News and Events

Asian Perspectives Vol. 59, No. 1 (2020)

The spring issue of Asian Perspectives includes two remembrances to Martin Thomas Bale (7 March 1970–21 September 2018) and Hung Ling-Yu 洪玲玉 (25 February 1975–26 April 2018).

Bale was one of Korean archaeology’s most active and ardent supporters. He was a pioneer of Korean prehistory in North America, devoting more than twenty years to the study of the Mumun Pottery Period (ca. 1500–300 b.c.) and broader East Asia. Hung was an anthropological archaeologist to her core, with extensive field experience in archaeological excavations and surveys in China and Taiwan, including work in Sichuan Province as part of the Luce Foundation-sponsored Chengdu Plain Archaeological Survey.

Find these remembrances, research articles, a review essay, and book reviews in the new issue.

Editors’ Note
Mike T. Carson, Rowan K. Flad

Formation and Function of Majiayao and Qijia Pottery: Analysis of Manufacturing Marks and Use-alteration on Vessels from the Tao River Valley
Andrew Womack, Hui Wang

Revisiting Prei Khmeng: The Excavation of an Iron Age Settlement and Cemetery in Cambodia
Dougald O’Reilly, Louise Shewan, Kate Domett, An Sopheap

Traditional Land Use and Resistance to Spanish Colonial Entanglement: Archaeological Evidence on Guam
Boyd Dixon, Danny Welch, Lon Bulgrin, Mark Horrocks

Lapita on Wari Island: What’s the Problem?
Merryn Chynoweth, Glenn R. Summerhayes, Anne Ford, Yo Negishi

Integration and the Regional Market System in the Early Chinese Empires: A Case Study of the Distribution of Iron and Bronze Objects in the Wei River Valley
Lam Wengcheong

Antenna-Style Daggers in Northeast Asia from the Perspective of Interregional Interaction
Park Sun Mi

Recovering Plant Microfossils from Archaeological and other Palaeoenvironmental Deposits: A Practical Guide Developed from Pacific Region Experience
Mark Horrocks

Ban Chiang, Northeast Thailand, Volumes 2A and 2B: A Review Essay
Charles Higham

Empires and Exchanges in Eurasian Late Antiquity: Rome, China, Iran, and the Steppe, ca. 250–750 ed. by Nicola Di Cosmo and Michael Maas (review)
Barry Cunliffe

Violence, Kinship and the Early Chinese State: The Shang and their World by Roderick Campbell (review)
Wang Haicheng

Silk, Slaves, and Stupas: Material Culture of the Silk Road by Susan Whitfield (review)
Toby C. Wilkinson

Martin Thomas Bale (7 March 1970–21 September 2018)
Rachel Lee, Mark Byington

Hung Ling-Yu 洪玲玉 (25 February 1975–26 Abril 2018)
Hung Ling-Yu, Tristram R. Kidder, Sara Friedman

 

Asian Perspectives cover 59-1
Asian Perspectives, Vol. 59, No. 1 (2020)

Cross-Currents – Limited Time Special Offer – 50% Off

Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review’s next issue—volume 9, issue 1—will be its last. Limited print copies of Cross-Currents are now available for a 50% discount through June 1. 

Since 2012, Cross-Currents has offered readers up-to-date research findings, emerging trends, and cutting-edge perspectives concerning East Asian history and culture from scholars in both English-speaking and Asian language-speaking academic communities.

A joint enterprise of the Research Institute of Korean Studies (RIKS) at Korea University and the Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS) at the University of California, Berkeley, Cross-Currents has balanced issues traditionally addressed by Western humanities and social science journals with issues of immediate concern to scholars in China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. 

Most issues include multiple special sections, guest edited by scholars in the field. The following issues are typically $15.00 per issue, but are now available for $7.50. Postage is included for mailing addresses within the U.S. For shipping outside the U.S., please add $5.00 per issue.


Complete Cross-Currents Set (17 issues)

A complete set of 17 issues may be purchased for $115 ($255 value). Contact uhpjourn@hawaii.edu to order and to inquire about international shipping options.

For individual issues, please click on the links below.

Volume 9, Number 1, May 2020 (Forthcoming)

Global Island: Taiwan and the World + Individual Submissions

Volume 8, Number 2, November 2019

Buddhist Art of Mongolia: Cross-Cultural Connections, Discoveries, and Interpretations

Volume 8, Number 1, May 2019

Diasporic Art and Korean Identity

Air-Water-Land-Human: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Health and Environment

Volume 7, Number 2, November 2018

Recent Research on North and South Korea

Writing Revolution Across Northeast Asia

Volume 7, Number 1, May 2018

Binding Maritime China: Control, Evasion, and Interloping

Volume 6, Number 2, November 2017

Maps and Their Contexts: Reflections on Cartography and Culture in Premodern East Asia

Naming Modernity: Rebranding and Neologisms during China’s Interwar Global Moment in Eastern Asia

Volume 6, Number 1, May 2017

Cartographic Anxieties

Recent Research on China, Korea and Japan

Volume 5, Number 2, November 2016

Frontier Tibet: Trade and Boundaries of Authority in Kham

Mapping Vietnameseness

Volume 5, Number 1, May 2016

Individual Submissions

Volume 4, Number 2, November 2015

Governing Marriage Migrations: Perspectives from Mainland China and Taiwan

Rethinking Business History in Modern China

Volume 4, Number 1, May 2015

(De)Memorializing the Korean War: A Critical Intervention

Recent Research on China

Volume 3, Number 2, November 2014

Stories and Histories from the China-Vietnam Border

Islam in China/China in Islam

Volume 3, Number 1, May 2014

The Globalization of K-pop: Local and Transnational Articulations of South Korean Popular Music

New Research on Colonial Korea

Volume 2, Number 2, November 2013

Urban Chinese Living

Law, Politics, and Society in Republican China

Bordering China: Modernity and Sustainability

Volume 2, Number 1, May 2013

Transcolonial Film Coproductions in the Japanese Empire: Antinomies in the Colonial Archive

Volume 1, Number 2, November 2012

Mediating Chineseness in Cambodia

Volume 1, Number 1, May 2012

Territoriality and Space Production in China

The Past and Future of the Gaihōzu Japanese Imperial Maps

Cross-Currents 8-2
Cross-Currents 8-1
Cross-Currents Cover 7-2
Cross-Currents 6-2 Cover

The Contemporary Pacific, vol. 32 no. 1 (2020)

Featured art, this issue: Brackish Waters (Muliwai), by Joy Lehuanani Enomoto, 2014. Photograph, salt, thread, and Maui dirt on handmade paper, 12 x 10 in. Muliwai, or estuaries, are nutrient rich and vital to the protection of our coastlines against climate change. The muliwai of Waikīkī was devastated due to two significant events: the Honolulu Sanitary Commission’s 1912 declaration that the muliwai was a threat to public health and safety, which led to the area’s wetlands being filled in, and the signing of Act 14, SL 1918, which condemned the muliwai and approved the creation of what is now the Ala Wai Canal. The dredging of the canal, led by Walter Dillingham, destroyed Hawaiian farmlands and displaced hundreds of Kānaka Maoli.



This issue of The Contemporary Pacific is a special issue, “Experiencing Pacific Environments: Pasts, Presents, Futures,” guest edited by Eveline Dürr, Philipp Schorch, and Sina Emde, and features the art of Joy Lehuanani Enomoto.

Read the special issue introduction free on Project MUSE.

Articles

Experiencing Pacific Environments:: Pasts, Presents, Futures
Sina Emde, Eveline Dürr, Philipp Schorch

Collaborative Strategies for Re-Enhancing Hapū Connections to Lands and Making Changes with Our Climate
Huhana Smith

Navigating for a Place in the Museum: Stories of Encounter and Engagement between the Old and the New from the Highlands of Papua New Guinea
Michael Mel

One Thousand and One Coconuts: Growing Memories in Southern New Guinea
Nicholas Evans

The Lizard in the Volcano: Narratives of the Kuwae Eruption
Chris Ballard

The Capitalism of Chambri Cosmology: The 2017 Sir Raymond Firth Memorial Lecture
Deborah Gewertz, Frederick Errington

Nesor Annim, Niteikapar (Good Morning, Cardinal Honeyeater): Indigenous Reflections on Micronesian Women and the Environment
Myjolynne Marie Kim

Afterword: “I Am the River, and the River Is Me”
Dame Anne Salmond

Resources

Teaching Oceania: Creating Pedagogical Resources for Undergraduates in Pacific Studies
Monica C LaBriola, Julianne Walsh

Political Reviews

Micronesia in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019
Gonzaga Puas

Guam
Elizabeth (Isa) Ua Ceallaigh Bowman, Michael Lujan Bevacqua, Tiara Na’Puti

Marshall Islands
Monica C Labriola

Nauru
Nic Maclellan

Northern Mariana Islands
Zaldy Dandan

Polynesia in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 2018 to 30 June 2019
Lorenz Gonschor

Māori Issues
Margaret Mutu

Niue
Salote Talagi

Pitcairn
Peter Clegg

Rapa Nui
Forrest Wade Young

Books and Media Reviews

Oceania (review)
Safua Akeli Amaama

Kaiāulu: Gathering Tides by Mehana Blaich Vaughan (review)
Mililani Ganivet

Ē Luku Wale Ē: Devastation upon Devastation by Mark Hamasaki and Kapulani Landgraf (review)
Halena Kapuni-Reynolds

Island Time: New Zealand’s Pacific Futures by Damon Salesa (review)
Masami Tsujita Levi

The Bounty from the Beach: Cross-Cultural and Cross-Disciplinary Essays ed. by Sylvie Largeaud-Ortega (review)
Vehia Wheeler

Breaking the Shell: Voyaging from Nuclear Refugees to People of the Sea in the Marshall Islands by Joseph H Genz (review)
M Blake Fisher

Pacific Alternatives: Cultural Politics in Contemporary Oceania ed. by Edvard Hviding and Geoffrey White (review)
Cheng-Cheng Li

Dispossession and the Environment: Rhetoric and Inequality in Papua New Guinea by Paige West (review)
Foley Pfalzgraf

Pacific Futures: Past and Present ed. by Warwick Anderson et al. (review)
Owen Jennings

Tatau: A History of Sāmoan Tattooing by Sean Mallon and Sébastien Galliot (review)
Kristina Togafau

The Contemporary Pacific 32-1
The Contemporary Pacific, Vol. 32, No. 1 (2020)

Oceanic Linguistics, vol. 58 no. 2 (2019)

China Review International Vol. 25 No. 1 (2018)

 

Volume 25 Number 1 of China Review International begins with one feature review and 23 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese Studies.

Featured Review:

When Fish Were Fish
Christopher Rea

Reviews:

Poetic Transformations: Eighteenth-Century Cultural Projects on the Mekong Plains by Claudine Ang (review)
Reviewed by Eric Henry

Worüber man nicht spricht: Tabus, Schweigen und Redeverbote in China ed. by Rüdiger Breuer and Heiner Roetz (review)
Reviewed by Anna Stecher

GMO China: How Global Debates Transformed China’s Agricultural Biotechnology Policies by Cong Cao (review)
Reviewed by Nancy N. Chen

Morality and Monastic Revival in Post-Mao Tibet by Jane E. Caple (review)
Reviewed by Nicole Willock

Qing Travelers to the Far West: Diplomacy and the Information Order in Late Imperial China by Jenny Huangfu Day (review)
Reviewed by Bradley Camp Davis

China’s Footprints in Southeast Asia ed. by Maria Serena I. Diokno, Hsin-Huang Michael Hsiao, and Alan H. Yang (review)
Karen M. Teoh

That Distant Country Next Door: Popular Japanese Perceptions of Mao’s China by Erik Esselstrom (review)
Reviewed by Lu Yan

Song King: Connecting People, Places, and Past in Contemporary China by Levi S. Gibbs (review)
Reviewed by Charlotte D’Evelyn

Farewell to the God of Plague: Chairman Mao’s Campaign to Deworm China by Miriam Gross (review)
Reviewed by Robert Peckham

The Silk Road Trap: How China’s Trade Ambitions Challenge Europe by Jonathan Holslag (review)
Reviewed by Min Ye

Efficacious Underworld: The Evolution of Ten Kings Paintings in Medieval China and Korea by Cheeyun Lilian Kwon (review)
Reviewed by Beatrix Mecsi

Becoming Bilingual in School and Home in Tibetan Areas of China: Stories of Struggle YiXi LaMuCuo (review)
Reviewed by Norbert Francis

Chinese Poetic Modernisms ed. by Paul Manfredi and Christopher Lupke (review)
Reviewed by Joseph R. Allen

Just a Song: Chinese Lyrics from the Eleventh and Early Twelfth Centuries by Stephen Owen (review)
Reviewed by Lanlan Kuang

China’s Chaplin: Comic Stories and Farces by Xu Zhuodai (review)
Reviewed by Zheyu Wei

Afterlives of Chinese Communism: Political Concepts from Mao to Xi ed. by Christian Sorace, Ivan Franceschini, and Nicholas Loubere (review)
Reviewed by Aaron Su

Fruit from the Sands: The Silk Road Origins of the Foods We Eat by Robert N. Spengler III (review)
Reviewed by Shiamin Kwa

The Dreaming Mind and the End of the Ming World by Lynn A. Struve (review)
Reviewed by Harry Miller

Asia Inside Out: Itinerant People ed. by Eric Tagliacozzo, Helen F. Siu, and Peter C. Perdue (review)
Reviewed by Ronald Skeldon

Public Goods Provision in the Early Modern Economy: Comparative Perspectives from Japan, China, and Europe ed. by Masayuki Tanimoto and R. Bin Wong (review)
Reviewed by Guillaume Carré

Raising China’s Revolutionaries: Modernizing Childhood for Cosmopolitan Nationalists and Liberated Comrades, 1920s–1950s by Margaret Mih Tillman (review)
Reviewed by Stig Thøgersen

Christian Women in Chinese Society: The Anglican Story ed. by Wai Ching Angela Wong and Patricia P. K. Chiu (review)
Reviewed by Fredrik Fällman

Maoist Laughter ed. by Ping Zhu, Zhuoyi Wang, and Jason McGrath (review)
Reviewed by Richard King

Works Received

 

China Review International
Vol. 25 No. 1
2018

Journal of World History, Vol 31, No. 1 (2020)

Special Issue

Liberal and Illiberal Internationalisms

Edited by Philippa Hetherington and Glenda Sluga

The twenty-first century is awash with diagnoses of the end of liberal internationalism. In both popular and academic manifestations, declarations of liberal internationalism’s ‘crisis’ tend to assume that the term has a stable meaning that is clearly differentiated from illiberal internationalist variants. The aim of this special issue of the Journal of World History is to interrogate this assumption. We argue that a historical view of internationalism highlights the interrelation between and the mutual dependence of liberal and illiberal internationalisms since 1880. Taken together, the essays collected here position the politics of internationalism at the centre of a new historiography that rejects an axiomatic relationship between the liberal and the international. They seek to rethink how liberal and illiberal cooperated, co-mingled and co-produced one another on the international plane.

Research Articles

Liberal and Illiberal Internationalisms
Philippa Hetherington, Glenda Sluga

Liberals, Socialists, Internationalists, Jews
Abigail Green

“Neither East Nor West,” Neither Liberal Nor Illiberal? Iranian Islamist Internationalism in the 1980s
Timothy Nunan

Urban Planning and the Politics of Expert Internationalism, 1920s–1940s
Phillip Wagner

The Crisis of Liberal Internationalism: The Legacies of the League of Nations Reconsidered
David Petruccelli

Constructing the ‘City of International Solidarity’: Non-Aligned Internationalism, the United Nations and Visions of Development, Modernism and Solidarity, 1955–1975
Ljubica Spaskovska

Liberal and Illiberal Internationalism in the Making of the League of Nations Convention on Broadcasting in the Cause of Peace
David Goodman

India, Apartheid and the New World Order at the UN, 1946–1962
Alanna O’Malley

Book Reviews

The Little Ice Age and the Demise of Rome: Lessons for the Anthropocene?
Roger L. Albin

A Primer for Teaching Environmental History: Ten Design Principles by Emily Wakild and Michelle K. Berry (review)
Frank Zelko

Europe and the European Union in Times of Growing Scepticism
Martijn Lak

Barbed-Wire Imperialism: Britain’s Empire of Camps, 1876–1903 by Aidan Forth (review)
Mark Condos

Trading in Faith: Christianity and Globalization?
Philip Jenkins

 

Journal of World History 31-1
Journal of World History,
Vol. 31, Issue 1

Pictured on the cover: Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah, photograph taken in June 2019. The photograph marks a transition for the Journal of World History, highlighting Utah as the new home of the journal office as well as the site of World History Association annual conference in 2020. The image is a precursor of a complete cover redesign in 2021.

Philosophy East and West Vol. 70, No. 1

The first issue of Philosophy East & West’s 70th volume includes the following scholarly articles:

Articles

Spiritual Discipline, Emotions, and Behavior during the Song Dynasty: Zhu Xi’s and Qisong’s Commentaries on the Zhongyong in Comparative Perspective
Diana Arghirescu

Eckhartian Neologisms and the Tathātā Framework: Istic/Isticheit in Conversation with The Awakening of Faith
John Becker

Dōgen’s “Leaving Home Life” (Shukke 出家): A Study of Aesthetic Experience and Growth in John Dewey and Dōgen
Jacob Bender

Is Free Will Confucian? Li Zehou’s Confucian Revision of the Kantian Will
Robert A. Carleo III

The Nondualistic Aesthetics of Qi 氣 in Antoni Tàpies’ Holistic Conception of Art
Mei-Hsin Chen

Wu-Wei, Merleau-Ponty, And Being Aware of What We Do
Marcus Lee

Sarvamukti: Sarvepalli Radhakrishnan’s Aporetic Metaphysics of Collective Salvation
Ayon Maharaj

The King’s Slaughterer—or, The Royal Way of Nourishing Life
Hans-Georg Moeller

Freedom of the Mind: Buddhist Soft Compatibilism
Rick Repetti

Virtue as Desire: Mengzi 6A In Light of the Kongzi Shilun
Boqun Zhou

Book Discussion

The Exclusion of Chinese Philosophy: “Ten Don’ts,” “Three Represents,” and “Eight Musts”
Carine Defoort

Intercultural Encounter in the Age of Hybridity: A Response to Eric S. Nelson
Mario Wenning

A Few Thoughts on the Possibility of Intercultural Thinking in a Global Age
Kai Marchal

Intercultural Philosophy and Intercultural Hermeneutics: A Response to Defoort, Wenning, and Marchal
Eric S. Nelson

Online Book Reviews

The Third Revolution: Xi Jinping and the New Chinese State by Elizabeth C. Economy (review)
Martin Schönfeld

Japanese Philosophy in the Making 1: Crossing Paths with Nishida by John C. Maraldo (review)
Bradley Park

Shen Gua’s Empiricism by Ya ZUO (review)
James D. Sellmann

 

 

Philosophy East and West cover 70-1
Philosophy East and West,
Vol. 70 Issue 1

Announcing Open Access for a new Pacific title!

book cover image

University of Hawai‘i Press proudly announces the publication of its first born-digital, open-access monograph: JoAnna Poblete’s Balancing the Tides: Marine Practices in American Sāmoa, now available in both complimentary electronic and for-purchase print formats.

Download an open access copy today!

ScholarSpace
JSTOR 
Project Muse
Internet Archive
Google Books
OAPEN

Also available for purchase in print here.

About the Book
“Poblete’s Balancing the Tides is remarkable for its focus on the impact of U.S. federal policies in American Sāmoa. Whether she is discussing federal minimum wage debates or examining federal fishing regulations, Poblete shows how Americans and Sāmoans alike shape and are shaped by the forceful and sometimes flexible nature of U.S. federal marine-related management in American Sāmoa.” —Keith L. Camacho, UCLA

Balancing the Tides highlights the far-reaching influence of marine practices and policies in the unincorporated territory of American Sāmoa on the local indigenous group, the American fishing industry, U.S. environmental programs, and on global discussions about ecology and indigenous communities. Each chapter of the book highlights a type of ocean-use policy or marine-related practice in American Sāmoa to demonstrate how American colonial efforts to protect natural resources intersect with indigenous adherence to customary principles of respect, reciprocity, and native rights. Poblete’s study ultimately connects the U.S.-American Sāmoa colonial relationship to global overfishing, world consumption patterns, the for-profit fishing industry, international environmental movements and studies, as well as native experiences and indigenous rights.

More information on this project
Balancing the Tides is sophisticated scholarship that investigates timely issues at the forefront of conversations in and outside of the academy,” said UH Press executive editor Masako Ikeda. “This makes it an especially well-suited book for OA; by making electronic copies available for download at no cost, we hope Dr. Poblete’s research about American Sāmoa will be more readily available to the people there, as well as to other important audiences, including policy makers and students.”

The first UH Press title to be released in OA prior to the print edition, Poblete’s book is produced through the Sustainable History Monograph Pilot, an initiative funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation that seeks to develop a viable model for publishing high-quality scholarship in OA format by employing new production technologies. “The OA edition of Balancing the Tides is really a landmark event,” said interim director Joel Cosseboom. “It not only sets a precedent for OA publishing at UH Press, but also contributes to our goal of serving indigenous communities throughout the Pacific.”

Other UH Press titles forthcoming from the Sustainable History Monograph Pilot will address the histories of Vietnam, Korea, and Vanuatu. “My hope is that UH Press will soon be able to adopt the new technologies employed by this program to issue more OA publications, especially in Hawaiian and Pacific studies,” said Cosseboom.

The next SHMP title will be Alec Holcombe’s Mass Mobilization in the Democratic Republic of Vietnam, 1945–1960.