UH Press Celebrates Asian Pacific American Heritage Month!

May is Asian Pacific American Heritage Month celebrating the achievements and contributions of Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders in the United States.

As the premier academic press within the Asian/Pacific region, the University of Hawaii Press would like to celebrate by offering discounts on the following titles for the entire month:

Merrie Monarch Sale 2019

The Merrie Monarch Festival is a week-long cultural festival that takes place annually in Hilo, Hawaii during the week after Easter. It honors King David Kalākaua, who was called the “Merrie Monarch” for his patronage of the arts and is credited with restoring many Hawaiian cultural traditions during his reign, including the hula. Many hālau hula (schools), including some from the U.S. mainland and some international performers, attend the festival each year to participate in exhibitions and competitions. The festival has received worldwide attention and is considered the most prestigious of all hula contests.

In honor of this festival, the University of Hawaii Press will be offering a 30% discount on the following titles:

Arbor Day Sale 2019

To celebrate Arbor Day, the University of Hawaii Press is offering 30% off the following titles from April 25-26:

Trees of Hawaii,
by Angela Kay Kepler

Trees of Hawaii, by Angela Kay Kepler

Surrounded by a vast array of colorful trees and shrubs, many residents and visitors with scant knowledge of botany are unable to find out more about “that tree with the small, pink flowers” or “the one on the corner with the pale green leaves.” Kepler comes to our rescue with this easy-to-use guide and brings alive the kaleidoscopic flora that beautifies Hawai‘i.

 

 

 

 

 


Loulu: THe Hawaiian Palm,
by Donald R. Hodel

Loulu: The Hawaiian Palm, by Donald R. Hodel

Forewords by Paul R. Weissich and William S. Merwin
The only native palms in Hawai‘i, loulu are among the Islands’ most distinctive plants. Several of the 24 recognized species are rare and endangered and all make handsome and appropriate ornamentals to adorn gardens and landscapes with their dramatic foliage, colorful flower clusters, and conspicuous fruits. In this volume, Donald Hodel shares his expertise on loulu, having traveled extensively throughout Hawai‘i to research and photograph nearly all the species in their native habitat. In the course of his work, he described and named three loulu that were new to science.

Each of the 24 species is treated in detail and this book is handsomely illustrated with more than 200 color photographs that clearly show leaves, flower stalks, fruits, and habitat. Chapters on loulu history, botany, ecology, conservation, uses, and propagation and culture provide essential background information for readers, whatever their level of interest or expertise. In the appendices, they will find a concise summary of loulu, lists of species by island, and an illustrated compendium of exotic, naturalized palms of Hawai‘i and relatives of loulu found throughout the South Pacific.

As interest in growing and conserving native Hawaiian plants surges while their numbers and habitat continue to decline, Loulu: The Hawaiian Palm will be valued as one of the most comprehensive and thoroughly illustrated treatments of these exceptional plants.

Campus Center Pop-Up Book Sale

April 16, 10:00am – 2:00pm
Manoa Campus, Center Courtyard (near front steps)

The University of Hawaii Press is bringing books to you! Save up to 90% on select titles! We’ll also have specially priced $1.00 & $5.00 bargain books and discounts on new releases! Come see our great selection of titles on Hawaii, including Hiking guides, bird books, art, history , literature, journals and so much more! You can also pick up a 20% off coupon for ALL UH PRESS BOOKS online when you sign up for our mailing list at the event.

Event Sponsor

University of Hawaii Press, Manoa Campus

More Information

UH Press, (808) 956-8255, uhpbooks@hawaii.edu,
https://uhpress.hawaii.edu

Pioneers of Modern Japanese Poetry wins translation prize

Pioneers of Modern Japanese Poetry, Translated by Takako Lento

The Cornell East Asia Series publication Pioneers of Modern Japanese Poetry (Takako Lento, 2019) has won the 2018-2019 Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission prize for the translation of Japanese literature, which is coordinated by the Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture at Columbia University. An award ceremony was held Friday, March 29, 2019 at the C.V. Starr East Asian Library at Columbia University in New York City.

The Japan-United States Friendship Commission Prize for the Translation of Japanese Literature was established in 1979, and the award has been administered by the Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture at Columbia University since the Center was founded in 1986. The Prize is awarded annually to outstanding works of translation into English from the Japanese language.

Purchase this book and receive 30% off by entering coupon code PIONEERS30 at checkout. Offer expires 4/30/2019.

See Pioneers of Modern Japanese Poetry

UH Press wins $90K grant for open-access publishing

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded the University of Hawaiʻi a $90,000 grant to digitize 100 out-of-print University of Hawaiʻi Press books for open access.

The project is part of the Humanities Open Book Program, a joint initiative between the Mellon Foundation and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

“We’re grateful to the Mellon Foundation and the NEH for supporting our open-access initiatives,” said Trond Knutsen, UH Press digital publishing manager. “Now, with the advent of digital technology, these works can become available to a new generation of readers around the world.”

UH Press selected the 100 titles—representing fields such as Asian studies, Pacific studies, linguistics, anthropology, and history—based on their contemporary scholarly relevance, historical significance, and practical value for teaching and research purposes.

“This initiative will be an enormous contribution to the advance of scholarship globally, but particularly for colleagues and students in places in Asia and the Pacific where libraries are inadequate and access to printed scholarly sources is difficult,” said Barbara Watson Andaya, chair of the UH Mānoa Asian studies program.

Revitalizing UH Press’s backlist

Beginning in 2018, the digitized titles will be hosted on a custom open-access portal where readers will be able to download them in EPUB and PDF formats. A print-on-demand option will also be offered for select titles.

“We hope this project will be only the beginning of a long-term effort to revitalize UH Press’s backlist,” said UH System President David Lassner. “This project will magnify the reach and influence of scholarly work done here at the University of Hawaiʻi, and support educational and cultural initiatives in the Asia and Pacific regions.”

UH Press currently offers more than 800 titles online through library e-book vendors, and more than 350 scholarly monographs through Hawaiʻi Scholarship Online, a partnership with Oxford University Press and University Press Scholarship Online.

“As stewards of scholarship, we find it important to keep our books widely accessible,” said Joel Cosseboom, UH Press interim director and publisher. “This grant will move us forward in disseminating knowledge while also highlighting our incredible backlist, which includes some of the best research among university presses.”

UH Press, which is celebrating 70 years of publishing, is a member of the Association of American University Presses and the Hawaiʻi Book Publishers Association.

About The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

Founded in 1969, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation endeavors to strengthen, promote, and, where necessary, defend the contributions of the humanities and the arts to human flourishing and to the well-being of diverse and democratic societies by supporting exemplary institutions of higher education and culture as they renew and provide access to an invaluable heritage of ambitious, path-breaking work. Additional information is available at mellon.org.

UH Press publishes open-access Hawaiian language journal

The University of Hawaiʻi Press now publishes the new, open-access resource for Hawaiian scholars, Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literature.

The entirety of Palapala volume 1, issue 1, which includes contemporary research in both Hawaiian and English, is freely available at the UH Press website.

“We are honored to offer, through a collaboration with the UHlibrary and the support of the university, an online journal of such scholarly importance to Hawaiʻi,” said Joel CosseboomUHPress interim director.

Palapala joins UH Press’s extensive list of Hawaiian studies titles, including The Hawaiian Journal of HistoryKanaka ʻŌiwi Methodologies and the Hawaiian Dictionary. It is the first peer-reviewed Hawaiian language journal to be published exclusively online.

“In spite of a vast and complex body of literature written in Hawaiian and a growing number of speakers, there has not been, until now, an academic journal dedicated to either the study of the language or the literature produced in it,” said Palapala editor Jeffrey “Kapali” Lyon of the UH Mānoa Department of Religion.

Palapala is intended to fill that gap as a peer-reviewed journal that allows scholars of Hawaiian from around the globe to present the results of their research through a centralized, scholarly archive dedicated to cherishing, preserving and advancing our knowledge of the native language of Hawaiʻi nei,” Lyon said.

The inaugural issue also features reprints from the Hawaiian alphabet, first published in 1822, and an anonymous 1857 account about translating the Bible into Hawaiian.

“We are excited to publish the first issue of Palapala,” said Pamela WilsonUH Press journals manager. “This journal truly aligns with our mission to be a Native Hawaiian place of learning and an indigenous-serving institution.”

Palapala editorial board, submission guidelines and more

Palapala receives support from UH Mānoa’s UH Press and the following departments: College of Arts & HumanitiesHawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian KnowledgeCollege of Languages, Linguistics and Literature and UH Hilo’s Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani, College of Hawaiian Language.

The journal’s editorial board includes UH faculty members Joseph “Keola” Donaghykuʻualoha hoʻomanawanui and Hiapokeikikāne K. Perreira, as well as ʻŌiwi Parker Jones of the University of Oxford. UH Mānoa graduate student Jane Au will serve as managing editor for the 2018 volume, and UH alumna Keiko “Kiele” Gonzalez will continue as the journal’s copyeditor.

Palapala submissions guidelines, print requests and more details may be found at the UH Press website.

UH Press publishes open-access Hawaiian language journal

The University of Hawaiʻi Press now publishes the new, open-access resource for Hawaiian scholars, Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literature.

The entirety of Palapala volume 1, issue 1, which includes contemporary research in both Hawaiian and English, is freely available at the UH Press website.

“We are honored to offer, through a collaboration with the UHlibrary and the support of the university, an online journal of such scholarly importance to Hawaiʻi,” said Joel CosseboomUHPress interim director.

Palapala joins UH Press’s extensive list of Hawaiian studies titles, including The Hawaiian Journal of HistoryKanaka ʻŌiwi Methodologies and the Hawaiian Dictionary. It is the first peer-reviewed Hawaiian language journal to be published exclusively online.

“In spite of a vast and complex body of literature written in Hawaiian and a growing number of speakers, there has not been, until now, an academic journal dedicated to either the study of the language or the literature produced in it,” said Palapala editor Jeffrey “Kapali” Lyon of the UH Mānoa Department of Religion.

Palapala is intended to fill that gap as a peer-reviewed journal that allows scholars of Hawaiian from around the globe to present the results of their research through a centralized, scholarly archive dedicated to cherishing, preserving and advancing our knowledge of the native language of Hawaiʻi nei,” Lyon said.

The inaugural issue also features reprints from the Hawaiian alphabet, first published in 1822, and an anonymous 1857 account about translating the Bible into Hawaiian.

“We are excited to publish the first issue of Palapala,” said Pamela WilsonUH Press journals manager. “This journal truly aligns with our mission to be a Native Hawaiian place of learning and an indigenous-serving institution.”

Palapala editorial board, submission guidelines and more

Palapala receives support from UH Mānoa’s UH Press and the following departments: College of Arts & HumanitiesHawaiʻinuiākea School of Hawaiian KnowledgeCollege of Languages, Linguistics and Literature and UH Hilo’s Ka Haka ʻUla O Keʻelikōlani, College of Hawaiian Language.

The journal’s editorial board includes UH faculty members Joseph “Keola” Donaghykuʻualoha hoʻomanawanui and Hiapokeikikāne K. Perreira, as well as ʻŌiwi Parker Jones of the University of Oxford. UH Mānoa graduate student Jane Au will serve as managing editor for the 2018 volume, and UH alumna Keiko “Kiele” Gonzalez will continue as the journal’s copyeditor.

Palapala submissions guidelines, print requests and more details may be found at the UH Press website.

UH Press presents new open-access content for language scholars

Three open-access journals for language scholars will be made available through University of Hawaiʻi Press.

UH Press, publisher of scholarly journals and books since 1947, will assist in making the content of Language Documentation and Conservation (LD&C), the Journal of the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society (JSEALS) and Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literature widely accessible online.

Through a long-standing partnership with UH Press, Language Documentation and Conservation is exclusively available in electronic formatLD&C is edited by Nicholas Thieberger from the University of Melbourne and sponsored by the National Foreign Language Resource Center.

In addition, UH Press assists the Southeast Asian Linguistics Society in the publication of their journal online. Edited by Mark Alves from Montgomery College, JSEALS adds to the language and linguistics journals available from UH Press, which also include Oceanic Linguistics.

The first issue of Palapala is set to arrive in March 2017. This open-access journal, edited by Jeffrey (Kapali) Lyon at the UH Mānoa Department of Religion, receives support from UH Press and the following departments:

The editorial boards for all three open-access, peer-reviewed journals include UH faculty.

“We are delighted to present such high-quality digital content to the public—be they students, translators or simply curious readers,” said Pamela WilsonUH Press journals manager.

The open-access journals join approximately 75 new books and 22 journals UH Press plans to publish in 2017. The press also offers more than 800 titles annually through library e-book vendors.

UH Press has a long history of providing educators with language materials for the classroom,” said Joel CosseboomUH Press interim director. “Through these new open-access journals and our digital hosting platforms, language scholars may access the content from anywhere there is an internet connection.”

More information about the journals, including journal submission guidelines, is available online. New journal content is also posted regularly on the UH Press journals blog.