Announcing Open Access for a new Pacific title!

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University of Hawai‘i Press proudly announces the publication of its first born-digital, open-access monograph: JoAnna Poblete’s Balancing the Tides: Marine Practices in American Sāmoa, now available in both complimentary electronic and for-purchase print formats.

Download an open access copy today!

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Also available for purchase in print here.

About the Book
“Poblete’s Balancing the Tides is remarkable for its focus on the impact of U.S. federal policies in American Sāmoa. Whether she is discussing federal minimum wage debates or examining federal fishing regulations, Poblete shows how Americans and Sāmoans alike shape and are shaped by the forceful and sometimes flexible nature of U.S. federal marine-related management in American Sāmoa.” —Keith L. Camacho, UCLA

Balancing the Tides highlights the far-reaching influence of marine practices and policies in the unincorporated territory of American Sāmoa on the local indigenous group, the American fishing industry, U.S. environmental programs, and on global discussions about ecology and indigenous communities. Each chapter of the book highlights a type of ocean-use policy or marine-related practice in American Sāmoa to demonstrate how American colonial efforts to protect natural resources intersect with indigenous adherence to customary principles of respect, reciprocity, and native rights. Poblete’s study ultimately connects the U.S.-American Sāmoa colonial relationship to global overfishing, world consumption patterns, the for-profit fishing industry, international environmental movements and studies, as well as native experiences and indigenous rights.

More information on this project
Balancing the Tides is sophisticated scholarship that investigates timely issues at the forefront of conversations in and outside of the academy,” said UH Press executive editor Masako Ikeda. “This makes it an especially well-suited book for OA; by making electronic copies available for download at no cost, we hope Dr. Poblete’s research about American Sāmoa will be more readily available to the people there, as well as to other important audiences, including policy makers and students.”

The first UH Press title to be released in OA prior to the print edition, Poblete’s book is produced through the Sustainable History Monograph Pilot, an initiative funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that seeks to develop a viable model for publishing high-quality scholarship in OA format by employing new production technologies. “The OA edition of Balancing the Tides is really a landmark event,” said interim director Joel Cosseboom. “It not only sets a precedent for OA publishing at UH Press, but also contributes to our goal of serving indigenous communities throughout the Pacific.”

Other UH Press titles forthcoming from the Sustainable History Monograph Pilot will address the histories of Vietnam, Korea, and Vanuatu. “My hope is that UH Press will soon be able to adopt the new technologies employed by this program to issue more OA publications, especially in Hawaiian and Pacific studies,” said Cosseboom.

The next SHMP title will be Alec Holcombe’s Mass Mobilization in the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, 1945–1960.

Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 4 (October 2019)

FIGURE 4. Thysanoteuthis rhombus. Hatchlings in: (A) ventral and (B) dorsal view. Dorsal and lateral chromatophore
patterns in: (C and D) hatchling, (E and F) paralarva, (G and H) paralarva (dyed methylene blue) in ventral and dorsal view, (I) arm crown of paralarva in oral view showing the arrangement of suckers in tentacles and chromatophore pattern, (J) portion of the egg mass, (K) relative size of embryo inside egg and hatchling compared to zooplanktonic fauna identified, (L) Exocoetus spp., (M) Oxyporhamphus micropterus fish larvae, and (N) water strider Halobates micans. Scale bars = 1.0 mm. From the article “First Records of an Egg Mass and a Paralarva of Thysanoteuthis rhombus (Cephalopoda:Thysanoteuthidae) in the Northern Tropical Pacific, by Roxana De Silva-Dávila, Raymundo Avendaño-Ibarra, Ricardo Palomares-García, and Unai Markaida.

Preview volume 73 number 4 titles below and find content to all 6 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Biology and Impacts of Pacific Island Invasive Species. 15. Psittacula krameri, the Rose-Ringed Parakeet (Psittaciformes: Psittacidae)
Aaron B. Shiels, and Nicholas P. Kalodimos

Coral Settlement and Post-Settlement Mortality on Artificial Substrata in South Mexican Pacific Reefs
Andrés López-Pérez, and Yalha Solís-García

Some Metazoan Parasites from Marine Mammals Stranded in California
Marlene M. Colón-Llavina, Simonetta Mattiucci, Giuseppe Nascetti, James T. Harvey, Ernest H. Williams Jr., and Antonio A. Mignucci-Giannoni

First Records of an Egg Mass and a Paralarva of Thysanoteuthis rhombus (Cephalopoda: Thysanoteuthidae) in the Northeastern Tropical Pacific
Roxana De Silva-Dávila, Raymundo Avendaño-Ibarra, Ricardo Palomares-García, and Unai Markaida

A New Distichopora Species (Cnidaria: Stylasteridae) from the Mesophotic Zone of Palau
Stephen D. Cairns, and Daniela Pica

Population Status of Green Turtles (Chelonia mydas) Foraging in Arica Bay, Chile
Walter Sielfeld, Paula Salinas-Cisternas, Darío Contreras, Marco Tobar, Jesús Gallardo, and Cristian Azocar

This issue also includes author and subject indexes for all of volume 73, and the latest Association Affairs report.

Pacific Science
Vol. 73 No. 4
October 2019

Pacific Science Volume 73 Number 2 (April 2019)

FIGURE 6 from Robert Perger’s article A New Species of Johngarthia from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae): Johngarthia oceanica sp. nov., Socorro I., body color in life (specimens not collected): (A) male (photograph by Jorge Ramón Reyes Olvera, Mexico); (B and C) males (photographs by Vince Scheidt, San Diego, U.S.A.); (D) female (photograph by Omar de Jesus Franco, Mexico); (E and F) gender unknown (photographs by Hartmut S. Walter, University of California, Los Angeles).

This second issue of volume 73 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article Seasonality and Prevalence of Pollen Collected from Hawaiian Nectarivorous Birds by Kathryn N. van Dyk, Kristina L. Paxton, Patrick J. Hart, and Even H. Paxton.

Preview volume 73 number 2 below and find a list of all 9 articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE.

CONTENTS

Sympatric Invasive Rats Show Different Diets in a Tropical Rainforest of an Island Biodiversity Hotspot
Duron Quiterie, Bourguet Edouard, Thibault Martin, Scussel Sarah, Gouyet Raphaël, Méheut Mathilde, and Vidal Eric

Using DNA to Identify the Source of Invasive Mongooses, Herpestes auropunctatus (Carnivora: Herpestidae) Captured on Kaua‘i, Hawaiian Islands
Darren J. Wostenberg, Matthew W. Hopken, Aaron B. Shiels, and Antoinette J. Piaggio

Migration by the Japanese Wood Pigeon (Columba janthina) Across the Islands of East Asia: Direct Tracking by Satellite Telemetry
Soon Kyoo Choi, Yung Chul Park, Jong Chul Park, Gi Chang Bing, and Woo Yuel Kim

Environmental Correlates for Seed Desiccation Sensitivity of New Caledonian Plant Species
Octavie Toublanc-Lambault, Robin Pouteau, Marion Davezies, Manon Marron, Anthony Pain, Bruno Fogliani, and Philippe Marmey

Macrobenthic Biomass and Secondary Production in the Northern East China Sea and the Relative Importance of Environmental Variables
Qingxi Han, and Xiaobo Wang

Killer Whale (Orcinus orca) Occurrence and Interactions with Marine Mammals Off Peru
Juan Pablo Testino, Andrea Petit, Belén Acorta, Aldo S. Pacheco, Sebastian Silva, Joanna Alfaro-Shigueto, David Sarmiento, Javier Quiñones, Alberto More Eche, Eduardo Motta, Sara Fernandez, Elizabeth Campbell, Geyby Carrillo, Maurice Epstein, Miguel Llapapasca, and Adriana González-Pestana

Apparent Low Densities of Small Cetaceans in Okinawa may be due to Uncontrolled Local Hunting
Thomas A. Jefferson, and Michael F. Richlen

A New Species of Johngarthia  from Clipperton and Socorro Islands in the Eastern Pacific Ocean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Gecarcinidae)
Robert Perger


About the Journal

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics.

Subscriptions

Individual subscription is by membership in the Pacific Science Association. Institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

Contributions to the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific area are welcomed from authors in all parts of the world. See Pacific Science‘s submission guidelines for details.

Pacific Science
Vol. 73 No. 2
April 2019

Pacific Science-Call for Submissions

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Pacific Science: A Quarterly Devoted to the Biological and Physical Sciences of the Pacific Region is edited by Curtis Daehler, Dept. of Botany, University of Hawai‘i.

Appearing quarterly since 1947, Pacific Science is an international, multidisciplinary journal reporting research on the biological and physical sciences of the Pacific basin. It focuses on biogeography, ecology, evolution, geology and volcanology, oceanography, paleontology, and systematics. In addition to publishing original research, the journal features review articles providing a synthesis of current knowledge. The official journal of the Pacific Science Association. Continue reading “Pacific Science-Call for Submissions”

Pacific Science Vol. 73 No. 1 (January 2019)

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Figure 4 from the article “Taiwan’s Dacini Fruit Flies: Rare Endemics and Abundant Pests, along Altitudinal Gradients” by Camiel Doorenwerd, Luc Leblanc, Yu-Feng Hsu, Chia-Lung Huang, Yu-Chi Lin, Michael San Jose, and Daniel Rubinoff. Bactrocera dorsaloides, voucher number ms4389, first recorded for Taiwan. (A) dorsal view, (B) head, frontal view, (C) abdomen detail photo, dorsal view, (D) lateral view, (E) detail photo of the wing.

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The first issue in volume 73 of Pacific Science, the official journal of the Pacific Science Association, features the article “Talāsiga Lands in Fiji: Their Potential Expansion through Modern Farming Activities” by R.J. Morrison, and eight more research articles.

Preview volume 73 number 1 below and find a list of all articles available on BioOne and Project MUSE. Continue reading “Pacific Science Vol. 73 No. 1 (January 2019)”

February 2017 UH Press Author Events

Several author appearances are scheduled for the coming months; here are the remaining ones lined up for February. These events are free and the public is invited to attend. Books will be available for sale and signing, unless otherwise noted.

Saturday, February 18, 3:00 to 5:00 pm, Eastwind Books of Berkeley (2066 University Avenue)
howan-charmbuyers72dpiAt this venerable independent bookshop, Lillian Howan will discuss and read from her debut novel, The Charm Buyers. Set in 1990s Tahiti during the last years of French nuclear testing in the Pacific, the book has been praised by early reviewers as “gorgeous,” “sensuous,” and “hynoptic” (see the blurbs under the “reviews” tab on the UH Press web page). A review scheduled to appear in the March/April issue of Foreword Reviews says, in part: “Howan’s language is breathtaking, building a land and family with detail and power. . . . The Charm Buyers is a thought-provoking insight into a time of cultural change. It captures an essence of existing between reality and surreality, dreaming and wakefulness, the past and the future.”

For event information, go to the Eastwind Books website or Facebook page.
Howan also did a reading on February 15 at the University of San Francisco. See the flyer here.

Saturday, February 18, 11:00 am, Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i
furuya-internment_100dpiFifty years ago, Suikei Furuya chronicled his World War II imprisonment and published his memoirs in Japan. It took JCCH Resource Center volunteer Tatsumi Hayashi ten years to translate the book into English and now An Internment Odyssey: Haisho Tenten has been published by JCCH, with additional distribution by UH Press. The book launch will include a panel discussion with Tatsumi Hayashi, Sheila Chun, Brian Niiya and a member of the Furuya family. For further details, see the JCCH website.

Thursday, February 23, 12 noon to 1:15 pm, Kuykendall Hall 410, UH Mānoa

tsai-peoplesrace_100dpiAt this Brown Bag talk sponsored by the Center for Biographical Research, Michael Tsai, author of The People’s Race Inc.: Behind the Scenes at the Honolulu Marathon, discusses his melding of journalistic and life-writing approaches as well as the expected and unexpected challenges of dealing with living subjects. Tsai is a Kapi‘olani Community College instructor and Honolulu Star-Advertiser columnist and reporter.

For the Spring 2017 Brown Bag schedule of speakers, click here.

Saturday, February 25, 2:15 to 3:30 pm, The Ritz-Carlton, Kapalua

baird-dolphinswhales_100dpiAt Whales Tales 2017, presented by Whale Trust Maui, marine biologist Robin Baird speaks about his ocean fieldwork with Cascadia Research Collective and the results covered in his book, The Lives of Hawai‘i’s Dolphins and Whales: Natural History and Conservation. These include findings from years of research using satellite tagging, genetics, and photo identification to study resident whales and dolphins in Hawai‘i. Dr. Baird’s February 14 illustrated talk at the Waikiki Aquarium elicited numerous questions from the audience, leading to answers with more fascinating facts on these ocean mammals.


To keep up with UHP author talks and other event news, please follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Surf Science: An Introduction to Waves for Surfing, Third Edition

buttSurfRevEdHave you ever wondered where waves come from? What makes every one different, why some peel nicely and others just close out? Why, some days, waves come in sets of six and others in sets of three, and what factors affect the behavior of a surfing break? If you have, this book by Tony Butt is for you.

Now in its third edition, Surf Science is the first book to talk in depth about the science of waves from a surfer’s point of view. It fills the gap between surfing books and waves textbooks and will help you learn how to predict surf. You don’t need a scientific background to read it—just curiosity and a fascination for waves.

2014 | 136 pages
Paper ISBN 978-0-8248-3954-3, $35.00