Vol. 8, issue 1
Diasporic Art and Korean Identity, guest edited by Hijoo Son and Jooyeon Rhee

Air-Water-Land-Human: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health and Environment in East Asia, guest edited by Ruth Rogaski

Cross-Currents Vol. 8, issue 2
Buddhist Art of Mongolia: Cross-Cultural Connections, Discoveries, and Interpretations, guest edited by Uranchimeg Tsultemin

Beyond Comparison: Japan and Its Colonial Empire in Transimperial Relations
, guest edited by Satoshi Mizutani

Journal of World History 30 1&2 cover
Philosophy East and West 69-3

Journal of World History Vol. 30, issues 1-2
Other Bandungs: Afro-Asian Internationalisms in the Early Cold War, guest edited by Su Lin Lewis and Carlien Stolte

Philosophy East and West Vol. 69, issue 3
Politics, Nature, and Society — Actuality of North African Philosopher Ibn Khaldūn, guest edited by Tamara Albertini

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 24, edited by Matt Pearson

Cross-Currents, Vol. 8, No. 2 (2019)

Rebuilt “Jarung khashar” stupa of Khejenge Monastery, Kizhinga, Buryatia, featured in “The Cult of Boudhanath Stupa/Jarung Khashar Suvraga in Mongolia” by Isabelle Charleux this issue. Photo by Ekaterina Sundueva.

This issue of Cross-Currents includes two special sections, “Buddhist Art of Mongolia: Cross-Cultural Connections, Discoveries, and Interpretations” edited by Uranchimeg Tsultemin, and “Beyond Comparison: Japan and Its Colonial Empire in Transimperial Relations” edited by Satoshi Mizutani.

Buddhist Art of Mongolia

Introduction
Uranchimeg Tsultemin

Buddhist Archeology in Mongolia: Zanabazar and the Géluk Diaspora beyond Tibet
Uranchimeg Tsultemin

In Search of the Khutugtu’s Monastery: The Site and Its Heritage
Sampildondovin Chuluun

Visualizing the Non-Buddhist Other: A Historical Analysis of the Shambhala Myth in Mongolia at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
Karénina Kollmar-Paulenz

The Interplay between Text and Image: The Molon Toyin’s Tale
Vesna A. Wallace

The Cult of Boudhanath Stupa/Jarung Khashar Suvraga in Mongolia: Texts, Images, and Architectural Replicas
Isabelle Charleux

Beyond Comparison: Japan and Its Colonial Empire in Transimperial Relations

Introduction
Satoshi Mizutani

Transimperial Genealogies of Korea as a Protectorate: The Egypt Model in Japan’s Politics of Colonial Comparison
Satoshi Mizutani

School Politics in the Borderlands and Colonies of Imperial Germany: A Japanese Colonial Perspective, ca. 1900–1925
Akiyoshi Nishiyama

The French Colonization and Japanese Occupation of Indochina during the Second World War: Encounters of the French, Japanese, and Vietnamese
Chizuru Namba

Comparisons and Deflections: Indian Nationalists in the Political Economy of Japanese Imperialism, 1931–1938
Aaron Peters

Individual Articles

Specters of Dependency: Hou Yuon and the Origins of Cambodia’s Marxist Vision (1955–1975)
Matthew Galway

Homeless in the Fatherland: Xiao Hong’s Migrant Geographies
Clara Iwasaki

Imagining Female Heroism: Three Tales of the Female Knight-Errant in Republican China
Iris Ma

Print copies are available for purchase.

Most Read Open Access Articles in 2019

Our open access titles include Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal, Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society, Language Documentation and Conservation, and Palapala: A Journal for Hawaiian Language and Literature. In 2019, these four journals garnered nearly 10,000 downloads worldwide. Here are the most downloaded articles.

Readership distribution for Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal in 2019.

The Munda Maritime Hypothesis
Felix Rau and Paul Sidwell
Journal of Southeast Asian Linguistics Society, Vol. 12, issue 2

Towards an interdisciplinary bridge between documentation and revitalization: Bringing ethnographic methods into endangered-language projects and programming
Sarah Shulist and Faun Rice
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

Notes from the Field: Remontado (Hatang-Kayi): A Moribund Language of the Philippines
Jason William Lobel and Orlando Vertudez Surbano
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

Global Survey of Revitalization Efforts: A mixed methods approach to understanding language revitalization practices
Gabriela Pérez Báez, Rachel Vogel, and Uia Patolo
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

maqlaqsyalank hemyeega: Goals and expectations of Klamath-Modoc revitalization
Joseph Dupris
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

The languages of northern Ambrym, Vanuatu: A guide to the deposited materials in ELAR
Michael Franjieh
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

Public access to research data in language documentation: Challenges and possible strategies
Mandana Seyfeddinipur, Manfred Krifka, Felix Ameka, Susan Kung, Lissant Bolton, Miyuki Monroig, Jonathan Blumtritt, Ayu’nwi Ngwabe Neba, Brian Carpenter, Sebastian Nordhoff, Hilaria Cruz, Brigitte Pakendorf, Sebastian Drude, Kilu von Prince, Patience L. Epps, Felix Rau, Vera Ferreira, Keren Rice, Ana Vilacy Galucio, Michael Riessler, Brigit Hellwig, Vera Szoelloesi Brenig, Oliver Hinte, Nick Thieberger, Gary Holton, Paul Trilsbeek, Dagmar Jung, Hein van der Voort, Irmgarda Kasinskaite Buddeberg, and Tony Woodbury
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

Language vitality assessment of Deori: An endangered language
Prarthana Acharyya and Shakuntala Mahanta
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

Proposing a Facilitated Participatory Approach for Southeast Asian Minority Language Orthography Design
Sigrid Lew
Journal of Southeast Asian Linguistics Society, Vol. 12, issue 1

The Javanese language at risk? Perspectives from an East Java village
Jozina Vander Klok
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

Most Read Journal Articles in 2019

As 2019 comes to a close, enjoy the most read articles across our journals on Project MUSE.

This year, we celebrated the 30th anniversary of three international journals, began publishing The Journal of Burma Studies, and increased individual access to many of our journal articles via the Project MUSE platform.

Stay tuned for popular articles from our open access titles.

Contemporary Pacific 31-2

Unsettling SpongeBob and the Legacies of Violence on Bikini Bottom
Holly M Barker
Contemporary Pacific, Vol. 31, No. 2

The Sonyŏsang Phenomenon: Nationalism and Feminism Surrounding the “Comfort Women” Statue
Vicki Sung-yeon Kwon
Korean Studies, Vol. 43

Other Bandungs: Afro-Asian Internationalisms in the Early Cold War
Carolien Stolte; Su Lin Lewis
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, Issues 1-2

Māori Issues
Margaret Mutu
Contemporary Pacific, Vol. 31, Issue 1

Indigenous Well-Being and Development: Connections to Large-Scale Mining and Tourism in the Pacific
Emma Hughes; Emma Richardson; Litea Meo-Sewabu; Sharon McLennan
Contemporary Pacific, Vol. 31, Issue 1

Where was the Afro in Afro-Asian Solidarity? Africa’s ‘Bandung Moment’ in 1950s Asia
Gerard McCann
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, Issues 1-2

Journal of World History 30 1&2 cover

Building Egypt’s Afro-Asian Hub: Infrastructures of Solidarity and the 1957 Cairo Conference
Reem Abou-El-Fadl
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, Issues 1-2

A Missing Peace: The Asia-Pacific Peace Conference in Beijing, 1952 and the Emotional Making of Third World Internationalism
Rachel Leow
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, Issues 1-2

Asian Socialism and the Forgotten Architects of Post-Colonial Freedom, 1952–1956
Su Lin Lewis
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, Issues 1-2

Asian Perspectives 58-1

Early Korea: Re-thinking Boundaries and Identities
Dennis Lee; Jack Davey
Asian Perspectives, Vol. 58, Issue 1