Asian Theatre Journal, Vol. 36, No. 1 (2019)

An image from Red Poem, featured in Jae Kyoung Kim’s “2017 Black Tent Theatre Project in Gwangwamun Square: Staging Tragic Memory and Building Solidarity through Public Theatre,” this issue.

In addition to performance and book reviews, the spring issue of Asian Theatre Journal includes articles on ritual and religious theatre, contemporary theatre and the state, and the performance of identity.

Ras and Affect in Ramlila (and the Radheshyam Ramayan)
By Pamela Lothspeich

Rescuing Mulian’s Mother in the Xi Era: Reviving Ritual Xiqu in Contemporary Fujian
By Josh Stenberg

Desiring Spectacular Discipline: Aspiration, Fraternal Anxiety, and the Allure of Restraint in ‘s Dōjōji
By Reginald Jackson

Chinese Entertainment Industry, the Case of Folk Errenzhuan
By Haili Ma

Theatre on the Move: Sakurai Daizhou’s Tent Theatre in East Asia
By I-Yi Hsieh

2017 Black Tent Theatre Project in Gwanghwamun Square: Staging Tragic Memory and Building Solidarity through Public Theatre
By Jae Kyoung Kim

Mystic Lear and Playful Hamlet: The Critical Cultural Dramaturgy in the Iranian Appropriations of Shakespearean Tragedies
By Amin Azimi and Marjan Moosavi

Uncle Tom’s Cabin in China: Ouyang Yuqian’s Regret of a Black Slave and the Tactics of Impersonating Race, Gender, and Class
By Megan Ammirati

Trapping the Heron: The Curious Case of Sagi School Kyōgen
By Alex Rogals

Local Community Ritual Theatre in Guangxi, South China
By Jian Xie

Masks and Costumes of Purulia Chhau
By Deepsikha Chatterjee

 

Asian Theatre Journal 36-1 cover
Asian Theatre Journal, Vol. 36, No. 1 (2019)

Journal of World History, Vol. 29, No. 3 (2018)

This issue of the Journal of World History includes the following scholarly articles:

Oil Boom: Agriculture, Chemistry, and the Rise of Global Plant Fat Industries, ca. 1850–1920
By Jonathan Robins

Fats extracted from plants and animals are an important and understudied part of the industrialization of the “global North” in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Demand for soap, lamp oil, candles, lubricants, and other products drove European and American efforts to extract fats from animals across the continents and oceans, and by the late nineteenth century a proportion of this fat entered the North’s food supply. Simultaneously, demand for edible and industrial fats appeared to be outstripping supplies. Plants emerged as an important source of fat in this period, as new technologies allowed plant fats to be transformed into more versatile and edible products. The transition to plant fats represented an important move down the food chain for Northern consumers, allowing for the efficient use of existing resources, as well as contributing to the ongoing extraction of raw materials from the tropics.

Spectacular Power in the Early Han and Roman Empires
By Rebecca Robinson

During their long reigns, Emperor Wu of the Western Han and Augustus of Rome respectively performed two spectacular ceremonies, the feng and shan sacrifices and the ludi saeculares. The performance of these ceremonies took place during a larger process of reforms to each state’s religious institutions and marked the culmination of these reforms. While there is no direct connection between the two rulers or their respective ceremonies, some of the salient characteristics can be compared. In both cases, the rulers claimed to revive ancient ceremonies, but incorporated new narratives of rulership into their performance. These spectacular ceremonies, performed in front of audiences, demonstrated the exalted position of the ruler, as well as the acceptance of the elites to the new order.

Beyond ‘Tribal Breakout’: Afghans in the History of Empire, ca. 1747–1818
By Jagjeet Lally

The narrative of ‘Tribal Breakout’ has allowed world historians to avoid narratives of the ‘decline of the East’ and the ‘rise of the West’—but only by casting Afghans as tribals whose incursions destabilized the Asian empires. This essay seeks to retrieve the constructive agency of Afghans during the so-called ‘colonial transition’ in South Asia. Their seizure of plunder was disbursed via the patronage of commercial groups, while careful economic management even led to economic expansion in a manner typical of some eighteenth-century states, thereby lubricating long-distance trade between south and central Asia. This was part of a process of Afghan state formation rooted in developments within the Mughal Empire, was typical of a process of imperial expansion evident in the histories of other empires, such as the Mughals, Ottomans, and Qing, and, thus, yields much to scholars interested in the patterns and processes of early-modern empires in general.

Plus book reviews.

Journal of World History 29-3 cover
Journal of World History, Volume 29, No. 3 (2018)

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 31 no. 1 (2019)

Contemporary Pacific 31-1 featured art. Pigs in the Yard, by Kalisolaite ‘Uhila, 2011.
Featured Art, this issue: Pigs in the Yard, by Kalisolaite ‘Uhila, 2011. 
Performance, Aotea Square Performance Arcade, Auckland.
In 2011, ‘Uhila lived with a piglet called Colonist for eight days in a shipping container in central Auckland’s Aotea Square, in full view of passersby and much to the amusement of audiences who have followed his work ever since. Pigs are valued commodities and symbols of status and prestige in numerous Pacific Island cultures, including in Tonga, where they can be gifted and eaten on special occasions and wander for much of the time in relative freedom. Evaluated in the wake of 2010 Tongan constitutional reforms, Pigs in the Yard also heeds a call for greater transparency and ongoing debate, if balancing Tongan values and systems of authority with inherited British legal conventions is to improve conditions for Tongan citizens. Photo courtesy of the artist and Michael Let

This issue of The Contemporary Pacific features the art of Kalisolaite ‘Uhila, Alan Howard’s resource “Creating an Archive for Rotuma: A Personal Account,” political reviews covering Micronesia and Polynesia, and the following articles and reviews.

Indigenous Well-Being and Development: Connections to Large-Scale Mining and Tourism in the Pacific
by Emma Richardson, Emma Hughes, Sharon McLennan, and Litea Meo-Sewabu

Indigenous Masculinities and the “Refined Politics” of Alcohol and Racialization in West Papua
by Jenny Munro

Tannese Chiefs, State Structures, and Global Connections in Vanuatu
by Marc Tabani

Epidemic Suicide in the Context of Modernizing Social Change in Oceania: A Critical Review and Assessment
by Edward D Lowe

Project Banaba (review)
by Mitiana Arbon

Holo Moana: Generations of Voyaging (review)
by Kelema Lee Moses

Anote’s Ark by Matthieu Rytz (review)
by David Lipset

Out of State (review)
by David Lipset

Island Soldier by Nathan Fitch (review)
by Emelihter Kihleng, Clement Yow Mulalap, Jacki Leota-Mua, and Vicente M Diaz


About the Journal

The Contemporary Pacific provides a publication venue for interdisciplinary work in Pacific studies with the aim of providing informed discussion of contemporary issues in the Pacific Islands region.

Submissions

Submissions must be original works not previously published and not under consideration or scheduled for publication by another publisher. Manuscripts should be 8,000 to 10,000 words, or no more than 40 double-spaced pages, including references. Find submission guidelines here.

The Contemporary Pacific
Volume 31, Issue 1

Philosophy East and West, vol. 68, no. 4 (October 2018)

Philosophy East and West vol. 68, no. 4 includes the following scholarly works:

Ru Meditation: Gao Panlong (1562–1626 C.E.) trans. by Bin Song (review)
by Leah Kalmanson

Knowledge and Power in the Philosophies of Ḥamīd al-Dīn Kirmānī and Mullā Ṣadrā Shirazi by Sayeh Meisami (review)
by Khalil Toussi

Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, Briefe über China (1694-1716): Die Korrespondenz mit Barthélemy Des Bosses S.J. und anderen Mitgliedern des Ordens ed. by Rita Widmaier and Malte-Ludolf Babin (review)
by Eric S. Nelson

Egocentricity and Mysticism: An Anthropological Study by Ernst Tugendhat (review)
by Christian Helmut Wenzel

Rules of Composition: A Mereological Examination of the Dao-You Relation
by Rafał Banka

I am Not a Sage but an Archer: Confucius on Agency and Freedom
by Rina Marie Camus

Zhuangzi’s Knowing-How and Skepticism
by Wai Wai Chiu

In a Double Way: Nāmarūpa in Buddhaghosa’s Phenomenology
by Maria Heim, Chakravarthi Ram-Prasad

Madhyamaka, Metaphysical Realism, and the Possibility of an Ancestral World
by Simon P. James

Self in Nature, Nature in the Lifeworld: A Reinterpretation of Watsuji’s Concept of Fūdo
by David W. Johnson

Huayan Numismatics as Metaphysics: Explicating Fazang’s Coin-Counting Metaphor
by Nicholaos Jones

The Context(s) of “Correct Seeing”: Truth and Fiction in Tibetan Madhyamaka
by Constance Kassor

The Discontents of Moderate Political Confucianism and the Future of Democracy in East Asia
by Zhuoyao Li

The Dao and the Form: Innate Divisions and the Natural Hermeneutics of Plato and Zhuangzi
by Mingjun Lu

The Logic of Not: An Invitation to a Holistic Mode of Thinking from an East Asian Perspective—An Essay in Celebration of Roger Ames on the Occasion of His Retirement
by Shigenori Nagatomo

China’s Particular Values and the Issue of Universal Significance: Contemporary Confucians Amidst the Politics of Universal Values
by Hoyt Cleveland Tillman

Contrasting Nyāya-Vaiśeṣika and Buddhist Explanations of Attention
by Alex Watson

Women on Love: Idealization in the Philosophies of Diotima (The Symposium) and Murasaki Shikibu (The Tale of Genji)
by Sandra A. Wawrytko

An Alternative Way of Confucian Sincerity: Wang Yangming’s “Unity of Knowing and Doing” as a Response to Zhu Xi’s Puzzle of Self-Deception
by Zemian Zheng

Plus book reviews.


About the Journal

Promoting academic literacy on non-Western traditions of philosophy, Philosophy East and West has for over half a century published the highest-quality scholarship that locates these cultures in their relationship to Anglo-American philosophy.

Submissions

The journal welcomes specialized articles in Asian philosophy and articles that seek to illuminate, in a comparative manner, the distinctive characteristics of the various philosophical traditions in the East and West. See the submission guidelines here.

Philosophy East and West 68-4
Philosophy East & West
Volume 68, Issue 4

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Language and Linguistics

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Today, the 6th International Conference on Language Documentation & Conservation (ICLDC), Connecting Communities, Languages & Technology kicked off at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa. The conference features keynote talks, talk story sessions, workshops, papers, and posters. Two of our linguistic journal editors, Language Documentation & Conservation editor Nick Thieberger and Oceanic Linguistics co-editor Daniel Kaufman, are featured in the program.

In 2018, new content from Language Documentation & Conservation, Oceanic Linguistics, and the Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society garnered nearly 11,000 downloads worldwide on both Project MUSE and the University of Hawai‘i’s open access digital repository, ScholarSpace. Find the most downloaded 2018 articles from these three journals below. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Language and Linguistics”

Becoming Brazil: New Fiction, Poetry, and Memoir (MĀNOA 30:2)

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Sebastião Salgado Selected photographs Brazil, 1981–2016
Sebastião Salgado, selected photographs. Brazil, 1981–2016. Salgado is the featured artist in Becoming Brazil.

Becoming Brazil, the newest issue from MĀNOA, brings together prose and poetry by more than two dozen authors, juxtaposing stories of the country’s diverse people in places urban, rural and remote. Depicted in this collection are the machinations of the military in Brasilia during the recent dictatorship; the cultural practices of the caiçara fishermen of Paraty; and the violence that too frequently befalls residents of Brazil’s impoverished favelas. 

While Becoming Brazil was in production, a fire destroyed the Brazilian National Museum, destroying countless artifacts in the world’s largest archive of indigenous Brazilian culture and history. For the team at MĀNOA and guest editors Eric M. B. Becker and Noah Perales-Estoesta, “this volume took on added significance … and became a project in which to represent—through the voices of writers—the resilience of the country’s diverse people, its long history, and what Brazil is still becoming.”

Explore this exciting new issue, including the work of acclaimed Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado. Continue reading “Becoming Brazil: New Fiction, Poetry, and Memoir (MĀNOA 30:2)”

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Religion and Philosophy

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New 2018 content published in our religion and philosophy journals garnered nearly 10,000 downloads worldwide on Project MUSE. Check out the top 10 downloads from quarterly Philosophy East and West, as well as popular articles from related titles. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Religion and Philosophy”

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Asian Studies

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Top downloads of new 2018 content in our Asian Studies journals include articles and reviews from quarterly China Review International and annual Korean Studies, which also publishes early release articles throughout the year. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Asian Studies”

Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Hawai‘i and the Pacific

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New 2018 content published in our Hawai‘i and Pacific journals garnered nearly 7,500 downloads worldwide on both Project MUSE and the University of Hawai‘i’s open access digital repository, Kahualike.

The Contemporary Pacific review of Disney film Moana tops the list, and an article from our new open access Asian/Pacific Island Nursing Journal features in the top 10. Open access Hawaiian language journal Palapala did not publish new content in 2018 but garnered nearly 2,700 downloads on ScholarSpace. Our new title Rapa Nui Journal began publishing early release articles on Project MUSE in late 2018. Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles 2018: Hawai‘i and the Pacific”

Top Downloaded Articles of 2018

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As we head into the new year, we look back on the journal issues published in 2018. Today we’re sharing the 10 most frequently downloaded articles on Project MUSE. Check them out at the links below and sign up for email alerts for new issues in the new year.

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The British Empire and the Suppression of the Slave Trade to Brazil: A Global History Analysis by Tâmis Parron

Beyond Paradise? Retelling Pacific Stories in Disney’s Moana by A Mārata Ketekiri Tamaira and Dionne Fonoti

No-Self in Sāṃkhya: A Comparative Look at Classical Sāṃkhya and Theravāda Buddhism by Douglas Osto Continue reading “Top Downloaded Articles of 2018”

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)

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The December issue of Oceanic Linguistics marks the end of an era. Retiring editor John Lynch, managing editor Byron Bender, and review editor Robert Blust will join the editorial advisory board as a new, international team takes over the helm.

In the final pages of this issue, Lynch writes, “On behalf of the outgoing team, I would like to thank authors for the constant flow of submissions, and for their generous acceptance of decisions that are not always in their favor; and I would like to wish the incoming team all the best for the future of Oceanic Linguistics.” Learn more about the new Oceanic Linguistics team here.

In this issue, Robert Blust remembers Richard Bernard McGinn Jr. (1939-2018), a “scholar who had a lifetime commitment to the Austronesian languages of insular Southeast Asia, a talented fieldworker, a lively and enthusiastic teacher, a skilled administrator and facilitator, a friend and colleague with an irrepressible sense of humor, and a committed social activist in his retirement years.” Continue reading “Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 57, no. 2 (2018)”

Cross-Currents, vol. 7, no. 2 (November 2018)

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 Na Hyesŏk's Kaebyŏk (Pioneer), July 1921. Source: Reprint from the I Am Na Hyesŏk catalogue. Courtesy of the Suwon Museum.
Figure 1 from “Anarchism and Culture in Colonial Korea” by Sunyoung Park this issue. Na Hyesŏk’s Kaebyŏk (Pioneer), July 1921. Source: Reprint from the I Am Na Hyesŏk catalogue. Courtesy of the Suwon Museum.

The new issue of Cross-Currents includes a special section, “Writing Revolution Across Northeast Asia,” guest edited by Steven S. Lee. In his introduction, Lee writes that these articles build on existing scholarship by

“…revisiting Russian and Soviet visions of revolution and their fraught, indelible imprint on China, Japan, and Korea. The Soviet Union of the interwar years was distinct from European powers in its mobilization against Western empire and capitalism. Indeed, Russia itself had long been regarded in the West as semi-Asiatic, whereas its stunning defeat in the Russo-Japanese War had blurred long-standing racial and cultural hierarchies. Soviet-Asian encounters might therefore best be understood as intra-Asian—Russia as an ‘Oriental occident’ that, after 1917, beckoned progressive Asians with calls for socialist internationalism and national self-determination. These encounters contributed to the establishment of communist regimes in China and North Korea but also reveal internationalist paths not taken: ways of thinking across national boundaries even while pursuing national struggles against empire. Continue reading “Cross-Currents, vol. 7, no. 2 (November 2018)”