AAAS Virtual Book Fair

We are pleased to participate in the inaugural AAAS Virtual Book Fair (August 10–14, 2020) organized by the Association for Asian American Studies (AAAS) to highlight recent titles released by university presses, especially ones by AAAS members. With the cancellation of the in-person annual meeting, this virtual event fills the gap to celebrate the fine works published in Asian American and Pacific Islander studies. Here is a selection of our new and recent titles in the field:

Beyond Ethnicity: New Politics of Race in Hawai‘i
Edited by Camilla Fojas, Rudy P. Guevarra Jr., and Nitasha Tamar Sharma

Announcing Open Access for a new Pacific title!

book cover image

University of Hawai‘i Press proudly announces the publication of its first born-digital, open-access monograph: JoAnna Poblete’s Balancing the Tides: Marine Practices in American Sāmoa, now available in both complimentary electronic and for-purchase print formats.

Download an open access copy today!

ScholarSpace
JSTOR 
Project Muse
Internet Archive
Google Books
OAPEN

Also available for purchase in print here.

About the Book
“Poblete’s Balancing the Tides is remarkable for its focus on the impact of U.S. federal policies in American Sāmoa. Whether she is discussing federal minimum wage debates or examining federal fishing regulations, Poblete shows how Americans and Sāmoans alike shape and are shaped by the forceful and sometimes flexible nature of U.S. federal marine-related management in American Sāmoa.” —Keith L. Camacho, UCLA

Balancing the Tides highlights the far-reaching influence of marine practices and policies in the unincorporated territory of American Sāmoa on the local indigenous group, the American fishing industry, U.S. environmental programs, and on global discussions about ecology and indigenous communities. Each chapter of the book highlights a type of ocean-use policy or marine-related practice in American Sāmoa to demonstrate how American colonial efforts to protect natural resources intersect with indigenous adherence to customary principles of respect, reciprocity, and native rights. Poblete’s study ultimately connects the U.S.-American Sāmoa colonial relationship to global overfishing, world consumption patterns, the for-profit fishing industry, international environmental movements and studies, as well as native experiences and indigenous rights.

More information on this project
Balancing the Tides is sophisticated scholarship that investigates timely issues at the forefront of conversations in and outside of the academy,” said UH Press executive editor Masako Ikeda. “This makes it an especially well-suited book for OA; by making electronic copies available for download at no cost, we hope Dr. Poblete’s research about American Sāmoa will be more readily available to the people there, as well as to other important audiences, including policy makers and students.”

The first UH Press title to be released in OA prior to the print edition, Poblete’s book is produced through the Sustainable History Monograph Pilot, an initiative funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that seeks to develop a viable model for publishing high-quality scholarship in OA format by employing new production technologies. “The OA edition of Balancing the Tides is really a landmark event,” said interim director Joel Cosseboom. “It not only sets a precedent for OA publishing at UH Press, but also contributes to our goal of serving indigenous communities throughout the Pacific.”

Other UH Press titles forthcoming from the Sustainable History Monograph Pilot will address the histories of Vietnam, Korea, and Vanuatu. “My hope is that UH Press will soon be able to adopt the new technologies employed by this program to issue more OA publications, especially in Hawaiian and Pacific studies,” said Cosseboom.

The next SHMP title will be Alec Holcombe’s Mass Mobilization in the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, 1945–1960.

Biography Vol. 42 No. 3 (2019)

Figure 3 from “Call My Name: Using Biographical Storytelling to Reconceptualize the History of African Americans at Clemson University” by Rhondda Robinson Thomas: Inventory of Slaves, Fort Hill Farm Deed, 15 May 1854, Thomas Green Clemson Papers, Special Collections and Archives, Clemson University Libraries, box 1, folder 25.

ARTICLES IN THIS ISSUE:

Introduction to Biographic Mediation: On the Uses of Personal Disclosure in Bureaucracy and Politics
Ebony Coletu, guest editor

Biographic Mediation and the Formerly Incarcerated: How Dissembling and Disclosure Counter the Extended Consequences of Criminal Convictions
Michelle Jones

A Complaint Biography
Sara Ahmed

Lives on the Line: An Interview with Aly Wane
Aly Wane interviewed by Ebony Coletu

The Securitate File as a Record of Psuchegraphy
Cristina Plamadeala

“Has someone taken your passport?”: Everyday Surveillance of the Migrant Laborer as Trafficked Subject
Annie Isabel Fukushima

Guidelines for Squatting: Concerned Citizens of North Camden, 1978–1990
Mercy Romero

Frames of Witness: The Kavanaugh Hearings, Survivor Testimony, and #MeToo
Leigh Gilmore

Call My Name: Using Biographical Storytelling to Reconceptualize the History of African Americans at Clemson University
Rhondda Robinson Thomas

Mirror Memoirs: Amita Swadhin on Survivor Storytelling and the Mediation of Rape Culture
Amita Swadhin interviewed by Ebony Coletu

The Consumption of Adoption and Adoptees in American Middlebrow Culture
Kimberly McKee

(Un)Reasonable, (Un)Necessary, and (In)Appropriate: Biographic Mediation of Neurodivergence in Academic Accommodations
Aimée Morrison

About the Journal

For over forty years, Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly has explored the theoretical, generic, historical, and cultural dimensions of life writing.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Unsolicited manuscripts between 2,500 to 7,500 words are welcome. Email inquiries and editorial correspondence to biograph@hawaii.edu.

 

 

Biography:
An Interdisciplinary Quarterly
Vol. 42 No. 3
2019

Hawaiian Journal of History Vol. 53 (2019)

Figure 1 from the article Remembering the Committee of Safety: Identifying the Citizenship, Descent and Occupations of the Men Who Overthrew the Monarchy by Ralph Thomas Kam and Jeffrey K. Lyons: A collage of the Committee of Safety January 1893. Henry E. Cooper, Chairman, (center) Clockwise, starting with the picture directly above the top of the diamond around Cooper: Henry Waterhouse, Lorrin A. Thurston, Ed Suhr, F.W. McChesney, John Emmeluth, Wm. R. Castle, Wm. O. Smith, J.A. McCandless, C. Bolte, W.C. Wilder, Andrew Brown and Theodore F. Lansing. Courtesy Hawaiʻi Archives [PP-28-7-003]

Articles:

The Case of Leslie Satoru Nakashima and His Breaking News Dispatch
Crystal Uchino

Remembering the Committee of Safety: Identifying the Citizenship, Descent and Occupations of the Men Who Overthrew the Monarchy
Ralph Thomas Kam and Jeffrey K. Lyons

The Establishment of Kilauea Military Camp: The Early Years 1898–1921
Jadelyn J. Moniz Nakamura and Geoffrey Mowrer

An Extraordinary Troop: The Boy Scouts Program at Kalaupapa
Fred E. Woods and Anita Manning

“Doing Our Duty”: Dancing, Dating, and the Limits of Tolerance in Wartime Hawaiʻi
Lori Pierce

Notes and Queries: 

“Ea Mai Hawaiʻinuiākea”: Marking the Global Diplomatic Presence of the Nineteenth-century Hawaiian Kingdom
Ronald Williams, Jr.

An Inquiry Into Kawaiahaʻo Seminary’s “Melting Pot” Photograph Published in The National Geographic Magazine in 1924
Tomiko Conner

The Kamehameha III Statue in Thomas Square
John Clark

Father Damien’s First Photograph at Kalaupapa Reveal Its Secrets
Ruben Boon and Patrik Jaspers

Book Reviews:

Hawaiian By Birth: Missionary Children, Bicultural Identity, and U.S. Colonialism in the Pacific
Reviewed by Lori Pierce

Light in the Queen’s Garden: Ida May Pope, Pioneer for Hawaiʻi’s Daughters, 1862–1914
Reviewed by Derek Taira

Return to Kahiki: Native Hawaiians in Oceania
Reviewed by Lorenz Gonschor

Kalaupapa Place Names: Waikolu to Nihoa
Reviewed by Christine Thomas

Sharks upon the Land: Colonialism, Indigenous Health, and Culture in Hawai’i, 1778–1855
Reviewed by Juliet Nebolon

Hawaiiana in 2018: A Bibliography of Titles of Historical Interest
Jodie Mattos

 

About the Journal

Published annually since 1967, the Journal presents original articles on the history of Hawai‘i, Polynesia, and the Pacific area as well as book reviews and an annual bibliography of publications related to Island history. The Hawaiian Historical Society publishes books in both English and Hawaiian, and HJH is a leading peer-reviewed journal that focuses on the history of Native Hawaiians and all other cultures in Hawai‘i during both pre- and post-contact times.

Subscriptions

Individuals may receive the journal by joining the Hawaiian Historical Society.

Submissions

The HJH welcomes scholarly submissions from all writers. See the Guidelines for Contributors.

You can also read more about this issue at the Hawaiian Historical Society’s website.

The Hawaiian Journal of History
Vol. 53
2019

From the Backstage of Publishing: Memories of Milton Murayama

headshot of Milton MurayamaOriginally this post was a way to mark this month’s Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month by sharing personal memories from an editorial perspective of a pioneering Asian American literary icon, Milton Murayama. It has grown to include other remembrances from a marketing perspective. We are all proud to be the publisher of his bestselling novels.

Masako Ikeda, Acquisitions:

I only met Milton Murayama once, at the Asian American studies conference held in Honolulu in 1991. I tagged along with Sharon Yamamoto, who acquired his manuscripts for Five Years on a Rock and then Plantation Boy. Nothing at that meeting was particularly memorable as I sort of stood in the background, but I ended up enjoying serving as his managing editor for those two books. We wrote letters back and forth and continued to do so even as the century changed. Most of the time all he said in his letters was that he wanted to buy copies of his books or he was writing a new book, which wouldn’t be finished for a while.

After Five Years our production department held onto an old computer drive knowing that Milton had not updated his system and refused to do so. Our marketing staff coaxed him a number of times: “Milton, I’ll help you set it all up.” He kept sending me hard copy manuscripts with perforations on both ends along with five-inch floppy disks. The manuscript wasn’t complete so he wanted everything back, including the floppy disks, which he couldn’t find anymore. Right before he sent the 4 books by Murayama, standing upright on deskvery final manuscript, which eventually became Dying in a Strange Land, we had gotten rid of the drive, and there was no way to read his WordPerfect files. I ended up asking our Production staffer to keystroke everything, which she did in three days.

Communication with Milton was always interesting and often a little strange. He’d call to complain about the copy editor who didn’t understand that “Pidgin English doesn’t have ellipses points, or letter spaces in between.” He would also hesitate to say “Okay bye” and hang up the phone, so our conversation would go on for a long time with several seconds of dead silence breaking our talks in the most uncomfortable way.

Milton passed away in July 2016, and I didn’t know it until a month later when we saw the obituary in the Sunday paper. I felt guilty for not staying in touch. I do think of him quite often just as I think about Sharon, his true editor, whose passing was almost fourteen years earlier.

Steven Hirashima, Marketing:

My fondest memories of Milton would be visiting his fudge brown three-story home in the hillside area of Glen Park of San Francisco. Whenever I was in town I would always make a point to book a visit. The ritual was always the same. I would call to say I’m leaving the hotel and heading for the Union Square BART Station. Once at Glen Park, I would call to say I arrived and no more than five minutes later Milton would arrive in his old Toyota and we would head up the steep and winding road to his “retreat in the hills.”

5 people, including Murayama and wife Dawn, wearing lei.
L to R: Steven Hirashima, Marie Hara, Milton Murayama, Dawn Murayama, Carol Abe after the “Revisiting Murayama” presentation, November 2008.

Overlooking the flatlands of the city with Candlestick Park and SFO to the west, I would always be given a tour as to what was updated or repurposed around the house since my last visit (the actor Lou Diamond Phillips’s childhood family had been a previous neighbor), from a newly reapportioned sunroom downstairs to a section outside with a bed of spring flowers to Milton’s designated writing room where tucked in a corner would be his antique word processor (a Commodore 64), which I almost convinced him to ditch in favor of a newfangled Mac but he never wavered and remained forever faithful to his trusty machine.

Any trip to the Murayamas would invariably end in the kitchen where Milton and Dawn were the most gracious of hosts. We would often gather around the large formal dinner table for spirited conversation from his next book project or his time in the 442nd, feasting on a bowl of delicious Alaskan King crab legs and steamed garlic brussels sprouts, masterfully prepared by Milton only minutes before. Looking back, they were wonderful and precious times. How I long for another afternoon with Milton. Until then, God Speed and Aloha.

Carol Abe, Marketing:

My very first encounter with Milton was in 1975, the year his original edition of All I Asking for Is My Body published, the green one with the bamboo forest on the cover and an overly large “$3” printed on the back All 5 of Murayama's books, surrounded by clippings and letterscover. He and wife Dawn lined up signings at Honolulu Book Shops, at which I was a bookstore clerk (we weren’t called “booksellers” until twenty years later). Of course I bought a copy with my generous employee discount and had it signed, but didn’t otherwise have a personal connection to him. Jump to 2008: I’d been at UH Press for ten years and we released Milton’s fourth and final novel in his tetralogy about the Oyama family. Steve Hirashima had switched to managing our Asian studies list and I did the same for our Hawai‘i, Pacific, and Asian American titles.

Dying in a Strange Land had a pub date of June but Milton called and said he would wait to visit in the fall, when it’d be cooler, and he only wanted to do low-key promotion of a few bookstore signings. Then, as now, the Press had no travel funds to support a book tour anyway. He finally decided November would be a good time to come and would do Maui and O‘ahu signings, but no readings or talks. So I booked a combination of Barnes & Noble and Borders stores that followed his wishes and filled his itinerary. We corresponded by snail mail and exchanged letters. In one of these, Milton revealed some of the real-life equivalents to the characters in his books. He wrote, “There’s more fact than fiction in my stories.”

After a fan of his scolded me for not paying for his travel and doing him justice, a series of serendipitous things happened that culminated in an event more befitting of a literary icon, “Revisiting Murayama: From Plantation to Diaspora.” Gary Pak, as it happened, had videotaped an interview with Milton that he still needed to screen; the amazing Marie Hara agreed to be co-organizer and was a conduit to both UHM English department and Bamboo Ridge; Craig Howes put me in touch with Phyllis 3 books opened to page showing author signed the bookLook, who had directed a play of All I Asking. The program developed further by recruiting Arnold Hiura, Lee Cataluna, and one of our student employees, Tricia Tolentino, all tied together with Steve as emcee. (And, by rolling the dice, we obtained funding from SEED and Hawai‘i Council for the Humanities, including an honorarium for Milton.)

During their visit, I had chauffeured Milton and Dawn to four or five appearances, perhaps being a bit manic in my driving. At the end, I asked Milton to sign my copy of Dying in a Strange Land. We all laughed warmly as I read his inscription: “It’s been fun getting to know you. I love smart flaky women, who’re also good drivers.” It was my honor and pleasure to have been a tiny part of his life.

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Each of Milton’s novels can be read separately and not in sequence. Dying in a Strange Land is on sale now, at a very special price—click here to order.

Samuel Hideo Yamashita on the “Japanese Turn” and Hawaii Regional Cuisine

Five people after library talk, including Samuel Yamashita and Roy Yamaguchi, with librarians
(L to R) Tokiko Bazzell, Monica Ghosh, Mire Koikari, Samuel Yamashita, Roy Yamaguchi

Pomona College history professor Samuel Yamashita‘s lecture on what he calls the “Japanese Turn” in fine dining drew a full house to University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa Hamilton Library last week (April 17). Audience members included well-known chef Roy Yamaguchi, who was part of this “turn” during his years in Los Angeles when he pioneered Euro-Asian cuisine. As a tie-in, advance copies and flyers were displayed of Professor Yamashita’s cover of book, Hawaii Regional Cuisinenew UH Press book, HAWAI‘I REGIONAL CUISINE: The Food Movement That Changed the Way Hawai‘i Eats. His talk was related to the library’s exhibit by Japan collection librarian Tokiko Bazzell, “Washoku: Japanese Foods & Flavors,” Yamashita next to Washoku displaywhich is on display until May 27 in Hamilton Library’s First Floor Elevator Gallery.

Read the wonderfully comprehensive information and view more photos on the event here. Yamashita will be returning to Honolulu in mid-July to launch Hawai‘i Regional Cuisine; meanwhile, order the book here. If you would like to be notified of the July events, contact Carol Abe in the UH Press marketing department. Mahalo to the UH Libraries and other sponsors for hosting Professor Yamashita during his UH Mānoa visit: UHM Center for Japanese Studies, UHM Department of American Studies, UHM Department of Women’s Studies, Kapi‘olani Community College, and UHM Student Equity, Excellence and Diversity (SEED).

Dubious Gastronomy: The Cultural Politics of Eating Asian in the USA

Ku-Dubious GastronomyDubious Gastronomy is the inaugural title in the Food in Asia and the Pacific series—

California roll, Chinese take-out, American-made kimchi, dogmeat, monosodium glutamate, SPAM—all are examples of what Robert Ji-Song Ku calls “dubious” foods. Strongly associated with Asian and Asian American gastronomy, they are commonly understood as ersatz, depraved, or simply bad. In Dubious Gastronomy, Ku contends that these foods are viewed similarly to Asians in the United States, in that the Asian presence, be it culinary or corporeal, is often considered watered-down, counterfeit, or debased manifestations of the “real thing.” The American expression of Asianness is defined as doubly inauthentic—as insufficiently Asian and unreliably American when measured against a largely ideological if not entirely political standard of authentic Asia and America.

In critically considering the impure and hybridized with serious and often whimsical intent, he argues that while the notion of cultural authenticity is troubled, troubling, and troublesome, the apocryphal is not necessarily a bad thing: The dubious can be and is often quite delicious.

Profile of Jazz Artist Gabe Baltazar Airs on Voice of America

The Paul Togawa Quartet, circa late 1950s.
The Paul Togawa Quartet, circa late 1950s. L to R: Gabe Baltazar, Paul Togawa, Dick Johnston, Buddy Woodson.

Broadcast journalist Heidi Chang‘s story on Gabe Baltazar Jr. as a pioneering Asian American jazz musician aired internationally on Voice of America. The show is archived on the VOA website; click here to read and listen (and comment!). It reveals just a sampling of what is in Gabe’s autobiography, If It Swings, It’s Music.

An American Girl in the Hawaiian Islands Earns AAUP Outstanding Rating

Each year the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) compiles its University Press Books for Public and Secondary Schools Libraries, a bibliography of titles submitted by member presses as a tool for collection development. The books are rated by committees of public and secondary-school librarians from two divisions of the American Library Association.

An American Girl in the Hawaiian IslandsIn this year’s collection, An American Girl in the Hawaiian Islands: Letters of Carrie Prudence Winter, 1890–1893, edited by Sandra Bonura and Deborah Day, received a top “Outstanding” rating. As defined by the selection process, Outstanding titles have “exceptional editorial content and subject matter. They are essential additions to most library collections.”

The reviewer’s comments below can be viewed at the end of the listing (sorted by Dewey Decimal class) of the 2013 Outstanding Titles.

The use of Carrie Prudence Winter’s original letters is what allows this book to become a rare primary source on topics such as: women missionaries, the last days of Hawaii’s monarchy, and a long-distance 19th century courtship. Ms. Winter’s use of language paints a compelling picture, engaging a reader’s imagination while they learn of a world few knew so intimately.”—Stacey Hayman (CODES/RUSA)

Besides being available online, the print bibliography was distributed last month at the American Library Association annual conference in Chicago. General information on the bibliography and rating system, as well as how to order copies, can be found here.

An American Girl in the Hawaiian Islands also was one of three finalists in the biography category of this year’s San Diego Book Awards.

Student Migration and the Remaking of Asian America

Transpacific ArticulationsIn 1854 Yung Wing, who graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Yale University, returned to a poverty-stricken China, where domestic revolt and foreign invasion were shaking the Chinese empire. Inspired by the U.S. and its liberal education, Yung believed that having more Chinese students educated there was the only way to bring reform to China. Since then, generations of students from China—and other Asian countries—have embarked on this transpacific voyage in search of modernity. What forces have shaped Asian student migration to the U.S.? What impact do foreign students have on the formation of Asian America? How do we grasp the meaning of this transpacific subject in and out of Asian American history and culture? Transpacific Articulations: Student Migration and the Remaking of Asian America, by Chih-ming Wang explores these questions in the crossings of Asian culture and American history.

“Wang’s incisive scholarship urges us to rethink the contours of ‘Asian America’ through a sophisticated analysis of ‘foreign students’ as transpacific subjects. By examining the transnational subjectivities and alliances that have been at the center of Asian America since its beginnings, Wang’s analysis helps to move beyond a dichotomous view of diasporism and nationalism. With a historian’s hand reaching deep into the archives and a literary scholar’s sophisticated eyes and ears for language, Wang presents a nuanced analysis of various forms of ‘translation’—linguistic, cultural, psychosocial, political—by foreign students that in turn shaped the ideals and struggles of the Asian American movement. —Mari Yoshihara, professor, Department of American Studies, University of Hawai`i at Mānoa

June 2013 / ISBN 978-0-8248-3642-9 / $46.00 (CLOTH)

UH Press at the Association for Asian American Studies Annual Conference, April 17-20, Seattle

AAAS Annual ConferenceUniversity of Hawai‘i Press will be exhibiting at the Association for Asian American Studies Annual Conference, April 17-20, at the Westin Seattle Hotel in downtown Seattle.

Editor Masako Ikeda will be attending. Please visit us in the exhibit hall, where we will be offering a 20% discount and free shipping in the U.S. (Free shipping applies only to orders placed at the conference.)

See you in Seattle!

Hmong Americans in the Twenty-First Century

Diversity in DiasporaDiversity in Diaspora: Hmong Americans in the Twenty-First Century, edited by Mark Edward Pfeifer, Monica Chiu, and Kou Yang, wrestles with Hmong Americans’ inclusion into and contributions to Asian American studies, as well as to American history and culture and refugee, immigrant, and diasporic trajectories. It negotiates both Hmong American political and cultural citizenship, meticulously rewriting the established view of the Hmong as “new” Asian neighbors—an approach articulated, Hollywood style, in Clint Eastwood’s film Gran Torino. The collection boldly moves Hmong American studies away from its usual groove of refugee recapitulation that entrenches Hmong Americans points-of-origin and acculturation studies rather than propelling the field into other exciting academic avenues.

Following a summary of more than three decades’ of Hmong American experience and a demographic overview, chapters investigate the causes of and solutions to socioeconomic immobility in the Hmong American community and political and civic activism, including Hmong American electoral participation and its affects on policymaking. The influence of Hmong culture on young men is examined, followed by profiles of female Hmong leaders who discuss the challenges they face and interviews with aging Hmong Americans. A section on arts and literature looks at the continuing relevance of oral tradition to Hmong Americans’ successful navigation in the diaspora, similarities between rap and kwv txhiaj (unrehearsed, sung poetry), and Kao Kalia Yang’s memoir, The Latehomecomer. The final chapter addresses the lay of the land in Hmong American studies, constituting a comprehensive literature review.

January 2013 / ISBN 978-0-8248-3597-2 / $60.00 (CLOTH)