New Journal: Filipino American National Historical Society Journal

University of Hawai‘i Press partners with the oldest, existing national Filipino American organization to publish its eponymous annual, the Filipino American National Historical Society Journal.

The Filipino American National Historical Society Journal is the only journal devoted exclusively to the identification, gathering, preservation, and dissemination of Filipino American history and culture in the US. The society was founded in Seattle, Washington, in 1982 by Dorothy Laigo Cordova and Fred Cordova, and now hosts 43 regional chapters nationwide.

The society and journal have long served as a primary informational resource for community organizations and educational institutions on Filipino American history, and hosted the first official Filipino American History Month in October 1992, long before the US Congress recognized the commemorative month in 2009.

Redesigned and under new leadership, the journal will publish Volume 11 in November 2023, alongside the journal’s 10-volume archive widely available for the first time via Project MUSE. As an interdisciplinary, peer-reviewed journal, each issue includes research by community-based and academic historians as well as personal histories. A new section, “Collaborating with Our Ancestors,” features tribute pieces and intergenerational conversations between past and present Filipino American academic and activist leaders.

The journal is led by Drs. Patricia Espiritu Halagao (College of Education, University of Hawai‘i—Mānoa) and Terese Guinsatao Monberg (Residential College in the Arts and Humanities, Michigan State University). Dr. Lily Ann B. Villaraza (Philippine Studies, City College of San Francisco), a national FANHS scholar, guest edits the forthcoming issue.

“We are so excited to publish the FANHS Journal with the University of Hawai’i Press. Working together, we can ensure that Filipino American history can be better documented and made more accessible to the masses,” said Dr. Kevin Nadal, president of the national society. “And because there are so many Filipino American historical narratives waiting to be told, we are looking forward to a long lasting partnership with such a prestigious publishing company to help us tell these stories.”

FANHS founder Dorothy Laigo Cordova adds, “I am excited to see the evolution of the FANHS Journal under its new editorial leadership and support the journal’s important role in promoting scholarship of Filipino American history.” 

For more information, visit uhpress.hawaii.edu/title/fanhs, and recommend this journal to your library.

Filipino American National Historical Society (FANHS) Journal

Volume 11

Forthcoming on Project MUSE, November 2023


Contributions include:

Remembering the Past, Living the Present, Planning for the Future
By Dorothy Laigo Cordova

Dr. Dawn Bohulano Mabalon Adobo Cook Off
By Kay Dumlao Doherty

Mare Dawn is a Dr. Diva, Di Ba? (Poem)
By Emily Lawsin

Our Story Includes Indipinos
By Holly Calica and Richard Vendiola

From Hollywood to the Battlefield: Stories of a Filipino American Houseboy Becoming a Soldier
By Mark Cazem

Producing a Filipino American Identity in the Sunbelt South
By Audrey Idaikkadar

Queering Filipino American History: Exploring LGBTQ Filipina/x/o American THEIR/OURstories
By Kevin Leo Yabut Nadal

The Manang Generation and the Radical Origins of the Pinay Identity
By Stacey Anne Baterina Salinas

Naimas!: The Rise of Filipino Foodways in Hawai‘i
By Shannon Cristobal

Building a Community Archive: Preserving and Uplifting Stories of Filipino Labor and Migration
By Christina Ayson Plank, Meleia Simon-Reynolds, Kathleen Cruz Gutierrez, Steve McKay, and Oliva Sawi

Journals: New research in Buddhist Christian Studies, Hawaiian History, Korean Religions + More

Front cover of Buddhist-Christian Studies volume 43 (2023)
Manoa 35-1 CHamoru

New CHamoru Literature

Volume 35, Number 1 (2023)

Hami Hu Ma’hasso Hamyo
Jay Baza Pascua

My First Time Alone in Ritidian’s Cave
Jacob l. Camacho

Maga’leena
Yasmine Romero

Songs of the South
Humlåo Evans

Aunty’s Candle
Mary Therese Perez Hattori

Find more literature at Project MUSE.

Pacific Science

Volume 77, Number 1 (2023)

Impacts of Tropical Rainforest Conversion on Soil Nutrient Pools in Viti Levu, Fiji
Shipra Shah and Ami Sharma

Automated Recording Unit Detection Probabilities: Applications for Montane Nesting Seabirds
Andrew J. Titmus and Christopher A. Lepczyk

On the Origin and Current Distribution of the Oceania Snake-Eyed Skink (Cryptoblepharus poecilopleurus) in the Hawaiian Archipelago
Valentina Alvarez, Samuel R. Fisher, Anthony J. Barley, Kevin Donmoyer, Mozes P. K. Blom, Robert C. Thomson, and Robert N. Fisher

Abarenicola pacifica Burrowing Behavior and Its Implications for Zostera marina Seed Burial, Restoration, and Expansion
Ryley S. Crow, Rachel Merz, Megan Dethier, and Sandy Wyllie-Echeverria

Differences in Feeder Visitation by Invasive Rose-Ringed Parakeets (Psittacula krameri) Between Hawaiian Islands
Steven C. Hess, C. Jane Anderson, Eric A. Tillman, William P. Bukoski Aaron B. Shiels, Page E. Klug, Shane R. Siers, and Bryan M. Kluever

Find more research articles at Project MUSE.

Journals: New Research in Burma Studies, World History + Pacific Science

JBS 27-2 cover

The Journal of Burma Studies

Volume 27, Number 2 (2023)

The new issue focuses on military dictatorship and migrationin 2021 in Myanmar. In this introduction Editor Jane S. Ferguson explains:

 This issue offers a blend of research articles which are based on nuanced research and social analysis of everyday survival, law and development, and politics in the years leading up to the 2021 coup d’etat. These include issues of migration, whether to overseas work destinations or within Myanmar, the situation for education and its relationship with international donor organizations, the creation of work conditions within Myanmar’s Special Economic Zones, the organization of intensive banana agriculture for export in geographically contested areas, and finally an analysis of the political lead-up to the military coup.

Read more articles at Project MUSE.

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Pacific Science 76-4 cover

Pacific Science

Volume 76, Number 4 (2022)

Population Size and Habitat Occupancy by the Endangered Mariana Crow
Robert J. Craig

Low Genetic Diversity in the Highly Morphologically Diverse Sida fallax Walp. (Malvaceae) Throughout the Pacific
Mersedeh Pejhanmehr, Mitsuko Yorkston, and Clifford W. Morden

Ingestion of Plastics in a Wild Population of the Pacific Fat Sleeper (Dormitator latifrons)
Fernando Isea-Leeón, Juan Diego Quispe, Alexandra Bermúudez-Medranda, Vanessa Acosta, Ana María Santana-Piñeros, Yanis Cruz-Quintana, Luz Marina Soto, Luciana Gomes-Barbosa, Luis Domínguez-Granda, and Carlos López

Evaluation of Reproductive Success of the Olive Ridley Turtle Lepidochelys olivacea (Testudinata: Cheloniidae) Using Different Incubation Treatments
J.L. Sandoval-Ramírez,  and E. Solana-Arellano

Continuous Reproduction Causes Stable Population Structure of Antipatharian-Associated Shrimp Sandyella tricornuta (Decapoda: Palaemonidae)
Ariadna Ávilā-García, Carlos Sánchez, Leonardo Huato-Soberanis, Elizabeth Borda, and Jaime Gómez-Gutiérrez

A Survey of Terrestrial Vertebrates of Tetepare Island, Solomon Islands, Including Six New Island Records
Jenna M. McCullough, Lucas H. DeCicco, Mark W. Herr, Piokera Holland, Douglas Pikacha, Tyrone H. Lavery, Karen V. Olson, Devon A. DeRaad, Ikuo G. Tigulu, Xena M. Mapel, Lukas B. Klicka, Roy Famoo, Jonathan Hobete, Lazarus Runi, Gloria Rusa, Alan Tippet, David Boseto, Rafe M. Brown, Robert G. Moyle, and Michael J. Andersen

Find more articles at Project MUSE.

JOURNALS: New issues of Azalea, CHINOPERL + Philosophy East and West

Azalea 16

Azalea

Special Features: The Long Korean War in Recent Korean Literature, Ch’oe Inhun, and Sejong Writing Competition

Volume 16 (2023)

In this new issue Editor Young-Jun Lee introduces the opening special feature, “The Long Korean War in Recent Korean Literature”:

While the Korean War may appear as a distant historical event to younger generations, seventy years after the armistice, its impact persists in the lives of South Koreans in ever-changing and menacing forms. The legacy of the war lies at the root of enduring ideological confrontations, provides the rationale for past dictatorships, and fuels present-day social tensions. Korean literature serves as a potent platform for preserving the memory of these historical legacies that continue to reverberate in the present. We extend our gratitude to Professor Seung Hee Jeon for guest-editing this special issue.

Find more poetry, fiction, images, the Sejong Writing Competition, and more at Project MUSE.

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PEW 73-2

Journal of World History seeks new editor

The Journal of World History, the official journal of the World History Association, published by the University of Hawai‘i Press and sponsored by the University of Hawai‘i History Department, is seeking an editor or a team of co-editors. The position will begin in January 2025, allowing a several month period of transition before the current editor, Matthew P. Romaniello, steps down from the position at the end of 2024. It will have an initial term of five years, renewable for three more.

Founded by Jerry Bentley and now in its 34th year, the Journal of World History publishes research into historical questions across any time period requiring the investigation of evidence on a global, comparative, cross-cultural, or transnational scale. It is devoted to the study of phenomena that transcend the boundaries of single states, regions, or cultures, such as large-scale population movements, long-distance trade, cross-cultural technology transfers, and the global spread of ideas. It is guided by an Editorial Board and an Advisory Board of scholars from around the world.

The responsibilities of the editor or co-editors will be:

  • Defining editorial policy
  • Overseeing and managing a rigorous review process
  • Making final decisions on the acceptance and rejection of articles
  • Editing articles accepted for publication
  • Shaping the direction of the Journal
  • Choosing and working with the Editorial Board
  • Working with the University of Hawai‘i Press journal production staff
  • Working with the journals’ two sponsors, the World History Association and the University of Hawai‘i History Department
  • Attending the World History Association annual meeting

To apply, please send a cv and a letter of application to Aaron Peterka, Interim Director of the World History Association: info@thewha.org. The deadline for applications is August 1.

In your letter, please address the following:

  • Your experience publishing, researching, and teaching in world history, and the way you see these as related
  • Your previous editorial and administrative experience
  • Your understanding of “world history” and the types of articles that belong in a journal dedicated to it.
  • Your vision for the Journal over the next five years
  • Your strategy for attracting high quality submissions, reviews of submissions, and book reviews from scholars diverse in terms of methodology, area of research, and institutional and geographic location
  • Your plan for engaging with developments in scholarly communication and research practice

A small amount of funding for travel related to the Journal will be provided, but if you may be able to obtain institutional backing for the position, including course release, please indicate this in your letter as well.


Journal of World History Special Issue: Transnational Approaches to the History of Race and Racism – Free!

The World History Association will be hosting its annual meeting at the University of Pittsburgh’s World History Center from June 22 to 24, on the theme “ENERGIES.” The Journal of World History offers this accompanying special collection, “Transnational Approaches to the History of Race of Racism,” free on the Project MUSE platform through September 30. Select World History titles will also be 30% off from July 1 through Sept 30, 2023.

The special issue “Transnational Approaches to the History of Race and Racism” draws together some of the journal’s most frequently cited and downloaded material alongside some less well-known contributions. Together, these articles compare historic roles, debates, and struggles in relation to today’s trials and tribulations with race consciousness.


Bricktop with patrons and fellow singer Mabel Mercer in Bricktop’s club, featured in “Jazz and the Evolution of Black American Cosmopolitanism in Interwar Paris” by Rachel Gillett in this special collection.

Editor Matthew P. Romaniello talks about this Special Issue in excerpts of his introduction, “Race and Racism beyond National Borders”:

Assembling a special collection of previously published articles has created an opportunity to engage with the legacy of Journal of World History. As with the first of these issues four years ago, I took the opportunity to review our “most downloaded” articles list from Project Muse. It has changed more than I expected – not only from the arrival of newly-published articles but also from articles published decades ago that have gained new prominence. One of those served as the launching point for this collection, Matthew Pratt Guterl’s “The New Race Consciousness: Race, Nation, and Empire in American Culture, 1910-1925,” a “top 10” article for 2022, though it was first published in 1999.

The renewed interest in race and racism is hardly unique to Journal of World History, much less global audiences in this particular historical moment. However, looking to JWH for an article on racism in America may not be the first stop on anyone’s pursuit of more information on the topic. For much of its history, JWH only published a few articles with American content.

Research on race and racism, settler colonialism and anticolonial rhetoric, cosmopolitanism and “Orientalism,” involving global empires and modern nations, has regularly appeared throughout the journal’s history. The benefits of pursuing these topics through a transnational lens broadens our discussions and hopefully encourages more thoughtful engagement with their presence in our daily lives. The articles included in this collection highlight these themes in a variety of regions, offering original perspectives on the entangled debates of race and racism globally.

It should not come as any surprise to a reader of Journal of World History that the history of colonialism is fully entangled with racial hierarchies, much less that colonial and neocolonial policies imposed racialized systems, whether it imposed segregation or achieved assimilation. Neither supported equality. Nor did cosmopolitan lives, those people who crossed borders and interacted with foreign cultures, necessarily demonstrate greater understanding or compassion for diversity. This special collection does highlight that these challenges are not unique or specific to the United States, and, perhaps, we might inform our ongoing discussions of diversity, equality, and inclusion by considering other viewpoints and histories beyond our own borders.  


The World History Association will host its annual meeting in person, from June 22 to 24, on the theme “ENERGIES.” The Journal of World History offers this digital special issue “Transnational Approaches to the History of Race and Racisms” free on the Project MUSE platform through the end of September 2023. Select World History titles in will also be 30% off July 1 through September 30 with coupon code WHA2023.

Journals: Founders of Asian Theatre, a Comparative Study of Empire + More

ATJ 40-1

Asian Theatre Journal

Volume 40, Number 1 (2023)

This new issue commemorates key individuals in Asian theatre. Editor Siyuan Liu explains:

This issue starts with two long-planned articles in ATJ’s ‘founders of the field’ series that started with two clusters of articles in 2011 (28.2) and 2013 (30.2), followed by a number of ‘founding mothers’ articles between 2014 and 2017 (31.1, 32.2, 33.2, 34.1), continuing in this issue with Carol Fisher Sorgenfrei’s profile of Betty Bernhard and Julie Iezzi’s article on Jonah Salz. Sorgenfrei focuses on Bernard’s extraordinary capacity in discovering and promoting aspects of Indian performance to the world through fundraising and sponsoring international engagements by India artists, students training and productions of India plays with Indian artists at Pomona College, as well as several research based films and videos, all of which made Bernard, as Sorgenfrei puts it, ‘an important influencer well before that concept became a social media meme.’

The second ‘founder’ article, written by Julie Iezzi, focuses on Jonah Salz, who stands out, in comparison to other founders profiled in this series, as a Western theatre director, producer, teacher, scholar, and translator primarily based in an Asian country, in his case Kyoto, Japan. Among Salz’s wide-ranging accomplishments, Iezzi focuses on his co-founded Noho Theatre Group that has produced hundreds of shows and toured internationally over forty years; his co-established Traditional Theatre Training (TTT) program that since 1984 has trained hundreds of artists in noh, kyōgen, and nihon buyō; and his research and publications, most notably as editor-in-chief of A History of Japanese Theatre, a monumental achievement via international collaboration.

Find more articles at Project MUSE.

China Review International

Volume 27, Numbers 3& 4 (2020)

The new double issue includes the following reviews:

Vincent Goossaert. Making the Gods Speak: The Ritual Production of Revelation in Chinese Religious History.
Reviewed by Gilbert Z. Chen

Susan Greenhalgh and Li Zhang, editors. Can Science and Technology Save China?
Reviewed by Robert Peckham

Li Guo. Writing Gender in Early Modern Chinese Women’s Tanci Fiction.
Reviewed by Jing Zhang

Dongfeng Xu. Friendship and Hospitality: The Jesuit-Confucian Encounter in Late Ming China.
Reviewed by Bin Song

Brook Ziporyn. Zhuangzi: The Complete Writings.
Reviewed by David McCraw

Find more reviews at Project MUSE.

Journal of World History

Special Issue: Global Travel, Exploration, and Comparative Study of Empire

Volume 34, Number 1 (2023)

In this new special issue Guest Editor Scott C. M. Bailey discusses the fascinating study of long-distance travelers during the late nineteenth century in this introduction:

This special issue addresses what can be gained from a comparative examination of long-distance travelers during the age of empire. Questions to address include: to what extent did the individual identities, personalities, and backgrounds of elite travelers relate to their opinions on the state of colonial or imperial affairs which they observed in their travels? Were imperial travelers’ observations representative of the imperial core’s opinions and assumptions about imperial spaces, including peripheral ones? To what degree did individual travelers who were traveling to destinations which were under the control of a rival imperial power provide descriptions or impressions which confirmed or rejected assumptions about the colonial or imperial relationship? Can travelers’ descriptions (those travelers from outside or competing empires) be used to provide an objective view of the nature of competing empires? How did factors like the occupations, educational backgrounds, class identifications, gender, life experiences, race, identity, or cultural backgrounds of individual travelers define or shape their descriptions? How did the purposes of these travels relate to the kinds of observations which were made? The articles in this special edition address these important questions, while also highlighting reasons why this era saw an increase in the volume and frequency of international long-distance travel.

Find more articles, review articles, and book reviews at Project MUSE.

The Journal of Burma Studies: Q&A with Jane Ferguson on Gender and Social Change in Myanmar Special Issue

Photo of Jane Ferguson
Photograph provided by Jane Ferguson

A new special issue from The Journal of Burma Studies is now available to readers on Project MUSE. “Gender and Social Change in Myanmar” analyzes the role of gender within social activism, everyday practices, identity politics, and religious histories in Myanmar are explored in this volume.

The Journal of Burma Studies was established in 1996, with current editor Jane M. Ferguson coming on board in December 2017.  She is an Associate Professor of Anthropology, Southeast Asian History, and School of Culture, History, and Language at the Australian National University with a PhD in Anthropology and Southeast Asian history from Cornell University.

Ferguson’s publications include Repossessing Shanland: Myanmar, Thailand, and a Nation-State Deferred (University of Wisconsin Press, 2021) and Silver Screens, and Golden Dreams: A Social History of Burmese Cinema (University of Hawai‘i Press, forthcoming).

Below she shares with UH Press what its been like these last five years as the editor for The Journal of Burma Studies:

University of Hawai‘i Press: After half a decade sitting at the editorial desk, what issues or historic events have changed in your field? Additionally, why was this issue important now?

Jane Ferguson: The horrific events and repression following General Min Aung Hlaing’s 2021 military coup in Myanmar — for a country struggling with economic collapse from the COVID pandemic — constitute a large-scale humanitarian crisis, with war enveloping the country even more than in previous decades. JBS’ charter is to support research and education about and within the country; it is a minuscule contribution where civil war and repression are horrendous, but it does represent one forum for discussing issues that matter to Myanmar, from politics to history, art to popular culture and more. It is also worth engaging with Myanmar’s diverse, rich cultures, ecologies, languages, and human creativity. There is a massive humanitarian crisis in Myanmar, but focusing only on suffering risks ignoring the cultural diversity and tremendous vibrance of its people, historically and today.

UHP: JBS recently introduced a new Special Issue, “Gender and Social Change.” How did this come about? 

JF: “Gender and Social Change” is a capacious theme, and remains crucial for any context and study. It is accessible in the sense that despite the articles’ individual topics and particular research in Myanmar, the lessons are relatable to others. This issue deals with topics including gendered activism and transformation, religiosity, global popular culture, sexism, homophobia, and cyber-bullying; subjects of universal concern and relevance.  

The Special Issue on “Gender and Social Change in Myanmar” is part of our plan to reach out to and engage new and emerging scholars. JBS has general issues which gather individually-submitted articles, but the strategy for this Special Issue was to take a general, but pressing theme, and seek out different responses to it. We advertised the Special Issue via a call for abstracts, worked with authors through peer-review and the revision process, and wrote an introduction engaging the papers thematically and historically. 

UHP: What is next for JBS

JF: The Journal of Burma Studies will carry on its research and educational charter, working with new and returning authors to encourage lively debate and discussion about issues relevant to Myanmar, Southeast Asian Studies, or disciplinary themes writ large. Please stay tuned for the next call for papers for a thematic issue, or if you have a research topic you are working on please get in touch!

UHP: Do you have any advice for academics interested in submitting to The Journal of Burma Studies?

JF: Anyone interested in contributing to the Journal simply needs to send us an email and let us know! We have standard research articles, but also sections about research notes and book reviews. To support and encourage new authors, we have short written guides to help them navigate the waves of academic publishing.   

The Journal of Burma Studies
Volume 27, Number 1 (2023)

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Editor’s Note: Special Issue: Gender and Social Change in Myanmar
Jane M. Ferguson

Deconstructing and Reinforcing Gender Norms and Cultural Taboos in Myanmar’s Spring
Revolution

Aye Lei Tun

Our Htamein, Our Flag, Our Victory: The Role of Young Women in Myanmar’s Spring Revolution
Marlar, Justine Chambers, and Elena

Reconsidering Renunciation: Shifting Subjectivities and Models of Practice in the Biography of a
Buddhist Woman

MK Long

The Gendered Rebel: Challenging Gendered Norms through Punk in Urban Yangon
Carolin Hirsch

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

Established in 1996, The Journal of Burma Studies is the premier peer-reviewed academic print journal that focuses exclusively on Burma. The Journal of Burma Studies is jointly sponsored by the Burma Studies Group and the Center for Burma Studies at Northern Illinois University.

It is published twice a year for the Center for Burma Studies. The Journal seeks to publish the best scholarly research focused on Burma/Myanmar, its ethnic nationalities, stateless and diasporic cultures from a variety of disciplines, ranging from art history and religious studies, to economics and law.

Submit your manuscript online.

Journals: Seabirds Vulnerable to Climate Change, Anger in a Non-Ideal World, Living the Way of Tea + more

Asian Perspectives

Volume 62, Number 1 (2023)

The new issue shares the following introduction and welcomes a new editor:

You will note that several articles in this issue focus on the identification and interpretation of specific materials and technologies. The topics covered by four of the articles include rock art in early Mongolia, bone tools in prehistoric eastern China, metallurgy at the Han empire’s southern periphery, and plant remains and parasite microfossils in pre-contact New Zealand. A fifth article relies on settlement pattern and demographic data from Neolithic and Bronze Age China to draw insightful comparisons between the developmental trajectories of two distant regions.

We take this opportunity to welcome Cristina Castillo as the journal’s new Book Review Editor and thank Michèle Demandt for serving as the first editor dedicated to this important section of the journal. Michèle streamlined many of the editorial procedures for the book reviews. We wish her the best in all her future professional and personal endeavors.

Find this editorial, research articles, and more at Project MUSE.

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biography

Volume 45, Number 3 (2022)

Editor Craig Howes honors founder George Simson in the introduction of this latest issue:

I am mentioning this constant in the life of Biography and the Center because when considering the contents of this “regular” issue, I realized that what began as an aspiration has with great effort become the norm. The five articles in this installment
feature writers and subjects from South Africa, Uganda, Lebanon, India, and France, representing an equally diverse range of approaches to life writing — whether through fashion, documentaries, oral histories, photographs, memoirs,
biographies, or “anti-biographies.”

I believe that George would find some of the theoretical approaches or topics puzzling—certainly far afield from biography as he understood and loved it. But I know he would be very happy that his dream of a journal that made its best effort to be international has been realized. And it will continue to do so.

Read this introduction, articles, reviews, and more at Project MUSE.

Journal of Daoist Studies JDS Volume 16 (2023)

Oceanic Linguistics 62-1 cover

Oceanic Linguistics

Volume 62, Number 1 (2023)

The new issue contains the following articles:

Variable Copying Sites in Truku Cə- Reduplication
Hui-Shan Lin

Voice and Pluractionality in Äiwoo
Åshild Næss

Comitative Constructions in Reefs–Santa Cruz
Åshild Næss, Valentina Alfarano, Brenda H. Boerger, and Anders Vaa

Preverbal Determiners and the Passive in Moriori
John Middleton

Some Remarks on Sagart’s New Evidence for a Numeral-Based Phylogeny of Austronesian
Alexander D. Smith

Find these and more articles and squibs at Project MUSE.


Pacific Science

Volume 76, Number 3 (2022)

The new issue contains the following articles:

Prioritization of Restoration Needs for Seabirds in the U.S. Tropical Pacific Vulnerable to Climate Change
Lindsay C. Young and Eric A. VanderWerf

A Third Pond on the Mauna Kea Summit Plateau
Norbert Schorghofer, Matthias Leopold, and Fritz L. Klasner

Lake Tagimaucia Montane Lake as a Potential Late Holocene Environmental Archive in Fiji’s Volcanic Highlands
James Terry, Kunal Singh, and Michelle McKeown

South(east) by Southwest: Identifi cation of a New Halocaridina rubra Holthuis, 1963 (Decapoda: Atyidae) Genetic Group From O‘ahu, Hawai‘i
Scott R. Santos, Livable Hawai‘i Kai Hui, Mike N. Yamamoto, Thomas Y. Iwai Jr., and Annette W. Tagawa

Landscape Configuration Influences ‘Ōma‘o (Myadestes obscurus)
Song Diversity

Nicole M. Fernandez, Kristina L. Paxton, Eben H. Paxton, Adam A. Pack, and Patrick J. Hart

Find more articles at Project MUSE.

Rapa Nui Journal

Volume 33, Number 1 & 2 (2020)

The new issue contains the following articles, reports, and news:

Mana Tupuna: Honoring the Ancestors Abroad
Phineas Kelly

Rapa Nui in the Hans Helfritz Collection at the Rautenstrauch-Joest Museum
Tania Basterrica Brockman and Betty Haoa Rapahango

Con-ticci and the Bennett Monolith of Mocachi
Andrea Ballesteros Danel

Identifying Places and People in Walter Lehmann’s Photograph Collection of Rapa Nui (Easter Island, 1911)
Cristián Moreno Pakarati and Rafał Wieczorek

Terevaka Archaeological Outreach (TAO) 2020 Project Report: Digital Repatriation
Britton L. Shepardson

Find more articles, reports, and news on Easter Island at Project MUSE.

Yearbook of the Association of Pacific Coast Geographers

Number 84 (2022)

The new issue includes the following articles:

The Geographer as Bibliophile
Michael Pretes

Canyonlands National Park: A Multiple-Use Test Case
Tate Pashibin, Geoffrey Buckley, and Yolonda Youngs

Donald W. Meinig’s Southwest at Half-Century, a Reflection
and Appreciation

Daniel D. Arreola, Richard L. Nostrand, William Wyckoff, Craig
Colten, and Paul F. Starrs

Portland’s Post-Industrial Neighborhoods
Mark D. Bjelland and Madelyn Vander Veen

Weighted OWA Operators in Spatial MultiCriteria Decision-
Making

Soheil Boroushaki

Find more articles, research notes, book reviews, abstracts, meeting reports, and awards at Project MUSE.

MĀNOA journal at AWP

Join Mānoa: A Pacific Journal of International Literature at the Association for Writing Programs (AWP) Conference & Bookfair in Seattle, WA from March 9-11.

Bookfair, March 9-11

Stop by the Mānoa table located at #309 to talk story, peruse and purchase titles, and get a discount on subscriptions.

Get a signed copy of Out of the Shadows of Angkor, Thursday, March 9, 1-3 p.m.

Putsata Reang, Greg Santos, Sharon May, and Sokunthary Svay will be signing copies of the recent Mānoa volume, Out of the Shadows of Angkor in the Mānoa booth, #309.

Panel: Celebrating Pacific Island Literature, Thursday, March 9, 1:45-3 p.m.

Ballroom 1, Summit Building, Seattle Convention Center, Level 5

Mānoa journal is sponsored by the University of Hawai‘i’s Department of English. Join two creative writing professors, editor Craig Santos Perez and Kristiana Kahakauwila, along with William Nu‘utupu Giles for a great reading and conversation on Pacific Island literature in this Kundiman panel.

Panel: Cambodian Poetry, Prose, and Translation Today, Friday, March 10, 3:20-4:35 p.m.

Rooms 338-339, Summit Building, Seattle Convention Center, Level 3

Guest editor Sharon May and contributors Sokunthary Svay, Putsata Reang, and Greg Santos will read and discuss their work on Out of the Shadows of Angkor.

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Subscribe to Mānoa

A one-year subscription gets you print copies or digital access to Out of the Shadows of Angkor: Cambodian Poetry, Prose, and Performance Throughout the Ages (Volume, 33-2 and 34-1) and In the Silence: International Fiction, Poetry, Essays, and Performance (Volume 34, Issue 2). 

A two-year subscription additionally includes two new issues, including New CHamoru Literature edited by Craig Santos Perez (Volume 35, Issue 1) and an issue featuring the eco-literature of Southeast Asia (Volume 35, Issue 2). 

Subscribe to Mānoa here.

Journals: Kapaemahu, Remembering Miriam Fuchs, Burmese Literature + Visuality and Materiality in Postwar Japan

Biography

Volume 45, Number 2 (2022)

The new issue contains the following articles as a remembrance for Miriam Fuchs who was an active contributor to the journal. It also contains the annual bibliography:

Miriam Fuchs, Life Writing, and Life
Craig Howes

A Voyage Beyond the Text as Self: Remembering Miriam Fuchs Holzman
Cynthia G. Franklin

Miriam, The Bookies, and I
Joseph H. O’Mealy

In the Warm Waters of Lanikai: Paddling with Miria
Leinaala Davis

A Tribute to Miriam Fuchs: With Love from Her Student
Amy Calrson

Find more articles at Project MUSE.

Front cover of Manoa 34-2

Mānoa

Volume 34, Number 2 (2022)
In the Silence

The new Mānoa issue features a special section on the literature of Burma/Myanmar. In the introduction, “To Write a History,” guest editors Penny Edwards, ko ko thett, and Kenneth Wong begin:

“‘How to write history / in a language / that has no past tense’ asks co-editor ko ko thett in his poetry collection The Burden of Being Burmese. How to publish literature under a military regime with no future tense?

“In Myanmar today, the simplest utterance is punishable as the defamation of the state. A song, a poem, a music video, an elegy are all open invitations to a cowardly regime to pursue their authors with impunity.”

Find literature from Burma/Myanmar, South Asia and more at Project MUSE.

Review of Japan Culture and Society

Volume 32 (2020)

The new issue includes the special section, “Visuality and Materiality in Postwar Japan” guest edited by Álex Bueno and Yasutaka Tsuji, and “Japan in Los Angeles” edited by Rika Hiro. Selections include:

Design as Cultural Representation: Visuality and Materiality in Postwar Japan
Yasutaka Tsuji (Translated by Álex Bueno)

Japan’s Postwar Building: Japanese Architecture and the West
Ryuichi Hamaguchi

Nature and Thought in Japanese Design
Teiji Itoh

Yamashiro: Imagined Home and the Aesthetics of Hollywood Japanism
Dianne Lee Shen

Bruce Yonemoto: Made in Occupied Japan
Rika Hiro

Find more articles, an interview with Manika Nagare, and literature in translation at Project MUSE.

Journal of World History Special Issue: Global Travel, Exploration, and Comparative Study of Empire

A new special issue from the Journal of World History is now available to readers on Project MUSE. 

This new special issue features guest editor Scott C. M. Bailey. Since 2018, Bailey has been fortunate to have support of a research grant from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). This has allowed him to explore the history of travel and exploration in a global context. He is now focusing on this topic in relation to the area around the Sea of Okhotsk and am preparing a book manuscript now on this topic.

We had the opportunity to speak to Bailey about this special issue:

University of Hawai‘i Press: Tell us how this special issue came together and why is this issue different from what JWH has published in the past?

Scott C. M. Bailey: My idea for this special issue originated in spring 2020 at the beginning of the pandemic. As countries closed borders and international travel was drastically curtailed, it led me to think more about the history of long-distance travel. I wanted to understand better how the international movement of people for business, tourism, research pursuits, and many other reasons today, which has become so routinized (and was also so disrupted during the pandemic), existed in an earlier form in the late nineteenth century world.

I thought that a comparative global analysis of the accounts of travelers from the “age of imperialism” in the late nineteenth century could forward our collective understanding of empires of the time, while also shining light on the degree to which long-distance travel reflected inequalities while also being done to serve commercial and political elites’ interests. I was fortunate that the colleagues who approached me with their ideas for papers each had very interesting examples from their own research backgrounds to work with, and that they were all excited to explore their topics through a new comparative framework.

“‘Mr Dooley’ on Sir Aleck”, New York Times February 3, 1907. Public domain.  Featured in "Passing the Torch? Anglo-American Encounters in the British West Indies and Negotiating White Supremacy, c. 1865–1914" by Alex Goodall.
“‘Mr Dooley’ on Sir Aleck”, New York Times February 3, 1907. Public domain. Featured in “Passing the Torch? Anglo-American Encounters in the British West Indies and Negotiating White Supremacy, c. 1865–1914” by Alex Goodall.

UHP: What were some of the challenges with this issue? Is the pandemic still an issue with the creation of these articles and research?

SB: The pandemic has of course made historical research more difficult in many ways, curtailing travel to some locations and restricting access to materials that need to be accessed in person. But to some degree the technological changes which the pandemic brought have helped make some research easier, since so many rare historical sources that could only be found in specific archives or libraries are becoming available to access online, as many institutions have moved or are moving towards digitization of their collections in the last few years. I think the pandemic has made us all adapt in many ways to the new circumstances, and our research has been in some ways strengthened by that. Regardless, I think most historians are happy that they can get back to in person research again. There’s no replacement for the unique experience of being in libraries and archives.

UHP: Is there anything that is not to miss in this volume?

SB: I think when you read this collection of articles together, you will find that each of them highlights these issues well. This special issue will probably be very interesting for those in more traditional area studies backgrounds, too, since each article has a regional focus of sorts (although always with external/global examples to compare those regional examples with).

 UHP: Is there anything else you would like our readers to know?

SB: I hope that readers will continue the work that our authors in this special edition have done with employing a comparative lens to the study of late nineteenth century travel. As I mention in my introductory piece for the special edition, I think that there is potential for many more studies that take a similar approach, given the high volume of existing travel accounts from that era. I hope some will be inspired by this collection to locate aspects of their own research topics that could benefit from taking this kind of comparative approach. I would be very pleased to read future articles in the Journal of World History which take this comparative approach to exploring the relationships between empire and long-distance travel.

Read the special issue here on Project MUSE.