Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 58 no. 1 (2019)

Schapper Map 1
Map 1, Distribution of Smell/Kiss Colexification in Southeast Asia and Beyond in Antoinette Schapper’s article, “The Ethno-Linguistic Relationship between Smelling and Kissing: A Southeast Asian Case Study” in this issue of Oceanic Linguistics.

The summer issue of Oceanic Linguistics is the first from the new editorial team, lead by Daniel Kaufman, Yuko Otsuka, and Antoinette Schapper. Read more about the transition in this issue’s editorial note. The journal is now accepting submissions online at oceaniclinguistics.msubmit.net.

Articles

A Syntactic Motivation for Valency Reduction: Antipassive Constructions in Ulwa
Russell Barlow

Reintroducing Welaun
Owen Edwards

Language Contact and Gender in Tetun Dili: What Happens When Austronesian Meets Romance?
John Hajek and Catharina Williams-van Klinken

The Ethno-Linguistic Relationship between Smelling and Kissing: A Southeast Asian Case Study
Antoinette Schapper

A Second Look at Proto-Land Dayak Vowels
Alexander D. Smith

Book Reviews

Histoire et voyages des plantes cultivées à Madagascar by Philippe Beaujard (review)
Sander Adelaar

Critical Christianity: Translation and denominational conflict in Papua New Guinea by Courtney Handman (review)
Joel Bradshaw

Top Articles from The Journal of Burma Studies, New UHP Title

Gate to Myang Gyi Ngu monastic community, Karen State. BGF guards control visitors for guns, drugs, alcohol and meat. DKBA has been ousted from the place. U Thuzana’s photo is in the middle (Photo courtesy of Mikael Gravers).
From Mikael Gravers’ “Disorder as Order“: Gate to Myang Gyi Ngu monastic community, Karen State. BGF guards control visitors for guns, drugs, alcohol and meat. DKBA has been ousted from the place. U Thuzana’s photo is in the middle (Photo courtesy of Mikael Gravers).

As we look forward to publishing the next issue of The Journal of Burma Studies, we’re pleased to share the top ten most-read articles on Project MUSE in the past year.

The Journal of Burma Studies is one of the only scholarly peer-reviewed journals that focus exclusively on Burma/Myanmar. 


 

Disorder as Order: The Ethno-Nationalist Struggle of the Karen in Burma/Myanmar€—A Discussion of the Dynamics of an Ethicized Civil War and Its Historical Roots
By Mikael Gravers
Volume 19, Number 1, June 2015

A Textbook Case of Nation-Building: The Evolution of History Curricula in Myanmar
By Nicolas Salem-Gervais and Rosalie Metro
Volume 16, Number 1, June 2012

“Transition”€ as a Migratory Model in Myanmar
By Felix Girke and Judith Beyer
Volume 22, Number 2, December 2018

“Making a Name for Themselves:” Karen Identity and the Politicization of Ethnicity in Burma
By Jessica Harriden
Volume 7, 2002

Rethinking Land and Property in a “Transitioning”€ Myanmar: Representations of Isolation, Neglect, and Natural Decline
By Elizabeth L. Rhoads and Courtney T. Wittekind
Volume 22, Number 2, December 2018

Appraisal of Burma/Myanmar’s Roundabout Roadmaps
By Khen Suan Khai
Volume 22, Number 2, December 2018

“Burmanization”€ and the Impact of J.S. Furnivall’s Views on National Identity in Late-Colonial Burma
By Carol Ann Boshier
Volume 20, Number 2, December 2016

Bitter Pills: Colonialism, Medicine and Nationalism in Burma, 1870-1940
By Penny Edwards
Volume 14, 2010

Notes on Burmese Manuscripts: Text and Images
By Christian Lammerts
Volume 14, 2010

The Disciplining Discourse of Unity in Burmese Politics
By Matthew J. Walton
Volume 19, Number 1, June 2015

 

Journal of World History Special Issue: Other Bandungs (Vol. 30, Nos. 1&2)

FIGURE 1. Sjahrir arrives for the Asian Socialist Conference. Left to right: Ali Algadri, SutanSjahrir, U Ba Swe, and U Kyaw Nyein   (Sjahrir Family Collection.
In “Asian Socialism and the Forgotten Architects of Post-Colonial Freedom, 1952–1956” by Su Lin Lewis, this issue. Sutan Sjahrir arrives for the Asian Socialist Conference. Left to right: Ali Algadri, Sutan Sjahrir, U Ba Swe, and U Kyaw Nyein (Sjahrir Family Collection).

Afro-Asian Internationalisms in the Early Cold War 

Excerpted from the Editors’ Introduction:

On the cover of the Jakarta Reporters Club handbook to the 1955 Asia-Africa Conference is an iconic photograph of a rickshaw driver looking up at a large billboard, featuring a map of the 29 participating nations stretching from China to Ghana. Bandung was once a colonial resort town, nestled in the mountainous tea plantations of West Java, and gained notoriety during the Indonesian Revolution, when Indonesians burned down part of their own town in response to the Dutch reoccupation of the city. Over six days in April, however, the modernist hillside bungalows housed not wealthy Dutchmen but the leaders of Asia’s largest powers. The city itself was overrun with diplomats, statesmen, journalists, and photographers enacting a spectacular moment of resurgence for nations emerging from colonial rule.

This special issue examines “other Bandungs”: conferences in the 1950s and 1960s that convened the decolonising world in different constellations. All the gatherings examined in this issue have in common that they were not styled as intergovernmental affairs. They did not convene heads of state, even though several of them were covertly or overtly state-sponsored. And none of them were completely disconnected from the state: delegations included civil servants, members of parliament, representatives of local and provincial governments, opposition leaders, government advisors, and state-appointed representatives. Together, they show the presence of a much broader Afro-Asian enthusiasm. While some of the early conferences foreshadow Bandung and solidify the connections that made the official conference possible, later conferences self-consciously claimed to be expressions of the Bandung Spirit, or at the very least located themselves vis-à-vis the Bandung conference.

Read the full introduction to the special issue by guest editors Su Lin Lewis and Carolien Stolte here. 

Articles

A Missing Peace: The Asia-Pacific Peace Conference in Beijing, 1952 and the Emotional Making of Third World Internationalism
Rachel Leow

Asian Socialism and the Forgotten Architects of Post-Colonial Freedom, 1952–1956
Su Lin Lewis

Where was the Afro in Afro-Asian Solidarity? Africa’s ‘Bandung Moment’ in 1950s Asia
Gerard McCann

“The People’s Bandung”: Local Anti-imperialists on an Afro-Asian Stage
Carolien Stolte

Building Egypt’s Afro-Asian Hub: Infrastructures of Solidarity and the 1957 Cairo Conference
Reem Abou-El-Fadl

Soviet “Afro-Asians” in UNESCO: Reorienting World History
Hanna Jansen

Dispatches from Havana: The Cold War, Afro-Asian Solidarities, and Culture Wars in Pakistan
Ali Raza

Plus book reviews.

Cross-Currents, Vol. 8, No. 1 (2019)

The new issue of Cross-Currents includes two special sections.

“Diasporic Art and Korean Identity,” is the fruit of a two-day conference held at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem in May 2017 and explores new delineations of the political, social, cultural, and emotional landscapes inhabited by Koreans living in diaspora.

“Air-Water-Land-Human: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health and Environment in East Asia” presents new directions for thinking through connections between health, well-being, and environment in the region.

Diasporic Art and Korean Identity

Painting in Hijoo Son article, Cross-Currents 8-1
From “The Diasporic Intimacy and Transindividuality of Artists
Himan Sŏk (1914–2003) and Jun Ch’ae (1926– )” by Hijoo Son, this issue. Left: Jun Ch’ae, Public Opinion (Yoron), 2002. Oil on canvas, 90 cm x
65.5 cm. Right: Jun Ch’ae, Glass Marbles (Yuri kusŭl), 2002. Acrylic on canvas, 162 cm x 130 cm. Source: Gyeongnam Art Museum.

 

Introduction

Hijoo Son, Jooyeon Rhee

The Forgotten Childhoods of Korea: Ounie Lecomte’s A Brand New Life (2009) and So Yong Kim’s Treeless Mountain (2009)

Ji-Yoon An

Performing in the “Cultural Borderlands”: Gender, Trauma, and Performance Practices of a North Korean Women’s Musical Troupe in South Korea

Iain Sands

The Diasporic Intimacy and Transindividuality of Artists Himan Sŏk (1914–2003) and Jun Ch’ae (1926–)

Hijoo Son

Air-Water-Land-Human: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health and Environment in East Asia

Figure 1 &2 in Air/Qi Connections and China’s Smog Crisis: Notes from the History of Science by Ruth Rogaski, Cross-Currents 8-1
From “Air/Qi Connections and China’s Smog Crisis: Notes from the History of Science” by Ruth Rogaski, this issue. Left: Beijing University statue of a taijiquan practitioner wearing a face mask. Source: ChinaFotoPress/Getty Images. Right: Doing taijiquan in the smog. Source: AP Photo.

 

Introduction

Ruth Rogaski

Cholera and the Environment in Nineteenth-Century Japan

William Johnston

Danger in the Air: Tuberculosis Control and BCG Vaccination in the Republic of China, 1930–1949

Mary Augusta Brazelton

Air/Qi Connections and China’s Smog Crisis: Notes from the History of Science

Ruth Rogaski

“Swimming in Poison”: Reimagining Endocrine Disruption through China’s Environmental Hormones

Janelle Lamoreaux

Sacred Trash and Personhood: Living in Daily Waste-Management Infrastructures in the Eastern Himalayas

Bo Wang

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society – Volume 12:1 (2019)

Figure 1: Location of the Dejing dialect area where Yang is spoken
Location of the Dejing dialect area where Yang is spoken, a figure in Eric Jackson’s “Two-Part Negation in Yang Zhuang” this issue.

The first issue of Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society‘s 12th volume is complete and available on the university open-access platform, ScholarSpace.

Research Papers (Peer-Reviewed)

Spatial Relations along the In-On Continuum in Thai Sign Language
Cassie Wallace

Vietnamese Initial Consonant Clusters in Quốc Ngữ Documents from the 17th to Early 19th Centuries
Duc Nghieu Vu

Types and Functions of Reduplication in Palembang
Mardheya Alsamadani and Samar Taibah

Request Modifications Used by Chinese Learners and Native Speakers of Thai
Yingyot Kanchina and Sujaritlak Deepadung

Two-part Negation in Yang Zhuang
Eric Jackson

Tonal Variation in Pyen
Christina Scotte Hornéy

The Labial Causative In Trans-Himalayan
Guillaume Jacques

Non-finite Clauses in Thai
Pornsiri Singhapreecha

Data Papers, Book Reviews, and Other Notes

Proposing a Facilitated Participatory Approach for Southeast Asian Minority Language Orthography Design
Sigrid Lew

Tones in the Cuoi Language of Tan Ki District in Nghe An Province, Vietnam
Huu Hoanh Nguyen and Van Loi Nguyen

Book Notice: Mainland Southeast Asian Languages – A Concise Typological Introduction, by N. J. Enfield

In Memoriam: Thomas M. Tehan (1951-2019)
Brian Migliazza

A View on Proto-Karen Phonology and Lexicon
Theraphan Luangthongkum

Journal of World History, Vol. 29, No. 4 (2018)

This issue of the Journal of World History includes the following scholarly articles:

Daud Shah and Dar ul-Islam: Transnational Elements of Socio-religious Reforms among Muslims in the Madras Presidency*
By Sundara Vadlamudi

Colonial British India witnessed a large increase in the formation of socio-religious reform movements during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. The major religious groups in British India sought to address the criticisms of Christian missionaries, enact responses to changing social and economic conditions under British imperialism, and attempt to resolve problems in their communities. This article examines the work of Daud Shah, an advocate for socio-religious reforms among Tamil-speaking Muslims in the Madras Presidency and the Bay of Bengal littoral. Existing research on Shah has examined his work within the context of social and political developments within the colonial Madras Presidency. This article argues that a proper assessment of Shah’s contribution to socio-religious reform can only be made by including the transnational aspects of his reform efforts, including sources of his religious knowledge and the impact of his actions on the diasporic community of Tamil Muslims in the Indian Ocean.

Divide to Unite: Ou Jujia, New Guangdong, and Provincial Consciousness in 1900s China
By Ying-Kit Chan

Under the “revolution paradigm” of existing Chinese historiography, Han Chinese intellectuals of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries are viewed as either supporting or resisting monarchical rule in Qing China (1644–1912). This article examines the implications of Guangdong intellectual Ou Jujia’s (1870–1912) magnum opus, New Guangdong, for late Qing politics. New Guangdong called for Guangdong’s independence from the Qing so that it could later reunite with other provinces as a federated China. Although Ou Jujia’s attempts to launch an independence movement had remained marginal to the reformist and revolutionary visions of governance and national unity, he embedded provincial consciousness in the modern, Western-inspired language of federalism. By suggesting that Guangdong could become a unique model province of a reformed China, Ou Jujia defined the “province” as the basic unit of Chinese federalism and made it central to discussions of China’s future in the 1900s.

Mysterious Ships, Troublesome Loans, and Rumors of War: The Tokugawa Arrest of Suetsugu Heizō Shigetomo
By Timothy Romans

By the late seventeenth century, independent maritime organizations such as the Suetsugu could not survive the changing dynamics of an East Asian maritime world that became increasingly polarized by Tokugawa Japan and the Qing Empire. Through their alliance to the Zheng family, the Suetsugu sought to maintain an independent network of merchants, smugglers, and pirates. Suetsugu connections to the Zheng family expanded Tokugawa commercial relations to ports throughout Asia. However, when the Qing conquered China in the mid-seventeenth century, Tokugawa Japan came to increasingly fear war with this emerging empire. The activities of the Zheng family and their allies, the Suetsugu, nearly brought East Asia to the brink of conflict in 1676. Instead of risking war with the Qing Empire, the Tokugawa chose to arrest and banish Suetsugu Heizō IV to maintain the stability of their regime within a multipolar international framework that was East Asia’s new reality.

Taking Children, Ruling Colonies: Child Removal and Colonial Subjugation in Australia, Canada, French Indochina, and the United States, 1870–1950s
By Christina Firpo and Margaret Jacobs

In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the French colonial government in Indochina and the settler colonial nations of the United States, Australia, and Canada all engaged in the systematic removal of Indigenous and/or mixed-race children from their families. All four governments placed the children in institutions that were meant to sever ties to their home communities, re-educate and assimilate them, and then slot them into particular roles in the colonial social order. By comparing child removal programs in these four colonial contexts, we contend that diverse colonial administrations used child removal as a key strategy of governance to address various political and demographic problems. In the settler colonial nations, child removal functioned primarily as a means of eliminating Indigenous identities, cultures, and land claims. In Indochina, the French carried out child removal to create a French colonial elite that would reside permanently in the colony. This comparative approach reveals significant insight into colonial practices, including authorities’ preoccupation with intimate family lives and children’s upbringing, how officials and reformers turned   to benevolent discourses to describe violent and coercive practices, how Indigenous women suffered from particular vilification, and how authorities removed Indigenous and/or mixed-race children to manage racial dynamics. The article particularly demonstrates the value of collaborative and comparative scholarship.

Plus book reviews.

 

Journal of World History Vol. 29 Issue 4
Journal of World History, Vol. 29, No. 4 (2018)

Republic of Apples, Democracy of Oranges: New Eco-Poetry from China and the United States (MĀNOA 31:1)

Qutang Gorge Entrance II, Daixi, 2003. Photograph by Linda Butler. In June 2003, when the reservoir formed, the confluence of the Daixi tributary and the Yangtze River disappeared beneath the waters, which washed over the feet of the distant mountains. The ruins of Daixi town also vanished.
Qutang Gorge Entrance II, Daixi, 2003. In June 2003, when the reservoir formed, the confluence of the Daixi tributary and the Yangtze River disappeared beneath the waters, which washed over the feet of the distant mountains. The ruins of Daixi town also vanished. Photograph by Linda Butler, this issue.

Republic of Apples, Democracy of Oranges presents nearly 100 poets and translators from China and the U.S.―the two countries most responsible for global carbon dioxide emissions and the primary contributors to extreme climate change. These poetic voices express the altered relationship that now exists between the human and non-human worlds, a situation in which we witness everyday the ways environmental destruction is harming our emotions and imaginations.

“What can poetry say about our place in the natural world today?” ecologically minded poets ask. “How do we express this new reality in art or sing about it in poetry?” And, as poet Forrest Gander wonders, “how might syntax, line break, or the shape of the poem on the page express an ecological ethics?”

Eco-poetry freely searches for possible answers. Sichuan poet Sun Wenbo writes:

… I feel so liberated I start writing about
the republic of apples and democracy of oranges. When I see
apples have not become tanks, oranges not bombs,
I know I’ve not become a slave of words after all.

The Chinese poets are from throughout the PRC and Taiwan, both minority and majority writers, from big cities and rural provinces, such as Liangshan Yi Autonomous Prefecture and Xinjiang Uyghur, Tibet, and Inner Mongolia Autonomous Regions. The American poets are both emerging and established, from towns and cities across the U.S.

Included are images by celebrated photographer Linda Butler documenting the Three Gorges Dam, on the Yangtze River, and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, on the Mississippi River Basin.

Asian Perspectives, Vol. 58, No. 1 (2019)

Hyung Il Pai
In Memoriam: Hyung Il Pai 裵炯逸 (14 June 1958 – 28 May 2018), this issue. Photograph courtesy of Alex José.

This issue of Asian Perspectives concentrates on Korean archaeology and is guest edited by Jack Davey and Dennis Lee. 

The journal editors encourage contributors who may be considering proposing a special issue or special section to contact Asian Perspectives. Learn more about special issues or sections in this issue’s editors’ note.

 

Editors’ Note
By Mike T. Carson and Rowan K. Flad

Early Korea: Re-thinking Boundaries and Identities
By Jack Davey and Dennis Lee

Identification and Chronology of Some Koguryŏ Royal Tombs
By Mark E. Byington

Paekche King Kŭnch’ogo’s Twisted Journey to the South: A Textual and Archaeological Perspective
By Dennis Lee

Wooden Inscriptions and the Culture of Writing in Sabi Paekche
By Marjorie Burge

Gendered Spaces and Prehistoric Households: A Geospatial Analysis of Mumun Period Pithouses from South Korea
By Rachel J. Lee

A Critical Examination of Models Regarding a Han 韓 – Ye 濊 Ethnic Division in Proto-Historic Central Korea, and Further Implications
By Hari Blackmore

Culture Contact and Cultural Boundaries in Iron Age Southern Korea
By Jack Davey

Ceramics and Society in Mahan and Paekche: A Comparison of Pottery Geochemistry and Craft Production Patterns at the Sites of P’ungnap T’osŏng and Kwangju Palsan
By Rory Walsh, Goung-Ah Lee, and Young-Cheol Lee

Overlooked Imports: Carnelian Beads in the Korean Peninsula
By Lauren Glover and J. M. Kenoyer

First Islanders: Prehistory and Human Migration in Island Southeast Asia by Peter Bellwood (review)
By Charles Higham

Karabalgasun – Stadt der Nomaden: Die archäologischen Ausgrabungen in der frühuigurischen Hauptstadt 2009–2011 by Burkart Dähne (review)
By Jan Bemmann

Hyung Il Pai 裵炯逸 (14 June 1958 – 28 May 2018)
By Lothar Von Falkenhausen

 

Asian Theatre Journal, Vol. 36, No. 1 (2019)

An image from Red Poem, featured in Jae Kyoung Kim’s “2017 Black Tent Theatre Project in Gwangwamun Square: Staging Tragic Memory and Building Solidarity through Public Theatre,” this issue.

In addition to performance and book reviews, the spring issue of Asian Theatre Journal includes articles on ritual and religious theatre, contemporary theatre and the state, and the performance of identity.

Ras and Affect in Ramlila (and the Radheshyam Ramayan)
By Pamela Lothspeich

Rescuing Mulian’s Mother in the Xi Era: Reviving Ritual Xiqu in Contemporary Fujian
By Josh Stenberg

Desiring Spectacular Discipline: Aspiration, Fraternal Anxiety, and the Allure of Restraint in ‘s Dōjōji
By Reginald Jackson

Chinese Entertainment Industry, the Case of Folk Errenzhuan
By Haili Ma

Theatre on the Move: Sakurai Daizhou’s Tent Theatre in East Asia
By I-Yi Hsieh

2017 Black Tent Theatre Project in Gwanghwamun Square: Staging Tragic Memory and Building Solidarity through Public Theatre
By Jae Kyoung Kim

Mystic Lear and Playful Hamlet: The Critical Cultural Dramaturgy in the Iranian Appropriations of Shakespearean Tragedies
By Amin Azimi and Marjan Moosavi

Uncle Tom’s Cabin in China: Ouyang Yuqian’s Regret of a Black Slave and the Tactics of Impersonating Race, Gender, and Class
By Megan Ammirati

Trapping the Heron: The Curious Case of Sagi School Kyōgen
By Alex Rogals

Local Community Ritual Theatre in Guangxi, South China
By Jian Xie

Masks and Costumes of Purulia Chhau
By Deepsikha Chatterjee

 

Asian Theatre Journal 36-1 cover
Asian Theatre Journal, Vol. 36, No. 1 (2019)

Journal of World History, Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)

This issue of the Journal of World History includes the following scholarly articles:

Oil Boom: Agriculture, Chemistry, and the Rise of Global Plant Fat Industries, ca. 1850–1920
By Jonathan Robins

Fats extracted from plants and animals are an important and understudied part of the industrialization of the “global North” in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Demand for soap, lamp oil, candles, lubricants, and other products drove European and American efforts to extract fats from animals across the continents and oceans, and by the late nineteenth century a proportion of this fat entered the North’s food supply. Simultaneously, demand for edible and industrial fats appeared to be outstripping supplies. Plants emerged as an important source of fat in this period, as new technologies allowed plant fats to be transformed into more versatile and edible products. The transition to plant fats represented an important move down the food chain for Northern consumers, allowing for the efficient use of existing resources, as well as contributing to the ongoing extraction of raw materials from the tropics.

Spectacular Power in the Early Han and Roman Empires
By Rebecca Robinson

During their long reigns, Emperor Wu of the Western Han and Augustus of Rome respectively performed two spectacular ceremonies, the feng and shan sacrifices and the ludi saeculares. The performance of these ceremonies took place during a larger process of reforms to each state’s religious institutions and marked the culmination of these reforms. While there is no direct connection between the two rulers or their respective ceremonies, some of the salient characteristics can be compared. In both cases, the rulers claimed to revive ancient ceremonies, but incorporated new narratives of rulership into their performance. These spectacular ceremonies, performed in front of audiences, demonstrated the exalted position of the ruler, as well as the acceptance of the elites to the new order.

Beyond ‘Tribal Breakout’: Afghans in the History of Empire, ca. 1747–1818
By Jagjeet Lally

The narrative of ‘Tribal Breakout’ has allowed world historians to avoid narratives of the ‘decline of the East’ and the ‘rise of the West’—but only by casting Afghans as tribals whose incursions destabilized the Asian empires. This essay seeks to retrieve the constructive agency of Afghans during the so-called ‘colonial transition’ in South Asia. Their seizure of plunder was disbursed via the patronage of commercial groups, while careful economic management even led to economic expansion in a manner typical of some eighteenth-century states, thereby lubricating long-distance trade between south and central Asia. This was part of a process of Afghan state formation rooted in developments within the Mughal Empire, was typical of a process of imperial expansion evident in the histories of other empires, such as the Mughals, Ottomans, and Qing, and, thus, yields much to scholars interested in the patterns and processes of early-modern empires in general.

Plus book reviews.

Journal of World History 29-3 cover
Journal of World History, Volume 29, No. 3 (2018)

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 31 no. 1 (2019)

Contemporary Pacific 31-1 featured art. Pigs in the Yard, by Kalisolaite ‘Uhila, 2011.
Featured Art, this issue: Pigs in the Yard, by Kalisolaite ‘Uhila, 2011. 
Performance, Aotea Square Performance Arcade, Auckland.
In 2011, ‘Uhila lived with a piglet called Colonist for eight days in a shipping container in central Auckland’s Aotea Square, in full view of passersby and much to the amusement of audiences who have followed his work ever since. Pigs are valued commodities and symbols of status and prestige in numerous Pacific Island cultures, including in Tonga, where they can be gifted and eaten on special occasions and wander for much of the time in relative freedom. Evaluated in the wake of 2010 Tongan constitutional reforms, Pigs in the Yard also heeds a call for greater transparency and ongoing debate, if balancing Tongan values and systems of authority with inherited British legal conventions is to improve conditions for Tongan citizens. Photo courtesy of the artist and Michael Let

This issue of The Contemporary Pacific features the art of Kalisolaite ‘Uhila, Alan Howard’s resource “Creating an Archive for Rotuma: A Personal Account,” political reviews covering Micronesia and Polynesia, and the following articles and reviews.

Indigenous Well-Being and Development: Connections to Large-Scale Mining and Tourism in the Pacific
by Emma Richardson, Emma Hughes, Sharon McLennan, and Litea Meo-Sewabu

Indigenous Masculinities and the “Refined Politics” of Alcohol and Racialization in West Papua
by Jenny Munro

Tannese Chiefs, State Structures, and Global Connections in Vanuatu
by Marc Tabani

Epidemic Suicide in the Context of Modernizing Social Change in Oceania: A Critical Review and Assessment
by Edward D Lowe

Project Banaba (review)
by Mitiana Arbon

Holo Moana: Generations of Voyaging (review)
by Kelema Lee Moses

Anote’s Ark by Matthieu Rytz (review)
by David Lipset

Out of State (review)
by David Lipset

Island Soldier by Nathan Fitch (review)
by Emelihter Kihleng, Clement Yow Mulalap, Jacki Leota-Mua, and Vicente M Diaz


About the Journal

The Contemporary Pacific provides a publication venue for interdisciplinary work in Pacific studies with the aim of providing informed discussion of contemporary issues in the Pacific Islands region.

Submissions

Submissions must be original works not previously published and not under consideration or scheduled for publication by another publisher. Manuscripts should be 8,000 to 10,000 words, or no more than 40 double-spaced pages, including references. Find submission guidelines here.

The Contemporary Pacific
Volume 31, Issue 1

Philosophy East and West, vol. 68, no. 4 (October 2018)

Philosophy East and West vol. 68, no. 4 includes the following scholarly works:

Ru Meditation: Gao Panlong (1562–1626 C.E.) trans. by Bin Song (review)
by Leah Kalmanson

Knowledge and Power in the Philosophies of Ḥamīd al-Dīn Kirmānī and Mullā Ṣadrā Shirazi by Sayeh Meisami (review)
by Khalil Toussi

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Briefe über China (1694-1716): Die Korrespondenz mit Barthélemy Des Bosses S.J. und anderen Mitgliedern des Ordens ed. by Rita Widmaier and Malte-Ludolf Babin (review)
by Eric S. Nelson

Egocentricity and Mysticism: An Anthropological Study by Ernst Tugendhat (review)
by Christian Helmut Wenzel

Rules of Composition: A Mereological Examination of the Dao-You Relation
by Rafał Banka

I am Not a Sage but an Archer: Confucius on Agency and Freedom
by Rina Marie Camus

Zhuangzi’s Knowing-How and Skepticism
by Wai Wai Chiu

In a Double Way: Nāmarūpa in Buddhaghosa’s Phenomenology
by Maria Heim, Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad

Madhyamaka, Metaphysical Realism, and the Possibility of an Ancestral World
by Simon P. James

Self in Nature, Nature in the Lifeworld: A Reinterpretation of Watsuji’s Concept of Fūdo
by David W. Johnson

Huayan Numismatics as Metaphysics: Explicating Fazang’s Coin-Counting Metaphor
by Nicholaos Jones

The Context(s) of “Correct Seeing”: Truth and Fiction in Tibetan Madhyamaka
by Constance Kassor

The Discontents of Moderate Political Confucianism and the Future of Democracy in East Asia
by Zhuoyao Li

The Dao and the Form: Innate Divisions and the Natural Hermeneutics of Plato and Zhuangzi
by Mingjun Lu

The Logic of Not: An Invitation to a Holistic Mode of Thinking from an East Asian Perspective—An Essay in Celebration of Roger Ames on the Occasion of His Retirement
by Shigenori Nagatomo

China’s Particular Values and the Issue of Universal Significance: Contemporary Confucians Amidst the Politics of Universal Values
by Hoyt Cleveland Tillman

Contrasting Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika and Buddhist Explanations of Attention
by Alex Watson

Women on Love: Idealization in the Philosophies of Diotima (The Symposium) and Murasaki Shikibu (The Tale of Genji)
by Sandra A. Wawrytko

An Alternative Way of Confucian Sincerity: Wang Yangming’s “Unity of Knowing and Doing” as a Response to Zhu Xi’s Puzzle of Self-Deception
by Zemian Zheng

Plus book reviews.


About the Journal

Promoting academic literacy on non-Western traditions of philosophy, Philosophy East and West has for over half a century published the highest-quality scholarship that locates these cultures in their relationship to Anglo-American philosophy.

Submissions

The journal welcomes specialized articles in Asian philosophy and articles that seek to illuminate, in a comparative manner, the distinctive characteristics of the various philosophical traditions in the East and West. See the submission guidelines here.

Philosophy East and West 68-4
Philosophy East & West
Volume 68, Issue 4