Buddhist-Christian Studies Vol. 39

From “The Souls of Animals in Christianity and Mahāyāna Buddhism” by Junhyoung Michael Shin: Fig. 8 Giotto, St. Francis preaching to Birds, 1297-99, Upper Church, San Francesco, Assisi.

From the Editors’ Introduction:

This issue continues to open up new questions in Buddhist-Christian Studies from a variety of approaches. We have included papers from the panels from our 2017 Society of Buddhist-Christian Studies’ panels held concurrently with the American Academy of Religion annual meeting on “Uses and Misuses of Anger in Buddhism and Christianity”  and “What Buddhism and Christians Can Learn from Muslims,”  as well as papers that were presented at other conferences such as the World Parliament of Religions held in Toronto in November 2018, and a symposium organized by Denison University in February 2019 on “Confronting Mara and Mammon: Buddhist-Christian Dialogue for Resistance and Spirituality.”  The themes of human suffering, resiliency, and resistance to structural forms of oppression run through all of these sections, as our authors seek new models for sustaining us in these challenging global times.

Articles from this Volume:

Stopping At Hell’s Gate
by Carolyn M. Jones Medine

The Wrathful Guru: Exploring the Vajrayana Understanding of Anger
by Lama Rod Owens

Anger Makes Us Ugly: Reflections from Pāli Buddhism
by Carol S. Anderson

The Wind Blows Gently and Fiercely: A Pentecostal Perspective on Love and Anger
by Joel D. Daniels

Holy Anger, Holy Wrath: The Role of Anger and the Emotions in Early Christian Spirituality and the Mahāyāna Buddhist Tradition
by Tomas Cattoi

Tending the Fire of Anger: A Feminist Defense of a Much Maligned Emotion
by Alice A. Keefe

Radicalization and Bold Mercy: Christian Theological Learning in Dialogue with the 2014 Open Letter
by John N. Sheveland

A Buddhist-Christian-Muslim Reflection on the Concepts of Mercy, Surrender, and Union
by Bahar Davary

The Small Engage the Powerful: An American Buddhist–Liberation Theology–Quaker Trialogue
by Sallie B. King

Resilience and Interdependence: Christian and Buddhist Views of Social Responsibility Following Natural Disasters
by Beverley Foulks McGuire

…plus 10 more articles, a News and Views section, and 6 Book Reviews.

About the Journal

Buddhist-Christian Studies is a scholarly journal published annually by University of Hawai‘i Press. It presents research papers, book reviews, and news items on Buddhism and Christianity, their interrelation, and comparative study based on historical materials and contemporary experience.

Subscriptions

Annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions are available here. Individual subscription is also available through membership in the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies (SBCS).

Submissions

The materials selected for publication will be balanced between historical research and contemporary practice, and, where possible, they should employ analytical and theoretical tools and be set within the framework of our shared human history. More information is available at the journal’s website.

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 3

The new issue of Philosophy East and West features a special section, “Politics, Nature, and Society — The Actuality of North African Philosopher Ibn Khaldūn,” guest edited by Tamara Albertini, as well as a book discussion on Vrinda Dalmiya’s Caring to Know: Comparative Care Ethics, Feminist Epistemology, and the Mahābhārata, along with other articles and reviews.



Ibn Khaldūn: A Philosopher for Times of Crisis
Tamara Albertini

Political Power, the Maghreb Space, and the “Arab Spring”: A Reading through Ibn Khaldūn’s Looking Glass
Ridha Chennoufi

Beyond the Fourth Generation: Constituting a Muslim State in the Thought of Ibn Khaldūn and Khayr al-Dīn al-Tūnisī
Jeremy Kleidosty

The (Re-)Introduction of Ibn Khaldūn to Spain: A Journey Passing through Ortega y Gasset’s Work
Cynthia Scheopner

Ibn Khaldūn’s Notion of ‘Umrān: An Alternative Unit of Analysis for Contemporary Politics?
M. Akif Kayapınar

The Refutation of Astrology in Ibn Khaldūn’s Muqaddima: A Study of His Multileveled Reasoning Capability
Mehdi Saiden

Ibn Khaldūn and the Immanence of Judgment
Lenn E. Goodman

Ibn al-Haytham, from Place to Space: A Comparative Approach
Yomna T. Elkholy

The Suberogation Problem for Lei Zhong’s Confucian Virtue Theory of Supererogation
Tsung-Hsing Ho

Scriptural Injunctivism: Reading Yeshayahu Leibowitz in the Light of Mīmāṃsā Philosophy
Dimitry Shevchenko

Buddhist Philosophy of Mind: Nāgārjuna’s Critique of Mind-Body Dualism from His Rebirth Arguments
Sonam Thakchoe

The Endless Pursuit of Self-Perfection: A Hidden Dialogue between Mou Zongsan and F. H. Bradley
Roy Tseng

Book Discussion

Comparative Epistemology
Linda Martín Alcoff

Caring about Care
Eva Feder Kittay

The Nature of the Disposition to Care: Discursive and Pre-discursive Dimensions
Keya Maitra

The Importance of Being Modest
Nilanjan Das

Caring to Know: Response to Commentators
Vrinda Dalmiya

Comment and Discussion

When Science is in Defense of Value-Linked Facts
Donald J. Munro

The Plasticity of the Human and Inscribing History within Biology: A Response to Donald J. Munro
Sonya N. Özbey

Online Book Reviews

Tarō Naka, Music: Selected Poems trans. by Andrew Houwen and Chikako Nihei (review)
Ryan Johnson

The Philosophy of the Bhagavad Gītā: A Contemporary Introduction by Keya Maitra (review)
Malcolm Keating

The Mandala Sutra and Its English Translation: The New Dunhuang Museum Version Revised by Yang Zengwen (review)
Ma Lijuan

Absent Mother God of the West: A Kali Lover’s Journey into Christianity and Judaism by Neela Bhattacharya Saxena (review)
Swami Narasimhananda

Confucianism for the Contemporary World: Global Order, Politial Plurality, and Social Action ed. by Tze-ki Ton and Kristin Stapleton (review)
Bin Song

Read more in Volume 69

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 2 is also available on Project MUSE.

Philosophy East and West 69-3
Philosophy East and West
vol. 69, no. 3

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 31 no. 2 (2019)

Featured art, this issue: Opening the hangi. Te Wake unveiling. Matihetihe Marae. During the tangihanga for Ralph Hotere, by Natalie Robertson, 2013. Presented as part of a collection titled The Headlands Await Your Coming, this image evokes the practices of ahi kaa roa (keeping the home fires burning) and manaakitanga (offering hospitality to visitors) through the provision of food—practices that proclaim and sustain mana whenua, or intergenerational authority, pride, and tribal connections to land.
Featured art, this issue: Opening the hangi. Te Wake unveiling. Matihetihe Marae. During the tangihanga for Ralph Hotere, by Natalie Robertson, 2013. Presented as part of a collection titled The Headlands Await Your Coming, this image evokes the practices of ahi kaa roa (keeping the home fires burning) and manaakitanga (offering hospitality to visitors) through the provision of food—practices that proclaim and sustain mana whenua, or intergenerational authority, pride, and tribal connections to land.

This issue of The Contemporary Pacific features the art of Natalie Robertson, remembers mentor Robert (Bob) C. Kriste, and the following articles and reviews.

Articles

“More than a Music, It’s a Movement”: West Papua Decolonization Songs, Social Media, and the Remixing of Resistance
By Camellia Webb-Gannon, Michael Webb

Unsettling SpongeBob and the Legacies of Violence on Bikini Bottom
By Holly M Barker

Elemental Eating: Samoan Public Health and Valuation in Health Promotion
By Jessica Hardin, Christina Ting Kwauk

Employment of the Weak: The Role of a Multinational Factory in the Life Trajectory of Early School Leavers in Sāmoa
By Masami Tsujita Levi

Rearticulating Diplomatic Relationships: Contextualizing Tuvalu-Taiwan Relations
By Jess Marinaccio

Dialogue

Robert (Bob) C Kriste: Mentor and Friend of the Pacific
By Brij V Lal

Political Reviews

Region in Review
By Nic Maclellan

Micronesia in Review
By Volker Boege, Mathias Chauchat, Joseph Daniel Foukona, Budi Hernawan, Michael Leach, and James Stiefvater

Book and Media Reviews

I Hinanao-ta Nu I Manaotao Tåno’ I CHamoru Siha (The Journey of the CHamoru People) (review)
By Teresita L Perez

Decolonisation and the Pacific: Indigenous Globalisation and the Ends of Empire by Tracey Banivanua Mar (review)
By Trish Tupou

Hope at Sea: Possible Ecologies in Oceanic Literature by Teresa Shewry (review)
By Erin Cheslow

The Cultural Animation Film Festival (review)
By Elizabeth Bennett

Ainikien Jidjid ilo Boñ, and: Batmon vs Majuro, and: Jilel: The Calling of the Shell, and: Lañinbwil’s Gift, and: Ña Noniep, and: Yokwe Bartowe (review)
By Tom Brislin

Crossing Spaces (review)
By Myjolynne Marie Kim

Tikopia Collected: Raymond Firth and the Creation of Solomon Island Cultural Heritage by Elizabeth Bonshek (review)
By David Lipset

Textilia Linnaeana: Global 18th Century Textile Traditions & Trade by Viveka Hansen (review)
By Alexander Mawyer

Ship of Fate: Memoir of a Vietnamese Repatriate by Trần Ðình Trụ (review)
By Mary Therese Perez Hattori

Uncovering Indigenous Models of Leadership: An Ethnographic Case Study of Samoa’s Talavou Clan by Leiataua Robert Jon Peterson (review)
By Luafata Simanu-Klutz

Contemporary Pacific 31-2
The Contemporary Pacific
Volume 31, Issue 2

The Journal of Burma Studies Vol 23, No. 1 (2019)

Featured in Caroline Ha Thuc's "Research as Strategy: Reactivating Mythologies and Building a Collective Memory in Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung's The Name (2008-)" this issue: Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung The Name (2008–). Detail: Portrait of Bo Cho. Multimedia installation. Image courtesy of the artists.
Featured in Caroline Ha Thuc’s “Research as Strategy: Reactivating Mythologies and Building a Collective Memory in Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung’s The Name (2008-)” this issue: Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung The Name (2008–). Detail: Portrait of Bo Cho. Multimedia installation. Image courtesy of the artists.

The new issue of The Journal of Burma Studies (JBS) promises a tour de force of ethnographic, historical, and artistic insight into religious practice and cultural
expression.

This issue marks the first in our new partnership with the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University. Find top articles from The Journal of Burma Studies‘ archive and enjoy the new issue today on Project MUSE.


Editor’s Note
By Jane M. Ferguson

Making Merit, Making Civil Society: Free Funeral Service Societies and Merit-Making in Contemporary Myanmar
By Mu-Lung Hsu

Thrice-Honored Sangharaja Saramedha (1801-1882): Arakan-Chittagong Buddhism across Colonial and Counter-Colonial Power
By D. Mitra Barua

Research as Strategy: Reactivating Mythologies and Building a Collective Memory in Wah Nu and Tun Win Aung’s The Name (2008-)
By Caroline Ha Thuc

Bottom-Up Explorations: Locating Rule of Law Intermediaries after Transition in Myanmar
By Kristina Simion

Smoke, No Fire 
By Richard M. Cooler

Imperial Intoxication: Alcohol and the Making of Colonial Indochina by Gerard Sasges (review)
By Luke Corbin

Constitutionalism and Legal Change in Myanmar ed. by Andrew Harding (review)
By Elliot Prasse-Freeman

Saffron Shadows and Salvaged Scripts: Literary Life in Myanmar under Censorship and in Transition by Ellen Wiles (review)
By Kenneth Wong

Journal of Burma Studies 23-1
The Journal of Burma Studies, Vol. 23, No. 1 (2019)

Asian Theatre Journal Vol. 36, No. 2, (2019)

From Troy, Troy. . . Taiwan, 2005 performed at Hobe Fort in Tamsui, featured in Sophia Yashih Liu's article, "Performing Intercultural Truama: State, Land, and Women in Troy, Troy. . . Taiwan" this issue.  Photo: Chen Shao-Wei
From Troy, Troy. . . Taiwan, 2005 performed at Hobe Fort in Tamsui, featured in Sophia Yashih Liu’s article, “Performing Intercultural Truama: State, Land, and Women in Troy, Troy. . . Taiwan” this issue. Photo: Chen Shao-Wei

The fall issue of Asian Theatre Journal opens with a special section on the 2016 quatercentenary celebration of Tang Xianzu and William Shakespeare, guest edited by Alexa Alice Joubin. The regular issue follows with scholarly articles and reviews, including three emerging scholar articles that offer perspectives from India, Taiwan, and Singapore.

From the Editor
By Siyuan Liu

Special Section: Tang Xianzu and William Shakespeare Quatercentenary Celebration

Performing Commemoration: The Cultural Politics of Locating Tang Xianzu and Shakespeare
By Alexa Alice Joubin

Intercultural and Cross-cultural Encounters during the Quatercentenary of Tang Xianzu and Shakespeare
By Mary Mazzilli

Looking for Common Ground: A Thematic Comparison between Tang Xianzu’s and Shakespeare’s Dramatic Imagination
By Letizia Fusini

Engaging Tang Xianzu and Shakespeare in the Quest for Self
By Liana Chen

Pansori Hamlet Project: Taroo’s New Pansori Shakespeare for the Local Audience
By Seokhun Choi

Regular Issue Articles

Politics and Tactics in Revolutionary Performance: A Sino-Burmese Arts Troupe in Transnational Circulation
By Tasaw Hsin-chun Lu

Bhuta Kola Ritual Performances: Locating Aesthetics in Collective Memory and Shared Experience
By Meera Baindur, Tapaswi H M

Tradition and Modernity: Two Modern Adaptations of the Chinese Opera Hezhu’s Match
By Shiao-ling Yu

Applying/Contesting the Brechtain “Model”: Calcutta Repertory Theatre’s Galileo Jibon (Life of Galileo)
By Dwaipayan Chowdhury

Performing Intercultural Trauma: State, Land, and Women in Troy, Troy… Taiwan
By Sophia Yashih Liu

Spaces of Citizenship in Contemporary Singaporean Theatre: Staging the 2011 General Election
By Nathan F. Bullock

Plus reviews.

Asian Theatre Journal 36-2
Asian Theatre Journal Vol. 36, No. 2, (2019)

Journal of Word History, Vol 30, No. 3 (2019)

Figure 2 from "Traveling Anthropophagy: The Depiction of Cannibalism in Modern Travel Writing, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries" by José María Hernández Gutiérrez, this issue: Ptolemaic Map of Africa (Geography, 1511). Anthropophagi are supposedly present in the southeast according to the map. Source: Rare Maps.
Figure 2 from “Traveling Anthropophagy: The Depiction of Cannibalism in Modern Travel Writing, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries” by José María Hernández Gutiérrez, this issue: Ptolemaic Map of Africa (Geography, 1511). Anthropophagi are supposedly present in the southeast according to the map. Source: Rare Maps.

 

This issue of the Journal of World History includes the following scholarly articles:

The Globalisation of Franciscan Poverty
By Julia McClure 

This article explores the Franciscans’ attempt to translate their local conception of poverty into a world order between the thirteenth and sixteenth centuries. Studies of Franciscan poverty have generally been confined to Europe and to the Middle Ages, yet the pursuit of poverty also shaped the Franciscans’ global interactions across the medieval and early modern periods. This focus provides an alternative perspective not only on the history of the Franciscan Order but also on global history, which has often been conceptualised as the European expansion of commodities, money and markets. Economic expansion was in dialogue with an overlooked story of resistance to, and questioning of, the phenomena of money and markets, and the attempt to realise a vision of the world based upon a unifying, yet unequal, notion of poverty.

The First Global Turn: Chinese Contributions of Enlightenment World History
By Alexander Statman

This article argues that certain Enlightenment approaches to world history developed through engagement with Chinese texts. In the eighteenth century, two French savants, Michel-Ange le Roux Deshauterayes and Joseph de Guignes, read original Chinese language histories and deployed them to ask and answer world-historical questions. Deshauterayes drew from the sixteenth-century historian Nan Xuan to argue that the mariner’s compass was invented in ancient China and diffused to the west. De Guignes looked to Ma Duanlin’s fourteenth-century encyclopedia to explain how the Huns came from Central Asia to threaten the Roman Empire. Their conclusions and their methods contributed to Enlightenment historiography through the works of philosophes such as Voltaire and Edward Gibbon. Enlightenment authors not only learned about China; they also learned from China.

Traveling Anthropophagy: The Depiction of Cannibalism in Modern Travel Writing, Sixteenth to Nineteenth Centuries
By José María Hernández Gutiérrez

Travel writing had a significant impact on the way cannibalism was to be interpreted and diffused from the sixteenth century onwards. By analyzing how much our current understanding of anthropophagy owes to the discourse of travel writing and the simultaneous interaction between concept and medium, a better understanding of its implications in philosophical, political and scientific discourse can be perceived. It also elaborates on how we built self-identification through the uses of fears and cultural stereotypes. A quick glance at the structure of travel writing helps conceptualize how the encounter with Native Americans by Christopher Columbus transformed the Western perceptions of cannibalism and determined relations with other peoples in the following centuries, from Polynesians to Africans. The repercussions of this dialectical process are still palpable today.

The War is Our War: Antifascism among Lebanese Leftist Intellectuals*
By Sana Tannoury-Karam

In the years preceding and during the Second World War, the Lebanese left founded and spearheaded a vibrant antifascist struggle in the Lebanese and wider Arab public sphere. Examining how Arab leftists organized against, debated, and rejected fascism and Nazism challenges the narrative of Arab cooperation with fascism. It also takes issue with viewing antifascism as simply reactive to fascism. Rather, this article shows that antifascists drew upon pre-war and interwar intellectual frameworks of nationalism and anticolonialism to create counterhegemonic discourses against fascism. It argues that those who opposed fascism were operating within a terrain of interconnected and overlapping structures of oppression that they saw facing their societies, specifically the nexus between colonialism and fascism, and their relation to Zionism. Lebanese antifascists built east-east networks of activism to create linkages between the Arab liberation struggle and other oppressed nations, thus converging their nationalist and internationalist projects.

Plus book reviews.

 

Journal of World History 30-3
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, No. 3 (2019)

Philosophy East and West, vol. 69, no. 2

Vincent Shen, 1949–2018.
Vincent Shen, 1949–2018.

Vincent Shen submitted his paper, “Desire, Representing Process, and Translatability” for blind review in 2017. Unfortunately, he passed away on Nov. 14, 2018, while the paper was in the last stages of copyediting. In this issue, Mingran Tan remembers this inspiring mentor and the editors at Philosophy East and West are honored to publish one of Prof. Shen’s last essays.

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 2 includes the following scholarly works:

Remembering Vincent Shen
Mingran Tan

Desire, Representing Process, and Translatability
Vincent Shen

Paul Tillich, Zhuangzi, and the Creational Role of Nonbeing
David Chai

Wang Bi’s Commentary on the Analects: A Confucian-Daoist Critique of Effable Morality
Paul J. D’Ambrosio

The Theory of the Self in the Zhuangzi: A Strawsonian Interpretation
Jenny Hung

Things Endure While We Fade Away: Tao Yuanming on Being Himself
Michael D. K. Ing

The No-Self View and the Meaning of Life
Baptiste Le Bihan

Abhidharma Metaphysics and the Two Truths
Kris McDaniel

A Pro-Realist Account of Gongsun Long’s “White Horse Dialogue”
Yuan Ren, Yuyu Liu

This Strange Idea of Art
Joseph Tanke

Agent and Deed in Confucian Thought
George Tsai

Knowledge, Action, and Virtue in Zhu Xi
Matthew D. Walker

“A Rich Conception of the Surface”: On Feng Zikai’s Paintings to Protect Life
Hektor K. T. Yan

Book Discussion

Bell’s Model of Meritocracy for China: Two Confucian Amendments
Yong Huang

Missing Links in The China Model
Chenyang Li

Meritocracy as a Political System: A Commentary on Bell’s The China Model
Binfan Wang

Toward Confucian-Inspired Democratic Meritocracy: A Response to Yong Huang, Chenyang Li, and Binfan Wang
Daniel A. Bell

Beyond Philosophical Euromonopolism: Other Ways of—Not Otherwise than—Philosophy
Bret W. Davis

Undoing Western Hegemony, Unpacking the Particulars:Taking Back Philosophy: A Review of Bryan Van Norden’s Taking Back Philosophy A Multicultural Manifesto
David H. Kim

A Comparative Feminist Reflection on Race and Gender
Li-Hsiang Lisa Rosenlee

Response to Comments by Bret Davis, David Kim, and Lisa Rosenlee on Taking Back Philosophy
Bryan W. Van Norden

Online Book Reviews

Tang Junyi: Confucian Philosophy and the Challenge of Modernity by Thomas Fröhlich (review) Chor-yung Cheung

Order in Early Chinese Excavated Texts: Natural, Supernatural, and Legal Approaches by Zhongjiang Wang (review)
Thomas Michael

Philosophy in Colonial India ed. by Sharad Deshpande (review)
Swami Narasimhananda

The Emotions in Early Chinese Philosophy by Curie Virág (review)
Ellen Y. Zhang

Philosophy of Language, Chinese Language, Chinese Philosophy: Constructive Engagement ed. by Bo Mou (review)
Rohan Sikri

Read more in Volume 69

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 1 is also available on Project MUSE.

 

Philosophy East and West 69-2
Philosophy East and West, vol. 68, no. 2

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 58 no. 1 (2019)

Schapper Map 1
Map 1, Distribution of Smell/Kiss Colexification in Southeast Asia and Beyond in Antoinette Schapper’s article, “The Ethno-Linguistic Relationship between Smelling and Kissing: A Southeast Asian Case Study” in this issue of Oceanic Linguistics.

The summer issue of Oceanic Linguistics is the first from the new editorial team, lead by Daniel Kaufman, Yuko Otsuka, and Antoinette Schapper. Read more about the transition in this issue’s editorial note. The journal is now accepting submissions online at oceaniclinguistics.msubmit.net.

Articles

A Syntactic Motivation for Valency Reduction: Antipassive Constructions in Ulwa
Russell Barlow

Reintroducing Welaun
Owen Edwards

Language Contact and Gender in Tetun Dili: What Happens When Austronesian Meets Romance?
John Hajek and Catharina Williams-van Klinken

The Ethno-Linguistic Relationship between Smelling and Kissing: A Southeast Asian Case Study
Antoinette Schapper

A Second Look at Proto-Land Dayak Vowels
Alexander D. Smith

Book Reviews

Histoire et voyages des plantes cultivées à Madagascar by Philippe Beaujard (review)
Sander Adelaar

Critical Christianity: Translation and denominational conflict in Papua New Guinea by Courtney Handman (review)
Joel Bradshaw

Top Articles from The Journal of Burma Studies, New UHP Title

Gate to Myang Gyi Ngu monastic community, Karen State. BGF guards control visitors for guns, drugs, alcohol and meat. DKBA has been ousted from the place. U Thuzana’s photo is in the middle (Photo courtesy of Mikael Gravers).
From Mikael Gravers’ “Disorder as Order“: Gate to Myang Gyi Ngu monastic community, Karen State. BGF guards control visitors for guns, drugs, alcohol and meat. DKBA has been ousted from the place. U Thuzana’s photo is in the middle (Photo courtesy of Mikael Gravers).

As we look forward to publishing the next issue of The Journal of Burma Studies, we’re pleased to share the top ten most-read articles on Project MUSE in the past year.

The Journal of Burma Studies is one of the only scholarly peer-reviewed journals that focus exclusively on Burma/Myanmar. 


 

Disorder as Order: The Ethno-Nationalist Struggle of the Karen in Burma/Myanmar€—A Discussion of the Dynamics of an Ethicized Civil War and Its Historical Roots
By Mikael Gravers
Volume 19, Number 1, June 2015

A Textbook Case of Nation-Building: The Evolution of History Curricula in Myanmar
By Nicolas Salem-Gervais and Rosalie Metro
Volume 16, Number 1, June 2012

“Transition”€ as a Migratory Model in Myanmar
By Felix Girke and Judith Beyer
Volume 22, Number 2, December 2018

“Making a Name for Themselves:” Karen Identity and the Politicization of Ethnicity in Burma
By Jessica Harriden
Volume 7, 2002

Rethinking Land and Property in a “Transitioning”€ Myanmar: Representations of Isolation, Neglect, and Natural Decline
By Elizabeth L. Rhoads and Courtney T. Wittekind
Volume 22, Number 2, December 2018

Appraisal of Burma/Myanmar’s Roundabout Roadmaps
By Khen Suan Khai
Volume 22, Number 2, December 2018

“Burmanization”€ and the Impact of J.S. Furnivall’s Views on National Identity in Late-Colonial Burma
By Carol Ann Boshier
Volume 20, Number 2, December 2016

Bitter Pills: Colonialism, Medicine and Nationalism in Burma, 1870-1940
By Penny Edwards
Volume 14, 2010

Notes on Burmese Manuscripts: Text and Images
By Christian Lammerts
Volume 14, 2010

The Disciplining Discourse of Unity in Burmese Politics
By Matthew J. Walton
Volume 19, Number 1, June 2015

 

Journal of World History Special Issue: Other Bandungs (Vol. 30, Nos. 1&2)

FIGURE 1. Sjahrir arrives for the Asian Socialist Conference. Left to right: Ali Algadri, SutanSjahrir, U Ba Swe, and U Kyaw Nyein   (Sjahrir Family Collection.
In “Asian Socialism and the Forgotten Architects of Post-Colonial Freedom, 1952–1956” by Su Lin Lewis, this issue. Sutan Sjahrir arrives for the Asian Socialist Conference. Left to right: Ali Algadri, Sutan Sjahrir, U Ba Swe, and U Kyaw Nyein (Sjahrir Family Collection).

Afro-Asian Internationalisms in the Early Cold War 

Excerpted from the Editors’ Introduction:

On the cover of the Jakarta Reporters Club handbook to the 1955 Asia-Africa Conference is an iconic photograph of a rickshaw driver looking up at a large billboard, featuring a map of the 29 participating nations stretching from China to Ghana. Bandung was once a colonial resort town, nestled in the mountainous tea plantations of West Java, and gained notoriety during the Indonesian Revolution, when Indonesians burned down part of their own town in response to the Dutch reoccupation of the city. Over six days in April, however, the modernist hillside bungalows housed not wealthy Dutchmen but the leaders of Asia’s largest powers. The city itself was overrun with diplomats, statesmen, journalists, and photographers enacting a spectacular moment of resurgence for nations emerging from colonial rule.

This special issue examines “other Bandungs”: conferences in the 1950s and 1960s that convened the decolonising world in different constellations. All the gatherings examined in this issue have in common that they were not styled as intergovernmental affairs. They did not convene heads of state, even though several of them were covertly or overtly state-sponsored. And none of them were completely disconnected from the state: delegations included civil servants, members of parliament, representatives of local and provincial governments, opposition leaders, government advisors, and state-appointed representatives. Together, they show the presence of a much broader Afro-Asian enthusiasm. While some of the early conferences foreshadow Bandung and solidify the connections that made the official conference possible, later conferences self-consciously claimed to be expressions of the Bandung Spirit, or at the very least located themselves vis-à-vis the Bandung conference.

Read the full introduction to the special issue by guest editors Su Lin Lewis and Carolien Stolte here. 

Articles

A Missing Peace: The Asia-Pacific Peace Conference in Beijing, 1952 and the Emotional Making of Third World Internationalism
Rachel Leow

Asian Socialism and the Forgotten Architects of Post-Colonial Freedom, 1952–1956
Su Lin Lewis

Where was the Afro in Afro-Asian Solidarity? Africa’s ‘Bandung Moment’ in 1950s Asia
Gerard McCann

“The People’s Bandung”: Local Anti-imperialists on an Afro-Asian Stage
Carolien Stolte

Building Egypt’s Afro-Asian Hub: Infrastructures of Solidarity and the 1957 Cairo Conference
Reem Abou-El-Fadl

Soviet “Afro-Asians” in UNESCO: Reorienting World History
Hanna Jansen

Dispatches from Havana: The Cold War, Afro-Asian Solidarities, and Culture Wars in Pakistan
Ali Raza

Plus book reviews.

Cross-Currents, Vol. 8, No. 1 (2019)

The new issue of Cross-Currents includes two special sections.

“Diasporic Art and Korean Identity,” is the fruit of a two-day conference held at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in May 2017 and explores new delineations of the political, social, cultural, and emotional landscapes inhabited by Koreans living in diaspora.

“Air-Water-Land-Human: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health and Environment in East Asia” presents new directions for thinking through connections between health, well-being, and environment in the region.

Diasporic Art and Korean Identity

Painting in Hijoo Son article, Cross-Currents 8-1
From “The Diasporic Intimacy and Transindividuality of Artists
Himan Sŏk (1914–2003) and Jun Ch’ae (1926– )” by Hijoo Son, this issue. Left: Jun Ch’ae, Public Opinion (Yoron), 2002. Oil on canvas, 90 cm x
65.5 cm. Right: Jun Ch’ae, Glass Marbles (Yuri kusŭl), 2002. Acrylic on canvas, 162 cm x 130 cm. Source: Gyeongnam Art Museum.

 

Introduction

Hijoo Son, Jooyeon Rhee

The Forgotten Childhoods of Korea: Ounie Lecomte’s A Brand New Life (2009) and So Yong Kim’s Treeless Mountain (2009)

Ji-Yoon An

Performing in the “Cultural Borderlands”: Gender, Trauma, and Performance Practices of a North Korean Women’s Musical Troupe in South Korea

Iain Sands

The Diasporic Intimacy and Transindividuality of Artists Himan Sŏk (1914–2003) and Jun Ch’ae (1926–)

Hijoo Son

Air-Water-Land-Human: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health and Environment in East Asia

Figure 1 &2 in Air/Qi Connections and China’s Smog Crisis: Notes from the History of Science by Ruth Rogaski, Cross-Currents 8-1
From “Air/Qi Connections and China’s Smog Crisis: Notes from the History of Science” by Ruth Rogaski, this issue. Left: Beijing University statue of a taijiquan practitioner wearing a face mask. Source: ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images. Right: Doing taijiquan in the smog. Source: AP Photo.

 

Introduction

Ruth Rogaski

Cholera and the Environment in Nineteenth-Century Japan

William Johnston

Danger in the Air: Tuberculosis Control and BCG Vaccination in the Republic of China, 1930–1949

Mary Augusta Brazelton

Air/Qi Connections and China’s Smog Crisis: Notes from the History of Science

Ruth Rogaski

“Swimming in Poison”: Reimagining Endocrine Disruption through China’s Environmental Hormones

Janelle Lamoreaux

Sacred Trash and Personhood: Living in Daily Waste-Management Infrastructures in the Eastern Himalayas

Bo Wang

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society – Volume 12:1 (2019)

Figure 1: Location of the Dejing dialect area where Yang is spoken
Location of the Dejing dialect area where Yang is spoken, a figure in Eric Jackson’s “Two-Part Negation in Yang Zhuang” this issue.

The first issue of Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society‘s 12th volume is complete and available on the university open-access platform, ScholarSpace.

Research Papers (Peer-Reviewed)

Spatial Relations along the In-On Continuum in Thai Sign Language
Cassie Wallace

Vietnamese Initial Consonant Clusters in Quốc Ngữ Documents from the 17th to Early 19th Centuries
Duc Nghieu Vu

Types and Functions of Reduplication in Palembang
Mardheya Alsamadani and Samar Taibah

Request Modifications Used by Chinese Learners and Native Speakers of Thai
Yingyot Kanchina and Sujaritlak Deepadung

Two-part Negation in Yang Zhuang
Eric Jackson

Tonal Variation in Pyen
Christina Scotte Hornéy

The Labial Causative In Trans-Himalayan
Guillaume Jacques

Non-finite Clauses in Thai
Pornsiri Singhapreecha

Data Papers, Book Reviews, and Other Notes

Proposing a Facilitated Participatory Approach for Southeast Asian Minority Language Orthography Design
Sigrid Lew

Tones in the Cuoi Language of Tan Ki District in Nghe An Province, Vietnam
Huu Hoanh Nguyen and Van Loi Nguyen

Book Notice: Mainland Southeast Asian Languages – A Concise Typological Introduction, by N. J. Enfield

In Memoriam: Thomas M. Tehan (1951-2019)
Brian Migliazza

A View on Proto-Karen Phonology and Lexicon
Theraphan Luangthongkum