Journal of World History Special Issue: Roads and Oceans, a 30th Anniversary Collection – Free!

The Journal of World History launches its first digital-only special issue, a 30th anniversary collection titled, “Roads and Oceans: Rethinking Mobility and Migrations in World History.” The issue is free on the Project MUSE platform through September 2020.

This week, world history scholars would have been gathering in Salt Lake City, Utah for the annual World History Association (WHA) conference, regretfully canceled in light of public health concerns during the coronavirus pandemic. 

This special issue provides accessible resources for scholars and teachers worldwide, pulled together by editor Matthew P. Romaniello. Here, Matt discusses “Roads and Oceans,” a central theme throughout the history of this journal founded by Jerry Bentley, a pioneer in the field who guided the journal through 24 volumes. 

Matthew P. Romaniello, editor of the Journal of World History
Matthew P. Romaniello, editor of the Journal of World History

University of Hawai‘i Press: Tell us how this special issue came together.

Matthew P. Romaniello: To celebrate the journal’s anniversary, we wanted to highlight a theme that has been important throughout the past thirty years. We reviewed the list of most frequently read articles available through Project Muse and developed three potential themes that would be a good fit. After consulting with a few members of the editorial board, “Roads and Oceans: Rethinking Mobility and Migrations in World History” seemed to best choice to encompass the journal’s history.

UHP: Why is this issue important now?

MPR: As I mention in the introduction, world history is not contained by border crossings or trade caravans but is instead defined by movement in general. Placing this selection of articles into context with each other opens a discussion on the importance of human migration, cultural exchanges broadly conceived, and the challenge crossing borders, either from state-imposed restrictions or geographic boundaries. As these articles highlight, the progress of history has been toward more exchanges, not obstacles.

UHP: How do you hope people will use this issue?

MPR: One of the most exciting opportunities resulting from this special online format is making older articles available free. While many scholars working at the university level will have access to the journal via their institutions, our secondary school colleagues are not so lucky. Getting more material into the hands of secondary school teachers to share with their students is a wonderful outcome of our anniversary celebration. Having a thematic collection available will lend itself to use at all levels as the basis for an in-depth discussion about the importance of migration and travel throughout the past, an issue that’s only more important in a Covid-19 world.

UHP: What was the most challenging thing about creating this issue?

MPR: The greatest challenge was the journal’s rich past. There are simply too many great articles worth highlighting. The editorial board and I debated a few different themes, any of which would have been capable to featuring ten wonderful articles. I’m pleased to say that the UH Press supports the idea of having a new online collection each year, which not only lets us cover a range of themes but also lets us keep sharing this research with a broader audience.

UHP: In lieu of this year’s World History Association meeting, what resources would you point your colleagues to?

MPR: “Roads and Oceans: Rethinking Mobility and Migrations in World History” is one great resource. It’s a chance to revisit the journal’s past and think about how current conditions are changing our ideas about migration and open borders. The World History Association has been producing new content to help with the current conditions with Under the Baobab, an extended conversation about how the pandemic is changing our research and teaching. And World History Bulletin, another official publication of the WHA, has just published a special issue on teaching during the pandemic.

UHP: Finally, how have the closures affected your own research and teaching? How are arranging your work in light of this year’s events?

MPR: Like so many of us, transitioning to full-time online teaching overnight was a huge change, but thankfully I’m getting a handle on our “new normal” by teaching this summer. I had enough time and support from my institution to try some new things and rethink how my courses are structured. For my scholarship, I can only say it’s a great time to be an editor, because all of the work is online so it’s not a dramatic shift. I’m pleased to have a new edited volume, Russia in Asia: Imaginations, Interactions, and Realities, getting published this summer in addition to the new JWH collection. It’s starting up a new research project that’s taken a backseat for the moment, but there is a wealth of online materials to get started with.

New Journal Issues: Azalea, Journal of Burma Studies, JSEALS + More (May 2020)

Azalea: Journal of Korean Literature & Culture

Volume 13 (2020)

The special feature of this issue of Azalea carries a feast of research: eight essays on modern Korean poetry, thanks to the endeavors of the two guest editors, Jae Won Chung and Benoit Berthelier. From the beginning period of the 1920s, described by Ku In-mo and David Krolikoski, to the genealogy of modernism, written by Jae Won Edward Chung, to North Korean poetry, covered by Benoit Berthelier and Sonja Haeussler, to twenty-first-century South Korean poetry, examined by Cho Kang-sŏk and Ivanna Sang Een Yi, this feature evinces that the field of modern Korean poetry has gotten in firm stakes.

—Young-Jun Lee, editor

Journal of Burma Studies 24-1

The Journal of Burma Studies

Special Issue: Environment and Resources: Burma/Myanmar and the (Un)Natural

Volume 24, Issue 1 (2020)

[I]n this Special Issue of The Journal of Burma Studies (JBS) we have gathered together an interdisciplinary set of research articles surrounding questions of what nature is and what its resources might be. With the four authors’ varied focus on historical and contemporary Myanmar, this set of papers offers challenging new vistas for the exploration and interrogation of how resources and the environment have been approached and brokered by local and transnational actors.

—Jane M. Ferguson, editor

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Open Access

Volume 13, Issue 1 (2020)

This issue includes five research articles and one data paper:

  • Reduction in Burmese Compounds by Dan Cameron Burgdorf
  • Situation Types in Thai Sign Language by Cassie Wallace,
  • Variation of Oral and Nasal Stops by English and Japanese Learners of Thai by Sugunya Ruangjaroon
  • Reconsidering the Diachrony of Tone in Rma by Nathaniel A. Sims
  • A Look at Diachronic Phonological Processes in Inthii Oy by Jennifer L. Daniell
  • “Ethnolinguistic Notes on the Language Endangerment Status of Mintil, an Aslian Language” by Teckwyn Lim
JSEALS Special Publication: Studies in the Anthropology of Language in Mainland Southeast Asia

Studies in the Anthropology of Language in Mainland Southeast Asia

Open Access

New JSEALS Special Publication

The papers in this special issue were first written for a workshop held at the University of Sydney in August 2019, titled The Anthropology of Language in Mainland Southeast Asia. Of special interest in the workshop was the fact that only a tiny fraction of the area’s languages have national language status. These national languages are far better researched and understood than the vast majority of languages spoken in the area. New research on minority languages (mostly in descriptive and historical linguistics) is beginning to redress this imbalance, but much work remains if we are going to achieve a full picture of human language in mainland Southeast Asia.

—N. J. Enfield, Jack Sidnell, and Charles H. P. Zuckerman, editors

Korean Studies

Volume 44 (2020)

The new issue includes the following research articles:

  • How Did Buddhists Venerate the Avataṃsaka-sūtra in Late Premodern Korea? Insights from Two Manuscript Ritual Texts by Richard D. McBride II
  • A Population Genetic Perspective on Korean Prehistory by Choongwon Jeong
  • From Catch-up to Convergence? Re-casting the Trajectory of Capitalism in South Korea by Keun Lee, Ho-Chul Shin, Jongho Lee
  • Qing China’s Misguided Foreign Policy and the Struggle to Dominate Korea (According to the Russian Archive) by Larisa Zabrovskaia
  • Mobile North Korean Women and Long-Distance Motherhood: The (Re)Construction of Intimacy and the Ambivalence of Family by Sung Kyung Kim
  • North Korean Migrants in South Korea: “Multicultural” or “Global” Citizens? by Young-a Park
Language Documentation & Conservation

Language Documentation & Conservation

Open Access

Volume 14 (2020)

In May, Language Documentation & Conservation added two new articles:

  • What is “natural” speech? Comparing free narratives and Frog stories in Indonesia
    By Marian Klamer, Francesca R. Moro
  • Contrasting statistical indicators of Māori language revitalization: Conversational ability, speaking proficiency, and first language
    By Chris Lane

Find the 2019 LD&C annual report here.

Philosophy East and West PEW 70-2

Philosophy East & West

Volume 70, Issue 2 (2020)

This issue of Philosophy East & West opens with a remembrance of Gerald James Larson, known more widely as Gerry Larson, who passed away suddenly on April 27, 2019 at the age of 81. His death was unexpected because he was just getting ready to leave for India in connection with a meeting centered on his recently published magnum opus Classical Yoga Philosophy and the Legacy of Sāṁkhya. Sadly, he experienced some sharp abdominal pain and passed away two weeks later.

Read Joseph Prabhu’s reflect on Gerry Larson and the issue’s articles, discussions, and reviews here.

MĀNOA Journal Receives Two National Grants

Published twice a year since 1989 by the University of Hawai‘i Press, Mānoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing has received two national grants to support its issues. The journal’s editorial offices are in the Department of English of the UH-Mānoa campus, and it is supported by the College of Languages, Linguistics, and Literature.

The National Endowment for the Arts awarded Mānoa an Art Works grant of $10,000 for fiscal year 2020. This grant was one of 1,187 that totaled $27.3 million and supported projects in every state. Art Works grants are given to artistically excellent projects that celebrate American creativity and cultural heritage.

The Community of Literary Magazines and Presses (CLMP), in alliance with the Amazon Literary Partnership (ALP), awarded Mānoa a 2020 Literary Magazine Fund grant of $5,000. ALP launched the Literary Magazine Fund with CLMP in 2019 to help CLMP support the crucial work of literary publishers. Grant applications were reviewed by a panel of judges convened by ALP and CLMP. Final selections were made by ALP and CLMP.

Since 2009, ALP has provided $13 million in grant funding to over 175 literary organizations, assisting thousands of writers. Originally founded in 1967, CLMP provides funding and technical assistance to over 400 magazines, presses, Internet publishers, and chapbook and zine publishers.

Mānoa was one of three UH Press journals that celebrated thirty years of publishing in 2019. It has published over sixty issues and featured the work of over a thousand contributors from all over the world. The CLMP and ALP award will support the publication of the journal’s summer 2020 issue, Tyranny Lessons: International Prose, Poetry, and Performance, a collection of writing about ordinary people struggling against the restrictions on lives, movements, and thoughts imposed by intolerant societies, repressive political systems, and failed states.

Manoa 32-1 Tyranny Lessons
Forthcoming from Mānoa: Tyranny Lessons (Vol. 32, Issue 1)

University of Hawai‘i Press to Publish CHINOPERL: Journal of Chinese Oral & Performing Literature

The University of Hawai‘i Press partners with The Permanent Conference on Chinese Oral and Performing Literature for the continued publication of CHINOPERL: Journal of Chinese Oral & Performing Literature, starting with the summer 2020 issue.

An interdisciplinary journal, CHINOPERL has been published continuously since 1969 and is the only Western-language journal in its field. The interplay between orality, performance, and written traditions is a question that concerns anyone who studies China, and the journal focuses on literature connected to oral performance, either formally on stage or as a means of everyday communication. This literature ranges from proverbs to poetry, folk songs to hip-hop. 

“We are excited to work with the University of Hawai‘i Press, which has a well-deserved reputation for excellence,” said editor Margaret B. Wan. “CHINOPERL welcomes diverse contributions to Chinese performance studies. Recent issues have explored Chinese performance in diaspora, the intersection of social and cultural history, and new approaches from media studies, gender studies, religious studies, and digital humanities.”

The forthcoming issue is a special issue on Regional Language and Performance Texts in the Qing, co-edited by Margaret B. Wan and Catherine Swatek. The issue grew out of a panel at the Association of Asian Studies meeting in 2017. The new issue will also feature a newly designed cover.

CHINOPERL’s interdisciplinary and global approach makes this title a great addition to our journals list,” said Joel Cosseboom, UH Press Interim Director and Publisher. 

CHINOPERL joins the established Asian Studies journals published by UH Press, including Azalea, Asian Theatre Journal, and China Review International, among others. 

The journal welcomes submissions on Chinese oral and performing literature, whether historical, descriptive, theoretical, or interdisciplinary in nature. Submission and subscription information can be found at uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/chp. All 38 volumes of CHINOPERL’s archive are also now available on Project MUSE (https://muse.jhu.edu/journals/chinoperl).


About Chinese Oral and Performing Literature (中國演唱文藝研究會)

CHINOPERL (chinoperl.osu.edu) is an organization that is devoted to the research, analysis, and interpretation of oral and performing traditions, broadly defined, and their relationship to China’s culture and society. Its membership consists of scholars in the humanities and the social sciences who recognize the significance of oral performance to Chinese literature and culture. CHINOPERL celebrated its 50th anniversary at the 2019 CHINOPERL Conference. CHINOPERL: Journal of Chinese Oral and Performing Literature is its official publication.

CHINOPERL Cover
CHINOPERL

Editor
Margaret B. Wan, University of Utah, USA

Consulting Editor
David Rolston, University of Michigan, USA

Associate Editors
Catherine C. Swatek, University of British Columbia, Canada

Vibeke Børdahl, Nordic Institute of Asian Studies, Denmark

Jing Shen, Eckerd College, USA

Asian Perspectives Vol. 59, No. 1 (2020)

The spring issue of Asian Perspectives includes two remembrances to Martin Thomas Bale (7 March 1970–21 September 2018) and Hung Ling-Yu 洪玲玉 (25 February 1975–26 April 2018).

Bale was one of Korean archaeology’s most active and ardent supporters. He was a pioneer of Korean prehistory in North America, devoting more than twenty years to the study of the Mumun Pottery Period (ca. 1500–300 b.c.) and broader East Asia. Hung was an anthropological archaeologist to her core, with extensive field experience in archaeological excavations and surveys in China and Taiwan, including work in Sichuan Province as part of the Luce Foundation-sponsored Chengdu Plain Archaeological Survey.

Find these remembrances, research articles, a review essay, and book reviews in the new issue.

Editors’ Note
Mike T. Carson, Rowan K. Flad

Formation and Function of Majiayao and Qijia Pottery: Analysis of Manufacturing Marks and Use-alteration on Vessels from the Tao River Valley
Andrew Womack, Hui Wang

Revisiting Prei Khmeng: The Excavation of an Iron Age Settlement and Cemetery in Cambodia
Dougald O’Reilly, Louise Shewan, Kate Domett, An Sopheap

Traditional Land Use and Resistance to Spanish Colonial Entanglement: Archaeological Evidence on Guam
Boyd Dixon, Danny Welch, Lon Bulgrin, Mark Horrocks

Lapita on Wari Island: What’s the Problem?
Merryn Chynoweth, Glenn R. Summerhayes, Anne Ford, Yo Negishi

Integration and the Regional Market System in the Early Chinese Empires: A Case Study of the Distribution of Iron and Bronze Objects in the Wei River Valley
Lam Wengcheong

Antenna-Style Daggers in Northeast Asia from the Perspective of Interregional Interaction
Park Sun Mi

Recovering Plant Microfossils from Archaeological and other Palaeoenvironmental Deposits: A Practical Guide Developed from Pacific Region Experience
Mark Horrocks

Ban Chiang, Northeast Thailand, Volumes 2A and 2B: A Review Essay
Charles Higham

Empires and Exchanges in Eurasian Late Antiquity: Rome, China, Iran, and the Steppe, ca. 250–750 ed. by Nicola Di Cosmo and Michael Maas (review)
Barry Cunliffe

Violence, Kinship and the Early Chinese State: The Shang and their World by Roderick Campbell (review)
Wang Haicheng

Silk, Slaves, and Stupas: Material Culture of the Silk Road by Susan Whitfield (review)
Toby C. Wilkinson

Martin Thomas Bale (7 March 1970–21 September 2018)
Rachel Lee, Mark Byington

Hung Ling-Yu 洪玲玉 (25 February 1975–26 Abril 2018)
Hung Ling-Yu, Tristram R. Kidder, Sara Friedman

 

Asian Perspectives cover 59-1
Asian Perspectives, Vol. 59, No. 1 (2020)

Cross-Currents – Limited Time Special Offer – 50% Off

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review’s next issue—volume 9, issue 1—will be its last. Limited print copies of Cross-Currents are now available for a 50% discount through June 1. 

Since 2012, Cross-Currents has offered readers up-to-date research findings, emerging trends, and cutting-edge perspectives concerning East Asian history and culture from scholars in both English-speaking and Asian language-speaking academic communities.

A joint enterprise of the Research Institute of Korean Studies (RIKS) at Korea University and the Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS) at the University of California, Berkeley, Cross-Currents has balanced issues traditionally addressed by Western humanities and social science journals with issues of immediate concern to scholars in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. 

Most issues include multiple special sections, guest edited by scholars in the field. The following issues are typically $15.00 per issue, but are now available for $7.50. Postage is included for mailing addresses within the U.S. For shipping outside the U.S., please add $5.00 per issue.


Complete Cross-Currents Set (17 issues)

A complete set of 17 issues may be purchased for $115 ($255 value). Contact uhpjourn@hawaii.edu to order and to inquire about international shipping options.

For individual issues, please click on the links below.

Volume 9, Number 1, May 2020 (Forthcoming)

Global Island: Taiwan and the World + Individual Submissions

Volume 8, Number 2, November 2019

Buddhist Art of Mongolia: Cross-Cultural Connections, Discoveries, and Interpretations

Volume 8, Number 1, May 2019

Diasporic Art and Korean Identity

Air-Water-Land-Human: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health and Environment

Volume 7, Number 2, November 2018

Recent Research on North and South Korea

Writing Revolution Across Northeast Asia

Volume 7, Number 1, May 2018

Binding Maritime China: Control, Evasion, and Interloping

Volume 6, Number 2, November 2017

Maps and Their Contexts: Reflections on Cartography and Culture in Premodern East Asia

Naming Modernity: Rebranding and Neologisms during China’s Interwar Global Moment in Eastern Asia

Volume 6, Number 1, May 2017

Cartographic Anxieties

Recent Research on China, Korea and Japan

Volume 5, Number 2, November 2016

Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham

Mapping Vietnameseness

Volume 5, Number 1, May 2016

Individual Submissions

Volume 4, Number 2, November 2015

Governing Marriage Migrations: Perspectives from Mainland China and Taiwan

Rethinking Business History in Modern China

Volume 4, Number 1, May 2015

(De)Memorializing the Korean War: A Critical Intervention

Recent Research on China

Volume 3, Number 2, November 2014

Stories and Histories from the China-Vietnam Border

Islam in China/China in Islam

Volume 3, Number 1, May 2014

The Globalization of K-pop: Local and Transnational Articulations of South Korean Popular Music

New Research on Colonial Korea

Volume 2, Number 2, November 2013

Urban Chinese Living

Law, Politics, and Society in Republican China

Bordering China: Modernity and Sustainability

Volume 2, Number 1, May 2013

Transcolonial Film Coproductions in the Japanese Empire: Antinomies in the Colonial Archive

Volume 1, Number 2, November 2012

Mediating Chineseness in Cambodia

Volume 1, Number 1, May 2012

Territoriality and Space Production in China

The Past and Future of the Gaihōzu Japanese Imperial Maps

Cross-Currents 8-2
Cross-Currents 8-1
Cross-Currents Cover 7-2
Cross-Currents 6-2 Cover

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 32 no. 1 (2020)

Featured art, this issue: Brackish Waters (Muliwai), by Joy Lehuanani Enomoto, 2014. Photograph, salt, thread, and Maui dirt on handmade paper, 12 x 10 in. Muliwai, or estuaries, are nutrient rich and vital to the protection of our coastlines against climate change. The muliwai of Waikīkī was devastated due to two significant events: the Honolulu Sanitary Commission’s 1912 declaration that the muliwai was a threat to public health and safety, which led to the area’s wetlands being filled in, and the signing of Act 14, SL 1918, which condemned the muliwai and approved the creation of what is now the Ala Wai Canal. The dredging of the canal, led by Walter Dillingham, destroyed Hawaiian farmlands and displaced hundreds of Kānaka Maoli.



This issue of The Contemporary Pacific is a special issue, “Experiencing Pacific Environments: Pasts, Presents, Futures,” guest edited by Eveline Dürr, Philipp Schorch, and Sina Emde, and features the art of Joy Lehuanani Enomoto.

Read the special issue introduction free on Project MUSE.

Articles

Experiencing Pacific Environments:: Pasts, Presents, Futures
Sina Emde, Eveline Dürr, Philipp Schorch

Collaborative Strategies for Re-Enhancing Hapū Connections to Lands and Making Changes with Our Climate
Huhana Smith

Navigating for a Place in the Museum: Stories of Encounter and Engagement between the Old and the New from the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
Michael Mel

One Thousand and One Coconuts: Growing Memories in Southern New Guinea
Nicholas Evans

The Lizard in the Volcano: Narratives of the Kuwae Eruption
Chris Ballard

The Capitalism of Chambri Cosmology: The 2017 Sir Raymond Firth Memorial Lecture
Deborah Gewertz, Frederick Errington

Nesor Annim, Niteikapar (Good Morning, Cardinal Honeyeater): Indigenous Reflections on Micronesian Women and the Environment
Myjolynne Marie Kim

Afterword: “I Am the River, and the River Is Me”
Dame Anne Salmond

Resources

Teaching Oceania: Creating Pedagogical Resources for Undergraduates in Pacific Studies
Monica C LaBriola, Julianne Walsh

Political Reviews

Micronesia in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019
Gonzaga Puas

Guam
Elizabeth (Isa) Ua Ceallaigh Bowman, Michael Lujan Bevacqua, Tiara Na’Puti

Marshall Islands
Monica C Labriola

Nauru
Nic Maclellan

Northern Mariana Islands
Zaldy Dandan

Polynesia in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019
Lorenz Gonschor

Māori Issues
Margaret Mutu

Niue
Salote Talagi

Pitcairn
Peter Clegg

Rapa Nui
Forrest Wade Young

Books and Media Reviews

Oceania (review)
Safua Akeli Amaama

Kaiāulu: Gathering Tides by Mehana Blaich Vaughan (review)
Mililani Ganivet

Ē Luku Wale Ē: Devastation upon Devastation by Mark Hamasaki and Kapulani Landgraf (review)
Halena Kapuni-Reynolds

Island Time: New Zealand’s Pacific Futures by Damon Salesa (review)
Masami Tsujita Levi

The Bounty from the Beach: Cross-Cultural and Cross-Disciplinary Essays ed. by Sylvie Largeaud-Ortega (review)
Vehia Wheeler

Breaking the Shell: Voyaging from Nuclear Refugees to People of the Sea in the Marshall Islands by Joseph H Genz (review)
M Blake Fisher

Pacific Alternatives: Cultural Politics in Contemporary Oceania ed. by Edvard Hviding and Geoffrey White (review)
Cheng-Cheng Li

Dispossession and the Environment: Rhetoric and Inequality in Papua New Guinea by Paige West (review)
Foley Pfalzgraf

Pacific Futures: Past and Present ed. by Warwick Anderson et al. (review)
Owen Jennings

Tatau: A History of Sāmoan Tattooing by Sean Mallon and Sébastien Galliot (review)
Kristina Togafau

The Contemporary Pacific 32-1
The Contemporary Pacific, Vol. 32, No. 1 (2020)

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 58 no. 2 (2019)

Journal of World History, Vol 31, No. 1 (2020)

Special Issue

Liberal and Illiberal Internationalisms

Edited by Philippa Hetherington and Glenda Sluga

The twenty-first century is awash with diagnoses of the end of liberal internationalism. In both popular and academic manifestations, declarations of liberal internationalism’s ‘crisis’ tend to assume that the term has a stable meaning that is clearly differentiated from illiberal internationalist variants. The aim of this special issue of the Journal of World History is to interrogate this assumption. We argue that a historical view of internationalism highlights the interrelation between and the mutual dependence of liberal and illiberal internationalisms since 1880. Taken together, the essays collected here position the politics of internationalism at the centre of a new historiography that rejects an axiomatic relationship between the liberal and the international. They seek to rethink how liberal and illiberal cooperated, co-mingled and co-produced one another on the international plane.

Research Articles

Liberal and Illiberal Internationalisms
Philippa Hetherington, Glenda Sluga

Liberals, Socialists, Internationalists, Jews
Abigail Green

“Neither East Nor West,” Neither Liberal Nor Illiberal? Iranian Islamist Internationalism in the 1980s
Timothy Nunan

Urban Planning and the Politics of Expert Internationalism, 1920s–1940s
Phillip Wagner

The Crisis of Liberal Internationalism: The Legacies of the League of Nations Reconsidered
David Petruccelli

Constructing the ‘City of International Solidarity’: Non-Aligned Internationalism, the United Nations and Visions of Development, Modernism and Solidarity, 1955–1975
Ljubica Spaskovska

Liberal and Illiberal Internationalism in the Making of the League of Nations Convention on Broadcasting in the Cause of Peace
David Goodman

India, Apartheid and the New World Order at the UN, 1946–1962
Alanna O’Malley

Book Reviews

The Little Ice Age and the Demise of Rome: Lessons for the Anthropocene?
Roger L. Albin

A Primer for Teaching Environmental History: Ten Design Principles by Emily Wakild and Michelle K. Berry (review)
Frank Zelko

Europe and the European Union in Times of Growing Scepticism
Martijn Lak

Barbed-Wire Imperialism: Britain’s Empire of Camps, 1876–1903 by Aidan Forth (review)
Mark Condos

Trading in Faith: Christianity and Globalization?
Philip Jenkins

 

Journal of World History 31-1
Journal of World History,
Vol. 31, Issue 1

Pictured on the cover: Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah, photograph taken in June 2019. The photograph marks a transition for the Journal of World History, highlighting Utah as the new home of the journal office as well as the site of World History Association annual conference in 2020. The image is a precursor of a complete cover redesign in 2021.

Philosophy East and West Vol. 70, No. 1

The first issue of Philosophy East & West’s 70th volume includes the following scholarly articles:

Articles

Spiritual Discipline, Emotions, and Behavior during the Song Dynasty: Zhu Xi’s and Qisong’s Commentaries on the Zhongyong in Comparative Perspective
Diana Arghirescu

Eckhartian Neologisms and the Tathātā Framework: Istic/Isticheit in Conversation with The Awakening of Faith
John Becker

Dōgen’s “Leaving Home Life” (Shukke 出家): A Study of Aesthetic Experience and Growth in John Dewey and Dōgen
Jacob Bender

Is Free Will Confucian? Li Zehou’s Confucian Revision of the Kantian Will
Robert A. Carleo III

The Nondualistic Aesthetics of Qi 氣 in Antoni Tàpies’ Holistic Conception of Art
Mei-Hsin Chen

Wu-Wei, Merleau-Ponty, And Being Aware of What We Do
Marcus Lee

Sarvamukti: Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan’s Aporetic Metaphysics of Collective Salvation
Ayon Maharaj

The King’s Slaughterer—or, The Royal Way of Nourishing Life
Hans-Georg Moeller

Freedom of the Mind: Buddhist Soft Compatibilism
Rick Repetti

Virtue as Desire: Mengzi 6A In Light of the Kongzi Shilun
Boqun Zhou

Book Discussion

The Exclusion of Chinese Philosophy: “Ten Don’ts,” “Three Represents,” and “Eight Musts”
Carine Defoort

Intercultural Encounter in the Age of Hybridity: A Response to Eric S. Nelson
Mario Wenning

A Few Thoughts on the Possibility of Intercultural Thinking in a Global Age
Kai Marchal

Intercultural Philosophy and Intercultural Hermeneutics: A Response to Defoort, Wenning, and Marchal
Eric S. Nelson

Online Book Reviews

The Third Revolution: Xi Jinping and the New Chinese State by Elizabeth C. Economy (review)
Martin Schönfeld

Japanese Philosophy in the Making 1: Crossing Paths with Nishida by John C. Maraldo (review)
Bradley Park

Shen Gua’s Empiricism by Ya ZUO (review)
James D. Sellmann

 

 

Philosophy East and West cover 70-1
Philosophy East and West,
Vol. 70 Issue 1

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society – Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 25

JSEALS: Papers from the Austronesian Formal Linguistics Association 25

This special publication of the Journal of Southeast Asian Linguistics, edited by Henry Y. Chang and Hui-chuan J. Huang, grew out of the 25th annual meeting of AFLA held at Academia Sinica, Taiwan, 10-12 May, 2018.

Contributions in this volume cover a wide variety of topics in Austronesian linguistics. Chen and Jiang argue that in Bunun, -in- is an existential past tense marker while =in is a change-of-state marker at the discourse level, in contrast to the dominant view in the literature. Focusing on the prosody of Kanakanavu, Cheng spells out a number of phonological conditions and identifies the morphemes that could either attract or repel prominence. Socolof and Shimoyama propose a split ergative analysis of Māori genitive relative construction while showing that this construction is more widely distributed than generally described. Sommerlot’s article shows that the ber-V-nya constructions in Indonesian do not fit into any functions of these affixes in previous descriptions and they instead resemble a type of presentational-there construction. Tanenbaum adopts a syntactically-grounded account of Tagalog second-position clitics, based on obligatory V-to-C head movement. Wu explores the constructions of noun incorporation (NI) in Northern Paiwan, including both lexical and syntactic NI, and examines their morphosyntactic behaviors. Yang and Wong study how Malay məN- prefixation interacts with reduplication and propose a new markedness constraint against word-initial nasals to account for the data.


Ways of talking about the past: The semantics of –in- and =in in Bunun
By Sihwei Chen and Haowen Jiang

More on Kanakanavu word-level prosody: Cyclic and postcyclic processes
By Yi-Yang Cheng

The distribution of the Māori genitive relative construction
By Michael Socolof and Junko Shimoyama

A presentational construction in Indonesian
By Carly J. Sommerlot

Untangling the Tagalog clitic cluster
By Russell Tanenbaum

Two types of noun incorporation in Northern Paiwan
By Chunming Wu

Malay verbal reduplication with the məN- prefix
By Meng Yang and Deborah J.M. Wong

This open-access special publication and the first articles in Vol. 13 issue 1 are available via ScholarSpace.

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PS2020J


Pacific Science: A Quarterly Devoted to the Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region celebrates its 75th anniversary in 2021 and welcomes submissions as we approach this important moment.

The University of Hawai‘i Press has increased access to published research in Pacific Science to better support both authors and readers.

Article-by-Article Publishing

This year (2020), Pacific Science will move to an article-by-article publishing model, reducing publication times from submission until online publication in both the BioOne and Project MUSE content databases. All authors are encouraged to submit color images with their articles, which will be included in the online version at no additional charge. All articles will be included in the print issues on a quarterly basis.

No Fees, Open Access Discount

Thanks to increased online usage, Pacific Science no longer charges submission fees or page charges for accepted articles that do not require the Open Access publishing option.

If authors would like to make their article Open Access upon publication, there is a one-time fee of $1,800, which also now includes the option to have images printed in color.

For a limited time, we are providing a discount code that will save you 20% on the Open Access publishing fee. This reduces the fee to only $1,440. The 20% discount is also good on subscription orders through April 30. Subscriptions may be ordered through our website. The discount code to use is PS2020J.

Submit

Please review the submission guidelines on our website by clicking on the tab labeled “AUTHOR GUIDELINES.”

Journal topics may focus on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.  Manuscript submissions on topics such as Pacific biodiversity, conservation, and sustainability are also encouraged. In addition to publishing original research, the journal also accepts review articles, which provide a synthesis of current knowledge.

Submissions may be emailed directly to Editor Curtis Daehler, Dept. of Botany at the University of Hawai‘i daehler@hawaii.edu.