MĀNOA journal at AWP

Join Mānoa: A Pacific Journal of International Literature at the Association for Writing Programs (AWP) Conference & Bookfair in Seattle, WA from March 9-11.

Bookfair, March 9-11

Stop by the Mānoa table located at #309 to talk story, peruse and purchase titles, and get a discount on subscriptions.

Get a signed copy of Out of the Shadows of Angkor, Thursday, March 9, 1-3 p.m.

Putsata Reang, Greg Santos, Sharon May, and Sokunthary Svay will be signing copies of the recent Mānoa volume, Out of the Shadows of Angkor in the Mānoa booth, #309.

Panel: Celebrating Pacific Island Literature, Thursday, March 9, 1:45-3 p.m.

Ballroom 1, Summit Building, Seattle Convention Center, Level 5

Mānoa journal is sponsored by the University of Hawai‘i’s Department of English. Join two creative writing professors, editor Craig Santos Perez and Kristiana Kahakauwila, along with William Nu‘utupu Giles for a great reading and conversation on Pacific Island literature in this Kundiman panel.

Panel: Cambodian Poetry, Prose, and Translation Today, Friday, March 10, 3:20-4:35 p.m.

Rooms 338-339, Summit Building, Seattle Convention Center, Level 3

Guest editor Sharon May and contributors Sokunthary Svay, Putsata Reang, and Greg Santos will read and discuss their work on Out of the Shadows of Angkor.

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Subscribe to Mānoa

A one-year subscription gets you print copies or digital access to Out of the Shadows of Angkor: Cambodian Poetry, Prose, and Performance Throughout the Ages (Volume, 33-2 and 34-1) and In the Silence: International Fiction, Poetry, Essays, and Performance (Volume 34, Issue 2). 

A two-year subscription additionally includes two new issues, including New CHamoru Literature edited by Craig Santos Perez (Volume 35, Issue 1) and an issue featuring the eco-literature of Southeast Asia (Volume 35, Issue 2). 

Subscribe to Mānoa here.

Journals: Kapaemahu, Remembering Miriam Fuchs, Burmese Literature + Visuality and Materiality in Postwar Japan

Biography

Volume 45, Number 2 (2022)

The new issue contains the following articles as a remembrance for Miriam Fuchs who was an active contributor to the journal. It also contains the annual bibliography:

Miriam Fuchs, Life Writing, and Life
Craig Howes

A Voyage Beyond the Text as Self: Remembering Miriam Fuchs Holzman
Cynthia G. Franklin

Miriam, The Bookies, and I
Joseph H. O’Mealy

In the Warm Waters of Lanikai: Paddling with Miria
Leinaala Davis

A Tribute to Miriam Fuchs: With Love from Her Student
Amy Calrson

Find more articles at Project MUSE.

Front cover of Manoa 34-2

Mānoa

Volume 34, Number 2 (2022)
In the Silence

The new Mānoa issue features a special section on the literature of Burma/Myanmar. In the introduction, “To Write a History,” guest editors Penny Edwards, ko ko thett, and Kenneth Wong begin:

“‘How to write history / in a language / that has no past tense’ asks co-editor ko ko thett in his poetry collection The Burden of Being Burmese. How to publish literature under a military regime with no future tense?

“In Myanmar today, the simplest utterance is punishable as the defamation of the state. A song, a poem, a music video, an elegy are all open invitations to a cowardly regime to pursue their authors with impunity.”

Find literature from Burma/Myanmar, South Asia and more at Project MUSE.

Review of Japan Culture and Society

Volume 32 (2020)

The new issue includes the special section, “Visuality and Materiality in Postwar Japan” guest edited by Álex Bueno and Yasutaka Tsuji, and “Japan in Los Angeles” edited by Rika Hiro. Selections include:

Design as Cultural Representation: Visuality and Materiality in Postwar Japan
Yasutaka Tsuji (Translated by Álex Bueno)

Japan’s Postwar Building: Japanese Architecture and the West
Ryuichi Hamaguchi

Nature and Thought in Japanese Design
Teiji Itoh

Yamashiro: Imagined Home and the Aesthetics of Hollywood Japanism
Dianne Lee Shen

Bruce Yonemoto: Made in Occupied Japan
Rika Hiro

Find more articles, an interview with Manika Nagare, and literature in translation at Project MUSE.

Words from the Fire: Poems by Jidi Majia (MĀNOA 30:1)

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Bbahxa Ayuosse by Qubi Shuomo. Bbahxa Ayuosse by Qubi Shuomo.
This Nuosu ritual painting is of the magical python Bbahxa Ayuosse or Bbahxa Arrysse, one of the supernatural helpers of the Nuosu hero Zhyge Alu. Bbahxa Ayuosse by Qubi Shuomo. Object #1998–83/102—Scroll, Painting. Gift of the Blakemore Foundation, courtesy of Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture, University of Washington.

The new issue of MĀNOA: A Pacific Journal of International Writing, volume 30 number 1, is a collection of poems by Jidi Majia, translated by Jami Proctor Xu.

Jidi Majia is a member of the Yi ethnic minority group, one of the fifty-five officially recognized minorities in China and the sixth largest, comprising about nine million people. The subgroup to which Jidi Majia belongs, Nuosu, is the largest. For centuries Nuosu people have held on to their language, culture, and social structure, staving off assimilation by the majority Han.

This collection of more than 125 of Jidi Majia’s poems opens with an editor’s note and concludes with a translation of Jidi Majia’s speech for the 2017 Xu Zhimo Poetry and Art Festival at Cambridge University. More than a dozen images featuring Nuosu scrolls and paintings accompany the poems. Continue reading “Words from the Fire: Poems by Jidi Majia (MĀNOA 30:1)”

November 2012 Author Events

Thursday, November 8, 12 noon to 1:15 p.m.
Wendy S. Arbeit shares her experiences in researching Hawaiian cultural and utilitarian objects, her techniques used in revealing their patterns, and how she documented them with detailed line drawings in her award-winning book, Links to the Past: The Work of Early Hawaiian Artisans.

Some of the questions that will be addressed:
What went into tracking down those artifacts now scattered across the globe?
What do the 1,400 illustrations tell you about pre- and early contact Hawaiian culture and the ways it changed in response to Westerners?
What sort of questions are raised by the grouping of so many objects?

The talk is part of the Brown Bag Biography series at the Center for Biographical Research, University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa, Henke Hall 325, 1800 East-West Road. For more information, see the UH event calendar or call 808-956-3774 or email: biograph@hawaii.edu.

Isaiah Walker

Thursday, November 8, 5:00 to 7:00 p.m.
BYU-Hawaii professor and former competitive surfer Isaiah Walker will  give a lecture at Arizona State University on his thought-provoking book, Waves of Resistance: Surfing and History in Twentieth-Century Hawai‘i. Walker explains how Hawaiian surfers have successfully resisted colonial encroachment in the po‘ina nalu (surf zone). In making his case, he also explores empowerment and masculinity, media representation of islanders, identity struggles, and other topics. The talk is open to the public and will be held in West Hall, Room 135, at ASU in Tempe. For more information, see the ASU calendar posting.

Tuesday, November 13, 6:00 to 9:00 p.m.
See below listing under November 18 for George and Willa Tanabe’s Japanese Buddhist Temples in Hawai‘i.

Saturday, November 17, 3:00 p.m.
San Diego resident Leilani Holmes will visit Basically Books in Hilo, Hawai‘i to discuss and sign copies of her recent work, Ancestry of Experience: A Journey Into Hawaiian Ways of Knowing. Born in Honolulu in 1952 to a Hawaiian mother, Holmes was adopted as an infant by a haole (Caucasian) couple who moved to Ohio when she was four years old. The book recounts, explores, and analyzes the author’s quest to reclaim her origins and come to terms with the duality inherent in being an indigenous adoptee. The two-column format of the book mirrors this dichotomy, with a personal, conversational style of narrative on one side, and academic explanatory text on the other.

Saturday, November 17, 4:00 p.m.
Seattle author/poet/artist Alan Chong Lau will be at the Wing Luke Museum’s Tateuchi Story Theatre to join his sister, food writer Linda Lau Anusasananan, as she reads from The Hakka Cookbook, published by University of California Press. (Read a related post on the UC Press blog here.) Alan Lau provided the artwork for the book, done in a similarly whimsical, sumi-e style that illustrates his UH Press-published book of poetry, Blues and Greens: A Produce Worker’s Journal.

Sunday, November 18, 2:00 p.m.
George J. Tanabe and Willa Jane Tanabe will appear at Barnes & Noble, Ala Moana Center, for a signing of their just-released guidebook, Japanese Buddhist Temples in Hawai‘i: An Illustrated Guide. The Tanabes personally visited each of the ninety temples still in existence, and took photographs not only the buildings’ exteriors but of the ornate altars and interior details. Over 360 of these color photos are contained in the book. Descriptions of each temple and explanations of the symbolism of objects and design elements will help temple visitors decipher the meaning behind these physical expressions. Also at this event, information will be distributed on the related exhibit due to open December 1 at the Japanese Cultural Center of Hawai‘i.

Last-minute update: On Tuesday, November 13, 6:00 to 9:00 p.m., George and Willa Tanabe will give a PowerPoint lecture at the Honpa Hongwanji Hawaii Betsuin Annex Temple (makai of the main temple), 1727 Pali Highway. Open to the public, with a $10 fee. For more information, click here for a link to the Dharma Light Project brochure and map, or call 808-536-7044.