Invented Traditions in North and South Korea

Hardback: $68.00
ISBN-13: 9780824890339
Published: November 2021

Additional Information

384 pages | 8 b&w illustrations
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  • About the Book
  • Almost forty years after the publication of Hobsbawm and Ranger’s The Invention of Tradition, the subject of invented traditions—cultural and historical practices that claim a continuity with a distant past but which are in fact of relatively recent origin—is still relevant, important, and highly contentious. Invented Traditions in North and South Korea examines the ways in which compressed modernity, Cold War conflict, and ideological opposition has impacted the revival of traditional forms in both Koreas. The volume is divided thematically into sections covering: (1) history, religions, (2) language, (3) music, food, crafts, and finally, (4) space. It includes chapters on pseudo-histories, new religions, linguistic politeness, literary Chinese, p’ansori, heritage, North Korean food, architecture, and the invention of children’s pilgrimages in the DPRK.

    As the first comparative study of invented traditions in North and South Korea, the book takes the reader on a journey through Korea’s epic twentieth century, examining the revival of culture in the context of colonialism, decolonization, national division, dictatorship, and modernization. The book investigates what it describes as “monumental” invented traditions formulated to maintain order, loyalty, and national identity during periods of political upheaval as well as cultural revivals less explicitly connected to political power. Invented Traditions in North and South Korea demonstrates that invented traditions can teach us a great deal about the twentieth-century political and cultural trajectories of the two Koreas. With contributions from historians, sociologists, folklorists, scholars of performance, and anthropologists, this volume will prove invaluable to Koreanists, as well as teachers and students of Korean and Asian studies undergraduate courses.

  • About the Author(s)
    • Andrew David Jackson, Editor

      Andrew David Jackson is associate professor of Korean studies at Monash University, Melbourne, where he has worked since 2017. Previously, he taught Korean studies at the University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    • Codruța Sîntionean, Editor

      Codruţa Sîntionean is assistant professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Literatures at Babeş-Bolyai University in Cluj-Napoca, Romania.
    • Remco Breuker, Editor

      Remco E. Breuker is professor of Korean studies at Leiden University, the Netherlands.
    • CedarBough Saeji, Editor

      CedarBough T. Saeji is a visiting assistant professor at Indiana University, Bloomington.

    Contributors

    • Don Baker
    • Keith Howard
    • Jan Creutzenberg
    • Maria Osetrova
    • Robert Winstanley-Chesters
    • Andrew Miles Logie
    • Eunseon Kim
    • Andreas Schirmer
    • Laurel Kendall