Displaced Lives: MĀNOA Vol. 31, No. 2 (2019)

  Four Generations of a Tibetan Family. Majnu Ka Tilla Diaries (007), 2007 Serena Chopra  © courtesy sepiaEYE
Four Generations of a Tibetan Family. Majnu Ka Tilla Diaries (007), 2007 Serena Chopra © courtesy sepiaEYE

The dislocation of people in the twenty-first century has been unprecedented. At the end of 2019, over 260 million people were living outside their countries of birth. Some are voluntary migrants, but others have been forced to relocate by violence, wars, persecution, hunger, or extreme weather events. Millions more are mentally and spiritually uprooted and isolated because of PTSD, depression, addiction, and aging.

The displaced are a statistical category, but their lives, emotions, and hopes are made vividly real in these powerful and intimate works of literature by more than thirty writers from four continents. Many of the authors are themselves exiles, members of immigrant families, or witnesses to the effects of displacement on loved ones. Authors are from Bangladesh, Canada, Cuba, China, Germany, India, Ireland, Iran, Israel, Macedonia, Mexico, the Netherlands, Pakistan, the Philippines, Romania, Russia, South Africa, Spain, and the U.S.

Alok Bhalla and Ming Di guest edited this new issue of Mānoa featuring fiction, poetry, memoirs and plays, and also Serena Chopra’s photographs from Majnu Ka Tilla Diaries.


Explore Displaced Lives

Editor’s Note

Images

Borderlands
Anna Badkhen

Statue of Liberty
Mario Bojórquez, Don Cellini

The Traveler
José Manuel Cardona, Hélène Cardona

Good Night
Chang Yao, Ming Di, Kerry Shawn Keys

Bhasha India
Siddharth Chowdhury

The Missing
Mangalesh Dabral, Asad Zaidi

Pig
Jose Dalisay

Werewolf
Patrick Deeley

Neve Shalom, September 2014
Batsheva Dori-Carlier, Lisa Katz

Wulkan
Ulrike Draesner, Iain Galbraith

Vanilla Crumble
Asif Farrukhi, Durdana Soomro

turning your body into a compass
Catherine Filloux

Return of the Exiles
Huang Fan, Ming Di, Frank Stewart

In a Silent City
Ilya Kaminsky

The Serpent
Wayne Karlin

The Speculative Fiction Writer
Jee Leong Koh

At Wagah
Sukrita Paul Kumar

Two Poems
Nikola Madzirov, Peggy and Graham W. Reid, Magdalena Horvat

Something Growing
Julia Martin

Fox-Sparrow
James McCorkle

Claude McKay Describes His Own Life
Claude Mckay

Six Poems from Harlem Shadows
Claude McKay

Bread
Mihaela Moscaliuc

Yesterday and Today
Masud Mufti, Durdana Soomro

The Subhuman and His Habitat
Ramsey Nasr, David Colmer

Lament for Mrs. Mones
Víctor Rodríguez Núñez, Katherine M. Hedeen

The Rehearsal
Manjula Padmanabhan

Big White Bird
Ann Pancake

Dera Baba Nanak
Joginder Paul, Naghma Zafir

Grandmas
Joginder Paul, Asif Farrukhi

Tonghui River in Beijing
Qing Ping, Ming Di, Frank Stewart

Gilt
Chloe Garcia Roberts

Two Poems
Françoise Roy, Amanda Fuller

Self
K. Satchidanandan

Two Poems
Aleš Šteger, Brian Henry

Five Prose Poems
Udayan Vajpeyi, Alok Bhalla

The Souls of Shah Alam Camp
Asghar Wajahat, Alok Bhalla

The White Night Photo Studio
Wang Suxin, Chen Zeping, Karen Gernant

Two Poems
Sholeh Wolpé

The Flower of All Water
Robert Wrigley

Refused a Visa at the U.S. Embassy
Yi Sha, Frank Stewart, Ming Di

About the Photographer

About the Contributors

 

Philosophy East and West Vol. 69, No. 4

Philosophy East and West vol. 69, no. 4 includes the following scholarly works:

Articles

Russell and Jin Yuelin on Facts: From the Perspective of Comparative Philosophy
Chen Bo

A Kantian Reading of the Mūlamadhyamakakārikā: The Philosophical basis And advantages
Justin P. Holder

On the Sit-Chûn Scholars of Taiwanese Philosophy
Tzu-wei Hung

In Defense of Beauty: Gao Ertai’s Aesthetics of Resistance
Maciej Kurzynski

Levels of Time in the Zhuangzi: A Leibnizian Perspective
Georg Northoff, Kai-Yuan Cheng

Muhammad Iqbal’s “Indirect Communication” with the Reader
Sevcan Ozturk

Releasing Boundaries, Relieving Suffering, Becoming Pained: An Engagement with Indian Buddhism and Martin Heidegger
Roshni Patel

Wandering in the Ruler’s Cage: Zhuangzi as a Political Philosopher
Lincoln Rathnam

Bu Ren 不忍 (Cannot Bear to Harm) in the Mencius
Winnie Sung

Book Discussion

No-Selves and Persons
Monima Chadha

Paying Attention to Buddhaghosa and Pāli Buddhist Philosophy
Sean M. Smith

Response to Monima Chadha and Sean M. Smith Reviews of Attention, Not Self
Jonardon Ganeri

Online Book Reviews

Islamic Spirituality: Theology and Practice for the Modern World by Zeki Saritoprak (review)
Adnan Aslan

Omnicide: Mania, Fatality, and Future-in-Delirium by Jason Bahbak Mohaghegh (review)
Ekin Erkan

An Investigation of Wang Fuzhi’s Study on the Zhuangzi: Focusing on the Zhuangzijie by Tan Mingran (review)
Li Huanyou

The Significance of Indeterminacy: Perspectives from Asian and Continental Philosophy ed. by Robert H. Scott and Gregory S. Moss (review)
Jingwen Zheng

The Journal of Burma Studies, vol. 23 no. 2 (2019)

Figure 2: Front cover of the pirate edition of The Thirty-Seven Nats, from “Counting to 37:Sir Richard Carnac Temple and the Thirty-Eighth Nat” by Sally Bamford, this issue.

The three articles in the new issue of The Journal of Burma Studies offer a compelling picture of accounting: nats, coins, and people.

Editor’s Note
Jane M. Ferguson

Counting to 37: Sir Richard Carnac Temple and the Thirty-Eighth Nat
Sally Bamford

Burma’s nats have formed part of that country’s spiritual and material culture for centuries, and first came to the attention of the West via traveler and colonial memoirs. The most notable of these such accounts is undoubtedly Sir Richard Carnac Temple’s The Thirty-Seven Nats: A Phase of Spirit-Worship Prevailing in Burma, published in 1906 and still cited by scholars today.

This article argues that the reliance by Western (and some Burmese) authors on Temple’s book has led to several misconceptions concerning the nats. These include, for example, that the pantheon known in the West as “The Thirty-Seven Nats” is a royal pantheon constituted by Anawrahta in the 11th century, under the leadership of Thakya Min (Sakka), in order to enfold the nats into Buddhism. Yet primary sources, including Burmese court documents, paint a much fuller picture of the nats, detailing three separate pantheons of 37. Each pantheon contains very different types of nat, each of which played a specific role throughout Burma’s history.

Following a clarification of these pantheons, this paper draws on extant primary sources to suggest a different interpretation of the “Thirty-Seven Nats” and their role vis-à-vis Burma’s kings. The source material available to R.C. Temple is also considered, which reveals significant information which Temple overlooked when writing his book. This led, in turn, to wrongly identified illustrations included in his book, which obscured the identity of a “Thirty-Eighth Nat.” These errors have also had an impact on how one of the most prominent nats is depicted in more recent publications.

King Bodawpaya’s Effort at a Konbaung Coinage
Philip Hauret

In 1797 King Bodawpaya became the first Konbaung king to introduce a national coinage by issuing copper and silver coins minted in both Calcutta and Amarapura. A British envoy, Hiram Cox, delivered the Calcutta coins and additional minting equipment to Amarapura and witnessed first-hand the roll-out of the new monetary system. Deriding the effort as incompetent and avaricious, Cox’s account has served as the basis for all subsequent historical and numismatic treatments. This paper examines this effort in a new light, and with the support of additional evidence uncovered in the 20th century, paints a picture far less negative than British accounts. The kingdom’s efforts, arguably inadequate to the task, nonetheless demonstrated a certain degree of planning and logical action. And despite Cox’s characterizations, the new coinage was apparently based upon an existing system of monetary value, resulting in coinage that continued to circulate throughout most of the 19th century.

Thinking Through Heterogeneity: An Anthropological Look at Contemporary Myanmar
François Robinne

Anchored in an ethnic-state structure since the 1947 Panglong Agreement, ethnic politics and ethnic determinism in Burma have become imprescriptible in the eyes of various actors, especially ethnic and religious elites, the military junta, civilian authorities, civil society, academics and international bodies. Based on years of field surveys devoted to the study of multiethnic crossroads and the de facto landscapes of hybridity in the highlands of Burma, the anthropological perspective of this paper invites us to leave the identity trap. An essentialist notion of ethnicity is not only at the root of the country’s ongoing civil war, but also continues to dictate parliamentary politics in the country. This paper will also consider how the democratic transition is itself caught up in this identity trap.

Journal Special Issues Published in 2019

Asian Perspectives 58-1
Asian Theatre Journal 36-2

Asian Perspectives Vol. 58, issue 1
Special Issue: Boundaries and Identities Through Material culture: Multi-Disciplinary Approaches from Early Korea, guest edited by Jack Davey and Dennis Lee

Asian Theatre Journal Vol. 36, issue 2
Special section: Tang Xianzu and William Shakespeare Quatercentenary Celebration, guest edited by Alexa Alice Joubin

Biograhy Vol 41, issue 4
M4BL and the Critical Matter of Black Lives, guest edited by Brittney Cooper and Treva B. Lindsey

Biography Vol 42, issue 3
Biographic Mediation: On the Uses of Personal Disclosure in Bureaucracy and Politics, guest edited by Ebony Coletu

Cross-Currents 8-1
Cross-Currents 8-2

Cross-Currents Vol. 8, issue 1
Diasporic Art and Korean Identity, guest edited by Hijoo Son and Jooyeon Rhee

Air-Water-Land-Human: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health and Environment in East Asia, guest edited by Ruth Rogaski

Cross-Currents Vol. 8, issue 2
Buddhist Art of Mongolia: Cross-Cultural Connections, Discoveries, and Interpretations, guest edited by Uranchimeg Tsultemin

Beyond Comparison: Japan and Its Colonial Empire in Transimperial Relations
, guest edited by Satoshi Mizutani

Journal of World History 30 1&2 cover
Philosophy East and West 69-3

Journal of World History Vol. 30, issues 1-2
Other Bandungs: Afro-Asian Internationalisms in the Early Cold War, guest edited by Su Lin Lewis and Carlien Stolte

Philosophy East and West Vol. 69, issue 3
Politics, Nature, and Society — Actuality of North African Philosopher Ibn Khaldūn, guest edited by Tamara Albertini

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 24, edited by Matt Pearson

Cross-Currents, Vol. 8, No. 2 (2019)

Rebuilt “Jarung khashar” stupa of Khejenge Monastery, Kizhinga, Buryatia, featured in “The Cult of Boudhanath Stupa/Jarung Khashar Suvraga in Mongolia” by Isabelle Charleux this issue. Photo by Ekaterina Sundueva.

This issue of Cross-Currents includes two special sections, “Buddhist Art of Mongolia: Cross-Cultural Connections, Discoveries, and Interpretations” edited by Uranchimeg Tsultemin, and “Beyond Comparison: Japan and Its Colonial Empire in Transimperial Relations” edited by Satoshi Mizutani.

Buddhist Art of Mongolia

Introduction
Uranchimeg Tsultemin

Buddhist Archeology in Mongolia: Zanabazar and the Géluk Diaspora beyond Tibet
Uranchimeg Tsultemin

In Search of the Khutugtu’s Monastery: The Site and Its Heritage
Sampildondovin Chuluun

Visualizing the Non-Buddhist Other: A Historical Analysis of the Shambhala Myth in Mongolia at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
Karénina Kollmar-Paulenz

The Interplay between Text and Image: The Molon Toyin’s Tale
Vesna A. Wallace

The Cult of Boudhanath Stupa/Jarung Khashar Suvraga in Mongolia: Texts, Images, and Architectural Replicas
Isabelle Charleux

Beyond Comparison: Japan and Its Colonial Empire in Transimperial Relations

Introduction
Satoshi Mizutani

Transimperial Genealogies of Korea as a Protectorate: The Egypt Model in Japan’s Politics of Colonial Comparison
Satoshi Mizutani

School Politics in the Borderlands and Colonies of Imperial Germany: A Japanese Colonial Perspective, ca. 1900–1925
Akiyoshi Nishiyama

The French Colonization and Japanese Occupation of Indochina during the Second World War: Encounters of the French, Japanese, and Vietnamese
Chizuru Namba

Comparisons and Deflections: Indian Nationalists in the Political Economy of Japanese Imperialism, 1931–1938
Aaron Peters

Individual Articles

Specters of Dependency: Hou Yuon and the Origins of Cambodia’s Marxist Vision (1955–1975)
Matthew Galway

Homeless in the Fatherland: Xiao Hong’s Migrant Geographies
Clara Iwasaki

Imagining Female Heroism: Three Tales of the Female Knight-Errant in Republican China
Iris Ma

Print copies are available for purchase.

Most Read Open Access Articles in 2019

Our open access titles include Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal, Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society, Language Documentation and Conservation, and Palapala: A Journal for Hawaiian Language and Literature. In 2019, these four journals garnered nearly 10,000 downloads worldwide. Here are the most downloaded articles.

Readership distribution for Asian / Pacific Island Nursing Journal in 2019.

The Munda Maritime Hypothesis
Felix Rau and Paul Sidwell
Journal of Southeast Asian Linguistics Society, Vol. 12, issue 2

Towards an interdisciplinary bridge between documentation and revitalization: Bringing ethnographic methods into endangered-language projects and programming
Sarah Shulist and Faun Rice
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

Notes from the Field: Remontado (Hatang-Kayi): A Moribund Language of the Philippines
Jason William Lobel and Orlando Vertudez Surbano
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

Global Survey of Revitalization Efforts: A mixed methods approach to understanding language revitalization practices
Gabriela Pérez Báez, Rachel Vogel, and Uia Patolo
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

maqlaqsyalank hemyeega: Goals and expectations of Klamath-Modoc revitalization
Joseph Dupris
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

The languages of northern Ambrym, Vanuatu: A guide to the deposited materials in ELAR
Michael Franjieh
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

Public access to research data in language documentation: Challenges and possible strategies
Mandana Seyfeddinipur, Manfred Krifka, Felix Ameka, Susan Kung, Lissant Bolton, Miyuki Monroig, Jonathan Blumtritt, Ayu’nwi Ngwabe Neba, Brian Carpenter, Sebastian Nordhoff, Hilaria Cruz, Brigitte Pakendorf, Sebastian Drude, Kilu von Prince, Patience L. Epps, Felix Rau, Vera Ferreira, Keren Rice, Ana Vilacy Galucio, Michael Riessler, Brigit Hellwig, Vera Szoelloesi Brenig, Oliver Hinte, Nick Thieberger, Gary Holton, Paul Trilsbeek, Dagmar Jung, Hein van der Voort, Irmgarda Kasinskaite Buddeberg, and Tony Woodbury
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

Language vitality assessment of Deori: An endangered language
Prarthana Acharyya and Shakuntala Mahanta
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

Proposing a Facilitated Participatory Approach for Southeast Asian Minority Language Orthography Design
Sigrid Lew
Journal of Southeast Asian Linguistics Society, Vol. 12, issue 1

The Javanese language at risk? Perspectives from an East Java village
Jozina Vander Klok
Language Documentation & Conservation, Vol. 13

Most Read Journal Articles in 2019

As 2019 comes to a close, enjoy the most read articles across our journals on Project MUSE.

This year, we celebrated the 30th anniversary of three international journals, began publishing The Journal of Burma Studies, and increased individual access to many of our journal articles via the Project MUSE platform.

Stay tuned for popular articles from our open access titles.

Contemporary Pacific 31-2

Unsettling SpongeBob and the Legacies of Violence on Bikini Bottom
Holly M Barker
Contemporary Pacific, Vol. 31, No. 2

The Sonyŏsang Phenomenon: Nationalism and Feminism Surrounding the “Comfort Women” Statue
Vicki Sung-yeon Kwon
Korean Studies, Vol. 43

Other Bandungs: Afro-Asian Internationalisms in the Early Cold War
Carolien Stolte; Su Lin Lewis
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, Issues 1-2

Māori Issues
Margaret Mutu
Contemporary Pacific, Vol. 31, Issue 1

Indigenous Well-Being and Development: Connections to Large-Scale Mining and Tourism in the Pacific
Emma Hughes; Emma Richardson; Litea Meo-Sewabu; Sharon McLennan
Contemporary Pacific, Vol. 31, Issue 1

Where was the Afro in Afro-Asian Solidarity? Africa’s ‘Bandung Moment’ in 1950s Asia
Gerard McCann
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, Issues 1-2

Journal of World History 30 1&2 cover

Building Egypt’s Afro-Asian Hub: Infrastructures of Solidarity and the 1957 Cairo Conference
Reem Abou-El-Fadl
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, Issues 1-2

A Missing Peace: The Asia-Pacific Peace Conference in Beijing, 1952 and the Emotional Making of Third World Internationalism
Rachel Leow
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, Issues 1-2

Asian Socialism and the Forgotten Architects of Post-Colonial Freedom, 1952–1956
Su Lin Lewis
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, Issues 1-2

Asian Perspectives 58-1

Early Korea: Re-thinking Boundaries and Identities
Dennis Lee; Jack Davey
Asian Perspectives, Vol. 58, Issue 1

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society – Volume 12:2 (2019) + Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 24

Figure 5 in this issue’s “The Munda Maritime Hypothesis” by Felix Rau and Paul Sidwell: Archaeological sites in the Mahanadi-Brahmani Delta.

The second issue of Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society‘s 12th volume is complete and available on the university open-access platform, ScholarSpace.

JSEALS also offers a new special publication, Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 24.

Research Articles (Peer-Reviewed)

The Compatibility between Expressive Elements: Kinship Terms, Pronouns, and Racial Slurs in Vietnamese
By Juliet Huynh and Suwon Yoon

Variation in the Voiced Coronals of Two Fataluku-speaking Villages
By Tyler M. Heston

The Vietnamese Polyfunctional Marker Mà as a Generalized Linker: A Multilevel Approach
By Danh Thành Do-Hurinville and Huy Linh Dao

The Munda Maritime Hypothesis
By Felix Rau and Paul Sidwell

Numeral Classifiers in Tai Lue (Xishuangbanna)
By Audra Phillips and William J. Hanna

Data Papers, Book Reviews, and Other Notes

Muak Sa-aak: Challenges of an Extensive Phoneme Inventory for a Contained Latin-Based Orthography
By Elizabeth Hall

Special Publication

Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 24
By Matt Pearson

 

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers Vol. 81 (2019)

Figure 4 from Paul F. Starr's "Plus ça change: Vignettes of Landscape Change" this issue—A wonderfully enhanced postcard captures leaky flumes in winter along the Truckee River. Geographer Matt Fockler wrote a 2007 ground-breaking master’s thesis at the University of Nevada on distribution systems attached to the Truckee River of California and Nevada (an origin at Lake Tahoe that concludes at Pyramid Lake). Lurid colors aside, waters provide recreation for summer boaters and a drinking water supply for hundreds of thousands of residents in Reno-Sparks. (Collection of the author, n.d.)
Figure 4 from Paul F. Starr’s “Plus ça change: Vignettes of Landscape Change” this issue—A wonderfully enhanced postcard captures leaky flumes in winter along the Truckee River. Geographer Matt Fockler wrote a 2007 ground-breaking master’s thesis at the University of Nevada on distribution systems attached to the Truckee River of California and Nevada (an origin at Lake Tahoe that concludes at Pyramid Lake). Lurid colors aside, waters provide recreation for summer boaters and a drinking water supply for hundreds of thousands of residents in Reno-Sparks. (Collection of the author, n.d.)

This year’s Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers includes the following scholarly works:

ARTICLES

Plus ça change: Vignettes of Landscape Change
by Paul F. Starrs

Because Rivers Are Life
by Sean J. Pries

Encounters with Confluences
by Ray Sumner

The Drought Is Over—Now What?
by Martin McCarthy, Suzanne Dallman

Achieving Water Sustainability through Coordination among Stakeholders: Vertical and Horizontal Governance Interactions in Arizona’s Central Highlands
by Deborah O. Ayodele-Olajire, Bob Bolin

A Spatial Analysis of Officer-Involved Shootings in Los Angeles
by Debbie Ma, Steven Graves, Jonathan Alvarado

A Comparison of Water Indices and Binary Thresholding Techniques for Water Surface Delineation for St. Croix Watershed Area
by Sanchayeeta Adhikari

Station-Based Climate Model Evaluation Comparison for Joshua Tree National Park, California, and Tucson, Arizona, with New Surface Air Temperature Data
by Ryan Heintzman

The Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers
Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers Vol. 81 (2019)

Journal of World History, Vol 30, No. 4 (2019)

This issue of the Journal of World History includes the following scholarly articles:

Economic Conquest of the Pacific: Revisiting the Tacna-Arica Plebiscite of 1925–1926
By Robert Niebuhr

This article surveys the Tacna-Arica plebiscite period (1925–1926) by taking into consideration the regional history alongside increasingly important global trends. While the contest between Peru and Chile highlights the battle between primordial versus constructed nationalism, it also places contested notions of nationalism alongside a growing spirit of internationalism. Woodrow Wilson’s proclamations at the end of World War I, especially his focus on self-determination and justice, directly inspired leaders in Bolivia, Chile, and Peru to seek a finalization of the Tacna-Arica dispute. Despite the hope that Wilsonian principals would win the day, traditional concepts such as economics and power proved victorious, which underscored the fragility of humanitarian rights and justice between the world wars. This investigation into how global trends influenced Tacna-Arica are placed alongside contemporary comparisons of plebiscites held in Europe between the world wars.

Igniting Change in Colonial Indonesia: Soemarsono’s Contestation of Colonial Hegemony in a Global Context
By Arnout H. C. Van Der Meer

In 1913, Javanese public prosecutor Soemarsono clashed with his colonial superior by refusing him traditional deference, donning European clothes, and actively engaging in nationalist associations. These actions culminated in an overhaul of the appearance of Dutch hegemony and a widespread emancipatory social change in colonial Indonesia. This history is best appreciated from a world historical perspective that includes both long-term historical processes that shaped Soemarsono’s world, such as the Indianization of Indonesia, the spread of Islam, and Western colonialism, as well as contemporary global developments, such as the rise of Japan, the Chinese revolution, Islamic Modernism, and the appeal of democratic principles. Soemarsono’s awareness of these global perspectives enabled him to successfully ignite change in colonial Indonesia. His story provides an approach that allows historians to emphasize how individual agents make history in a world historical context.

Playing Politics with the Youth: Aga Khan III’s Use of Colonial Education and the Ismaili Girl Guide Movement in British Colonial Tanganyika, 1920–1940
By Alia Paroo

This article assesses how Ismaili Muslim leaders in British colonial Tanganyika utilized Guiding and Victorian schooling philosophies in an attempt to negotiate for advancement within the colonial structure. Aga Khan III understood the role that followers were expected to play in the “Great Game” of imperialism and attempted to use cooperation to broker for increased opportunities within the system of subjugation. This article sets out to analyze then how the Aga Khan and his representative leaders in British colonial Tanganyika used youth programs to operate within these liminal spaces, in turn revealing the ongoing negotiations that took place between colonizer and the colonized.

Bombs in Beijing and Delhi: The Global Spread of Bomb-Making Technology and the Revolutionary Terrorism in Modern China and India
By Yin Cao

In early 1910, Chinese revolutionaries attempted to assassinate the regent of the Qing Empire by planting a bomb near his residence in Beijing. Two years later, an explosive of a similar type was used by Indian revolutionaries in their attempted assassination of the viceroy of the British Raj in Delhi. Investigating these two seemingly unconnected events demonstrates that radical political activists in both China and India acquired their explosive-making skills from diasporic Russian revolutionaries in Japan and France respectively after the failure of the 1905 Russian Revolution. Although both assassination attempts failed and have largely been marginalized in the national narratives in both countries, the transnational connections between Chinese and Indian revolutionaries in their pursuit of learning the portable dynamite technology overseas sheds light on how modern Chinese and Indian history can be analyzed in a single framework. Staging Chinese and Indian revolutionary terrorism in the context of the cross-boundary circulation of dissident ideologies and technologies in the early twentieth century reexamines marginalized aspects of China’s 1911 Revolution and the Indian Nationalist Revolution that can be written as connected transnational history.

Putting Words in the Emperor’s Mouth: A Genealogy of Colonial Potential in the Study of Qing Chinese Diaspora
By Nicholas McGee

The Qing emperor Qianlong’s supposed response to the 1740 massacre of roughly 8,000 Chinese civilians in Dutch Batavia represents perhaps the most famous quotation by any Chinese emperor concerning the diaspora. Tracing a genealogy of the quote, this article contends that it was in fact invented and deployed by eighteenth and nineteenth century British authors in service of a discourse that framed Chinese migrants as ideal potential colonial recruits and the Qing state as secretly desiring their recruitment. Only in the twentieth century was it taken up by Chinese authors, who mourned the Qing’s failure to capitalize on this colonial potential in their efforts to construct a diaspora-centered national identity. Legacies of this translingual discourse endure, especially in the narrative that the Qing state forbade its subjects from going overseas, and disowned those who did so, until forced to allow Chinese indentured labor recruitment following the Second Opium War (1856–1860).

Plus book reviews.

Journal of World History 30-4
Journal of World History, Vol. 30, No. 4 (2019)

Journal of Korean Religions Vol. 10, No. 2 (2019)

A Comparative Study of Sudden and Gradual in Sŏn 禪 and the New Testament
by Bernard Senécal S.J.

Chinul’s Empty and Quiescent Spiritual Knowing (kongjŏk yŏngji 空寂靈知) and Ignatius of Loyola’s Indifference and Discernment of Spirits
by Yon-dahm Kwon

The Re-emergence of Chosŏn Buddhism in the 17th Century: A Question of Institutional Development and Legitimation
by Sung-Eun T. Kim

Kyŏnghŏ Sŏngu and the Existential Dimensions of Modern Korean Buddhism
by Jin Y. Park

The Real Face of Korean Buddhism under Japanese Colonial Rule
by Kue-jin Song

Four Pillars and Four Diviners: Fate, Fluidity, and Invention in Horoscopic Saju Divination in Contemporary South Korea
by David J. Kim

Religious and Philosophical Traditions of Korea by Kevin N. Cawley (review)
by David W. Kim

The Journal of Korean Religions is the only English-language academic journal dedicated to the study of Korean religions. The publication aims to stimulate interest in and research on Korean religions across a range of disciplines in the humanities and social sciences. Launched in 2010 by the Institute for the Study of Religion at Sogang University in Korea, the journal is peer-reviewed and published twice yearly, in April and October.

Journal of Korean Religions Vol. 10, No. 2 (2019)

Access Now: Trending Journal Articles, Fall 2019

Contemporary Pacific 31-2

Philosophy East and West 69-3

Buddhist-Christian Studies 37

Individuals can now access many of our journal articles and issues previously only available to those with institutional access, thanks to a new program on the Project MUSE platform.

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