Three International Journals Celebrate 30th Anniversary

(HONOLULU, Hawai‘i)  The University of Hawai‘i Press celebrates the 30th Anniversary for three influential university-based journals—The Contemporary Pacific, Journal of World History, and Mānoa—in collaboration with the Center for Pacific Island Studies, Department of History, and the Department of English at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa.

In the past three decades, these journals have attracted a growing, global audience for more than 6,300 articles read in over 170 countries. The Journal of World History served as a pioneer in the field of world history and continues to publish quality peer-reviewed articles and special issues quarterly. Research published in The Contemporary Pacific has shaped an entire field of Pacific Studies and has often demonstrated foresight and long-lasting relevance. Indeed, the journal kicked off its first issue in 1989 with an article on the potential impacts of climate change in the Pacific. Also among the journal’s most cited pieces are features published in its political reviews section which document the local and regional politics of Pacific Islands states. Mānoa brings to light new translations of international literature, highlighting the work of both emerging and established translators and authors, including Pulitzer Prize winners and Nobel laureates. In 2018 alone, works from the three journals garnered more than one-quarter million downloads.  

The journals were founded in 1989 in response to the university president’s call to expand the journals published by UH Press. “Since being awarded the modest, three-year start-up funding, these journals now annually reach tens of thousands of researchers, scholars, students, and the general public,” said Joel Cosseboom, Interim Press Director & Publisher.

A special celebration was held at College Hill on March 13, commemorating the 30th anniversary of their founding. Learn more about The Contemporary Pacific, Journal of World History, and Mānoa below and at www.uhpress.hawaii.edu/journals.

The Contemporary Pacific: A Journal of Island Affairs, edited by Alexander Mawyer

ISSN: 1043-898X  / E-ISSN: 1527-9464  Published twice a year.

Founding Editorial Team: Robert Kiste, Terence Wesley-Smith, David Hanlon, Brij Lal and Linley Chapman. Awarded Best New Journal (1990) from the Association of American Publishers. The journal editorial office is supported by the Center for Pacific Island Studies.

The journal covers a wide range of disciplines with the aim of providing comprehensive coverage of contemporary developments in the entire Pacific Islands region, including Melanesia, Micronesia, and Polynesia. It features refereed, readable articles that examine social, economic, political, ecological, and cultural topics, along with political reviews, book and media reviews, resource reviews, and a dialogue section with interviews and short essays. Each issue highlights the work of a Pacific Islander artist.

The Journal of World History: Official Journal of the World History Association, with editor-in-chief Fabio López Lázaro

ISSN: 1045-6007 / E-ISSN: 1527-8050  Published quarterly.

Founding Editor, Jerry Bentley with Imre Bard as Book Review Editor. Awarded Best New Journal (1990) from the Council of Editors of Learned Journals. The journal editorial office is supported by the Department of History.

JWH publishes research into historical questions requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. It is devoted to the study of phenomena that transcend the boundaries of single states, regions, or cultures, such as large-scale population movements, long-distance trade, cross-cultural technology transfers, and the transnational spread of ideas. Individual subscription is by membership in the World History Association.

Mānoa: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, edited by Frank Stewart

ISSN: 1045-7909 / E-ISSN: 1527-943X Published twice a year.

Founding Editors, Frank Stewart and Robert Shapard.  Works in MĀNOA have been cited for excellence by the editors of such anthologies as Best American Short Stories, Best American Poetry, Best American Essays, Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards, and Pushcart Prize. The journal editorial office is supported by the Department of English.

Mānoa is a unique, award-winning literary journal that includes American and international fiction, poetry, artwork, and essays of current cultural or literary interest. An outstanding feature of each issue is original translations of contemporary work from Asian and Pacific nations, selected for each issue by a special guest editor. Beautifully produced, Mānoa presents traditional alongside contemporary writings from the entire Pacific Rim, one of the world’s most dynamic literary regions.

University of Hawai‘i Press

The University of Hawai‘i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. It strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai‘i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications, the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

UH Press is a member of the Association of University Presses and the Hawai‘i Book Publishers Association. The Press has also partnered with museums and associations to bring new or out-of-print titles into circulation, and offers publishing services for authors and partnering organizations.

News Release Date: March 19, 2019
Media contact: Pamela Wilson, Journals Manager
Pwilson6@hawaii.edu 808-956-6790

Call for Papers: Rapa Nui Journal

Edited by Dr. Mara A. Mulrooney, Director of Cultural Resources, Bishop Museum

The Rapa Nui Journal (RNJ) is the official, peer-reviewed journal, of the Easter Island Foundation (EIF). The journal serves as a forum for interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities and social sciences on Easter Island and the Eastern Polynesian region. Each issue may include Research Articles, Research Reports, Commentaries or Dialogues, Book or Media Reviews and EIF News.

rnj_cover
Cover Image courtesy of:
© Stephen, Jesse W. (2005, July 28). The Traveling Moai [At Tongariki near Rano Raraku, Rapa Nui].
RNJ is published twice a year and welcomes contributions from a wide range of social, cultural, indigenous and historical disciplines on topics related to the lives and cultures of the peoples of Rapa Nui and Eastern Polynesia. Abstracts for articles may be published in English, Spanish, and Rapanui. We welcome submissions from scholars across Oceania, North and South America, and beyond.

File Format and Manuscript structure
Article manuscripts are peer-reviewed, and should be 3000 to 9000 words in length. Reports, Reviews and commentaries are not peer-reviewed, and should be 1000 to 6000 words in length.

Manuscripts should be double-spaced with margins of at least 1 inch (2.5 cm) on each side, and submitted as a single Microsoft Word (or similar) file with the following structure:

  1. Article title
  2. Author’s name(s) and contact details for publication
  3. Abstract
  4. Keywords 3-6
  5. Text
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. References
  8. Figures with captions
  9. Tables with captions

Manuscripts should be submitted online.  You may review journal policies and author guidelines on the journal submission site.

Please send inquiries to the Rapa Nui Journal editor at (rapanuijournal@gmail.com).

Subscribe to Rapa Nui Journal through UH Press or browse full-text issues online .

 

Call for Nominations: 2018 Biography Prize

The editors of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have announced their call for nominations for the 2018 Biography Prize, which is awarded to an UH Mānoa graduate student who demonstrates excellency in life writing.

The Biography Prize winner receives a monetary award and is invited to give a presentation in the Brown Bag Biography lecture series.

NOMINATION DEADLINE

Nominations–which should include the student’s name, contact information, and project title–are due to biograph@hawaii.edu by Monday, April 16.

Once nominations are received, the Center for Biographical Research will notify the student to arrange for submission of the project. Candidates may also nominate their own work for the award.

Some candidates will be working on their manuscripts well into April, and this will not be a problem so long as they are able to submit their work by the April 16 deadline.

CRITERIA FOR NOMINATION

  1. The candidate should be a PhD or MA student in any graduate department of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (or have graduated with an MA or PhD in December 2017).

  2. The submission can be work that is written for a class, that is a section of a thesis or dissertation, or that is the completed thesis or dissertation. If written for a class, it should be work completed between May 2017 and May 2018 (and not previously submitted for a Biography Prize).

The project should focus on or intersect with any aspect of life writing theory, history, or practice in any medium and discipline

The project should be at least 3,000 to 10,000 words in length: longer projects can be submitted in their entirety, with a particular chapter or section highlighted for consideration. The work should demonstrate knowledge or awareness of central debates and theorizing in the field and study of life writing.

See flyer below or visit CBR’s Facebook page for more details.

Biography Prize 2018 Announcement


Read Biography archives at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about Biography new issues from Project MUSE

 

Spring 2018 Biography Brown Bag Series

The editors of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly and directors of the Center for Biographical Research at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have released their Spring 2018 schedule of Biography Brown Bags.

If you’re in Hawai’i, mark your calendars and BYOL (bring your own lunch) to these exciting discussions about life writing. Unless otherwise noted, the following brown bags are held from noon to 1:15 p.m. Thursdays in Kuykendall Room 409-A at UH Mānoa. Click here for visitor parking information.

February 1: “Themes in the Narratives by Escapees from the Holocaust in WWII Italy.”
Luciano Minerbi, Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning, UH-Mānoa

February 8: “Constructing Post-Soviet Stardom: Auteur and the state in the case of Renata Litvinova.” Olga Mukhortova, Languages and Literatures of Europe and the Americas, UH Mānoa

February 15: “Writing With Not About: Constellating Stories in Auto-ethnography.”
John Gagnon, Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa

February 22: “Masters of the Currents: Theater, Community, and Social Change.”
Leilani Chan and Ova Saopeng, TeAda Productions

March 1*: “Island Soldiers: Living with Militarization in Micronesia.” Pacific Island Student Panel co-organized by the Marianas Club, for Mes Chamoru and Nuclear Remembrance Day. Moderated by Craig Santos Perez.
*This session will be held in Kuykendall Room 410

March 8: “Hulahula and Learn Something: Expressing Culture and Science.” Kiana Frank, Pacific Biosciences Research Center, UH-Mānoa

March 15: “Selling It Like It Is: The Value of Narrative in Business and Policy.” Amanda Rothschild, Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning, UH-Mānoa

March 22: “An Introduction to the Jon Van Dyke Archive at the UHM Law Library.” Ellen-Rae Cachola, William S. Richardson School of Law, UH-Mānoa

April 5: “Losing Don Belton: Meditations on Friendship, Murder, and Race, and the Ethics of Life Writing.” Mara Miller, Visiting Scholar with the Center for Biographical Research and Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa

April 12: “Al Harrington: Reflections on Genealogy, Acting, and a Polynesian Revue.” Al Harrington, Educator, Actor, and Entertainer

April 19: “Filling the Void: Creating Playing Space for Today’s Pacific Islander.”
Kiki Rivera, Dept. of Theatre and Dance, UH-Mānoa

Apr 26*: “Exploring the Vā in the Oral Sharing of Poetry.” Grace Teuila Taylor, Visiting Writer in Residence, Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa
*This session will be held in Kuykendall Room 410

See flyer below or visit CBR’s Facebook page for more details.

Spring 2018 Biography Brown Bag Flyer


Read Biography archives at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about Biography new issues from Project MUSE

 

Interview: The Contemporary Pacific editor Alexander Mawyer

Alexander Mawyer‘s passion for Pacific Island studies is contagious​, and has led him to a prolific career in Hawai`i and abroad​. As a graduate of the University of Hawai`i at Mānoa and the University of Chicago, he has conducted research with the Mangarevan community in the Gambier and Society Islands of French Polynesia. He has also served as coeditor of Varua Tupu: New Writing from French Polynesia and contributed a chapter for the UH Press volume At Home and in the Field: Ethnographic Encounters in Asia and the Pacific Islands. As an associate professor, he has worked on research involving the languages of Eastern Polynesia and sovereignty issues, and has served as co-director of the Biocultural Initiative of the Pacific in Oceania at UH Mānoa. With Mawyer now at the helm as editor upon its 30th anniversary, and with the launch of a new website for the journal, we asked him to share his approach to gleaning and organizing the content for The Contemporary Pacific

Photo on 1-18-18 at 11.37 AM

What led you to become an editor in this field?

What a striking question! You make me think of Borges’s garden of forking paths, wherein stories ramify, intersect, cross over and back, and all paths turn out to have many beginnings and few, if any, evident ends . . . still a few thoughts come to mind. In the summer after college, I found myself in Honolulu and, among other things, volunteering as an editorial assistant for MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, which Frank Stewart and Robbie (Robert) Shapard had founded some years earlier.

Looking back, that was a serendipitous moment. Still in its first decade, I happened to be present while MĀNOA was coming into its own with growing national and international recognition. I got to know passionately committed local thinkers and writers such as Mahealani Dudoit, who founded ‘Oiwi: A Native Hawaiian Journal in 1999 and who was very often in MĀNOA’s offices in those years. I was trained as an editorial assistant and later as assistant to the managing editor by the inimitable and formidable Pat Matsueda. Frank, Pat, Mahealani, and others on the staff and around at the time were inspiring for their commitment to the ethical imagination and the transformative potential of the inked page.

At some point during my first months with MĀNOA, Frank asked me to write a review of Vilsoni Hereniko’s then freshly published Woven Gods. Vili, a professor at the Center for Pacific Islands Studies, had just edited an issue of MĀNOA dedicated to Oceanic and Pacific Islander writers and writing. At the time, this literary space was almost entirely out of view for those not themselves seizing the pen in home islands and communities. I suppose my review was not a complete disaster since Frank suggested that Vili would enjoy lunching and chatting about my review. As I discovered, Vili’s scholarly spirit expands to fill whatever space he’s in and, somehow, by the end of that lunch he had more or less talked me into doing an MA in Pacific Islands Studies.

A year later, after my MA, I moved to Chicago for my doctorate and did not imagine (and, I think, could not have imagined) that I would ever have the privilege of serving as the editor of The Contemporary Pacific. I am confident that any number of other more recent experiences could be identified as part of the story-garden for how I came to take on this editorship. But in retrospect, I’m struck by how early career experiences play out over years, by how unexpectedly paths cross and re-cross, and by how the kindness of intellectual and professional mentorship was a planting that continues to flower and bear fruit.

Each issue includes a Political Reviews section. Tell us about the section appearing in vol. 30, no. 1.

Our Political Reviews alternate between issues in which they are devoted to the countries, territories, and states of Polynesia and Micronesia, and issues in which the reviews are devoted to those of Melanesia. The Political Reviews section that includes the reviews of our Melanesian neighbors also includes a single review of the region as a whole over the course of the preceding year. vol. 30, no. 1, features Micronesia in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017 with reviews of the Federated States of Micronesia (by Clement Yow Mulalap), Guam (by Michael Lujan Bevacqua and Elizabeth Ua Ceallaigh Bowman), and the Marshall Islands (by Monica C Labriola), and Polynesia in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 2016 to 30 June 2017 with reviews of French Polynesia (by Lorenz Gonschor), Hawai‘i (by ‘Umi Perkins), Māori issues (by Margaret Mutu), Norfolk Island (by Chris Nobbs), Pitcairn Island (by Peter Clegg), Rapa Nui (by Forrest Wade Young), and Tonga (by Steven Ratuva).

These reviews are among our most used and cited pieces over many years. There is really nothing like them published elsewhere and their value is non-diminishing in time. Actually, it seems to me that their value is only increasing, given how poor our individual and collective powers of memory are and how, with each subsequent review, year after year, for each Pacific Islands country or territory, this islands’-eye-view of the political ebb and flow becomes ever richer as a record of the volutions and convolutions of local politics.

What have I learned in the most recent issue? Oceanic politics are wonderfully local but islands are, always were, also global, and the butterfly winds disturbing wildflowers in the continental distances are not always soothing breezes when they arrive in Pacific places. Similarly, the stirrings of regional leviathans touch lives within, across, and far beyond Pasifika communities.

TCP also carries its fair share of reviews, from media to books. Do you have any advice for reviewers interested in writing for your journal?

We do! I actually served as reviews editor for a number of years and regularly try to inculcate in my graduate students a sense of the value of the review literature to their present and future scholarly practice. Advice for potential reviewers? If a recent volume (or film or exhibition) with geographical placedness in Oceania emerges for which one feels a sufficiency of expertise to review, please feel free to reach out to suggest the possibility!

We are always looking for new reviewers, especially graduate students for whom reviews are a wonderful way of cutting teeth on the publication process, professionalizing one’s writing craft, and pushing back against the spirit-bruising isolation of the mind with which many scholars are all too familiar.

Beyond that, I’m often struck by how difficult it can be for reviewers to keep in mind the review genre’s trinity-like nature. Impactful, timeless, and productive reviews usually seem to have something of the quality of reflecting the reviewer’s irreducibly individual, personal take on the work, as well as reflecting the way the work is positioned within relevant literatures, within the already-existing conversation around the relevant empirical or conceptual material, as well as reflecting the way the work is positioned with respect to Pacific Studies or to the region.

Great reviews are individual, collective, and worldly and often reflect wildly productive tensions between these different commentary-domains.

Sculpture by Maika'i Tubbs

“Homegrown, Green #1,” by Maika’i Tubbs, the featured artist in vol. 30, no. 1. Push pins, plastic plates, forks, wood, 5″ x 11.5″ x 3″. Photo courtesy of the artist. From the issue: “This work is one of a series of miniature trees Tubbs made from office supplies while thinking about the way we may yearn for nature, try to control it, and sometimes force it to dwell in places we do not wish to be.”

The Contemporary Pacific recently introduced a new website. What can readers find there?

Super of you to notice this too! Strangely, we’ve not ever had a website before that was dedicated solely to TCP. In the last six months we have developed an SMS strategy and have a website, Facebook page, and Twitter feed. Our goals were not over-ambitious. We wanted to make it easier for the journal to be perceived as an integral whole, particularly now in our 30th anniversary year! We wanted to promote the visibility of current, future, and recent numbers, as well as issues from deeper in time. We have a classic article of the month, highlight past featured artists, and make it easy to search for particular authors or by keywords. Although it’s only been online for a couple of months so far, we’re already thinking about how the site might further develop, including better tools for potential authors!

Click here to view our new website.

What work are you most proud of since joining The Contemporary Pacific?

I suppose every institution is a bit like Theseus’s ship, in a state of constant self-becoming through renewal. Nevertheless, TCP is in a period of striking transitions. Robert (Bob) Kiste, former director for the Center for Pacific Islands Studies, and who really was the motivating force behind the journal’s founding, recently passed away, as did long-time board member Ben Finney, who was well-known for his role in the vitalization of Polynesian voyaging. Some cherished colleagues who have been key in the journal’s direction and management have recently left the board to take on remarkable new positions, such as Maenette K. P. Ah Nee-Benham, previously Dean of the Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge and now Chancellor of the University of Hawai‘i—West O‘ahu, while others are anticipating retirement in the coming semesters. So, over most of my tenure as Editor we’ve been working behind the scenes to think about the bones, ligaments, and tendons of the journal—timelines, guidelines, frameworks and scaffolds for the editorial process, supports for authors, and the needs of readers and our regional communities. While perhaps not visible in any recent issues’ pages, all of this work is intended to insure that the journal’s next 30 years have the opportunity to be as rich and impactful as the prior 30. As part of this work, we’ve recently given the journal, and its current and past issues, an online presence. This was wildly overdue! I’m proud of these ongoing initiatives oriented towards the journal’s foundations and imagined futures.

What’s next for The Contemporary Pacific?

Well, the first thing that comes to mind is the old quip that time is a scythe, certainly true for plans and expectations. I hesitate to prognosticate too far into the future. Still, we do have wonderful work lined up for the next several issues. Currently we are well into preparation of a special issue titled Possessing Paradise, guest-edited by Siobhan McDonnell and Kalissa Alexeyeff. Featuring diverse approaches to and examinations of the ways in which ideas of ‘paradise’ are brought to bear on Oceania’s peoples and insular places, we hope the issue (TCP 30:2) will be an impactful return and fresh engagement with this persistent trope.

Further out on the horizon, we have recent submissions on experiences of Oceanic environments and conservation needs, about which I am personally very excited. As I mentioned above, 2018 is TCP’s 30th anniversary year. In fall 2018, we will reach 60 numbers in print! We are looking forward to some sort of celebratory event during that semester and hope many in the community will join us! Please do!


To receive an email when new issues of The Contemporary Pacific publish online, click here to sign up at Project MUSE.


00_30.1 cover_FINAL_RGBAbout the Journal

The Contemporary Pacific provides a publication venue for interdisciplinary work in Pacific studies with the aim of providing informed discussion of contemporary issues in the Pacific Islands region.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Submissions must be original works not previously published and not under consideration or scheduled for publication by another publisher. Manuscripts should be 8,000 to 10,000 words, or no more than 40 double-spaced pages, including references. Find submission guidelines here.

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 30 no. 1 (2018)

Artwork by Maika'i Tubbs, featured in this issue
Next Show in Fifteen Minutes, by Maika’i Tubbs, 2008. The Hawaiians (1970 book by authors Gavan Daws and Ed Sheehan and photographer Robert B Goodman), 15″ x 10″ x 8″. Photo courtesy of the artist. Next Show in Fifteen Minutes is a performance that looks at stereotypical depictions of Native Hawaiians and expectations sometimes placed on them to perform “on command.” In this performance, Tubbs picks up a book from a pedestal, opens it, and folds the pages into a circus tent while singing in Hawaiian. He then unfolds the pages, closes the book, and repeats the performance after fifteen minutes.

This issue of The Contemporary Pacific includes a scholarly resource from the University of Hawai’i at Mānoa Library for “Making Pacific Languages Discoverable;” political reviews covering Polynesia and Micronesia; the work of artist and UH Mānoa grad Maika’i Tubbs; and the following articles and media reviews:

Articles

Book and Media Reviews


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


00_30.1 cover_FINAL_RGBAbout the Journal

The Contemporary Pacific provides a publication venue for interdisciplinary work in Pacific studies with the aim of providing informed discussion of contemporary issues in the Pacific Islands region.

Subscriptions

Single issue sales and annual subscriptions for both individuals and institutions available here.

Submissions

Submissions must be original works not previously published and not under consideration or scheduled for publication by another publisher. Manuscripts should be 8,000 to 10,000 words, or no more than 40 double-spaced pages, including references. Find submission guidelines here.

Mountain/Home: New Translations from Japan (MĀNOA 29:2)

"Mount Fuji in the Spring." Norikane Hiroto. Etching, 1997.
“Mount Fuji in the Spring.” Norikane Hiroto. Etching, 1997. Gift of Philip H. Roach Jr., 2010 (31780). Courtesy of Honolulu Museum of Art.

The new issue of MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, volume 29 number 2, is a collection of Japanese literature in translation edited by Leza Lowitz and Frank Stewart.

From the editors:

Mountain/Home presents new translations of selected Japanese works from the medieval period to the present. The volume opens with traditional folktales, court poetry, Edo Period poetry, and contemporary fiction—all from “One Hundred Literary Views of Mount Fuji,” a collection of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction related to Japan’s national symbol. The works reveal how Japanese attitudes toward Mount Fuji have changed over time, particularly after the country was opened to the West in the nineteenth century.

Table of Contents

One Hundred Literary Views of Mount Fuji: Mount Fuji has been celebrated by poets, novelists, and playwrights for almost 1,500 years, from Japan’s earliest literary works to the present. Peter MacMillan provides these translations and introductions.

  • The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter: Taketori Monogataria tenth-century tale, recounts the origin of Mount Fuji’s name and is one of the earliest examples of Japanese literary fiction.
  • Love Song and Reply: These poems are from the Gosen Wakashū, a major tenth-century anthology of Japanese poetry. Many of the waka in the collection are “dialogue poems,” written in pairs by men and women of the court, speaking the cloaked language of secret love affairs, seductions, and laments.
  • from The Confessions of Lady Nijo: Lost for over six hundred years, Lady Nijo’s manuscript was discovered by a Japanese scholar in the Imperial Library in 1940.
  • A Tale of a Mount Fuji Cave: This story from the Kamakura Period tells of a journey to the mouth of hell and back.
  • Two Haiku by Matsuo Bashō: His poetry broke from the decadent style of the time, finding instead a resonance with nature, simplicity, spontaneity, and originality.
  • Sanshirō: In this excerpt from Natsume Soseki’s 1908 coming-of-age novel, the protagonist, Ogawa Sanshiro, is twenty-three years old.

Continue reading “Mountain/Home: New Translations from Japan (MĀNOA 29:2)”

UH Press Open-Access Journals

OAlogo

In celebration of #OpenAccessWeek, October 23-29, 2017, we’re proud to share a round-up of open-access (OA) journals and OA journal archives published by University of Hawai`i Press. Mahalo to our sponsors, editors, and researchers for making these publications possible and freely available to the public.

UH Press Open-Access Journals

Language Documentation & Conservation

Language Documentation & Conservation (LD&C) is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal sponsored by the National Foreign Language Resource Center and published exclusively in electronic format by the UH Press. The journal is hosted on LD&C’s website.

LD&C publishes papers on all topics related to language documentation and conservation, including, but not limited to, the goals of language documentation, data management, fieldwork methods, ethical issues, orthography design, reference grammar design, lexicography, methods of assessing ethnolinguistic vitality, biocultural diversity, archiving matters, language planning, areal survey reports, short field reports on endangered or underdocumented languages, reports on language maintenance, preservation, and revitalization efforts, plus reviews of software, hardware, books, and data collections.

LD&C publishes one volume per year with no fees either for contributors or for readers. Articles are uploaded four times per year in a publish-on-acceptance model.

Palapala: A Journal for Hawaiian Language and Literature

Palapala is the first peer-reviewed Hawaiian language journal to be published exclusively online. For details on what they publish, please review the journal’s editorial page.

With the inaugural issue appearing in 2017, this journal is provided in open-access format via ScholarSpace through a partnership between UH Press and University of Hawai’i at Mānoa Hamilton Library, and is sponsored by the following departments:

  • College of Arts & Humanities, UH Mānoa
  • Hawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian Knowledge, UH Mānoa
  • College of Languages, Linguistics & Literature, UH Mānoa
  • Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani, College of Hawaiian Language, UH Hilo

UH Press is seeking additional funding and support for this journal. Interested parties may contact Journals Manager Pam Wilson.

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society

Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society (JSEALS) is the peer-reviewed, open-access, electronic journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society.

The journal accepts submissions written in English that deal with general linguistic issues which further the lively debate that characterizes the annual SEALS conferences. Devoted to a region of extraordinary linguistic diversity, the journal features papers on the languages of Southeast Asia, including Austroasiatic, Austronesian, Hmong-Mien, Tibeto-Burman, and Tai-Kadai.

UH Press began publishing JSEALS in 2017; with this partnership, volume 10 and all future issues will appear for free on UH Mānoa’s ScholarSpace. Previous volumes are also available in the society’s online archive.

UH Press Journals with OA Archives

The following UH Press journals also have OA archival issues available on UH Mānoa’s ScholarSpace:

Recent Journal Issues with OA Content

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review

In addition to the print volumes distributed by UH Press, Cross-Currents publishes an e-journal that is in OA format. Click here to read e-journal issue 24, published in September 2017.

Pacific Science: A Quarterly Devoted to the Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region

Pacific Science frequently publishes individual articles in open-access format with institutional support. The October 2017 vol. 71, no. 4 issue includes seven open-access articles on Project MUSE and BioOne.

For a full listing of #OpenAccessWeek news and events at UH Mānoa, please click here.


UHP-primarylogo-2cEstablished in 1947, the University of Hawai`i Press supports the mission of the university through the publication of books and journals of exceptional merit. The Press strives to advance knowledge through the dissemination of scholarship—new information, interpretations, methods of analysis—with a primary focus on Asian, Pacific, Hawaiian, Asian American, and global studies. It also serves the public interest by providing high-quality books, journals and resource materials of educational value on topics related to Hawai`i’s people, culture, and natural environment. Through its publications the Press seeks to stimulate public debate and educate both within and outside the classroom.

For more information on the University of  Hawai`i Press and our publications, visit www.uhpress.hawaii.edu

Interview: Pacific Science 71:4 special section editors

Published this October, Pacific Science volume 71, no. 4 arrived with a special section on habitat restoration, which includes seven open-access articles. We asked Editor-in-Chief Curtis C. Daehler and guest editors Melissa Price and Robert J. Toonen to weigh in on this issue’s special topic and other research important to the quarterly science journal. 

Image of He'eia National Estuarine Research Reserve
This scenic photo shows the He’eia National Estuarine Research Reserve, where some Pacific Science 71:4 contributors did their research. The reserve is managed in partnership by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the State of Hawai’i. (Photo by Manuel Meija of The Nature Conservancy.)

Vol. 71, Issue 4 includes a special feature: “Scaling Up Restoration Efforts in the Pacific Islands.” Why devote a whole section to this topic?

We have lost a lot of native species to habitat destruction in the Pacific region. Today, considerable attention is being given to protecting native ecosystems, for example, in the Hawai‘i Governor’s Sustainable Hawai‘i Initiative to protect 30% of the state’s watersheds by 2030. However, much less attention is given to restoration efforts, or the conversion of nonnative to native-dominated habitats. Invaded ecosystems may be more at risk for wildfires, and may enhance invasions of nearby native ecosystems. A few large-scale restoration success stories exist, such as that of Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, and there are a number of small-scale efforts across the Pacific led by nonprofit groups. In this issue, we hope to promote conversations about how we can scale up restoration efforts to improve resiliency, promote ecosystem services, and reduce extinction rates across the Pacific region.

Koolaus 2
Melissa Price, guest editor of Pacific Science vol. 71, no. 4, is an assistant professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Management, CTAHR, at UH Mānoa. She provided this picture from her field work.

What challenges did you face in the creation of this special section?

The biggest challenges were representing the range of work being done around the Pacific and asking those working at small scales to think about how their work might be scaled-up. Also, a number of projects were just getting started, and it may be decades before there are results from these efforts. Finally, truly transformative work will likely be transdisciplinary. People involved in restoration must partner across sectors to solve challenging problems associated with restoration, such as seed production, removal of invasive plants and animals, and access for equipment and people to remote locations. We still have a long way to go in these areas, but we hope that this special collection will spark productive conversations.

Continue reading “Interview: Pacific Science 71:4 special section editors”

Call for Papers: Biography special issue

Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly seeks papers for an upcoming special issue tentatively titled, Biographic Mediation: The Uses of Disclosure in Bureaucracy and Politics.

The issue will be guest edited by Ebony Coletu of Pennsylvania State University.

From the submissions prompt by the Center for Biographical Research:

While personal storytelling in public advocacy has long been a strategy for social movements, biographic mediation emphasizes the interactive dynamics between public disclosure and administrative decision-making. This issue addresses multi-level demands for biographic mediation in contests over public policy, employment, and educational access to explore how disclosure has the capacity to reshape identity or to refocus engagement with policy consequences. Contributors may consider how personal disclosure shapes public debates, when self-narrative is restructured according to political opportunity, and how telling the stories of others becomes a standard mode of political argument.

BIO40-1_cover1_blogAbstracts of 350-400 words are due by December 1, 2017 for consideration. Click here for the complete submission guidelines. Authors of manuscripts selected for publication may also be invited to present on their papers at the University of Hawai’i in August 2018.

Subscribe to Biography through UH Press or browse full-text issues online via Project MUSE.

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Eyes of the Heart (MĀNOA 29:1)

Accompanying artwork in Eyes of the Heart: The Selected Plays of Catherine Filloux from Camille Assaf, a French and American costume designer for theater, dance, opera, and film, and lead design editor at Chance, a photography magazine that looks at the world through the lens of theatrical design.

Eyes of the Heart presents six of Catherine Filloux’s plays.

Playwright, librettist, teacher, lecturer, and activist Catherine Filloux has been writing plays about human rights, social justice, and individual freedoms for over twenty years. Her plays often incorporate actual people and events, but are never merely biographical. By reimagining real-life characters and situations—employing temporal shifts, dreams, hallucinations, soundscapes, and other theatrical techniques—she explores the characters’ thoughts and emotions as they struggle with moral and ethical dilemmas, resist evil while searching for goodness, and react to assaults on human dignity. Her plays also question the fallibility of our collective memory, and the ways our interpretations of the past change and become distorted over time.

— From Editor’s Note

The following notes provide some historical background to the plays: Continue reading “Eyes of the Heart (MĀNOA 29:1)”

Fall 2017 Biography Brown Bag Series

The editors of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly and directors of the Center for Biographical Research at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have announced their Fall 2017 schedule of Biography Brown Bags.

If you’re in Hawai’i, don’t miss this exciting line-up of speakers here to talk about life writing. Each event listed below is held from noon to 1:15 p.m. Thursdays in Kuykendall Room 409 at UH Mānoa. Bring your lunch and enjoy!

Sept. 14: Noenoe K. Silva, a contributor to The Hawaiian Journal of History, on ‘Elua Maka Kila: How Joseph Kānepu’u and Joseph Poepoe Contributed to the Life of ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i

Sept. 21: Daven Chang on Composing Mele for Community

Sept. 28: Kyle Kajihiro on Mehameha Wale No O Pu’uloa, I Ka Hele A Ka’ahupāhau: Lonely Was Pu’uloa when Ka’ahupāhau Went Away

Oct. 5: Virgie Chattergy on Pinay: Culture Bearers of the Filipino Diaspora

Oct. 12: Carla Manfredi on Little House in the Bush: Afterlives of Vailima

Oct. 19: Patricia Steinhoff on her UH Press book, Destiny: The Secret Operations of the Yodogō Exiles

Oct. 26: Otto Heim on Pacific Ghost Stories: John Kneubuhl and Oral History

Nov. 2: Sandra Bonura, on her UH Press book, Light in the Queen’s Garden: Ida May Pope, Pioneer for Hawai‘i’s Daughters, 1862–1914

Nov. 9: Lauren Nishimura on Hawaiian Ancestry: Positioning Indigeneity in the Na’i Aupuni Biographies

Nov. 16: Kim Compoc on American Tutelage Gone Awry: Antonio Taguba, Filipino Americanism, and the Critique of Torture

Nov. 30: Anna Feurstein on The Animal That Therefore I Am Not: The Politics of Animal (Auto)biography from Black Beauty to Cat Internet Videos

See flyer below or visit CBR’s Facebook page for more details.

Read Biography archives at Project MUSE