Call for Papers: Rapa Nui Journal

Edited by Dr. Mara A. Mulrooney, Director of Cultural Resources, Bishop Museum

The Rapa Nui Journal (RNJ) is the official, peer-reviewed journal, of the Easter Island Foundation (EIF). The journal serves as a forum for interdisciplinary scholarship in the humanities and social sciences on Easter Island and the Eastern Polynesian region. Each issue may include Research Articles, Research Reports, Commentaries or Dialogues, Book or Media Reviews and EIF News.

rnj_cover
Cover Image courtesy of:
© Stephen, Jesse W. (2005, July 28). The Traveling Moai [At Tongariki near Rano Raraku, Rapa Nui].
RNJ is published twice a year and welcomes contributions from a wide range of social, cultural, indigenous and historical disciplines on topics related to the lives and cultures of the peoples of Rapa Nui and Eastern Polynesia. Abstracts for articles may be published in English, Spanish, and Rapanui. We welcome submissions from scholars across Oceania, North and South America, and beyond.

File Format and Manuscript structure
Article manuscripts are peer-reviewed, and should be 3000 to 9000 words in length. Reports, Reviews and commentaries are not peer-reviewed, and should be 1000 to 6000 words in length.

Manuscripts should be double-spaced with margins of at least 1 inch (2.5 cm) on each side, and submitted as a single Microsoft Word (or similar) file with the following structure:

  1. Article title
  2. Author’s name(s) and contact details for publication
  3. Abstract
  4. Keywords 3-6
  5. Text
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. References
  8. Figures with captions
  9. Tables with captions

Manuscripts should be submitted online.  You may review journal policies and author guidelines on the journal submission site.

Please send inquiries to the Rapa Nui Journal editor at (rapanuijournal@gmail.com).

Subscribe to Rapa Nui Journal through UH Press or browse full-text issues online .

 

China Review International Vol. 23 No. 2 (2016)

Volume 23 #2 of China Review International begins with two featured reviews and a response, along with 20 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese studies.

FEATURES

RESPONSE

REVIEWS

…plus 15 more reviews and works received.


Browse the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


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About the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.

China Review International Vol. 23 No. 1 (2016)

Volume 23 of China Review International begins with four featured reviews and a response, along with 15 more reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese studies.

FEATURES

RESPONSE

REVIEWS

  • Song-Chuan Chen’s Merchants of War and Peace: British Knowledge of China in the Making of the Opium War Reviewed by Emily Mokros

  • James Flath’s Traces of the Sage: Monument, Materiality, and the First Temple of Confucius (available from UH Press) Reviewed by Man Xu

  • Wu Hung’s Zooming In: Histories of Photography in China Reviewed by Shana J. Brown

  • Stuart Young’s Conceiving the Indian Buddhist Patriarchs in China (available from UH Press) Reviewed by Hans-Rudolf Kantor

  • Laura Madokoro’s Elusive Refuge: Chinese Migrants in the Cold War Reviewed by Glennys Young

…plus 10 more reviews and works received.


Browse the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about new issues from Project MUSE


00_23.1cover_Page_1

About the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.

Call for Nominations: 2018 Biography Prize

The editors of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have announced their call for nominations for the 2018 Biography Prize, which is awarded to an UH Mānoa graduate student who demonstrates excellency in life writing.

The Biography Prize winner receives a monetary award and is invited to give a presentation in the Brown Bag Biography lecture series.

NOMINATION DEADLINE

Nominations–which should include the student’s name, contact information, and project title–are due to biograph@hawaii.edu by Monday, April 16.

Once nominations are received, the Center for Biographical Research will notify the student to arrange for submission of the project. Candidates may also nominate their own work for the award.

Some candidates will be working on their manuscripts well into April, and this will not be a problem so long as they are able to submit their work by the April 16 deadline.

CRITERIA FOR NOMINATION

  1. The candidate should be a PhD or MA student in any graduate department of the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa (or have graduated with an MA or PhD in December 2017).

  2. The submission can be work that is written for a class, that is a section of a thesis or dissertation, or that is the completed thesis or dissertation. If written for a class, it should be work completed between May 2017 and May 2018 (and not previously submitted for a Biography Prize).

The project should focus on or intersect with any aspect of life writing theory, history, or practice in any medium and discipline

The project should be at least 3,000 to 10,000 words in length: longer projects can be submitted in their entirety, with a particular chapter or section highlighted for consideration. The work should demonstrate knowledge or awareness of central debates and theorizing in the field and study of life writing.

See flyer below or visit CBR’s Facebook page for more details.

Biography Prize 2018 Announcement


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Spring 2018 Biography Brown Bag Series

The editors of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly and directors of the Center for Biographical Research at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have released their Spring 2018 schedule of Biography Brown Bags.

If you’re in Hawai’i, mark your calendars and BYOL (bring your own lunch) to these exciting discussions about life writing. Unless otherwise noted, the following brown bags are held from noon to 1:15 p.m. Thursdays in Kuykendall Room 409-A at UH Mānoa. Click here for visitor parking information.

February 1: “Themes in the Narratives by Escapees from the Holocaust in WWII Italy.”
Luciano Minerbi, Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning, UH-Mānoa

February 8: “Constructing Post-Soviet Stardom: Auteur and the state in the case of Renata Litvinova.” Olga Mukhortova, Languages and Literatures of Europe and the Americas, UH Mānoa

February 15: “Writing With Not About: Constellating Stories in Auto-ethnography.”
John Gagnon, Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa

February 22: “Masters of the Currents: Theater, Community, and Social Change.”
Leilani Chan and Ova Saopeng, TeAda Productions

March 1*: “Island Soldiers: Living with Militarization in Micronesia.” Pacific Island Student Panel co-organized by the Marianas Club, for Mes Chamoru and Nuclear Remembrance Day. Moderated by Craig Santos Perez.
*This session will be held in Kuykendall Room 410

March 8: “Hulahula and Learn Something: Expressing Culture and Science.” Kiana Frank, Pacific Biosciences Research Center, UH-Mānoa

March 15: “Selling It Like It Is: The Value of Narrative in Business and Policy.” Amanda Rothschild, Dept. of Urban and Regional Planning, UH-Mānoa

March 22: “An Introduction to the Jon Van Dyke Archive at the UHM Law Library.” Ellen-Rae Cachola, William S. Richardson School of Law, UH-Mānoa

April 5: “Losing Don Belton: Meditations on Friendship, Murder, and Race, and the Ethics of Life Writing.” Mara Miller, Visiting Scholar with the Center for Biographical Research and Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa

April 12: “Al Harrington: Reflections on Genealogy, Acting, and a Polynesian Revue.” Al Harrington, Educator, Actor, and Entertainer

April 19: “Filling the Void: Creating Playing Space for Today’s Pacific Islander.”
Kiki Rivera, Dept. of Theatre and Dance, UH-Mānoa

Apr 26*: “Exploring the Vā in the Oral Sharing of Poetry.” Grace Teuila Taylor, Visiting Writer in Residence, Dept. of English, UH-Mānoa
*This session will be held in Kuykendall Room 410

See flyer below or visit CBR’s Facebook page for more details.

Spring 2018 Biography Brown Bag Flyer


Read Biography archives at Project MUSE


Sign up to receive e-mail alerts about Biography new issues from Project MUSE

 

China Review International Vol. 22 No. 3&4 (2015)

This double-issue issue of China Review International arrives with two features and more than 20 reviews of scholarly literature in Chinese studies, including seven reviews of University of Hawai`i Press books.

FEATURES

REVIEWS

…plus 10 more.


Find the full text of the issue at Project MUSE


CRI_22-3&4_cover_RGBAbout the Journal

Every quarter, China Review International presents timely, English-language reviews of recently published China-related books and monographs. Its multidisciplinary scope and international coverage make it an indispensable tool for all those interested in Chinese culture and civilization, and enable the sinologist to keep abreast of cutting-edge scholarship in Chinese studies.

Subscriptions

Individual and institutional subscriptions available through UH Press.

Submissions

China Review International publishes reviews of recent scholarly literature and “state-of-the-art” articles in all fields of Chinese studies. Reviews are generally published by invitation only; however, unsolicited reviews will be considered for publication based on merit and guidelines can be found here.

Call for Papers: Biography special issue

Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly seeks papers for an upcoming special issue tentatively titled, Biographic Mediation: The Uses of Disclosure in Bureaucracy and Politics.

The issue will be guest edited by Ebony Coletu of Pennsylvania State University.

From the submissions prompt by the Center for Biographical Research:

While personal storytelling in public advocacy has long been a strategy for social movements, biographic mediation emphasizes the interactive dynamics between public disclosure and administrative decision-making. This issue addresses multi-level demands for biographic mediation in contests over public policy, employment, and educational access to explore how disclosure has the capacity to reshape identity or to refocus engagement with policy consequences. Contributors may consider how personal disclosure shapes public debates, when self-narrative is restructured according to political opportunity, and how telling the stories of others becomes a standard mode of political argument.

BIO40-1_cover1_blogAbstracts of 350-400 words are due by December 1, 2017 for consideration. Click here for the complete submission guidelines. Authors of manuscripts selected for publication may also be invited to present on their papers at the University of Hawai’i in August 2018.

Subscribe to Biography through UH Press or browse full-text issues online via Project MUSE.

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Fall 2017 Biography Brown Bag Series

The editors of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly and directors of the Center for Biographical Research at the University of Hawai‘i at Mānoa have announced their Fall 2017 schedule of Biography Brown Bags.

If you’re in Hawai’i, don’t miss this exciting line-up of speakers here to talk about life writing. Each event listed below is held from noon to 1:15 p.m. Thursdays in Kuykendall Room 409 at UH Mānoa. Bring your lunch and enjoy!

Sept. 14: Noenoe K. Silva, a contributor to The Hawaiian Journal of History, on ‘Elua Maka Kila: How Joseph Kānepu’u and Joseph Poepoe Contributed to the Life of ‘Ōlelo Hawai‘i

Sept. 21: Daven Chang on Composing Mele for Community

Sept. 28: Kyle Kajihiro on Mehameha Wale No O Pu’uloa, I Ka Hele A Ka’ahupāhau: Lonely Was Pu’uloa when Ka’ahupāhau Went Away

Oct. 5: Virgie Chattergy on Pinay: Culture Bearers of the Filipino Diaspora

Oct. 12: Carla Manfredi on Little House in the Bush: Afterlives of Vailima

Oct. 19: Patricia Steinhoff on her UH Press book, Destiny: The Secret Operations of the Yodogō Exiles

Oct. 26: Otto Heim on Pacific Ghost Stories: John Kneubuhl and Oral History

Nov. 2: Sandra Bonura, on her UH Press book, Light in the Queen’s Garden: Ida May Pope, Pioneer for Hawai‘i’s Daughters, 1862–1914

Nov. 9: Lauren Nishimura on Hawaiian Ancestry: Positioning Indigeneity in the Na’i Aupuni Biographies

Nov. 16: Kim Compoc on American Tutelage Gone Awry: Antonio Taguba, Filipino Americanism, and the Critique of Torture

Nov. 30: Anna Feurstein on The Animal That Therefore I Am Not: The Politics of Animal (Auto)biography from Black Beauty to Cat Internet Videos

See flyer below or visit CBR’s Facebook page for more details.

Read Biography archives at Project MUSE

Biography Vol. 40 No. 1 (Winter 2017)

Jaya Daronde, Relationship, oil on canvas. From Caste Life Narratives, Visual Representation, and Protected Ignorance in this issue. Copyright and reproduced courtesy of the artist.

This special issue of Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly focuses on Caste and Life Narratives. From the guest editors:

Life narratives ranging from autobiographies and biographies to blogs and pictorial art have historically played a vital role in both the affirmation as well as interrogation of caste identities. However, serious study of life narratives in relationship to caste is still relatively underdeveloped. The scholarship on caste (or the varna-jati complex) is vast, as is the study of life narratives as a genre—it is the conjunction of the two that especially merits sustained scrutiny. The study of caste is animated by a Critical Caste Studies that takes its bearing from Dalit Studies, a lively area of scholarly endeavor in recent years, in order to explore diverse phenomena within the varna-jati complex. The scrutiny of life narratives in conjunction with caste promises to expand the scope of inquiry into life narratives by bringing new cultural contexts into the discussion and by enabling the formulation of new theoretical questions of genre. Such an investigation contributes to the study of caste by directing attention to fresh archives and by making available for analysis in powerful ways questions of identity. The critical work of studying caste in conjunction with life narratives is most pertinent with regard to India but includes the South Asian diaspora as well as other countries such as Japan.

— Editors’ Introduction: “My Birth Is My Fatal Accident”: Introduction to Caste and Life Narratives by S. Shankar and Charu Gupta

Literary Lives

Continue reading “Biography Vol. 40 No. 1 (Winter 2017)”

China Review International, vol. 22, no. 2 (2015)

This issue of China Review International: A Journal of Reviews of Scholarly Literature in Chinese Studies opens with one feature and includes 15 reviews.

FEATURE

Herself an Autobiographer: Writing Women’s Self-Representation in the Qing (Reviewing Binbin Yang, Heroines of the Qing: Exemplary Women Tell Their Stories) Reviewed by Xu Ma

REVIEWS

Sarah Allan, The Heir and the Sage: Dynastic Legend in Early China, reviewed by Paul R. Goldin

Paul Bevan, A Modern Miscellany: Shanghai Cartoon Artists, Shao Xunmei’s Circle, and the Travels of Jack Chen, 1926–1938, reviewed by Hal Swindall

Susanne Bregnbæk, Fragile Elite: The Dilemmas of China’s Top University Students, reviewed by Chongmin Yang Continue reading “China Review International, vol. 22, no. 2 (2015)”

Call for Papers: Palapala

Palapala

Palapala: a journal for Hawaiian language and literature seeks papers for forthcoming volumes. Read the complete call for papers from the editors below:

Aloha Kākou!

Palapala is Hawaiʻi’s first academic, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the study of and literature produced in ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi. Following the online release of our first volume, we are eager to call for new submissions for future annual editions. Our first volume can be accessed online for free through the following link: Palapala Vol. 1

Palapala journal comes to us at a time when despite a growing number of speakers and academic work being produced in Hawaiian, there are few avenues through which scholars can share their research within a centralized, peer-reviewed archive dedicated to their language of study. Though Hawaiian is one of the most well-preserved indigenous languages in the world today, few outside of Hawaiʻi think to give it the scholarly attention it deserves, and there is still much archival information left for us to discover. It is our hope that Palapala will create a shift in this trend, and help bring Hawaiian and Hawaiian literature back to the forefront of scholarship, particularly in Hawaiʻi schools, but also throughout the academic world. Those eager to study Hawaiian language and culture should have more access to academically-credible, peer-reviewed works, which Palapala hopes to produce and provide for the community of scholars interested in na mea Hawaiʻi. It is our ambition that with this journal, we can continue to expand our knowledge of ancestral Hawaiʻi, and share that ʻike with the global community.

Palapala currently solicits three types of contributions:

  1. New research on Hawaiian language and literature.
  2. Book reviews on significant new books as well as books that have been widely used as references for people working in Hawaiian.
  3. Important reprints of newspaper and journal articles that continue to be important for new research, whether from the Hawaiian language newspapers or from other sources that are now difficult to access.

Palapala prints articles in Hawaiian, English, and, if we can find peer reviewers, other languages. Anyone interested in contributing as an author or peer-reviewer may address an email to the editors at palapala@hawaii.edu. Please note that the annual deadline for submissions is September 1.

In honor of the many kupuna who strove to preserve Hawaiian language during its time of adversary, we look forward to embarking on this important voyage towards a better future for ʻŌlelo Hawaiʻi.

Submission guidelines: Submissions (research articles and reviews) must be original works not scheduled for publication by another publisher or original work for which the contributor has received all necessary permissions to republish as open access. Reprints of important articles may also be submitted. Please send proposals or full-length articles for consideration to the editors at palapala@hawaii.edu.

Manuscripts must be provided in Word doc format with all images and tables extracted as separate files. Please format all manuscript notes as endnotes and refer to the 16th edition of The Chicago Manual of Style for citations and style guidelines. Please see the University of Hawai‘i Press Manuscript Guidelines for more details.

Upon acceptance, contributors will be asked to sign a publication agreement with University of Hawai‘i Press, and all content in Palapala is published under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

Call for Papers: Biography special issue

Biography: An Interdisciplinary Quarterly seeks papers for an upcoming special issue tentatively titled, Political Biographies in Literature and Cinema.

From the editors at the Center for Biographical Research:

To what extent do biographies promote or question the biographee’s political values? What are the limitations of prevailing assumptions (popular and/or academic) about biography’s relationship with history? What models of the political subject do biographies of political figures presuppose, and with what consequences? Articles of general relevance, as well as specific case studies of print or film biographies, are welcome in this special number of Biography, An Interdisciplinary Quarterly on political biographies in literature and cinema.

bio-39-3-c1-blogAbstracts of 250-500 words for projected manuscripts of 6,000-8,000 words may be submitted electronically by April 15, 2017. Click here for complete submission guidelines.

Subscribe to Biography through UH Press or browse full-text issues online via Project MUSE.

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